Travel Trouble

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How not to behave on a plane

<p>Flying economy, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact we’re all in it together.</p> <p><strong>1. The Armrest Warrior</strong></p> <p>They dominate the shared armrests and can provoke an in-flight turf war.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Sharing is best, or one ‘outside’ rest for window and aisle seats and both for the middle. If someone’s obsessed with claiming ownership, it may be worth retreating peacefully for a more relaxing journey.</p> <p><strong>2. The Recliner</strong></p> <p>Their seat goes back as soon as the plane levels out and stays there until landing, making it impossible for those behind to work or eat.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> On a short flight, reclining is frowned upon. On longer flights, keep your seat straight until it’s acceptable to recline – generally once meal trays have been collected.</p> <p><strong>3. The Hygiene Offender</strong></p> <p>It’s a long flight, so they took a long run beforehand, then covered up with the strongest deodorant available. <br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> While most of us arrive at the airport fresh and clean, the close quarters of a plane mean that normally pleasant smells like curry and fragrance can affect other passengers. On long-haul flights, pack wet-wipes for an inflight wash and a change of socks, top and underwear.</p> <p><strong>4. The Chatterer</strong></p> <p>These flyers can’t wait to talk your ear off for the duration of the flight. <br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Have headphones or a laptop ready to show you’re busy. Nervous flyers may need you to chat to calm them; remind them planes are statistically the safest way to travel.</p> <p><strong>5. The Overhead Storage Hog</strong></p> <p>They get on early and stuff every available overhead locker with their excess carry-on.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Store heavy items under the seat in front of you, then look for free space in the overheads, accepting you may not get it above your seat.</p> <p><em>Written by Jackie Middleton. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/flights/How-Not-to-Behave-on-a-Plane"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Travel Trouble

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Aussies warned of deadly mozzie disease

<p>Australians travelling to Bali have been issued a warning after a deadly mosquito-born brain disease is spreading throughout the popular tourist destination.</p> <p>The health ministry of Indonesia says that an increased amount of Japanese encephalitis cases has been brought to light as of recently.</p> <p>The disease, which is considered to be life-threatening, can cause blindness, weakness and movement disorders.</p> <p>If the viral brain infection is contracted, the symptoms include fever, headache, neck stiffness, tremors, paralysis and convulsions, especially amongst younger children.</p> <p>The disease can also send those affected into a coma or ultimately death, and those who are lucky enough to survive the deadly disease are usually left with neurological impairments that last throughout the course of their life.</p> <p>According to The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDPC), the disease is currently spreading throughout Asia with countries such as India, Pakistan and Japan reporting an increased amount of cases.</p> <p>With 30-50,000 cases reported per year, the ECDPC says that number has been seeing a decline due to vaccinations and an improvement in agriculture.</p> <p>While the disease is most likely to occur from mosquitos, it can also be transmitted through birds, bats, cows and pigs.</p> <p>The ministry is currently monitoring the disease in Bali, North Sulawesi and Manado but so far, Bali is the worst affected area.</p> <p>“To intervene with (the spread of) this disease, we have been introducing vaccinations in Bali with pretty good results. We are intervening with immunisation,” said Vensya Sitohang, the Ministry of Health Director of Surveillance and Quarantine to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/warnings/australians-warned-about-travelling-to-bali-amid-spike-in-japanese-encephalitis-cases/news-story/e255ca32f524bcbdae9d1ee1f7e3a429" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>.</p> <p>Children who are aged between nine months old to 15 years are eligible for vaccination as they are considered to be the most at risk when it comes to contracting the infection.</p> <p>According to the ministry, 979,953 people have been vaccinated so far.</p> <p>“The hope is that it prevents it early, so no physical disability is reached,” said Ms Sitohang.</p> <p>Signs and symptoms occur within five-15 days after being bitten by the infected insect.</p> <p>Those who are travelling to Bali or Asia are advised to remain covered up and regularly apply mosquito repellent to avoid getting bitten.</p> <p>“A Japanese encephalitis vaccine is available for people aged 12 months and older and is recommended for travellers spending extended one month or more in rural areas of high-risk countries for JE,” the NSW Health website reads.</p> <p>Contact your GP for further information on the vaccine. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Cruise descends into "pure chaos" as ship loses its balance

<p>It was supposed to be a relaxing five-day cruise trip to the Caribbean, but instead, passengers were faced with their worst nightmare after a malfunctioning switchboard forced the ship to tilt to its side.</p> <p>The Carnival Sunshine cruise liner left Port Carnaveral on Sunday, October 28, and it didn’t take long for problems to start arising as the unbalanced cruise ship caused chaos with passengers flying out of their seats and plates and glasses falling to the ground in pieces.</p> <p>Those on board compared the incident to the Titanic, with one person claiming that water was seeping into the ship during dinnertime.</p> <p>“We were actually at the table where the window broke and the water came in,” said a passenger to Orlando news station WFTV.</p> <p>“Next thing we know, the whole boat tilted … we were literally hanging on for our lives, dangling … it was really like a scene from the Titanic.”</p> <p>David Crews, a passenger on board the doomed ship, said he didn’t think the back and forth rocking of the ship was a problem until he saw others crying and screaming for help.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">This is the inside of the Carnival Sunshine cruise ship on Sunday evening. <a href="https://twitter.com/CarnivalCruise?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@CarnivalCruise</a> says the ship listed (tilted or leaned) because of a technical issue just hours after leaving <a href="https://twitter.com/PortCanaveral?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PortCanaveral</a>. <br /><br />(H/t to David Crews for the pictures) <a href="https://t.co/usSaQsZBzG">pic.twitter.com/usSaQsZBzG</a></p> — Clay LePard (@ClayLePard) <a href="https://twitter.com/ClayLePard/status/1057717193968943106?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">31 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“Plates and silverware started sliding off the tables. Then the tables themselves started to slide. Glasses and plates started to fall and shatter. At this point, it was pure chaos. Screams. Cries. Panic.”</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/cruise-descends-pure-chaos-ship-loses-balance-005339076.html" target="_blank"><em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em></a>, a spokesperson claims that everything was under control after a minute into the chaos.</p> <p>“There was never any issue with the safe operation of the ship and our officers quickly intervened to correct the situation,” said the spokesperson, as they also admitted to some passengers walking away with minor injuries.</p> <p>The day after the incident took place, the captain issued a note to each guest to explain what went wrong.</p> <p>“We have identified that an electrical switchboard malfunction impacted the use of the fin stabilisers,” it said.</p> <p>“It’s important to note that fin stabilisers are not a safety feature; they are deployed solely for guest comfort to minimise any potential ship motion while at sea. There was never any issue with the safe operation of the ship, and our officers quickly intervened to correct the situation.”</p> <p>Although the cruise line offered compensation of $50 to each guest, many were not impressed and chose to end their journey after the terrifying event. </p>

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Women thrown off flight for what she tried to smuggle on board

<p>Although it’s an option to transport your pets with you when you fly, most pet owners will leave their furry friends behind when they go on a trip.</p> <p>But one woman thought she’d try a sneaky way to smuggle her cat on board a British Airways flight from Glasgow to London Heathrow Airport. In the American’s hand luggage, her cat was stored inside a box with the passenger claiming it was necessary for “emotional support,” reported <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/woman-thrown-off-flight-tried-smuggle-luggage-002404191.html" target="_blank">Yahoo 7</a></em>.</p> <p>The unidentified woman had somehow made it through airport security with the feline in her carry-on luggage. According to the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6310577/American-passenger-kicked-British-Airways-flight-trying-smuggle-CAT-onboard.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail</a></em> an airport insider claimed that the security scanner “would not have picked up the cat as being alive, dead or stuffed".</p> <p>Needless to say, she was removed from the October 21 flight, but not before the woman became panicked when she was asked to store the bag in an overhead locker as she was seated at an emergency exit.</p> <p>It comes after some even more bizarre incidents of passengers attempting to smuggle “emotional support” animals on board flights. One woman was removed from a Frontier Airlines flight in the US earlier this month when she tried to bring a squirrel with her on her voyage, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/british-airways-emotional-support-cat-passenger-kicked-off-a8600941.html" target="_blank">The Independent</a></em>.</p> <p>And earlier this year a United Airlines passenger wanted to stowaway her “emotional support peacock” named Dexter on a flight to Los Angeles, even attempting to buy the bird a ticket.</p> <p>Speaking of the latest incident, a British Airways spokesman told <em>The Independent</em> that while cats weren’t allowed in plane cabins, assistance dogs were “very welcome".</p> <p>“Cats cannot travel in the cabin but recognised assistance dogs are always very welcome and travel completely free of charge alongside their owners on board,” they said.</p> <p>“Other animals will need to travel in the hold but will be just as comfortable in a carefully controlled environment," the spokesman added. </p> <p>What's the strangest thing you have seen a passenger bring on board a flight? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Couple's creepy discovery in cruise ship cabin: "Is that what I think it is?"

<p>A US couple from Florida made a creepy discovery in their cruise ship cabin during what was supposed to be a relaxing holiday.</p> <p>Chris and Dana White were enjoying their three-day Carnival cruise to the Caribbean last October before they found a device pointed in the direction of their bed.</p> <p>When they went to have a closer look, they realised it was a video camera that was intentionally placed in between their TV wires.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.insideedition.com/" target="_blank"><em>Inside Edition</em></a> Mr White said, “We were just really flabbergasted that there’s a camera in the room and it’s plugged up and it’s working.”</p> <p>“I just immediately felt like we had been invaded,” Mrs White added.</p> <p>“Our privacy has been invaded.”</p> <p>After making the shock discovery, the pair informed the cruise company who then asked an employee to remove the camera from the premises.</p> <p>After launching an investigation, the company said that a “video transmitter” was found by the staff on the ship but did not mention if the device was connected to a power source or if it was able to record, according to a report by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.usatoday.com/" target="_blank"><em>USA Today</em></a>.</p> <p>Carnival has alerted US Customs and Border Protection and has also given the transmitter to the FBI for a more detailed analysis.</p> <p>The incident comes after a young couple came across a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/the-terrifying-moment-a-couple-make-an-eerie-discovery-inside-their-airbnb" target="_blank">video camera in their Airbnb</a> while visiting Canada. The camera was built into an alarm clock. </p> <p>Has anything like this ever happened to you on holiday? Share your story with us in the comments below. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Panic as ill passenger opens plane door during flight

<p>Passengers on a Frontier Airlines flight received the shock of their lives after an ill passenger managed to open the cabin door as the plane was taxiing, deploying the emergency slide on the taxiway.</p> <p>The incident occurred as the plane was scheduled to leave Cancun in Mexico for St Louis, Missouri, reported <a href="https://www.foxnews.com"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Fox News</strong></em></span></a>.</p> <p>One passenger aboard the flight, Andy Karandzieff, explained that the incident started after the passenger vomited.</p> <p>“We were in the front row and a gentleman behind us started throwing up.”</p> <p>Mr Karandzieff said the man then left his seat distressed and began banging on the cockpit door, prompting the crew to reseat him.</p> <p>However, the sick passenger left his seat again and managed to open the cabin door, automatically deploying the emergency slide.</p> <p>According to Fox8, the passenger was also fighting off a flight attendant.</p> <p>Passenger Kathleen Ingham wrote on Facebook: “Thank God for the brave men and women who held him in the plane or he for sure would have been sucked into the engine.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkathleen.ingham.3%2Fposts%2F2401345276546453&amp;width=500" width="500" height="586" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Police were then called to escort the passenger from the airport and transport him to a hospital.</p> <p>The sick passenger’s mother, who was not on the flight, said the man and his father were returning home after enjoying a trip to Cancun.</p> <p>She suggested that her son may have consumed a drink that had been spiked as he was attacked the night before.</p> <p>The mother explained that her son had been struck on the head after being attacked in his hotel.</p> <p>Passengers on the flight were moved to other flights or given hotel rooms to stay in overnight.</p> <p>What is the scariest thing that has happened to you on a plane? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Emirates flight attendant accused of stealing $7000 from passengers

<p>Emirates Airlines has hit the headlines again, but for all the wrong reasons. It has seen several alleged thefts on its flights, and in <span>the latest incident, a 37-year-old Egyptian flight attendant has been accused of stealing over $AU7000 from three brothers who were flying from Thailand to Dubai in June.</span></p> <p>The men were travelling in business class when they left their valuables behind to tend to their sick father during the flight, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://gulfnews.com/news/uae/courts/airline-steward-stole-dh18-500-from-3-brothers-on-plane-1.2290870" target="_blank">Gulf News</a></em>.</p> <p>“My brothers and I went to check on my father,” one of the brothers told prosecutors during the current court case of the stolen money valued at 18,100 Emirati dirhams.</p> <p>“When we returned to our seats, I discovered that Dh 3700 ($AU1423) were missing from my wallet. My brothers also discovered that Dh 14,800 ($AU5692) in dollars and dirhams were missing from their wallets,” he said.</p> <p>“We alerted the cabin supervisor who took us to the business class galley and took photos of the money that wasn’t stolen from our wallets. These had serial numbers that were in sequential order with the stolen banknotes.</p> <p>“When the plane landed, police took our belongings to examine the fingerprints and they searched the plane, but the money wasn’t recovered.”</p> <p>The flight attendant’s fingerprints matched those on the brothers’ wallets but during proceedings at the Dubai Court of First Instance, <span>the man pleaded not guilty, stating, “That did not happen." </span></p> <p>But according to <em>Gulf News</em>, an investigating policeman told prosecutors that the Emirates flight attendant had admitted his guilt when he was discovered that his fingerprints matched.</p> <p>According to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/crime/1015437/chinese-man-nabbed-for-mid-air-theft-bribe" target="_blank">The New Zealand Herald</a></em>, last year, an Auckland couple alleged that they had €2674 ($AU4334) stolen from their hand luggage from the First Class cabin of an Emirates flight from Paris to Dubai.</p> <p>And in 2016, a Chinese man was arrested for theft for allegedly stealing almost 500,000 Thai baht (AU$2154) on an Emirates flight, reports the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/crime/1015437/chinese-man-nabbed-for-mid-air-theft-bribe" target="_blank"><em>Bangkok Post</em>.</a></p> <p>Have you ever had anything stolen on a flight before? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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Cruise ship passenger charged after trying to throw partner overboard

<p>A Queensland woman whose partner allegedly attempted to throw her off a cruise ship had taken to social media to share how excited she was to be able to take time off with her “beautiful man” and go on a luxury trip.</p> <p>But things did not go according to plan, after her partner was arrested as soon as the ship docked in Hobart.</p> <p>The civil construction worker from Wamuran near Caboolture is currently in custody and has been charged with attempted murder after it was discovered that he tried to throw his partner off the ship following an argument on Thursday.</p> <p>Authorities were called to cruise liner <em>Radiance of the Seas</em> following the incident.</p> <p>It is alleged that the woman's partner grabbed her under her arms before attempting to throw her off the 13-storey ship. The events that followed were chaotic as passengers claim they heard an alarm and screaming early on Thursday morning.</p> <p>Some approached the woman to see if she was okay.</p> <p>Appearing at the Hobart Magistrates Court on Friday afternoon, the 46-year-old father-of-three pleaded not guilty but was refused bail and will be expected to appear at the Supreme Court in February.</p> <p>Having departed Sydney on October 16, the cruise was expected to dock in Tasmania and then return to Sydney after five days.</p> <p>Only last month, the woman took to her social media account to share her excitement about the holiday.</p> <p>“Tassie here we come!” she wrote. “Radiance of the Seas owner’s suite … holiday we so deserve. My beautiful man has rented a Mercedes for the day to take me to Table Cape Tulip Farm and eat as many oysters as I can smash.”</p> <p>She also went on to write: “So excited for our holiday … we are going to have our own butler, concierge and VIP gold passes for everything. The beginning of many journeys.”</p> <p>A spokeswoman from the Royal Caribbean issued a statement and said that authorities have the company's full support.</p> <p>“Our security staff responded to the incident, and Tasmania Police were notified and attended the ship on arrival in Hobart,” she said.</p> <p>“The safety and security of our guests and crew is our highest priority.”</p>

Travel Trouble

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Coca-Cola's embarrassing vending machine blunder

<p>It’s a pitfall marketing departments must come across regularly, the risk of a message painfully missing the mark, lost in translation.</p> <p>Coca-Cola Amatil New Zealand is currently feeling the heat over that very pitfall, with some vending machines in the country causing much mirth on social media.</p> <p>The offending slogan on the machines reads: “Kia ora, Mate”. ‘Kia ora’ is a greeting you’ll often hear in New Zealand, but “mate” in te reo Māori means “death”. So the slogan essentially reads “Hello, death.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">When the languages don't mix well. <a href="https://t.co/3piZIoptAE">pic.twitter.com/3piZIoptAE</a></p> — Waikato Reo (@waikatoreo) <a href="https://twitter.com/waikatoreo/status/1051264259089264640?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 14, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>One of the machines is at Auckland International Airport and is <span>where Gareth Seymour spotted the vending machine.</span></p> <p>"I read with Māori language eyes and thought, ‘They haven't had this checked by a Māori,” he told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/article/2018/10/15/kia-ora-death-vending-machine-slogan-gets-lost-translation" target="_blank">NITV News</a></em>. He suggested the slogan should have read “Kia ora e hoa” or “hello friend”.</p> <p>The response on social media after a shot of the vending machine was posted was merciless.</p> <p>“This reminds me of being back in uni and learning marketing 101,” said one Facebook user.</p> <p>“The coca cola company gains self-awareness?” tweeted another detractor, referencing the potentially dire health effects of Coca-Cola.</p> <p>But the commentary became serious with this comment on social media: “Totally spot on, it does mean death for a lot of Indigenous people.”</p> <p>There are some that have argued that the Māori native tongue and English language commonly mix, and that’s the line Coca-Cola Amatil NZ has taken.</p> <p>"In no way was the ‘mate’ in reference to any Māori word, that would have been inappropriate and unacceptable,” the company said in a statement to <em>NITV News</em>.</p> <p>It said that by merging the two words, it "only meant to bring Maori and English together".</p> <p>"Coca-Cola Amatil New Zealand is proudly Kiwi and respects and embraces all aspects of Maori culture and any other culture."</p> <p>The company wouldn’t say, however, whether the Māori community had been consulted on the marketing campaign.</p> <p>Seymour said that, “Even a Māori-speaking school kid would notice the mistake. The moral of [the] story is – if you use it there are ways of doing it right.”</p> <p>What "lost in translation" blunders have you seen? Let us know in the comments section.</p>

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Passenger's “disgusting” pedicure on flight caught on camera

<p>If you think you’ve dealt with awful plane passengers then think again, because it can’t get any worse than this. A passenger has become a viral sensation on social media after footage of her cutting her toenails was released.</p> <p>The woman was caught giving herself a mid-air pedicure and is now being shamed for it through an Instagram account called Passenger Shaming.</p> <p>The account, which is dedicated to exposing terrible passengers, shared the video of the lady buffing her soles with a foot file and trimming her toenails.</p> <p>She also has zero remorse, as she makes no attempt to hide her stomach-churning behaviour.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BorS94EB5RY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BorS94EB5RY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">PEDICURES ON PLANES! #happymonday ✈️👣🔪🤷🏼‍♀️😂 #DEADFLYINGSKINFORTHEWIN #passengershaming #flyingfeet #hatchetman • • • #NOPE #instagramaviation #airplaneetiquette #frequentflyer #crewlife #aviation #cabincrew #avgeek #cabincrewlife #flightattendant #flightattendantlife #stewardess #flightattendantproblems #travel #flightattendants #instapassport #aviationgeek #FAlife #airtravel #travelgram #traveltips #pilot #pilotlife #travelling #frequentflier</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/passengershaming/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Passenger Shaming</a> (@passengershaming) on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:06am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Having now been viewed close to 150,000 times, users from all over the world have left their opinions in the comments, and none of them sympathise with the woman in the video.</p> <p>“How [are you] even allowed to do that! Disgusting and I would have raised hell if I were sitting next to her. YUCK!!,” one user wrote.</p> <p>“Are you ****ing kidding me???? I am seriously losing all hope in humanity,” said another.</p> <p>Many wanted to see the woman banned off future flights or be forced to sit with the cargo next time.</p> <p>Do you think this passenger's behaviour is unacceptable? Let us know in the comments below</p>

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The common items in your luggage that could land you in jail overseas

<p>You may be surprised to learn that certain everyday over-the-counter medicines that are legal in Australia could be illegal overseas. That cold and flu tablet you may have in your luggage could land you in jail.</p> <p>“Even medications that are legal in Australia can attract heavy fines overseas or, in extreme cases, jail sentences in prison environments that might be much harsher than at home,” said household savings and travel insurance expert Abigail Koch of <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.comparethemarket.com.au/blog/travel/common-medications-jailed-abroad/" target="_blank">comparethemarket.com.au.  </a></em></p> <p>“In these instances, travel insurance may not cover you if you are carrying or using drugs that are classified as illegal overseas.”</p> <p>Koch advises travellers speak to their doctor in advance and get a letter from them to confirm that their medication is legitimate, and research what’s illegal in the countries they’re visiting. Travellers should also be sure to declare to their travel insurer any medical conditions.</p> <p>“If you have a medical condition, it is important to talk to your doctor to see if there are alternative medications you can take, and to get a doctor’s letter or prescription before travelling,” she says. “It’s also crucial to disclose any pre-existing medical conditions and current medical treatments to your travel insurer, and ensure you’re covered for any health issues that may arise while travelling.”</p> <p>According to comparethemarket.com.au, these are the medications that are illegal or restricted in each country.</p> <p>United States</p> <p>Addictive narcotics like antidepressants and sleeping pills, if you don’t have a doctor’s note. Any drugs that fit this category should be in their original packaging with no more than a 90-day supply.</p> <p>United Arab Emirates</p> <p>Surprisingly, children’s Panadol is prohibited here, common contraceptive pills and nicotine lozenges. Any medications with codeine is banned, as well as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis medication, Valium and Ritalin. Having any of these drugs on your person can lead to a jail sentence in many Gulf countries.</p> <p>But if you need your medication for health reasons, you may be able to carry them for 30 days if you have permission from the UAE Ministry of Health.</p> <p>Thailand</p> <p>Some drugs containing codeine are prohibited, while medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is considered a controlled substance.</p> <p>Hong Kong</p> <p>You’ll need a doctor’s note for otherwise prohibited sleeping tablets, and medications for things like anxiety and erectile dysfunction.</p> <p>Singapore</p> <p>Nicotine gum is illegal, while you’ll need a licence for medications for anxiety, sleeping and strong painkillers. It’s illegal to have more than a three-month supply of medications for things like diabetes or high cholesterol.</p> <p>Japan</p> <p>You could be detained for carrying ADHD medicine dexamphetamine, and some cold and flu tablets that have pseudoephedrine as an ingredient. You’ll need a narcotics certificate for any medications containing morphine or codeine.</p> <p>China</p> <p>Be sure to have a doctor’s note for any medication you are carrying with you, and you’ll need to have the prescription with you for verification of anything prescribed for above seven days. You should also bring a copy of your prescription for Customs.</p> <p>Greece</p> <p>Anything with codeine can only be carried with a prescription, and it needs to clearly show what it’s for, the dosage and that it’s for personal use.</p> <p>South Korea</p> <p>Anything considered a controlled substance or narcotic needs permission from the Narcotic Control Division of the Korean Food and Drug Administration before you can enter the country. So be sure to leave enough time for approval before you travel and have a doctor’s letter or prescription handy to show.</p> <p>Russia</p> <p>A doctor’s letter is required for anything containing codeine, and over-the-counter cold and fly medication may also need a prescription.</p>

Travel Trouble

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Family forget 5-year-old daughter at airport

<p>Reminiscent of the famous film <em>Home Alone</em>, a 5-year-old child was left stranded at an airport after her parents forgot to take her with them.</p> <p>The child was abandoned at Stuttgart Airport, which is claimed to be one of Germany’s busiest locations, on Monday.</p> <p>Police say that travellers noticed the young girl wandering around with no accompanying adult as she looked confused and lost.</p> <p>While countless announcements were made through the airport's intercom system, her parents failed to show up to retrieve their daughter.</p> <p>Authorities had no other choice but to take the child to the police station where they received a phone call from her concerned mother.</p> <p>When asked how the situation managed to happen, she explained that after coming home from a family holiday, the couple headed home in two separate cars.</p> <p>According to police, both parents were under the assumption that the other had their daughter.</p> <p>“The five-year-old was eventually safely picked up by her father,” said a police spokesperson.</p> <p>The sequence of events reminded those online of the film <em>Home Alone</em>, where a child by the name of Kevin McCallister is left alone in New York after his parents forget to take him to Paris with them.</p> <p>“Honey, are the children with you? A simple and self-explanatory sentence!” said one social media user.</p> <p>“This can happen to any mother who knows how lively children can be. People who have no children should not have a say here. No mother does this deliberately,” said another.</p> <p>Do you think the situation could have been avoided? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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This airline denied a passenger from boarding because of an everyday piece of clothing

<p>Imagine thinking you’re all set for your flight, only to make it on board to discover you’re being denied entry. Some airlines, due to cultural sensitivities, have harsher dress codes than others as one traveller found out, reports <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/saudi-arabian-airlines-flight-passenger-yore-oyster-jakarta-istanbul-riyadh-denied-boarding-shorts-a8574351.html" target="_blank">The Independent</a>.</p> <p>Last year, Saudi Arabian Airlines made the news for enforcing a strict dress code, refusing to carry “women exposing legs or arms, or wearing too thin or too tight clothes, and men wearing shorts exposing legs".</p> <p>It’s the national airline of Saudi Arabia, where Wahhabism is followed, a conservative interpretation of Sunni Islam.</p> <p>But on its <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.saudia.com/TRAVEL-WITH-SAUDIA/On-Board/SAUDIA-Dress-Code" target="_blank">website</a>, the carrier has a very general, and brief, description of its dress code.</p> <p>“Saudia is requesting from their guests to abide by a dress code whereby they are clothed in a manner that is in line with public taste or not offensive to other passengers,” it says.</p> <p>So, for western passengers travelling on the airline, what’s considered decent attire could be hard to discern. Wearing a comfy pair of shorts for a comfortable journey could, understandably, fly under the radar as Jordan Bishop found out.</p> <p>When he went to board his Saudi Arabian Airlines flight, he faced a polite refusal, reports The Independent.</p> <p>“Sir, I’m afraid we can’t allow you to board. You cannot fly with Saudia wearing shorts,” a manager informed Bishop, who was boarding a 4 pm flight at Jakarta to fly via Riyadh to Istanbul on October 3.</p> <p>But when the Forbes writer – ironically also the founder of Yore Oyster, a corporate flights concierge – was caught short … with nothing else to change into, the manager again denied him entry.</p> <p>“If you don’t have pants, I can’t allow you to board,” he said.</p> <p>So quick-thinking Bishop made a dash for a clothes store at the airport.</p> <p>“When it became clear that I had no other option but to find a pair of pants on my own, I ran down the length of the terminal until I found a travel kiosk selling sarongs,” he said.</p> <p>“I bought the first one I saw, raced back to the gate and tied it around my waist like a full-length skirt.”</p> <p>Where he was given an “awkward” once-over by a flight attendant at the gate before boarding, the addition of the sarong provoked some bemused glances according to the writer, but he was finally given permission to board.</p> <p>Have you ever been refused entry to a flight? Tell us why and what happened in the comments section below.</p>

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Can you spot what is wrong with this controversial hotel ad?

<p>Sofitel Hotels is weathering a stormy response to an advertisement that appeared in <em>Good Weekend</em> magazine for its Brisbane hotel.</p> <p>It seems like an innocuous, prosaic hotel ad, but on further inspection, the devil is in the detail.</p> <p>On one side of the bed sits a bath-robed man reading a copy of <em>Australian Financial Review</em>. On the other is a bath-robed woman reading a Chanel coffee table book. He has a basket of pastries for breakfast nearby. She has a plate of fruit.</p> <p>The advertisement has been branded as sexist on social media, reports the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6252039/Whats-wrong-hotel-advert-Women-arms-sexist-poster.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a>, with criticism scathing of what the young couple are each reading – he something intellectual, her something presumably frivolous – and the proximity of each type of breakfast foods to them.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hi <a href="https://twitter.com/SofitelBrisbane?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@SofitelBrisbane</a>, your breakfast looks delicious! Hey and just wanted to let you know I’m a woman and I also read the <a href="https://twitter.com/FinancialReview?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@FinancialReview</a> every day <a href="https://t.co/qOg5J2vkqz">pic.twitter.com/qOg5J2vkqz</a></p> — Elizabeth Redman (@elizabethredman) <a href="https://twitter.com/elizabethredman/status/1049034184570929154?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 7, 2018</a></blockquote> <p><em>The Australian</em><span> </span>reporter Elizabeth Redman tweeted:</p> <p>“Hi @SofitelBrisbane, your breakfast looks delicious! Hey and just wanted to let you know I’m a woman and I also read the <span>@FinancialReview every day.”</span></p> <p>“Yes, newsflash for @SofitelBrisbane — some women are in fact more interested in whether stocks and shares are going up and down than whether hemlines are,” another Twitter user wrote.</p> <p>Someone else brought attention to the layout of the breakfast spread on Twitter.</p> <p>“Of course the fruit platter is on her side, she'd be loathed to touch the baked goods...' they wrote.</p> <p>One man thought the advertisement resembled something that <em>Mad Men</em>’s fictional Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce 1950s-era advertising agency would have come up with.</p> <p>A spokesperson for the hotel chain tweeted that depicting a sexist representation of a couple was not the intention of the advertisement, with the company pulling the ad.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hi Elizabeth, we appreciate you voicing your concerns. There was no intention of portraying a stereotype but we recognise it &amp; apologise for any offence it has caused The creative has been pulled from any future activity. Feel free to send us a DM if you’d like to discuss further</p> — Sofitel Brisbane (@SofitelBrisbane) <a href="https://twitter.com/SofitelBrisbane/status/1049181902354014208?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“There was no intention of portraying a stereotype but we recognise it and apologise for any offence that it has caused.”</p> <p>Do you think there’s anything wrong with this advertisement? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Airbnb holiday renters facing $6000 fines – will it affect you?

<p>A council in NSW plans to fine residents $6000 for listing their properties on Airbnb without prior approval.</p> <p>In an attempt to control housing costs, Byron Shire council has planned to implement consequences for those who put their properties up for short-term holiday letting without council permission.</p> <p>Mayor of Byron Bay Shire, Simon Richardson, said the fines would help restrain the cost of housing.</p> <p>“Due to Byron Shire’s popularity as a tourist destination many people now see short-term holiday letting as their opportunity to make money on their property from tourism and in some cases, this can come at a cost to the community,” Cr Richardson said to the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.northernstar.com.au/" target="_blank">Northern Star</a></em>.</p> <p>The law, which was announced late last week, will force owners to seek prior approval if they hope to get tourism benefits out of their properties. If people fail to comply, they will be faced with a $3000 fine if an individual or a $6000 for a company.</p> <p>The Byron Shire Council announced plans to exclude secondary dwellings from development fees back in 2011, if the property was considered a home to permanent residents.</p> <p>But since then, the council has realised that many of these homes are being used for tourist accommodation rather than for residential purposes.</p> <p>According to Cr Richardson, 17.6 per cent of the total housing stock in Byron Shire is being used for holiday rental.</p> <p>Compare that to the national rate which is 0.2 per cent, and Sydney which is 1.7 per cent, that is an enormous difference.</p> <p>“There are hundreds of approved tourism accommodation providers in the Byron Shire who do the right thing with respect to approvals, safety and compliance,” said Cr Richardson. “Something needs to be done to protect our community’s right to residential areas that are filled with neighbours not tourists.”</p> <p>But not everyone is fond of the new law, with Airbnb claiming that the new policy is “heavy-handed.”</p> <p>“It is disappointing that Byron Shire Council continues to try and malign home sharing and the immense benefits it brings,” said Julian Crowley, Airbnb’s public affairs manager for Australia and New Zealand.</p> <p>But others approve, saying the needs of residents should always come first.</p> <p>Gold Coast property owner and representative of Strata Owners Speak Out said that other councils should follow suit.</p> <p>“Short-term rentals immediately remove dwellings from the market, so of course that puts up the prices,” he said.</p> <p>Do you rent your property on Airbnb? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Take cover: Wild wet weather ahead

<p>With Australia suffering the worst drought it has ever faced in years, there is some good news on the horizon, as parts of the country can expect a downpour of rain over the weekend.</p> <p>Labelled as Australia’s most significant rain event of 2018, the stormy conditions are working their way through NSW, with many coastal areas expecting 50-100mm of rain between now and next Tuesday.</p> <p>Those residing in Sydney have already experienced a preview of the wet weather as heavy rainfall was recorded in most of the city yesterday.</p> <p>Three suburbs across the city experienced the heaviest amount of rainfall – Peakhurst, Prospect and North Rocks, which all received 74mm of rain between 9 am Thursday and 7 am Friday.</p> <p>According to the Bureau of Meteorology, the downpour of rain will continue throughout today but will ease this afternoon. The NSW coast will experience heavy winds and authorities have issued a warning to surfers as the conditions will be dangerous today and tomorrow in Sydney, Wollongong and Newcastle.</p> <p>Sydney will face the rainy conditions all throughout the weekend and into next week.</p> <p>While many may find the weather miserable, it is a blessing in disguise for Australian farmers who have been struggling under the dry conditions. The western town of Broken Hill in NSW got more rain in one night than the whole year combined. Many farmers considered themselves lucky as they received between 40mm and 100mm of rain on Wednesday night, according to the <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-05/sydney-weather-heavy-rain-to-continue-farmers-celebrate-downpour/10339964" target="_blank">ABC</a>.</em></p> <p>But while there are plenty of farmers celebrating, some didn’t get much rain at all, such as Lachlan Fall who owns a property east of Broken Hill.</p> <p>“It seemed to turn into a bit of a rain band and that provided a bit of relief for some lucky people,” Mr Gall told AAP.</p> <p>“I’m not confident that there’s going to be widespread heavy rain this year.”</p> <p>Across Australia, the Northern Territory, Tasmania and South Australia may experience a light shower while ACT and Victoria are expected to remain dry.</p>

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The incredible photo that’s killing people

<p>The Sea Cliff Bridge in the northern Illawarra region of NSW is a spectacular view, but visitors are going to extreme lengths to ensure they get the perfect photo of the view.</p> <p>The jaw-dropping bridge opened in 2005 to avoid the frequent rockfalls that posed a danger to motorists on the previous road and would force the closure of the road for months at a time.</p> <p>The $49 million structure has since featured in television commercials and also sports an impressive walkway.</p> <p>However, visitors are venturing off the path and onto the surrounding cliffs in an attempt to get the most impressive photo.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoYpLelnh-6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoYpLelnh-6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Anita (@anitaawu)</a> on Oct 1, 2018 at 2:13am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>On Saturday, a man in his 20s tragically died after falling off a cliff at the site.</p> <p>The man was reportedly walking with friends near the southern end of the bridge, when he slipped and fell more than 40m on to the rocks below.</p> <p>He died at the scene.</p> <p>Now, a local has shared their distress after they spotted four people walking towards the same location just one day after the death.</p> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Sydney Morning Herald</u></em></strong></a>, another 10 people were seen close to the edge of the cliffs earlier this week.</p> <p>The local said she was “really upset” after noticing the reckless behaviour of the visitors.</p> <p>“I yelled out to them, ‘Hey guys get out of there, someone died up there yesterday,” she said.</p> <p>“They just waved it off and laughed like it was a joke. It’s as much the attitude of people walking up there as it is inadequate fencing and signage.”</p> <p>Although there is no suggestion that the man died taking a selfie, tourists have become increasingly reckless as young people put themselves in life-threatening situations to take the perfect Instagram photo.</p> <p>Now, scientists are calling for “no selfie zones” to be put in place at different landmarks around the world.</p> <p>A new study found that selfies have claimed the lives of 259 people between 2011 and 2017.</p> <p>“Selfies are themselves not harmful, but the human behaviour that accompanies selfies is dangerous,” Dr Agam Bansal from the India Institute of Medical Sciences, who led the research, said.</p> <p>“Individuals need to be educated regarding certain risky behaviours and risky places where selfies should not be taken.</p> <p>“‘No selfie zone’ areas should be declared across many tourist areas, (especially) places such as water bodies, mountain peaks and over tall buildings to decrease the incidence of selfie-related deaths,” he said.</p> <p>Do you think “no selfie zones” should be put in place? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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"Absolutely unacceptable" for your baby to cry – flight attendant to passenger

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">A new mother who was travelling from Sydney to San Francisco was yelled at by a United Airlines flight attendant because her child was crying.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Krupa Patel Bala was flying business class when the incident happened.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Ms Bala<span> </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/mums-fury-as-flight-attendant-tells-her-off-for-crying-baby/news-story/a95c0a4efb3ea204d651cbcb4460257e">told news.com.au</a><span> </span>that her eight-month-old baby had been crying for five minutes, when she was approached by the chief flight attendant.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The attendant then insisted it was "part of the rule book that the babies are not allowed to cry for more than five minutes".</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Parents of newborns have it hard enough already travelling with a baby and we certainly don't need CREW MANAGERS piling on when we are doing our best to ensure we're containing our children and their cries," she posted on Facebook.</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><a href="http://www.fox5dc.com/news/mom-claims-united-flight-attendant-said-it-was-absolutely-unacceptable-for-baby-to-cry-on-flight">Fox News reported</a><span> </span>that the captain apologised to her after they'd landed at their destination, but not the flight attendant.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Fox also said that United Airlines released a statement saying, "We've been in touch with our customer via social media and United representatives met the family upon arrival to apologise, offer a refund and make clear that the experience she relayed doesn't reflect our commitment to serving our customers, including our youngest customers.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Young families are welcome on our flights, including in business class. We are continuing to review the incident internally and the flight attendant is being held out of service pending the investigation."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Bala had vowed to never fly United again.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Republished with permission of<a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/107463963/absolutely-unacceptable-for-your-baby-to-cry--united-airlines-to-passenger"> Stuff.co.nz.</a> </em></p> </div>

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Aussie family's $62K holiday nightmare

<p>An Australian mum has spoken of her horror after a simple slip on holiday left their son with devastating injuries – and a $62,000 bill.</p> <p>Alison Karbowiak’s son Tom, 14, was on a skiing trip with family and friends in France when he mistook ice for snow on the side of a slip, lost his balance and fell.</p> <p>The young skier, who is skilled at the sport, was taken to a medical centre close by where tests showed no signs of broken bones or internal bleeding, and he was quickly discharged.</p> <p>Though it wasn’t that simple. What the doctors failed to notice was Tom had irreparably damaged his spleen and suffered abdominal trauma – injuries that resulted in worsening symptoms throughout the night.</p> <p>Tom’s family was forced to call an ambulance to take him to the nearest hospital as his condition was rapidly deteriorating – a journey that lasted two gruelling hours, due to a snowstorm, with the teen slipping in and out of consciousness.</p> <p>It was every parent’s nightmare according to Ms Karbowiak.</p> <p>“The level of stress that comes along with seeing your child suffering, while in a strange country and hours from the nearest hospital, is absolute torture,” she said.</p> <p>When the ambulance eventually reached the hospital, Tom was rushed into emergency surgery to remove his spleen. The surgery was a success, and the young traveller spent 11 days recovering in hospital.</p> <p>But the nightmare wasn’t over just yet. When the cost of emergency medical, flights, accommodation, taxi charges and fees for missed transfers were added up, it totalled to a whopping $62,121 for the Karbowiak family.</p> <p>Thankfully Ms Karbowiak decided on taking out travel insurance before their trip, otherwise the massive bill would have had to come out of the family's own pocket.</p> <p>“If we’d had to personally cover these costs, the long-term implications on our future would be terrifying,” she said.</p> <p>“It would have drained our savings, affected our ability to cover everyday bills and taken away our freedom to make education choices for our sons. I honestly don’t know how we would have survived.</p> <p>“We always travel with insurance, I just like that peace of mind. Prior to the trip I’d checked we were fully insured for everything.</p> <p>“I didn’t expect we’d need it, but when this happened – it was such a relief not to have to worry about debilitating ambulance or hospital costs, so I could just focus on my son.”</p> <p>Have you had any travel horror stories? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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