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Police announce new road rule

<p>While all Aussie drivers already know about speed cameras, red light cameras and mobile phone cameras, there could soon be another camera catching out negligent drivers on the road.</p> <p>New technology could soon allow police to detect when drivers are too tired to be operating a vehicle.</p> <p>According to the <em>Herald Sun</em>, high-tech cameras are being tested to see if they can scan motorists’ pupils and accurately detect their level of fatigue.</p> <p>The device would be used by police to assess Aussie motorists who they’ve pulled over for driving in an unsafe manner.</p> <p>Victoria Police have shared their support for the technology that will scan drivers while they are in their car, however, the research by VicRoads and Monash University is not yet complete.</p> <p>Before the cameras are used on Victorian roads, a year-long trial will take place to test the results of Australia’s first ever roadside fatigue detection test.</p> <p>The trial will assess the fatigue levels of drivers who have been awake for 32 hours before and after taking part in a two-hour monitored drive.</p> <p>The participants will drive a duel control vehicle and be accompanied by a qualified driving instructor.</p> <p>In Victoria, 20 per cent of road crashes were caused by drivers who were fatigued.</p> <p>Roger Chao, a vehicle access director, believes the new technology could have the capability to save lives.</p> <p>“Roadside tests for drugs and alcohol have helped take impaired drivers off our roads – we want to see if a roadside fatigue test could have similar results and help keep all road users safe,” he said. </p> <p>Will you be happy to see police officers use this new camera? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Woman receives massive fine for breaking three road rules at once

<p>Reckless road behaviour has seen a young mother cop a huge fine for breaking three road laws at once. The 32-year-old woman from Kilkenny in Adelaide’s inner-west, was allegedly texting on her mobile phone while driving yesterday morning, and ran a red light at the same time at a busy intersection in Adelaide’s CBD. In the back seat, her three-year-old child was unrestrained.</p> <p>According to a South Australia Police<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.police.sa.gov.au/sa-police-news-assets/front-page-news/child-unrestrained-and-driver-using-mobile-while-disobeying-traffic-light#.W8fCdmIzZTZ" target="_blank">statement</a>, the woman was issued three fines on the spot, amounting to a whopping $1,341, and scored a total of nine demerit points. This included $394 for using a mobile while driving, $524 for disobeying a traffic light, and $423 for failing to have her child in an approved child restraint.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">A young mum has racked up $1,341 in fines today, in a motoring trifecta which could’ve had fatal consequences <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FIVEaaNews?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#FIVEaaNews</a> <a href="https://t.co/8P8CJLjxnX">pic.twitter.com/8P8CJLjxnX</a></p> — Matthew Pantelis 🎙 (@MatthewPantelis) <a href="https://twitter.com/MatthewPantelis/status/1052424497259827201?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 17, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“This incident occurred at a major city intersection, at peak hour and not only put the life of the child and driver at risk but other road users,” said Superintendent Craig Wall, Officer in Charge, Eastern District.</p> <p>“To say Police are extremely disappointed in this driving behaviour is an understatement and is one of the reasons police facilitate traffic operations and actively target this type of driving behaviour."</p> <p>Over a nine day period in March, around 30 South Australian drivers a day were pulled over during the state police’s seatbelt safety blitz<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.police.sa.gov.au/sa-police-news-assets/traffic/operation-belt-up-results#.W8fQJmIzaqA" target="_blank">Operation Belt Up</a>.</p>

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The big change coming to all alcohol bottles sold in Australia

<p>After a meeting on Thursday, it has now become mandatory for all alcohol bottles being sold in Australia to be clearly labelled with a pregnancy warning.</p> <p>The decision comes after the Australian and New Zealand Food Ministers have been lobbying for alcohol companies to add warning labels for the last seven years.</p> <p>Despite the pressure, only 75 per cent of alcohol bottles featured labels highlighting the risk of consumption during pregnancy.</p> <p>Michael Thorn, the chief executive of the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education spoke to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/health/all-alcohol-bottles-sold-in-australia-to-warn-against-drinking-while-pregnant/news-story/4db016c92c61e97d04b7cfd654856102" target="_blank">The Daily Telegraph</a></em> and said that he is happy that after seven long years, we are finally moving forward with the decision.</p> <p>“This is a win for consumers and a critically important decision that will save lives and the pain that is caused as a result of what is a preventable, but lifelong disability,” said Mr Thorn.</p> <p>According to Mr Thorn, the number of women not knowing the potential “life-threatening risks” of drinking while pregnant is alarmingly high, and the label will help reduce that number.</p> <p>Not-for-profit website <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://fare.org.au/" target="_blank">FARE</a> </em>claims that damage caused by alcohol is extremely prevalent throughout Australia.</p> <p>“More than 5500 lives are lost every year and more than 157,000 people are hospitalised making alcohol one of our nation’s greatest preventative health challenges,” the website states.</p> <p>Even though any amount of alcohol is considered harmful during pregnancy, as it can cause neurological disability, it’s estimated that almost 50 per cent of women drink during their pregnancy.</p> <p>CEO of the Brewers Association of Australia, Brett Huffman, said the industry supports the legislation.</p> <p>“While it is disappointing that mandating pregnancy labelling for all packaged alcohol products is necessary, today’s decision by Ministers is a no-brainer. We fully expected this outcome,” said Mr Heffernan.</p> <p>Currently no date has been put into place for the change, but food ministers are hoping it’s as soon as possible.</p>

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Furious homeowners hit with fines for parking debacle on their own street: “It’s ridiculous”

<p>Residents in a Melbourne suburb are rallying together after they were hit with a series of fines for parking in their own street.</p> <p>Numerous residents in Melbourne’s Sunshine West are furious at their local council after receiving fines for parking on the nature strip in their street.</p> <p>Sunshine West pensioner Helena Guselev has parked her car in the same spot for over a decade, but recently woke up to find a ticket on her vehicle.</p> <p>Many of her neighbours have also found themselves in similar situations, with the combined amount of their fines totalling hundreds of dollars.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="/media/7821271/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3e5450ee5e564b70ba02e9e5202b1784" /></p> <p>“My fine was because my husband was a bit over the white concrete,” Helena said in an interview with <em style="font-weight: inherit;">A Current Affair</em>.</p> <p>“I think it's ridiculous and I could say a lot of words besides ridiculous, but I can't say it on camera.”</p> <p>The residents say they park on the nature strip to allow enough room for other cars to get through the street.</p> <p>They are also concerned that if they park how the council is suggesting, there will not be enough room for emergency service vehicles to pass through.</p> <p>Last month, Helena’s family had to call the ambulance after she collapsed in her home.</p> <p>However, the vehicle was unable to get through the street as cars were parked on either side of the road.</p> <p>“They were trying to get the ambulances through but it was really hard, we had to get people to move their cars,” Helena said. </p> <p>“As they said, only minutes to spare but people parking the way they have to now, we can't do it.”</p> <p>In a statement, Brimbank Council said it had “received complaints from residents about illegally parked cars damaging nature strips and restricting pedestrian access – particularly on one side of the road where there is no footpath.”</p> <p>“The Victorian Road Safety Rules 2017 prohibit cars from parking on nature strips. Council is obliged to enforce these rules across Brimbank, including in Parry Drive, Sunshine West."</p> <p>Do you think cars should be allowed to park on nature strips? Share your thoughts in the comments below. </p>

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How to spot the new cameras targeting dangerous drivers

<p>We all know it’s against the law to use our mobiles behind the wheel, but some will still do so believing that they won’t get caught.</p> <p>But world first camera technology being trialled in Sydney will make you think twice.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/spot-new-cameras-targeting-one-dangerous-driver-behaviour-100838741.html" target="_blank">7 News</a>, “smart” detection cameras are being piloted by the NSW state government that detect mobile phone use and analyse driver behaviour, and more trials are expected to happen early next year.</p> <p>A camera that identifies drivers on their phones has never been used before until now, and it’s part of a group of cameras located above the M4 Western Motorway in Sydney, in the suburb of Prospect at the overpass at Clunies Ross Street.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7821209/clunies-ross-st.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a2134a34a2db40ad8bf157eeb5201ad4" /></p> <p>The camera technology is designed to monitor motorists’ attention as they drive, and is said to be able to even tell if you’re on Facebook or texting, as well as talking, listening or browsing on your phone. The stealthy cameras can catch you out using artificial intelligence, images and video.</p> <p>7News reports that the trial will test the accuracy of the technology in identifying drivers using their phones illegally, and whether they are the registered owner of the vehicle. All recordings from the test will be deleted, and the technology has to be deemed accurate before any infringement notices will be given.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" src="https://au.news.yahoo.com/smart-cameras-targeting-drivers-using-075516907.html?format=embed" allowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" allowtransparency="true" allow="autoplay; fullscreen; encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Melinda Pavey, Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight said: <span>“We are confident we will get the technology right. </span><span>But we’re not going to trick anybody.”</span></p> <p>The use of the high tech cameras is not about revenue raising says the government, with $14 million in phone penalties raked in per year already.</p> <p>It says the technology is about saving lives. Mobile use caused seven deaths, 47 serious injuries, and 184 crashes in the last five years in NSW.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7821210/camera-close-up.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4d133b3fecf84a1ca4307e55840fc9d1" /></p> <p>“You’re much more likely, more than 20 times more likely, to be involved in a crash if you’re texting and driving,” said Bernard Carlon, Executive Director of the Centre for Road Safety.</p> <p>A few motorists interviewed by <em>7News</em> thought the new technology was a good idea.</p> <p>There are a lot of accidents because of mobile use,” one said.</p> <p>“This is a good idea.”</p> <p>Said another: <span>“Look, at the end of the day, it keeps people safe, that’s the main thing, isn’t it?”</span></p> <p>Do you think cameras to catch drivers using their phones is a good idea? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Tests reveal the “very dangerous” chemical found in Aussie alcohol recall

<p><span>Last month, Food Standards Australia </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/urgent-alcohol-recall-warning-issued-over-contamination-fears-in-popular-brands" target="_blank">recalled</a><span> eight different brands of spirits distributed by GJ Wholesale due to possible contamination.</span></p> <p>Now, the NSW Food Authority has revealed that the “very dangerous” chemical in the products is tert-butanol.</p> <p>“Tert-butanol is a foul smelling and foul tasting denaturant which is added to ethanol to make it unfit to drink,” a spokesperson for the authority told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/2018/10/04/18/10/recalled-alcoholic-drinks-contained-dangerous-chemical-substance-say-food-safety-experts" target="_blank">nine.com.au </a></p> <p>“Tert-butanol is also a very dangerous product in its own right.”</p> <p>The symptoms of consuming tert-butanol include vomiting, nausea and headaches according to the World Health Organisation, reports nine.com.au.</p> <p>The recalled brands are 700ml bottles of Veruschka Vodka, Mississippi Bourbon, Los Cabos Tequila, Yachtsman White Rum, Mudgee Rum, Barman’s Choice Whisky, Hunters Brandy and Her Choice Gin.</p> <p>All brands include a label that states, “Supplied to and bottled in Australia for GJ Wholesale.”</p> <p>The spokesman said the NSW Food Authority and the Australian Tax Authority would be investigating if enforcement action will be carried out.</p> <p>If you’ve purchased any of the recalled products, you can return the product and receive a full refund.</p> <p>For further information, customers are advised to contact GJ Wholesale on 0411 150 254, and if you’ve consumed these spirits recently, please seek medical advice.</p>

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Do you live on the worst road in Australia?

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Hazardous roads in capital cities around the country have been revealed by insurer AAMI’s 2018 National Crash Index. It’s based on data from accident insurance claims, reports the<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6233801/Do-live-worst-road-Australia-streets-crashes-occur-revealed.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail</a></em>.</p> <p>North Melbourne suburb Bundoora is Australia’s top danger hotspot for car accidents according to the report, due to the high-traffic Plenty Road. Ms Ashleigh Paterson, spokesperson for AAMI, said this was because of the road’s multiple lanes of traffic and traffic lights, a major tram route, and two of Melbourne’s major universities causing “extreme congestion during peak hours.”</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, highways and motorways feature prominently in the survey, including Sydney’s Hume Highway and M4 Motorway at Parramatta, Canberra’s Monaro Highway, Perth’s Albany Highway and Great Eastern Highway, Melbourne’s Burwood Highway, and Hobart’s Brooker Highway.</p> <p>AAMI reports that other areas around the country with the most car accidents include:</p> <p>Sydney: Pennant Hills Road in Pennant Hills, Pacific Highway in Chatswood, and Stacey Street, Bankstown.</p> <p>Brisbane: Gympie Road, Chermside and Aspley, and Mains Road, Sunnybank.</p> <p>Canberra: Canberra Avenue in Fyshwick, Anketell Street in Greenway, and Gungahlin Drive in Gungahlin.</p> <p>Melbourne: Doncaster Road in Doncaster, Springvale Road in Glen Waverley, and Stud Road in Rowville.</p> <p>Perth: Garden City in Booragoon, Ranford Road in Canning Vale, and Joondalup Drive in Joondalup.</p> <p>Adelaide: The Parade in Norwood, Marion Road in Marion, and Brighton Road in Brighton.  </p> <p>Hobart: Argyle Street, Macquarie Street, Davey Street in Hobart; and Sandy Bay Road in Sandy Bay.  </p> <p>The insurer’s report confirms all the red flags we should be looking out for in highly congested roadways such as frequent stopping and starting, changes in driving conditions, and multiple intersections.</p> <p>Ms Paterson reminded motorists of the need to maintain concentration while driving as a key measure to prevent accidents.</p> <p>But mobile use continues to hamper this as AAMI’s research shows.</p> <p>35 per cent of those motorists surveyed said they texted while stopped at traffic lights, and 31 per cent said they held their handset as they spoke while driving.</p> <p>AAMI also revealed that a disturbing amount of motorists – 38 per cent – weren’t aware that it is illegal to have your handset in your lap on speakerphone as you drive.</p> <p>And if it irks you to see people blatantly using their mobiles as they drive, you’re in the majority with 67 per cent of motorists feeling the same way.</p> <p>Ms Patterson said mobile use is one of the key causes of car accidents.</p> <p>Are governments doing enough to make our roads safe? Tell us in the comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div class="replay_area"> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"><a href="https://over60.monday.com/users/1552837-fiona-tomarchio" class="user_name router"></a> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Madeleine McCann detective's shock new theory: "Someone knows where she is"

<div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The disappearance of young toddler Madeleine McCann has captivated the world. Ten years later, the case is yet to be solved, and Maddie is nowhere to be found.</p> <p>But a former detective who worked on the case in 2007 has come out with a theory on how to find the young girl. David Edgar says that the only chance of solving this case is if the culprit admits to the crime on their deathbed.</p> <p>Speaking to<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em>, he said, “The best hope of a breakthrough, even after all this time, will be if and when someone’s conscience is pricked.</p> <p>“It may be that the person responsible for Madeleine’s kidnap is dying and makes a deathbed confession, or someone close to that person comes forward after he or she has passed away.”</p> <p>Mr Edgar, who was privately hired by the toddler’s parents in a desperate attempt to find answers, added: “There is every possibility that Madeleine is still alive and could be being hidden somewhere and having no idea that she is at the centre of a worldwide hunt for her.”</p> <p>He mentioned that it is strange behaviour for a kidnapper to not tell anyone about the crime they committed, which is why he hopes that the person the abductor confided in steps forward in the future.</p> <p>Madeleine was only three years old when she mysteriously vanished from a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal, in 2007 which started a worldwide manhunt.</p> <p>The young girl’s dad Gerry was seen crying last week as he mentioned his hopes to be “reunited” with his daughter one day.</p> <p>The 50-year-old father broke down into an emotional state as he believes he will see his daughter again one day.</p> <p>“Never a day goes by when I don’t think about Madeleine,” he said.</p> <p>“I certainly did believe in heaven … I feel we will be reunited at some point.” </p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Council vows to ban cats from roaming outside

<p>A Sydney council has created the purrfect storm, dividing public opinion with its proposal to force cats inside and penalise cat owners who let their beloved pets roam outside.</p> <p>Newly minted mayor Kathy Neilson, of the south-eastern Sydney suburb of Randwick, introduced a motion that could force cat owners to keep their pets inside, particularly at night. Otherwise they could face fines if cats "run free and defecate in public places,” as dog owners are already subject to, reports <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-03/randwick-councils-cat-ban-idea-stirs-debate/10331946" target="_blank">ABC NEWS</a>.</p> <p>It has been put forward “in the interest of protecting native habitat and fauna," with the council planning to form a committee to investigate the proposal further, including raising registration fees for cat owners.</p> <p>"We're losing a lot of natural wildlife around parks, because of what the cats are doing,” Independent Councillor for Randwick <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/carlos-da-rocha-b9450041/?originalSubdomain=au" target="_blank">Carlos Da Rocha</a>, who has over 30 years of experience as a senior ranger, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/2018/10/02/18/24/randwick-council-sydney-trying-to-ban-cats" target="_blank">9News</a>. “There's no responsible ownership and care factor.”</p> <p>The council’s <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.randwick.nsw.gov.au/services/animals-and-pets/dogs-and-cats" target="_blank">guidelines</a> currently state that “curfews, desexing and bells alone are not effective in protecting our native animals.”</p> <p>But how on earth do you police pooping cats? Liberal Councillor for Randwick Harry Stavrinos told 9News the idea is “laughable and absolutely ridiculous to think we're going to have our rangers jumping over back fences chasing people’s defecating cats.”</p> <p>Stavrinos, a longtime cat lover, said it was unfair to target cat owners, and that the proposed increased registration fee would put considerable strain on seniors and the disabled who may live on fixed incomes.</p> <p>“Increasing the fee just makes life more difficult for these people who rely on [cats] for therapy, love and relaxation,” he told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/home/pets/sydneys-randwick-council-wants-to-stop-cats-going-outside/news-story/ecbbf0c619b179d850d297ff4aa1f5ef" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</p> <p>ABC News reports that some of their viewers also think the planned restrictions are unreasonable.</p> <p>“Responsible cat owners know how to give their cat outdoor time, which is important for overall health and wellbeing, whilst keeping limits on them, i.e. not letting them out at night or when you're not home,” said Cathryn. “My cat would be miserable without any outside time.”</p> <p>But others were all for banning wandering felines.</p> <p>“We have strict rules put in place for dogs so why should cats be any different?” said Kelly. “I'm sick and tired of cats in my local neighbourhood coming inside and pooing and weeing all over our front and backyard.”</p> <p>Viewer Loraine took a pragmatic approach, saying that while cats are natural hunters, they need to be contained to protect wildlife.</p> <p>“I love cats and also our wonderful native animals,” she said. “As such, I understand cats' natural instinct to hunt and our role in keeping our wildlife safe. So I firmly believe there are no such things as "bad cats" but bad owners who do not have their animals desexed and allow them to stray around the neighbourhood.”</p> <p>Various restrictions are in place around Australia, including cat curfews at night, and “cat containment” suburbs in the ACT. As news.com.au reports, the federal government looked at implementing a similar ban to that of the Randwick council proposal in 2015.</p> <p>Dr Sally Box, who became Australia’s Threatened Species Commissioner last year, told the <em>Weekend Australian</em> that such measures aren’t designed to be punitive to cat owners, who may not realise how far their furry friends roam, but to protect large numbers of threatened species in urban areas.</p> <p>“Roaming domestic cats kill about 60 million birds a year,” she said.</p> <p>“We’re encouraging people to have their pets microchipped, desexed and contained at night.</p> <p>“It’s not about preventing people from having cats – they are important companions for a lot of people. We’re just trying to encourage responsible pet ownership.”</p> <p>Do you think banning cats from roaming outside is fair? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Faulty brake recall: More than 40,000 family cars recalled across Australia

<p>A national recall has been issued for more than 40,000 Subaru vehicles over potential brake issues.</p> <p><span>The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission issued the recall on Sunday for Subaru Liberty and Outback vehicles with the model years 2010-2014.</span></p> <p>The recall, which includes both Liberty sedans and station wagons, was issued because of concerns over their electronic parking brakes.</p> <p>"If the electronic parking brake (EPB) circuit board fractures, the warning light will illuminate and the EPB cannot be applied or released," the ACCC recall notice said.</p> <p>"If this happens, the vehicle may be in breach of the Australian Design Rules (ADRs) for motor vehicles."</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7821075/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6419262a87a64fa69980ab587e67edbb" /></p> <p>The ACCC warned if the electronic parking brake could not be applied or released, it could lead to an “increased risk of injury to the vehicle occupants and other road users”.</p> <p>Subaru warned affected customers in a statement that the "EPB Actuator may become faulty creating a situation where the EPB cannot be applied."</p> <p>"Subaru Australia is conducting this Recall Campaign to ensure the affected vehicles maintain compliance with the Australian Design Rules for motor vehicles."</p> <p>The ACCC said vehicle owners would be contacted to organise a time for repairs to be made.</p> <p>"Affected owners will be contacted by mail to present their vehicle to their preferred Subaru dealer for the rectification work to be carried out free of charge.”</p> <p>Drivers who own a Subaru Liberty or Outback model from 2010-2014 can also check if their vehicle is subject to the recall on the Subaru <a href="https://www.subaru.com.au/recall"><strong style="font-style: inherit;"><u>website</u></strong></a>.</p> <p>Is your car affected by this recall? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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The driving law hardly anyone knows – and it could cost you more than $350

<p>We’ve either been a witness to the act or the perpetrator, but did you know that throwing fruit waste out of a car window is against the law and can result in a hefty fine and loss of demerit points?</p> <p>While fruit is biodegradable, disposing of fruit and food waste still falls under littering in all of Australia’s states and territories.</p> <p>The state with the biggest fine is Queensland, where the crime of “dropping injurious matter on a road” will cost you $353 and two demerit points.</p> <p>Coming in second is Victoria, where you will be charged $322 by the state’s Environmental Protection Authority if you’re caught in the act.</p> <p>In New South Wales, anyone caught throwing discarded fruit out of a vehicle window faces a $250 fine.</p> <p>“Though biodegradable, items like apples still pollute; compost them or put them in the bin,” the NSW EPA website states.</p> <p>“If no bin is at hand, you must keep your rubbish until you find a bin. You cannot rely on other people to clean up your litter.”</p> <p>In South Australia, the fine is $210 and in Western Australia it’s $200.</p> <p>Throwing any unwanted organic material out of a car window is littering, according to Keep Australia Beautiful Western Australia.</p> <p>“Apple cores and fruit skins take a number of months to break down and is unsightly like other litter. This litter can attract vermin and if littered in the bush can attract wildlife to the roadside which creates danger for drivers and hazards for native wildlife,” the website states.</p> <p>“In cases of littering from vehicles, where neither the litterer nor the driver of the vehicle can be identified, the person responsible for the vehicle (usually the registered owner) will be deemed to have committed the offence and will have to pay the fine unless they can identify the offender,” the Keep Australia Beautiful WA website states.</p> <p>In the Australian Capital Territory, littering a small item in a public place incurs a $60 fine, which increases to $200 for “litter that escapes or likely to escape into public place.”</p> <p>In the Northern Territory, an EPA spokesperson said the littering falls under the local councils. </p>

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Phone scam alert: How fraud syndicates are robbing Aussies of millions of dollars

<p>Australians are being scammed of hundreds of millions of dollars by phone fraudsters claiming to be representatives of major organisations.</p> <p>Elaborate fraud syndicates have been calling Aussies in an attempt to gain access to their finances.</p> <p>In an interview with<em style="font-weight: inherit;"> A Current Affair</em>, Damian Cromwell said he received a call from someone who claimed to be from Telstra’s anti-fraud taskforce.</p> <p>As they knew his details and the fact that he was a Telstra customer, Damian listened to them.</p> <p>“They said they’re running a sting operation to get these scammers,” he said.</p> <p>However, the person he was speaking to was connected to multiple other people on the phone who persuaded him to buy $2000-worth of gift cards in the hope of catching the scammers.</p> <p>After the purchase was made, the imposter hung up immediately.</p> <p>“That’s when I started to panic. I thought, ‘Gee, I’ve been done,’,” he said.</p> <p>“I’m just a average guy. I’m not Forrest Gump – it can happen to anybody.”</p> <p>Lorraine Saunders, 71, also received a call from a Telstra imposter and lost almost $10,000.</p> <p>Lorraine received a call from someone claiming to be from the company to organise a new modem for her home.</p> <p>Shortly after the phone call, her bank account had been drained.</p> <p>“I thought it was true,” she said.</p> <p>“I had savings there for my grandkids, who lost their father three years ago. It was all the savings I had.”</p> <p>Sam Jenkins from Consumer Affairs Victoria said that although most victims ask for call-back numbers, syndicates have become smarter and now use multiple people.</p> <p>“The scammers will say, ‘Yes there is a number’, and they’ll have one of their fellow scammers ready to take that call in just a few minutes’ time when the unsuspecting member of the community calls them,” he said.</p> <p>“Major corporations and certainly government entities will never contact members of the community … and ask for money.”</p> <p>Aussies are also being bombarded with calls from scammers pretending to be <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/new-ato-phone-scam-swindling-hundreds-of-thousands-from-aussie-taxpayers"><strong><u>investigation officers with the ATO</u></strong></a>.</p> <p>Speaking to <em style="font-weight: inherit;">ACA,</em> Myrene Chambers said she received a call from a fraudster who threatened to call the Australian Federal Police if she didn’t back pay the ATO money.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of people out there who are getting sucked into it,” she said.</p> <p>“I was really scared. I actually thought it might’ve been the case. I started going through my head thinking, ‘What have I done? How could I have committed fraud?’”</p> <p>Last year alone, Aussies lost $340 million to elaborate scams, which are becoming increasingly harder to detect. </p>

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The little-known offences that could see you lose your driver's licence

<p>All drivers know that a sure-fire way to lose your licence is speeding and drink driving, but there are offences that could see you suspended.</p> <p>Drivers are not only responsible for themselves on the road, but they are responsible for the actions of their passengers.</p> <p>A driver can be slapped with a fine and lose demerit points if passengers are caught without their seatbelt on.</p> <p>In NSW, a driver with two or more passengers without a seatbelt can lose up to six demerit points or 12 during a double-demerit period.</p> <p>If there are four passengers in a vehicle without their seatbelts on, a driver could face fines of up to $1422.</p> <p>Using your mobile phone while driving is illegal across all states and territories in Australia and is another offence that could land you without a licence.</p> <p>Earlier this month, the penalty for the crime increased in NSW to five demerit points, or 10 during double-demerit periods.</p> <p>If you are caught using your phone in Victoria or the ACT, you could lose four demerit points.</p> <p>In Tasmania, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory, motorists will attract a three-point deduction for the offence.</p> <p>Speeding will also result in a deduction of between one and eight demerit points depending on the amount the vehicle has gone over the speed limit.</p> <p>Driving with a device that detects or interferes with speed cameras, known as a ‘speed evasion article’, is also illegal and will result in a nine-demerit point deduction in NSW along with a $1757 fine.</p> <p>Motorbike riders are also responsible for themselves and any passengers not wearing a helmet and can face steep fines and demerit point reductions.</p> <p>Across all state and territories, L plate and P plate licence holders start with a lower amount of demerit points, so they can quickly lose their licence if they are caught breaking the law. </p>

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Disgraced comedian Bill Cosby sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">His Hollywood career and good-guy image in ruins, 81-year-old Bill Cosby has been sentenced to 3 to 10 years in a US prison for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The sentence makes Cosby the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The punishment all but completed the dizzying late-in-life fall for the comedian, former TV star and breaker of racial barriers.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It is time for justice. Mr Cosby, this has all circled back to you. The time has come," Montgomery County Judge Steven O'Neill said. He quoted from victim Andrea Constand's own statement to the court, in which she said Cosby took her "beautiful, young spirit and crushed it."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Cosby declined the opportunity to address the court before the sentence came down.</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The punishment came at the end of a two-day hearing at which the judge declared Cosby a "sexually violent predator" – a modern-day scarlet letter that subjects him to monthly counselling for the rest of his life and requires that neighbours and schools be notified of his whereabouts.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The comic, once known as "America's Dad" for his role on the top-rated<span> </span><em>The Cosby Show</em> in the 1980s, was convicted in April of violating Constand, a Temple University women's basketball administrator, at his suburban Philadelphia estate in 2004. It was the first celebrity trial of the #MeToo era.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Cosby faced a sentence of anywhere from probation to 10 years in prison. His lawyers asked for house arrest, saying Cosby – who is legally blind – is too old and vulnerable to do time in prison.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Prosecutors asked for five to 10 years behind bars, saying he could still pose a threat to women.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele rejected the notion that Cosby's age and infirmity entitle him to mercy. "He was good at hiding this for a long time. Good at suppressing this for a long time. So it's taken a long time to get there," Steele said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The sentencing came as another extraordinary #MeToo drama unfolded on Capitol Hill, where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stands accused of sexual misconduct more than three decades ago.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The Cosby case "really raised awareness of the pervasiveness of ... sexual misconduct against subordinates and against women of relatively less power," said Daniel Filler, dean of Drexel University's law school. "For jurors, I think it's inherently changed the credibility of the accusers."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In the years since Constand first went to authorities in 2005, more than 60 women have accused Cosby of sexual misconduct, though none of those claims have led to criminal charges.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The judge ruled on Cosby's "sexually violent predator" status after a psychologist for the state testified that the entertainer appears to have a mental disorder that gives him an uncontrollable urge to have sex with women without their consent. When the ruling came down, a woman in the courtroom shot her fist into the air and whispered, "Yessss!"</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In a statement submitted to the court and released on Tuesday (Wednesday local time), Constand, now 45, admitted that she has had to cope with years of anxiety and self-doubt. She said she now lives alone with her two dogs and has trouble trusting people.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"When the sexual assault happened, I was a young woman brimming with confidence and looking forward to a future bright with possibilities," she wrote in her five-page statement. "Now, almost 15 years later, I'm a middle-aged woman who's been stuck in a holding pattern for most of her adult life, unable to heal fully or to move forward."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">She also wrote of Cosby: "We may never know the full extent of his double life as a sexual predator, but his decades-long reign of terror as a serial rapist is over."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The AP does not typically identify people who say they are victims of sexual assault unless they come forward publicly, which Constand and other accusers have done.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Constand went to police a year after waking up in a fog at Cosby's gated estate, her clothes askew, only to have the district attorney pass on the case.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Another district attorney reopened the file a decade later and charged the TV star after stand-up comic Hannibal Buress' riff about Cosby being a rapist prompted more accusers to come forward and after a federal judge, acting on a request from The Associated Press, unsealed some of Cosby's startling, decade-old testimony in Constand's related civil suit.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In his testimony, Cosby described sexual encounters with a string of actresses, models and other young women and talked about obtaining quaaludes to give to those he wanted to sleep with.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Cosby's first trial in 2017 ended with a hung jury. He was convicted at a retrial that opened months after the #MeToo movement had taken down such figures as Hollywood studio boss Harvey Weinstein, NBC's Matt Lauer, actor Kevin Spacey and US Senator Al Franken.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Constand said Cosby gave her what she thought were herbal pills to ease stress, then penetrated her with his fingers as she lay immobilised on a couch. Cosby claimed the encounter was consensual, and his lawyers branded her a "con artist" who framed the comedian to get a big payday – a US$3.4 million settlement she received over a decade ago.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Five other accusers took the stand at the trial as part of an effort by prosecutors to portray him as a predator.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Cosby, whose estimated fortune once topped US$400 million, broke barriers in the 1960s as the first black actor to star in a network show,<span> </span><em>I Spy</em>.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He went on to superstardom as wise and understanding Dr Cliff Huxtable on<span> </span><em>The Cosby Show</em>, a sitcom that showed America a new kind of black TV family: a warm and loving household led by two professionals, one a lawyer, the other a doctor.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He also found success with his Saturday morning cartoon<span> </span><em>Fat Albert</em>, appeared in commercials for Jello-O pudding and became a public moralist, lecturing the black community about young people stealing things and wearing baggy pants. He won a Presidential Medal of Freedom and countless Emmys, Golden Globes and Grammy awards.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">As the allegations mounted, his career all but collapsed,<span> </span><em>The Cosby Show</em> reruns were taken off the air, and one college after another stripped him of his honorary degrees.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by MaryClaire Dale and Michael R Sisak. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/whats-on/entertainment/107376007/Bill-Cosby-81-sentenced-to-3-to-10-years-in-state-prison-for-2004-sexual-assault">Stuff.co.nz</a>.</em></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"> </p> </div>

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New Aussie driving laws slammed by experts

<p>A new law allowing drivers to be hit with on-the-spot fines for drink driving instead of fronting court have been slammed by legal experts for providing “no deterrence".</p> <p>In order to avoid the overcrowding of courts, the NSW Government reforms will permit low-range drink driving offences to be dealt with by infringement notices.</p> <p>While the laws have passed the NSW Parliament’s Lower House, it has yet to get through the Upper House and an urgent committee hearing into their impact was told yesterday that “more people will take a risk".</p> <p>Doug Humphrey, president of the Law Society of NSW, says he has concerns that the campaign “drink driving is a crime” will be diluted by the changes.</p> <p>“There is a genuine deterrent factor for first-time low-range PCA offenders in going to court,” he said.</p> <p>According to Humphrey, low-range PCA offences were only 1.9 per cent of all Local Court matters.</p> <p>John Sutton, a lawyer from Sydney, said, “Infringement notices do nothing to change driver’s behaviour.”</p> <p>He said when he was a police prosecutor 20 years ago, a three- to four-page traffic record was a big record.</p> <p>“Now it’s nothing to see a record of up to 15 pages quite easily,” he said.</p> <p>“I believe this is because people see infringement notices as more or less a taxation rather than a punishment and therefore do not recognise their offending as dangerous but rather simply providing an income stream to the state.”</p> <p>He said Victoria had an infringement notice system and their repeat offender rate was 29 per cent compared to NSW of 8.1 per cent.</p> <p>“The humiliation and embarrassment of having to collect references and admit criminal conduct, culminating in the experience of appearing before a judicial officer is what is necessary to cause offenders to modify their behaviour.</p> <p>“In doing so the roads are safer because people do not reoffend.”</p> <p>Richard Wilson, the NSW Bar Association deputy senior public defender said the “shame” of having to get references from friends and family and employers for court was an effective deterrent for “functional” normally law-abiding people.</p> <p>He said getting an on the spot fine is a “much less serious” outcome in the eyes of offenders.</p> <p>Under the new rules first-time low-range drink-drivers in NSW will be fined $561, up from $482, and have their licences automatically suspended for three months.</p> <p>Mid-range offenders will be forced to have a breath-test device fitted to their car for two years.</p> <p>Roads Minister Melinda Pavey said the new rules would “act as a stronger deterrent” and said under the existing rules over 50 per cent of first-time offenders receive no fine or recorded conviction.</p> <p>But according to Mr Sutton, the use of a so-called “Section 10” – where drivers were not fined or convicted – was proven to be effective in cutting repeat offenders.</p> <p>“That is a punishment that objectively works – these people come to the court, they face the same … face the fear of a criminal record and they don’t reoffend.”</p> <p>What do you think of the new rule? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Con-artists swindle $150K from Aussies: Don't fall for these fake celebrity scams

<p>Scammers are using images of popular celebrities to swindle Aussies out of almost $150,000.</p> <p>From Cate Blanchett’s anti-ageing lotion to Eddie McGuire’s erectile dysfunction pills, unsuspecting people are being deceived by fake celebrity endorsements.</p> <p>Since the start of the year, fake celebrity endorsements have increased by a huge 400 per cent.</p> <p>The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission's (ACCC) Scamwatch website received almost 200 reports this year alone with the losses of victims totalling $142,000.</p> <p>Those aged 45 years and older account for 63 per cent of victims of the celebrity scams, while women are also more likely than men to be deceived by the advertisements.</p> <p>The scams appear on social media platforms as online advertisements or promotional stories and use the image and often fake quotes from a celebrity to give credibility to the product being sold.</p> <p>Victims are then asked to hand over their credit card details to sign up for a “free trial” of the product, which either never turns up or has difficult contract terms to back out of.</p> <p>Celebrities who have been exploited by scammers include <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/technology/it-s-a-scam-carrie-bickmore-warns-of-face-cream-hoax-on-facebook"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Carrie Bickmore</strong></span></a>, Delta Goodrem, Kyle Sandilands, Lisa Wilkinson, Meghan Markle and <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Shark Tank</em>’s Steve Baxter.</p> <p>ACCC deputy chair Delia Rickard said most people who have fallen for the scam this year lost between $100 and $500, but one victim was swindled of more than $50,000.</p> <p>Ms Rickard said tech giants, such as Facebook and Google, were responsible for not being diligent enough.</p> <p>“Most of the reports to Scamwatch involve these scam advertisements running on Google ad banners or as ads in Facebook news feeds,” Ms Rickard said.</p> <p>“These tech giants must do more to quickly suspend ads, as every time consumers click on a scam ad, they are at risk of losing money.”</p> <p>Recently, Channel 9’s Sonia Kruger's image was used in a number of ads selling a facial cream.</p> <p>“It’s a relief to see the ACCC step in with regards to this issue,” she told <a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>The Daily Telegraph.</u></em></strong></a></p> <p>“It’s very concerning that Australians are being duped into parting with their hard-earned money on the false belief that these products have been endorsed by Australian celebrities. Facebook and Google should block these ads.”</p> <p>A Google spokeswoman said advertisements that violated its polices would be removed, while Facebook Australia and New Zealand’s head of communications, Antonia Sanda, said false and misleading ads are also being disabled.</p> <p>“From January to March 2018 we took down 837 million pieces of spam, nearly 100 per cent of which we found and flagged before anyone reported it,” she said.</p> <p>“We also disabled about 583 million fake accounts — most of which were disabled within minutes of registration.”</p> <p>To avoid being caught up in a celebrity scam, the ACCC encourages all online shoppers to research a company before they hand over their details.</p> <p>“It is vital to research and read independent reviews of the company. Consumers should verify celebrity endorsement of products from the celebrity’s official website or social media account,” Ms Rickard said.</p> <p>The ACCC said if someone falls victim to a fake celebrity endorsement, they should contact their bank, arrange a chargeback and stop any further debits to their credit card.</p> <p>Have you spotted any of these celebrity scams while scrolling online? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Is Lisa Wilkinson considering a career in politics?

<p>She has worked in the Australian media industry for nearly four decades and now, <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Project’</em>s Lisa Wilkinson could be taking on the world of politics.</p> <p>On this week’s episode of <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Sunday Project</em>, Lisa appeared to be on edge when co-host Hamish Macdonald questioned her on a possible career change.</p> <p>Hamish quizzed the 58-year-old during an interview with Dr Kerryn Phelps, who has recently confirmed her bid for Malcolm Turnbull’s Sydney seat of Wentworth.</p> <p>Hamish asked: “How do you think Lisa would fare against someone like Tony Abbott given the mood you're describing?”</p> <p>Dr Phelps said that she would be “awesome”, while Lisa quickly added that she “already had a job”.</p> <p>Lisa replied: “I am ruling it out, I do not know where this has come from!”</p> <p>However, as Hamish continued to ask Lisa about making the switch, the host didn’t deny it could happen one day.</p> <p>“It was in the newspaper, that's where it's come from,” Hamish said, prodding for his co-host to confirm if it could be in the works.</p> <p>He asked: “As an Independent, maybe, one day?”</p> <p>Lisa, who appeared to be slightly flustered by the topic, then discussed the logistics that would surround a career change.</p> <p>Lisa said: “Erm... Look, I'm really interested, fascinated, by politics, but I think the life of a politician would just be awful and I admire people who go for it.</p> <p>“And really stuck by what they believe in. </p> <p>“But I think that's the problem in the political climate at the moment, no one is sticking to what they believe in and that's why Michael Turnbull went.”</p> <p>Hamish, who was still not satisfied with her response, continued: “Can you honestly tell me you don't think that you'd do a better job than Tony Abbott representing your community?”</p> <p>Laughing at the question, Lisa replied: “I am not going to answer that question. It would come back to haunt me!”</p> <p>During the episode, Lisa’s exclusive <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/the-tense-moment-between-lisa-wilkinson-and-serena-williams-i-ll-walk-out"><strong><u>interview with Serena Williams</u></strong></a> also aired.</p> <p>While the tennis champ agreed to discuss her outburst at the US Open, Lisa revealed that she was told she wasn’t allowed to mention the controversial cartoon depicting the incident by Australian artist Mark Knight. </p>

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Sad new twist in search for Madeleine McCann

<p>Kate McCann has been forced to close down an online shop aimed at raising funds to help find her missing daughter Madeleine McCann.</p> <p>The website sold T-shirts, posters and car stickers with Maddie’s face on it, along with slogans saying, “Please don’t give up on me” and “Still missing, still missed.”</p> <p>Kate said she shut it down because of her “many commitments and pressures”, making it too difficult to attend to orders, the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://metro.co.uk/2018/09/23/kate-mccann-shuts-online-store-to-find-madeleine-as-donations-dwindle-to-virtually-zero-7970987/" target="_blank">Metro UK</a></em> reported.</p> <p>The family, who has already faced so much tragedy, has faced another low blow as it has been revealed that donations from the public to the Maddie Fund have dwindled to “virtually zero” over the past 11 years – when the little girl went missing in Portugal.</p> <p>A friend claiming to be close to Kate and Gerry McCann told the<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6196197/Shock-Kate-McCann-closes-online-fundraising-shop.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail</a></em> that the idea that money is still flooding in was just wrong.</p> <p>“Donations dried up a long time ago. At times the story comes into the news a few kind people send a quid or two but there is nothing of any real value,” the friend said.</p> <p>According to <em>Metro UK</em>, in the first month of investigations regarding the disappearance of Madeleine, £1.8 million ($AU3.2 million) was donated to the fund, out of which £64,000 ($AU115,000) was from merchandise sales.</p> <p>The fund, which is officially called Leaving No Stone Unturned, has a total of £750,000 ($AU1.3 million) left in the pot, but this could soon be wiped out.</p> <p>If police and investigators decide to close the case, the McCanns will be forced to dip into the fund and pay for their own investigators.</p> <p>A majority of it ($AU773,000) may also be needed to cover the costs on an ongoing legal battle against former Portugal police chief Goncalo Amaral.</p> <p>Amaral accused the McCanns of being involved in their daughter’s disappearance, saying they killed her and are now covering it up – claims which the couple has denied and has sued him for.</p> <p>Up until now, police have spent over $AU36 million searching for Maddie, who would have turned 15 in May this year. The last handout from the government of $AU269,000 was given at the start of April.</p> <p>Speaking to the <em>Daily Mail</em>, a family member said: “We have to wait to see what the Home Office decide about the Grange operation.”</p> <p>However, a Home Office spokesperson said that to date, no request has ever been received from the Metropolitan Police Service to extend funding for operation Grange beyond the end of September 2018.</p> <p>In 2011, Scotland Yard launched its own review, named Operation Grange, into the case.</p> <p>“Before we would even consider an application from the Met Police to continue its Operation Grange inquiry, we need to know what work is left to be done and how much it would cost,” a spokesperson said.</p> <p>Despite the global search and high level of funding, there has been no significant clues as to what could have happened to Maddie. </p>

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The bizarre vehicle found cruising on an Aussie road – can you guess what it is?

<p>A video uploaded to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=23&amp;v=Okp8XYj3Uik" target="_blank">Dash Cam Owners Australia </a>is making waves online after footage shows an unlikely vehicle cruising on an Aussie road.</p> <p>A surprised driver captured the vehicle gliding down the street – but can you guess what it is?</p> <p>The video shows a bright yellow jet-ski casually making its way past traffic. The driver, who was dressed in protective leather and a helmet, was easily sticking with the flow of traffic.</p> <p>The vehicle was also spotted by Gold Coast drivers earlier this month, with those having witnessed the bizarre form of transport left scratching their heads after the jet-ski manoeuvred its way around a roundabout.</p> <p>Believe it or not, this isn't the first time a jet-ski has been spotted on the road. In a video uploaded to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news4jax.com/news/florida-man-beats-the-heat-with-makeshift-jet-ski-scooter" target="_blank">News 4 Jax</a></em> in Jacksonville, Florida, on September 18, a car is seen driving alongside a motorised jet-ski.</p> <p>The driver can also be seen wearing a helmet for safety and finishing off his look with a pair of fluorescent and reflective sunglasses.</p> <p>The driver gave a friendly thumbs up as the car passed him.</p> <p>A child can be heard from the backseat of the car saying, “That’s meant to be in the water.”</p> <p><span>In another video uploaded to </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJxrYo1Nf0Y" target="_blank">ViralHog</a><span>, a teen is seen taking his new toy for a spin down his driveway.</span></p> <p>“We built it because I woke up one day thinking about such a thing and I decided it had to happen,” the driver wrote.</p> <p>At this current moment, there is no law that prohibits drivers to use jet-skis on Australian roads.</p> <p>However, pocket bikes, motorised scooters and golf carts are banned.</p>

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Road rule test: Is it against the law to cross an unbroken double line?

<p>You would hope that licenced drivers would be aware of the road rules that are currently in place, but it turns out there is one rule that a surprising number of motorists aren’t aware of, and it has to do with road markings.</p> <p>A surprising number of motorists are under the impression that they are unable to cross an unbroken double line when driving, are you one of them? </p> <p>If living in the state of NSW, there are plenty of instances where drivers are permitted to cross unbroken double lines, and one of them is if you're entering or leaving a road.</p> <p>The idea that it is illegal to cross a continuous double or single line when driving off or on to a road is a myth.</p> <p>According to the NSW road rules. crossing a dividing line is allowed if entering or leaving a propery or road "by the shortest route."</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820974/capture.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4c925f97f74c4f1f9a84a3926f4a15e5" />A good example is when coming out of a petrol station, it is perfectly legal to turn right over the dividing lines unless there is a sign specifically saying you can't.</p> <p>The rule applies to both double and single unbroken road markings.</p> <p>Drivers are also allowed to cross any type of dividing line when turning right at an intersection.</p> <p>Motorists in NSW are also permitted to cross unbroken lines if needing to maintain a safe distance when overtaking a bicycle rider or to avoid obstruction on the road.</p> <p>If passing a cyclist, drivers must leave a one metre gap in a 60km/h or less speed zone or 1.5 metres when the limit is above 60km/h.</p> <p>When deciding whether a road obstruction permits someone to cross double lines, drivers must use their own intuition and make sure they have a clear view of oncoming traffic, and if it is “necessary and reasonable in all circumstances” to cross the dividing line and if it is safe to do so.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/on-the-road/the-double-dividing-line-rule-many-aussie-drivers-are-getting-wrong/news-story/9baa90c6155e10810b64a83ea99348a0">news.com.au</a></em>, Transport for NSW said that it is critical that all drivers are aware of the road rules, and update themselves regularly if any changes are made.</p> <p>“It is important that all road users know the rules and abide by them,” a Transport for NSW spokesperson said.</p> <p>“We will include this rule in the next Road Rules Awareness Week in early 2019.”</p> <p>Drivers in the Northern Territory and Western Australia are also allowed to turn right across double dividing lines when entering or leaving a property.</p> <p>It is illegal in Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania to cross a double dividing line when entering or leaving a road.</p> <p>Motorists in Victoria are only permitted to cross double lines to avoid a potential hazard, while those in Queensland are only allowed if overtaking a cyclist.</p> <p>Tasmanians and South Australians are able to cross the line in both of these situations.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://mylicence.sa.gov.au/road-rules/the-drivers-handbook/driving-road">MyLicenceSA</a>, a “slower moving vehicle or a vehicle stopped in a line of traffic” is not considered an obstruction.</p> <p>But if a situation occurs where a driver is faced with a fallen tree, crashed vehicle or broken down car, then it is permitted to cross an unbroken line.</p> <p>In NSW, illegally crossing an unbroken like could cost you two demerit points and a $263 fine.</p> <p>Victoria and South Australia have the highest penalties for illegally crossing an unbroken line, with fines of $322 and $446 and both costing three demerit points.</p> <p>Queensland also has a three-demerit point penalty, along with a $234 fine.</p> <p>Drivers in Tasmania are subjected to a $203.75 fine and two demerit points while Western Australia has the lowest penalties at $150 but will cost drivers three demerit points.</p>

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