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"Karen" assaults old man after trying to steal Ooshies from him

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A "Karen" has gone viral after she allegedly got into a physical altercation at a Woolworths after trying to steal Ooshies from an old man's trolley.</p> <p>The details of the fight were posted on Reddit by a shopper who witnessed the incident.</p> <p>“So this literally just happened about half an hour ago and it p*ssed me off,” the shopper wrote on Tuesday.</p> <p>“I finish up my shopping and the total came to $60, so I went collected the 3 Ooshies,” the shopper wrote, saying they first offered them to an elderly woman who “respectfully declined”.</p> <p>“I then see an older gentleman and ask again. He said yes and that they would love them as his oldest [grandchild] is only 7.”</p> <p>“Perfect, so I hand them over (to the elderly man) and that’s when I hear a troll clearing her throat. I turn around to see a ‘Karen’ staring at me standing next to her son as he just looked at his phone. I wasn’t in the way of anything so I just gave her a confused look.”</p> <p>The shopper explained that the "Karen" then argued with them about the Ooshies.</p> <p>“What about my son,” the "Karen" said adding, “If you‘re giving them away you should give some to him.”</p> <p>The shopper said that 14 was a "little old" and that they wanted to give the Ooshies to someone with younger kids.</p> <p>The "Karen" suggested a trade of the unopened Ooshies for some of her son's duplicates.</p> <p>“Thank you but I’d rather the kids open them as that’s half the fun,” the elderly man said.</p> <p>She then offered six Ooshies to the shopper for their unopened three, opening up her bag showing she has a swag of the collectibles.</p> <p>“Sorry these are for my grandkids,” the elderly man said.</p> <p>“Just give me the damn things,” the woman allegedly said.</p> <p>According to the account on Reddit, things got physical.</p> <p>“She then lunges forward and snatches them out of his cart, I see this coming so I grab her around the wrist stopping her from taking them,” the shopper wrote. “People started watching the incident.”</p> <p>“Let go or I’ll have you arrested for assault,” she is reported to have said.</p> <p>“Only after you let go,” the shopper said.</p> <p>A store manger then had to intervene between the group, and the woman walked off.</p> <p>“The manager apologised to the old man and he even cracked a joke about how he hasn‘t had something stolen off him since the white man came to Australia (he was Aboriginal) and thanked me.”</p> <p>Others were quick to comment, saying that they've seen similar issues play out when small items are given away.</p> <p>“I remember the beanie-baby craze and when McDonalds was giving away mini-beanie-babies with their happy meals and people were crazy about those things (my mother collected them). They were SO expensive too! I bet she was going to re-sell no doubt,” one user commented.</p> <p>“I worked there during the first teeny weeny Beanie Bratz craze,” another said. “We had a limit of 2 that you could buy without a happy meal purchase, and only were giving out one version at a time until those boxes were gone, then moved on to the next."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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A computer can guess more than 100,000,000,000 passwords per second. Still think yours is secure?

<p>Passwords have been used for thousands of years as a means of identifying ourselves to others and in more recent times, to computers. It’s a simple concept – a shared piece of information, kept secret between individuals and used to “prove” identity.</p> <p>Passwords in an IT context <a href="https://www.wired.com/2012/01/computer-password/">emerged in the 1960s</a> with <a href="https://www.techopedia.com/definition/24356/mainframe">mainframe</a> computers – large centrally operated computers with remote “terminals” for user access. They’re now used for everything from the PIN we enter at an ATM, to logging in to our computers and various websites.</p> <p>But why do we need to “prove” our identity to the systems we access? And why are passwords so hard to get right?</p> <p><strong>What makes a good password?</strong></p> <p>Until relatively recently, a good password might have been a word or phrase of as little as six to eight characters. But we now have minimum length guidelines. This is because of “entropy”.</p> <p>When talking about passwords, entropy is the <a href="https://www.itdojo.com/a-somewhat-brief-explanation-of-password-entropy/">measure of predictability</a>. The maths behind this isn’t complex, but let’s examine it with an even simpler measure: the number of possible passwords, sometimes referred to as the “password space”.</p> <p>If a one-character password only contains one lowercase letter, there are only 26 possible passwords (“a” to “z”). By including uppercase letters, we increase our password space to 52 potential passwords.</p> <p>The password space continues to expand as the length is increased and other character types are added.</p> <p>However, the problem with depending on password complexity is that computers are highly efficient at repeating tasks – including guessing passwords.</p> <p>Last year, a <a href="https://www.cbronline.com/news/stolen-user-credentials">record was set</a> for a computer trying to generate every conceivable password. It achieved a rate faster than 100,000,000,000 guesses per second.</p> <p>By leveraging this computing power, cyber criminals can hack into systems by bombarding them with as many password combinations as possible, in a process called <a href="https://www.kaspersky.com/resource-center/definitions/brute-force-attack">brute force attacks</a>.</p> <p>And with cloud-based technology, guessing an eight-character password can be achieved in as little as 12 minutes and cost as little as US$25.</p> <p>Also, because passwords are almost always used to give access to sensitive data or important systems, this motivates cyber criminals to actively seek them out. It also drives a lucrative online market selling passwords, some of which come with email addresses and/or usernames.</p> <p><strong>How are passwords stored on websites?</strong></p> <p>Website passwords are usually stored in a protected manner using a mathematical algorithm called <a href="https://www.wired.com/2016/06/hacker-lexicon-password-hashing/">hashing</a>. A hashed password is unrecognisable and can’t be turned back into the password (an irreversible process).</p> <p>When you try to login, the password you enter is hashed using the same process and compared to the version stored on the site. This process is repeated each time you login.</p> <p>For example, the password “Pa$$w0rd” is given the value “02726d40f378e716981c4321d60ba3a325ed6a4c” when calculated using the SHA1 hashing algorithm. Try it <a href="https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha1-hash-generator/">yourself</a>.</p> <p>When faced with a file full of hashed passwords, a brute force attack can be used, trying every combination of characters for a range of password lengths. This has become such common practice that there are websites that list common passwords alongside their (calculated) hashed value. You can simply search for the hash to reveal the corresponding password.</p> <p>The theft and selling of passwords lists is now so common, a <a href="https://haveibeenpwned.com/">dedicated website</a> — haveibeenpwned.com — is available to help users check if their accounts are “in the wild”. This has grown to include more than 10 billion account details.</p> <p>If your email address is listed on this site you should definitely change the detected password, as well as on any other sites for which you use the same credentials.</p> <p><strong>Is more complexity the solution?</strong></p> <p>You would think with so many password breaches occurring daily, we would have improved our password selection practices. Unfortunately, last year’s annual <a href="https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91461-the-worst-passwords-of-2019">SplashData password survey</a> has shown little change over five years.</p> <p>As computing capabilities increase, the solution would appear to be increased complexity. But as humans, we are not skilled at (nor motivated to) remember highly complex passwords.</p> <p>We’ve also passed the point where we use only two or three systems needing a password. It’s now common to access numerous sites, with each requiring a password (often of varying length and complexity). A recent survey suggests there are, on average, <a href="https://www.newswire.com/news/new-research-most-people-have-70-80-passwords-21103705">70-80 passwords per person</a>.</p> <p>The good news is there are tools to address these issues. Most computers now support password storage in either the operating system or the web browser, usually with the option to share stored information across multiple devices.</p> <p>Examples include Apple’s <a href="https://www.computerworld.com/article/3254183/how-to-use-icloud-keychain-the-guide.html">iCloud Keychain</a> and the ability to save passwords in Internet Explorer, Chrome and Firefox (although <a href="https://www.howtogeek.com/447345/why-you-shouldnt-use-your-web-browsers-password-manager/">less reliable</a>).</p> <p><a href="https://tech.co/password-managers/what-is-a-password-manager">Password managers</a> such as KeePassXC can help users generate long, complex passwords and store them in a secure location for when they’re needed.</p> <p>While this location still needs to be protected (usually with a long “master password”), using a password manager lets you have a unique, complex password for every website you visit.</p> <p>This won’t prevent a password from being stolen from a vulnerable website. But if it is stolen, you won’t have to worry about changing the same password on all your other sites.</p> <p>There are of course vulnerabilities in these solutions too, but perhaps that’s a story for another day.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Haskell-Dowland and Brianna O’Shea. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-computer-can-guess-more-than-100-000-000-000-passwords-per-second-still-think-yours-is-secure-144418">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Pensioner unapologetic over attack on pregnant woman

<p>A woman who was attacked by a stranger as she sat in a Sydney restaurant while 38 weeks pregnant has spoken about the incident ten months on.</p> <p>Mother-of-four Rana Elasmar was dining with a group of friends late last year when she was viciously punched and stomped on by a man.</p> <p>At the time of the attack, Ms Elasmar was wearing a hijab and the attacker was accused of spewing racist comments before he lost control.</p> <p>Her unborn son Zayn was fortunately unharmed in the assault and was safely delivered the following month.</p> <p>"That's the first thing you think of as a mother to protect your baby," she said today.</p> <p>On Wednesday she faced Stipe Lozina in court for the first time during his sentencing hearing.</p> <p>Lozina pleaded guilty to assault, saying while he does not “get along” with Muslims, it was not the motive behind the attack.</p> <p>He claimed she did not give him a dollar which infuriated him.</p> <p>"I don't hate them, but I don't get along with them. I've got no business with them," Lozina said in court.</p> <p>The crown prosecutor argued that Lozina’s negative opinion on Muslims was borderline obsessive.</p> <p>Ms Elasmar issued a strong statement to those who engage in violence against women and are Islamophobic.</p> <p>"If you feel the right to physically or verbally abuse somebody who looks a bit different than you, then Australia's not the right country for you," she said.</p> <p>Lozina will be sentenced at a later date.</p>

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Officer suspended after stomping on man’s head in “brutal” arrest

<p>A Melbourne police officer has been suspended after his involvement in a violent arrest that left a mentally ill man in an induced coma fighting for his life.</p> <p>A Senior Constable from the Victoria Police Critical Incident Response Team was forced to pay the price on Monday night after a clip emerged of a Heathcote Junction man having his head stomped on by a cop.</p> <p>Footage showed the moment 32-year-old man Timothy Atkins was arrested by five officers in Epping on Sunday afternoon.</p> <p>The video depicted one constable kicking Mr Atkins before another stomped on his head.</p> <p> on Sunday afternoon in the northern suburb of Epping captured the moment 32-year-old Timothy</p> <p><em>7News<span> </span></em>released another clip which showed police hitting the man with their car just moments before the arrest.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837875/officer-police-atkins-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6b69b363234e45998f3909f1c95047a5" /></p> <p>The father of three now lies in an induced coma and was being treated at the Northern Hospital in Epping for a bipolar episode when he fled.</p> <p>Staff retaliated by calling police as they feared for Mr Atkind’s safety.</p> <p>Victoria Police said that a Senior Constable has been suspended “following his involvement in a protracted incident which commenced at the Northern Hospital at Epping on Sunday 13 September.”</p> <p>“Professional Standards Command continue to investigate the matter and are currently assessing all available information,” Victoria Police said.</p> <p>A spokesperson for Victoria Police told The Guardian that the officer would continue to be paid while he is suspended.</p> <p>Robinson and Gill lawyer Jeremy King, who is representing Mr Atkins,  says there is a high chance that the incident could lead to criminal charges being laid against some of the arresting officers.</p> <p>“I think the last incident regarding the stomp on the head when he is already restrained on the ground could well lead to criminal charges,” he told Nine’s <em>Today</em>.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837874/officer-police-atkins-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/18f796a28edd4c73914c5578d51d9879" /></p> <p>Before the senior constable was suspended, Mr King suggested the officer who was filmed stomping on Mr Atkins’ head should be stood down from their duty while an investigation happens.</p> <p>“I think it would be appropriate given the gravity of the situation. That’s probably as bad as I’ve seen in terms of police misconduct, the stomping on the head, it’s such a dangerous, violent act,” he said.</p> <p>“Given the nature of that conduct, I think it would be appropriate for the police officer to be stood down while independently investigated.”</p> <p>Mr King went on to condemn the use of such violence and said that the police needed to be taking a harm minimisation approach when dealing with people who have mental health issues.</p> <p>“Obviously people with mental health issues like this, who are seeking treatment can often be in a vulnerable state, they can often be agitated and where possible police should be doing everything they can to try and de-escalate the situation and really not to be using violence or physical aggression in any way,” he said.</p> <p>Mr King said Mr Atkins’ family was shocked and devastated by the incident, and said they were focussing on letting his client recover before speaking about what action needs to be taken.</p> <p>Mr Atkins’ brother Bryce said the move was a “dog act”, telling the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/truecrimeaustralia/police-courts/police-to-probe-arrest-after-man-appears-to-be-kicked-by-cop/news-story/dffe97f58b6458ff77f138b3c3628f18" target="_blank" title="www.heraldsun.com.au">Herald Sun</a></em>: “I’m just disgusted with what police think they can get away with”.</p> <p>“It is in inhumane. To see him in a coma breaks my heart.”</p> <p>His father, Glenn Atkins said he respects police but “this is not Australian.”</p> <p>“They don’t need to do that to a person with a mental illness, who didn’t even fight back. My son was scared and confused. No one can tell me this was the right thing to do.”</p> <p>The couple who filmed the arrest lashed out at the officers involved on social media, and labelled the situation “violent” and “barbaric”.</p> <p>“I don’t know what this man did, but nevertheless, this is NOT OKAY. This is absolutely disgusting behaviour from Victoria Police. Excuse my language but I couldn’t control myself,” the man said.</p> <p>“He had no weapons (yes he was resisting arrest) but their violent attack and disgusting and barbaric treatment towards this guy is inexcusable,” the other man added.</p> <p>Victoria Police claimed Mr Atkins became aggressive during the arrest, which lead to an officer being assaulted.</p> <p>“Police were called to Cooper Street, Epping, to reports of a male behaving erratically about 4.10 pm (Sunday),” Victoria Police said.</p> <p>“Upon arrival the male allegedly became aggressive and damaged a police vehicle whilst attempting to avoid arrest.</p> <p>“During the highly dynamic incident a police officer was assaulted and OC spray was deployed before the man was arrested and subsequently taken to hospital for assessment.</p> <p>“The arrest has been referred to Professional Standards Command for oversight.”</p>

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COVID Lockdown: Victorian premier may have lied about curfew advice

<p>Both the Victorian Police Commissioner and the Victorian Chief Health Officer have embarrassed Premier Daniel Andrews this week by admitting on separate occasions to national media that the nightly curfews which have Melburnians locked in their homes between the hours of 8pm to 5am were not instigated by either of them.</p> <p>Now many are asking the question: who decreed the nightly lockdowns, and why?</p> <p>Originally, Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews told State Parliament that the Police Commissioner had told him that a nightly curfew would make it easier to police stage four restrictions.</p> <p>But this appears to be incorrect, with the <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/i-was-never-consulted-police-did-not-request-victorian-curfew-20200910-p55u7j.html">Police Commissioner saying he was never consulted on the issue</a> and was only alerted to the curfew hours before it was put into place on 2 August 2020.</p> <p>Melburnians continue to face another several weeks of night curfews, although from this weekend, the night curfew will be changed to start at 9pm.</p> <p>Pressure to remove the curfew</p> <p>With many questioning the difference an hour could possibly make in terms of ‘stopping the spread of the virus’, Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Professor Brett Sutton has also admitted that the curfew was not his idea, although staying on Uncle Dan’s good side by saying he is not against it.</p> <p>“The curfew came in as part of the state of disaster, for example, it wasn’t a state of emergency requirement,” Professor Sutton told the media.</p> <p>Many believe overnight curfews are excessive and unnecessary, considering that under Stage 4 restrictions people in Melbourne are banned from travelling more than once per day and further than 5km to go shopping or to exercise, with very few exceptions, and must wear a face mask when in public.</p> <p>But despite mounting pressure to lift the curfew, Mr Andrews is adamant it will remain in place until 26 October 2020.</p> <p>Covid-19 fines exceed $1 million in Victoria</p> <p>According to data released last month, the curfew has also been a steady revenue earner for the state, with dozens of people fined for being out of home after 8pm, including a man who was <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/police-shoot-through-car-window-of-man-who-allegedly-ignored-curfew/">involved in a serious incident with Police who shot through his car window.</a></p> <p>In one night alone, <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/police-shoot-through-car-window-of-man-who-allegedly-ignored-curfew/">shortly after the curfew was introduced, police issued 43 fines</a>. So far, <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/state-governments-collect-millions-in-covid-fines/">Victoria has collected a total of more than $1 million </a>in fines for Covid-19 public health breaches.</p> <p>Federal Government intervention</p> <p>In the meantime, the Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt has urged Daniel Andrews to lift the curfew, considering that it is not based on health advice, and has also asked the government to be transparent about its virus modelling.</p> <p>Whether his federal standing will actually make a difference is difficult to determine.</p> <p>Earlier this week, Prime Minister Scott Morrison <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-10/annastacia-palaszczuk-scott-morrison-bullying-covid-19/12649008">found himself accused </a>by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk of bullying when he intervened in the case of a woman from the ACT who had been refused permission from Queensland Health Authorities to attend her father’s funeral. At the same time, a family with four children had been told that only one child could visit their dying father in a Brisbane Hospital.</p> <p>While the funeral issue was eventually resolved and the  family has since been allowed to visit, under strict conditions, there have been other reports of the harsh impact of the strict Queensland border closures on people in Northern New South Wales, with some being <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/twins-die-after-delay-in-border-exemption/">denied access to medical care</a>, and many families separated because of work and other commitments.</p> <p>The fact remains that at some point the state governments  have got to put sensible measures in place to deal with Covid-19.</p> <p>Medical experts have been saying for a long time that we will have to learn to ‘live with’ the coronavirus for many months to come, which means that governments should be considering ways to isolate, contain and manage virus outbreaks, rather than simply revert to severe laws lockdowns which are not only beginning to take a toll on people’s <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-mental-health/">mental and emotional wellbeing</a>, but have all but brought the economy to a standstill.</p> <p>This is a very real and complex issue that needs to be addressed so that Australia can start to move forward, and give people back their basic democratic freedoms and safeguards.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/covid-lockdown-victorian-premier-may-have-lied-about-curfew-advice/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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“World’s Greatest Daddy”: Evil dad’s twisted message after killings

<p>A monstrous father who stalked and murdered his two children as they cowered under a desk left a suicide note blaming his estranged wife for his cowardly crime.</p> <p>John Edwards, 67, killed his daughter Jennifer Edwards, 13, and his son Jack, 15 in West Pennant Hills in Sydney’s north-west on July 5, 2018.</p> <p>The children were found “crumpled together” under Jack’s bedroom desk with multiple gunshot wounds.</p> <p>Edwards then committed suicide at his rented home near Normanhurst on the night of the murders, with investigators later stumbling across a USB-stick near his body containing a note for the mother of his children, Olga.</p> <p>Before shooting himself dead, the psychotic killer also hung a “World’s Greatest Daddy” shirt on a chest of drawers at the end of his bed.</p> <p>“Olga you may scream out what has John done when the reality is what has Olga done,” the three-page suicide letter began, the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/truecrimeaustralia/police-courts/you-may-scream-what-has-john-done-evil-dads-suicide-note-after-child-slayings/news-story/1367b0ef8700a7ba3f4ed3d6e7ed7ae8" target="_blank">Daily Telegraph</a> reports.</p> <p>“None of this had to happen had you been a halfway normal person.”</p> <p>Only six months after the crime occurred, Olga took her own life.</p> <p>An inquest into the deaths began last week and NSW Coroners Court heard Edwards had “a propensity for domestic violence”, including physical and psychological assaults against the women in his life and his children.</p> <p>His ex-partner’s came forward, with one saying he wasn’t physically violent towards her but was “controlling”.</p> <p>Another said he was “unbalanced and a narcissist”.</p> <p>Some of his controlling behaviours including forcing them to wear lipstick and mini skirts, and giving them the silent treatment for weeks.</p> <p>He also used to keep a tight hold on finances.</p> <p>Including the two he murdered, Edwards had 10 children to seven partners.</p> <p>He treated two of his former partners lives and gave another rat poison, while his other kids recounted being beaten with a belt and cattle whip.</p> <p>Edwards was given a licence to shoot rifles and pistols in June 2017 after NSW Firearms Registry staff used a police database report that had failed to pick up several matters related to domestic violence.</p>

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Parents receive $5 million over bungled baby birth

<p><span>A couple in Perth will keep their $5.2 million in damages after their child suffered severe and lifelong brain injuries during birth after a court challenge.</span><br /><br /><span>It has been revealed that during Cooper Ellis' birth at Bentley Hospital in August 2009, doctor Hamza Amira repeatedly tried to use an instrumental delivery, specifically one using vacuum extraction devices.</span><br /><br /><span>Cooper was eventually delivered via a combination of techniques.</span><br /><br /><span>However it was during the birthing process he was deprived of oxygen and his heart rate flatlined.</span><br /><br /><span>The young boy required resuscitation and also suffered other injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>His parents Chris Ellis and Michelle Hoglin launched legal action against the East Metropolitan Health Service and claimed that Cooper's injuries were a result of the horrifying circumstances of his birth.</span><br /><br /><span>WA District Court Judge Michael Gething sided with the family in 2018, saying Dr Amira's negligence caused Cooper's birth injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>He also acknowledged that his subsequent developmental and cognitive impairments were due to the birthing process.</span><br /><br /><span>The EMHS took the case to the WA Court of Appeal, but on Thursday the application was thrown out.</span><br /><br /><span>The appeal judges said the birth was "prolonged and difficult".</span><br /><br /><span>"(Cooper) did not take his first breath until five minutes after birth and underwent resuscitation for 20 minutes," they said.</span><br /><br /><span>The infant did not start moving his legs until an hour after birth, the judge added.</span><br /><br /><span>Slater and Gordon principal lawyer Jeffrey Potter said in a statement the firm was pleased to have assisted the family to succeed with the complex case.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Potter said Cooper's parents were relieved their "long and hard-fought battle" was finally over.</span><br /><br /><span>Now they will continue to focus on their 11-year-old son's ongoing care.</span><br /><br /><span>The $5.2 million will go towards ensuring Cooper has the support he will need for the rest of his life.</span></p>

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The serious crime that has spiked during COVID-19

<p>Public tipoffs about online child sexual exploitation material have surged during the coronavirus pandemic, with authorities to say, statistically, every Australian would know an abuser.</p> <p>Reports made by members of the public to the Australian Centre of Counter Child Exploitation (ACCCE) increased by 122 per cent as the country went into coronavirus lockdowns through April, May and June.</p> <p>Only last week, over nine men faced court after Australian Federal Police (AFP) investigated against child exploitation. </p> <p>Speaking to the ABC, the coordinator of AFP forensics in NSW, Nathan Green, said people were spending more time online and meant offenders were spending more time with potential victims.</p> <p>"The restrictions that COVID has brought in have resulted in families being locked up at home, and if in that family there happens to be an abuser it's fairly apparent what's going to happen," he said.</p> <p>ACCCE has received 21,000 reports in the 12 months to July 2020, last year the number was 14,000 during the same time period.</p> <p>Jennifer Garcia, a digital forensic examiner with the AFP, has never been busier, issuing back-to-back warrants around the clock in recent weeks.</p> <p>In a single investigation conducted by Ms Garcia’s team has resulted in 40 children in NSW being rescued from abusive situations.</p> <p>"They were children in direct harm, being sexually, physically or emotionally abused, or a combination of all three," she said.</p> <p>In any given month the AFP’s digital forensics team in NSW could be dealing with 30 to 40 active investigations.</p>

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Police officer who endangered domestic violence victim wins appeal

<p>A Queensland Court has <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/sep/01/queensland-police-officer-who-leaked-address-of-domestic-violence-victim-has-conviction-overturned">set aside the conviction</a> of a Police Officer who hacked into the State’s confidential database, and then gave the address of a domestic violence victim to his ‘mate’, the woman’s abusive former partner.</p> <p>Senior Constable Neil Punchard has had his conviction for computer hacking offences overturned after he was initially <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/police-officer-who-endangered-domestic-violence-victim-avoids-prison/">sentenced to a two month suspended prison sentence</a> – meaning a conviction was recorded against his name but he did not have to spend time behind bars.</p> <p>Officer Punchard, who pleaded guilty to nine <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/section-308h-of-the-crimes-act-computer-hacking-and-high-tech-offences/">computer hacking offences</a> and was sentenced in 2019, has won an <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/services/appeals/">appeal against the severity of his sentence</a> by having his conviction set aside and, instead, being ordered to undertake 140 hours of community service without the recording of a conviction.</p> <p>In New South Wales, any order which contains community service must be accompanied by a criminal conviction, but the situation in Queensland is different in so far as a court may order community service without recording a conviction.</p> <p><strong>The story so far</strong></p> <p>Mr Punchard’s case highlighted the misuse of the state’s QPrime database, which a recent investigation found has been systemically accessed by officers without authorisation.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Mr Punchard’s actions have had serious consequences for his victim Julie* who lived in fear of her former partner because he had threatened to kill her as well as strap bombs to their two children and blow them up as “martyrs”.</p> <p>He was a friend of Mr Punchard, who when handing over Juiie’s address to his mate quipped: “Just tell her you know where she lives and leave it at that. Lol. She will flip.”</p> <p>In a subsequent message, Mr Punchard wrote: “The police will contact you if they want to speak to you – then you give them my name. That is your ‘get-out-of-jail-free’ card.”</p> <p>Julie had to relocate her family after her address was leaked, and has since spent several years battling the Police force for compensation with a long and drawn out battle through the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT).</p> <p><strong>Victim’s ongoing battle for compensation</strong></p> <p>Last year, the Queensland Police Force (QPS) <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/police-ordered-to-pay-for-endangering-domestic-violence-victim/">was ordered to pay Julie compensation</a> but it was revealed earlier this year that the legal terms of the settlement presented to Julie meant that she was open to liability of for any future action brought by third-parties, including police officers and other people whose details were accessed by Neil Punchard.</p> <p>It’s understood the clause could also make her liable for any wrongful dismissal case brought against the police by Neil Punchard. Negotiations around the settlement are still continuing, which is shameful in itself given that her fight for compensation has already taken a number of years.</p> <p>What’s also deplorable is the <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/system-protects-police-officer-who-endangered-victim/">determination with which QPS has fought the case </a>of an officer who clearly – by his own eventual admission of guilt – did the wrong thing. QPS has spent thousands of dollars on top notch legal representation, while the victim Julie, has represented herself.</p> <p>Despite the media attention and the political discussion the case has generated, the ongoing saga shows a disgraceful and problematic attitude in police response to incidents of family violence.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Suspended on full pay</strong></p> <p>The fact that Mr Punchard’s conviction has now been set aside and replaced by a non-conviction order could mean the QPS will allow him to keep his job. He was stood down from frontline duty in 2018 and suspended in 2019 on full pay.</p> <p>The controversial decision is likely to receive backlash from around the country.</p> <p>District court judge Craig Chowdhury said he took into account Punchard’s age, 54, and his likelihood of gaining other employment if sacked from the police service.</p> <p>“There was no specific evidence before me that a conviction would result in the appellant’s dismissal from the police service, but that was the implication made by the solicitor for the appellant in the court below.</p> <p>“Logically a conviction for a serious offence would result in an officer’s dismissal.”</p> <p><strong>Sentencing considerations</strong></p> <p>In deciding not to record a conviction, Judge Chowdhury also took into account the serious nature of the offences; that Punchard had already been disciplined by the police service; that Punchard had some symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder at the time; and his “otherwise good character attested to by … referees, including senior police officers”.</p> <p>There are calls for Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll (who has so far remained steadfastly silent on the issue) to terminate officer Punchard now the full court process has concluded.</p> <p>In a statement the QPS acknowledged “that a failure to discharge prescribed responsibilities in an ethical, professional and lawful manner erodes public trust and confidence in the QPS, and that  “the unlawful or improper use of information can have significant consequences and impacts for those individuals whose privacy have been breached, and has expressed sincere regret.”</p> <p>But at this point, Mr Punchard’s future with the force remains unclear, which is cold comfort for his victim and indeed any Queensland resident putting their faith in the police force, because despite breaking the law, and putting another person’s life in jeopardy, the officer has faced minimal consequences.</p> <p><em>Written by Sonia Hickey and Ugur Nedim. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/police-officer-who-endangered-domestic-violence-victim-wins-appeal/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a> </em></p>

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58-year-old man arrested for dangerous driving

<p>A 58-year old driver has been charged with a number of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/traffic/offences/">serious driving offences</a> after the conclusion of an investigation relating to a collision that occurred earlier this year.</p> <p>Emergency services were called to the intersection of Memorial Avenue and the T-Way in Liverpool, south-western Sydney at 11am on Saturday, 8 February 2020 after a collision between a Toyota Avalon and a bus.</p> <p>The collision is reported to have caused serious injuries to the Toyota driver’s two passengers – a 50-year old woman and 12-year old girl – who were trapped in the vehicle for a period of time, and later hospitalised in a critical condition.</p> <p>The 62-year old bus driver and two of his passengers – a 40-year old woman and 12-year old boy – were treated for minor injuries.</p> <p>The Toyota driver was determined by police to be at fault and has been charged with a range of driving offences, including dangerous driving occasioning grievous bodily harm, driving in a dangerous manner, negligent driving occasioning GBH and proceeding through a red light.</p> <p>The man appeared in <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/about/offices/liverpool/">Liverpool Local Court</a>, Monday 7 September 2020.</p> <p><em>Written by Ugur Nedim. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/the-offence-of-dangerous-driving-occasioning-grievous-bodily-harm-in-nsw/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a> </em></p>

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Paramedic dragged down road in “rage car attack”

<p><span>A private paramedic is slowly recovering after suffering serious injuries from being dragged 40 metres down the road on a car bonnet.</span><br /><br /><span>The 54-year-old was carried on the bonnet of a Ford Falcon XR8 before he fell to the ground after he attempted to break up a fight between a man and a woman in Western Sydney.</span><br /><br /><span>He had intervened in a heated row between a 44-year-old man and a 32-year-old woman, who are known to each other, when the man returned to his vehicle and drove at him.</span><br /><br /><span>After the injured man fell from the vehicle, the driver sped off.</span><br /><br /><span>The man responsible is now facing a raft of serious charges over the alleged road rage attack.</span><br /><br /><span>Emergency services were called to assist the injured paramedic on a raceway at Eastern Creek around 3.15 pm yesterday.</span><br /><br /><span>The alleged victim was taken to Westmead Hospital where he remains in a serious but stable condition.</span><br /><br /><span>Police located his Ford sedan stopped on Ettalong Road in Greystanes and attempted to pull it over, but it took off.</span><br /><br /><span>Authorities attempted to chase the vehicle but had to call off the pursuit due to the car's manner of driving.</span><br /><br /><span>PolAir were called in to look for the car.</span><br /><br /><span>It was tracked to a car park on Distribution Road in Seven Hills.</span><br /><br /><span>The driver allegedly ran from the vehicle but was chased down by police and arrested.</span><br /><br /><span>He has now been charged with a range of serious offences, including stalk/intimidate intend fear physical harm, common assault, dangerous driving occasioning grievous bodily harm and using an offensive weapon to prevent lawful detention.</span></p>

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Facebook blocks terminally ill man from live streaming his death

<p>Facebook said it would block the livestream of a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition who wanted to broadcast his death on the social media platform. </p> <p>Alain Cocq recently announced that he was refusing all food, drink and medicine after President Emmanuel Macron declined his request for euthanasia.</p> <p>The 57-year-old suffers from a rare medical condition which causes the walls of his arteries to stick together.</p> <p>Cocq believed he had less than a week to live and said he would broadcast his death from Saturday morning.</p> <p>"The road to deliverance begins and believe me, I am happy," he wrote on Facebook shortly after midnight in a post announcing he had "finished his last meal".</p> <p>"I know the days ahead are going to be difficult but I have made my decision and I am calm," he added.</p> <p>Facebook has been heavily criticised over the way it monitors content and said it was against their rules to portray suicide.</p> <p>"Although we respect  (Cocq's) decision to want to draw attention to this complex question, following expert advice we have taken measures to prevent the live broadcast on Alain's account," a Facebook spokesman told AFP.</p> <p>"Our rules do not allow us to show suicide attempts." </p> <p>Cocq is trying to gather supporters saying: "Facebook is blocking my video broadcast until September 8."</p> <p>"It is up to you now," he said in a message to supporters before giving out Facebook's French address "so you can let them know what you think about their methods of restricting free speech".</p> <p>"There will be a back-up within 24 hours" to run the video, he added.</p> <p>Cocq had asked Macron for permission after he wanted to die in peace by taking a substance, but the president refused, saying it was not allowed under French law.</p> <p>Cocq has used his plight to draw attention to the situation of terminally ill patients in France who are unable to be allowed to die in line with their wishes.</p> <p>"Because I am not above the law, I am not able to comply with your request," Macron said in a letter to Cocq, which the patient published on his Facebook page.</p> <p>"I cannot ask anyone to go beyond our current legal framework... Your wish is to request active assistance in dying which is not currently permitted in our country."</p>

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Oatland parents forgive man responsible for killing their children

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The two families that were torn apart after four children were killed have decided there are no place for revenge and bitterness in their hearts.</p> <p>Eight-year-old Sienna Abdallah was killed alongside siblings Angelina, 12, and Antony, 13, and their cousin Veronique Sakr, 13, when Samuel William Davidson’s ute mounted the kerb on February 1.</p> <p>Samuel Davidson pleaded guilty to four counts of manslaughter.</p> <p>The siblings’ parents, Danny and Leila Abdallah spoke to <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/nsw/parents-forgive-the-man-responsible-for-killing-their-children-in-tragic-oatlands-crash-c-1290233" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>7News</em></a> about the guilty verdict.</p> <p>“We welcome the plea, the guilty plea, so the good thing is we’re not going to be dragged through court,” Danny said.</p> <p>“I don’t want anger, bitterness and revenge in my household today.”</p> <p>The family have remarkably forgiven Davidson, drawing on their faith for strength throughout the ordeal.</p> <p>“We are all broken and there is obviously some justice to be served,” Leila said.</p> <p>“He made a mistake and there are consequences for every mistake you make.”</p> <p>Danny agrees, saying: “Forgiveness and justice go hand in hand and you can’t have one without the other.”</p> <p>A total of 34 charges were laid against Davidson with all but seven of them dropped which left four counts of manslaughter and three counts related to three other children injured in the crash.</p> <p>Danny has urged families to love your children.</p> <p>“Hug your kids tight, love them, treasure every moment,” says Danny.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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"Outrageous" demand imposed on sexual assault victims

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/letusspeak-campaign-outrageous-demand-victoria-government-is-making-of-rape-victim/news-story/1be4d840ccf8b17b651368335a3aaf5c" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>News.com.au</em></a> and <em>Herald Sun</em> exclusively launched the #LetUsSpeak campaign after revealing shocking new laws in Victoria about rape victims.</p> <p>Rape survivors are currently silenced under the state's new victim gag-laws and are being ordered by courts to seek out their offender's views and input if they want to be exempt from the silencing laws. </p> <p>These new laws were quietly introduced in February this year and the laws gag all sexual assault survivors in cases that have resulted in a guilty verdict.</p> <p>The only way to be exempt from these laws is if the survivor returns to court and is granted a court order that allows them to be identified.</p> <p>Maggie* – one of the rape survivors who spearheaded the #LetUsSpeak campaign – has been told by the Victorian County Court that she first must seek the views of the man who raped her before she applies for the exemption.</p> <p>“My first reaction is to tell them to just forget it. I don’t want anything to do with it if that’s what they are going to make me do. It infuriates me that he has a say. They don’t have the right to involve him.”</p> <p>Maggie’s father repeatedly molested and raped her from age 8, before he murdered Maggie’s older step-sister when she reported him to police for abusing her too.</p> <p>“If I have to ask his permission to tell my story now, then I’ll just say ‘no’. And I’ll hate the law forever because yet again they have deterred me and let me down.”</p> <p>“It gives him all the power. It takes me back to when I was a child I had to shut up and do what he said.</p> <p>Maggie’s lawyer Michael Bradley, managing partner of Marque Lawyers, said the laws had created “an illogical incoherent mess.”</p> <p>“We were shocked when the initial response we got from the court was that they wanted us to contact the perpetrator to get his consent or views on whether our client should be allowed to identify herself.</p> <p>“That’s patently outrageous and even having to let our client know that was the court’s attitude was a traumatic experience for her.</p> <p>“It speaks to an almost complete lack of understanding of what the priorities should be in these situations.”</p> <p>Under the new gag-laws, Maggie's real name is supressed and her perpetrator also remained unidentified as a default to protect her identity. The family connection makes it impossible to name one person without identifying the other.</p> <p>“If his victim had been a stranger then his identity would not currently be suppressed” said Mr Bradley. “He is currently receiving an accidental benefit of the law.”</p> <p>Any court order allowing Maggie to be named would reverse that, enabling media to also identify him by extension too.</p> <p>“He doesn’t want anyone to know he’s a convicted paedophile” said Maggie.</p> <p>“He killed my sister because her actions threatened to expose him [as one]. When he [murdered her] I asked him ‘why did you do this?’ He said it’s because she was going to ruin the family name.”</p> <p>“He is to shut up now. He has been found guilty of the crime and he doesn’t get a say in my life now. This is my time. My voice. My story."</p> <p>The Government has announced that they will amend the gag-law by the end of the year after an outpouring of community outrage.</p> <p>According to the press statement: “The Victorian Government will move urgently to respond to victim-survivors who have raised concerns about their ability to share their stories.</p> <p>“Attorney-General Jill Hennessy announced today that reforms will be fast-tracked to streamline processes for victim-survivors who wish to speak out.</p> <p>“This change will mean the majority of victims will no longer require a court order to tell their stories if they have given informed consent to being identified.</p> <p>“The Government is developing urgent amendments to be introduced to parliament this year. The changes will be progressed in close consultation with victim-survivors and those who work with them.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Jamie Durie in million-dollar legal battle

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Jamie Durie is taking legal action against a property developed based in Melbourne, as he claims his company is owed almost $1 million for a "conceptual bespoke design" for a luxury hotel project in Queensland.</p> <p>Durie Design Pty Ltd, which Durie is the sole director of, is going against Chiodo Corporation Operations Pty Ltd over an alleged breach of contract relating to property design concepts and landscape designs created for the Port Douglas Fairmont Hotel project.</p> <p>The developer claims that the designs were not up to scratch and needed significant changes.</p> <p>Durie Design Company was employed in December 2019 to come up with In an affidavit filed in the Victorian Supreme Court, Durie claims he's owed $905,374.18 for the conceptual design and other work as part of Phase 1 of the hotel project.</p> <p>Durie has received $270,132.33 for the work but claims he has not had invoices paid since February, despite promises that the payments would be made.</p> <p>He says he wasn't notified of any issues with the invoices before Chiodo Corporation Operations filed a Notice of Dispute on May 26th 2020.</p> <p>His company hit back quickly, issuing the company a Revocation of Licence to use or keep the design concepts.</p> <p>Paul Chiodo, director of Chiodo Corporation Operations, questioned the quality and value of the work done by Durie Design for the project and said that Durie Design had “claimed and been paid more than it was contractually entitled.”</p> <p>“The vast majority of the documentation provided by the plaintiff as at 10 April 2020 did not meet the defendant’s requirements and required significant amendment to meet the requirements of the Accor Group,” Chiodo said in his affidavit.</p> <p>“It was of very little value in terms of what was to be provided under the contract …. notwithstanding that the defendant has paid to the plaintiff $270,132.40 under the contract to date, such representing approximately 20 per cent of the Phase 1 contracted sum.”</p> <p>On Friday, the parties have since made positive steps towards resolving their dispute.</p> <p>“The matter is currently scheduled in the Supreme Court of Victoria, however the parties have had positive and productive discussions and are working on the details of a settlement agreement and an expanded engagement that will see Durie Design not only continue its role with the Fairmont Port Douglas Hotel, but also expand its partnership to other hotel projects in the Chiodo portfolio,” they said in a joint statement.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Zoom class captures terrifying moment student was held hostage

<p><span>An online Zoom class captured the terrifying moment a young woman was held hostage in a home invasion.</span><br /><br /><span>The scary ordeal took place during a live English lesson that was being broadcast during Zoom due to the strict coronavirus restrictions placed on citizens in the State of Durango, northwest of Mexico City.</span><br /><br /><span>The horrifying footage showed Ariana Sofia Hernandez Aldama on the left hand side of her screen with her hands tied and her face covered.</span><br /><br /><span>Throughout the video Ms Aldama remains motionless so as not to egg on the intruder.</span><br /><br /><span>Her fellow classmates watched on as the man moved silently in the background wearing a baseball hat.</span><br /><br /><span>The man lowers the camera so his movements can no longer be recorded.</span><br /><br /><span>The suspect then allegedly stole a set of keys from inside Ms Aldama’s home and used them to steal a car.</span><br /><br /><span>A number of the girl’s horrified classmates contacted emergency services to report the crime but by the time anyone arrived at Ms Aldama’s house, the attacker had already fled in the stolen vehicle.</span><br /><br /><span>While Ms Aldama was physically unharmed, there is no doubt she will be haunted forever by the incident and has undergone counselling to help recover from the invasion.</span><br /><br /><span>The Durango Prosecutor's Office reported the alleged perpetrator has been identified, and they are working to find his whereabouts.</span><br /><br /><span>The authorities also maintained that the vehicle stolen by the assailant has already been recovered.</span></p>

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Proof that no-one knows how to merge properly

<p>It seems like the easiest thing in the world ­– yet how many times have you heard the irate complaint: “No-one knows how to merge in this country!”</p> <p>Well, a recent online quiz from the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads has shown that plaintive cry might hold more than a seed of truth – as a staggering number of people got it completely wrong.  </p> <p>The Main Roads department posted the image shown here and asked drivers the simple question: Which car has the right of way when two lanes become one?</p> <p>The image clearly depicts two vehicles driving in adjacent lanes separated with a broken white line.</p> <p>The orange car on the left-hand side is slightly ahead of the blue car, as the left-hand lane ends parallel to a “form one lane” sign.</p> <p>“The two cars need to merge into one lane,” asks the quiz. “Who goes first?”</p> <p>Buckle up, because here are some of the responses.</p> <p>Some respondents were convinced the car with its own lane directly ahead had right of way. “Blue one because it’s for overtaking and that yellow one will just slow down blue car and flow of traffic,” one said.</p> <p>“Blue car, orange needs to give way to your right!” another person wrote.</p> <p>“Orange has to give way to the blue car since it is merging to the right lane. Before filtering, it is the orange car's duty to check proper clearance and give sufficient signal time for the blue car to react,” another wrote. While a fourth driver described it as “the most confusing rule of all”.</p> <p>But most insisted the car travelling ahead had the right of way. The Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads gave clarity as debate continued to rage.</p> <p>“When lines of traffic merge, you must give way to any vehicle that's ahead of you,” same the response. “Lines of traffic refers to adjacent rows of vehicles that don't have a lane separation line between them.</p> <p>“Here the blue car must give way to the orange.”</p> <p>So how did you go? Are you on the same (correct) page as the Qld department, or are you likely to risk the wrong move – and maybe cop some righteous abuse – next time you get behind the wheel?</p> <p><strong>IMAGE:</strong> Qld Gov</p>

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New evidence could clear Kathleen Folbigg of killing her daughters

<p>Fresh genetic evidence which raises new questions about the conviction of Kathleen Folbigg for killing all four of her children have been unveiled.</p> <p>The new genetic findings, discovered by a team of 27 scientists from Australia, Denmark, Italy, Canada, the United States and France have been peer-reviewed and published in top international cardiology journal, Europace.</p> <p>The scientists studied a never-before reported genetic mutation found in Folbigg’s children Sarah and Laura that they inherited from her.</p> <p>Scientists in Denmark, who carried out biochemical experiments say the results show the mutation, known as the CALM2 G114R variant is “likely pathogenic” and “likely” caused the girls’ deaths.</p> <p>And despite the boys not being the focus of their experiments, the team also discovered a different genetic mutation found in Folbigg’s two sons, Patrick and Caleb, that could explain their deaths too.</p> <p>Senior author of the recent paper Professor Peter Schwartz said: "The significance of our evidence is that there is a strong possibility that the two female Folbigg children died a natural death, due to a lethal arrhythmia favoured by the presence in these two children of a disease-causing mutation inherited from the mother.</p> <p>"This mutation causes a 'Calmodulinopathy' — an extremely severe arrhythmic disease that can manifest in three main clinical variants, all predisposing to sudden cardiac death in infancy and childhood, or also later in life."</p> <p>Professor Schwartz added: "The two girls with the Calmodulin mutation fit the pattern well known in genetic disorders and — more likely than not — they both died a natural arrhythmic death due to their disease.</p> <p>"It goes without saying that this important finding does not explain the death of the two boys.</p> <p>"That's another story and I cannot comment on it."</p>

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