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How to avoid common financial scams

<p>Australians aged 40-60 face an increased risk of being involved in cyber-scams, here's a few tips on how to avoid becoming a victim. </p> <p><span>There is an increased surge when it comes to financial security concerns online and beyond. Even Hollywood is recognising the rise of these cyber-scams with the tv show CSI: Cyber on Channel 10. Financial scams and more are being explored with actress Patricia Arquette leading a team of FBI investigators to keep the internet safer for all.</span></p> <p>Many of us are finding it difficult to navigate this often-confusing terrain to keep money we have worked hard for safe. With scams designed to infiltrate your security from every point of entry - your phones, your mail and the internet - it is important for consumers to be aware of integral rules for maintaining financial security. </p> <p>The Australian Consumer and Competition Commission (ACCC) offers sound advice for avoiding the pitfalls of unwise investments and scams. On its SCAMWatch website, the ACCC offers users a useful online resource.</p> <p>Have you seen or experienced something that doesn’t feel quite right? Help others by reporting it.<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.scamwatch.gov.au/content/index.phtml/tag/SCAMwatchRadar" target="_blank">The SCAMWatch Radar</a><span> </span>is a section for reporting scams and has a page featuring stories from victims involved in a vast array of dodgy dealings.</p> <p>The ACCC's golden rules for safe dealings are simple yet effective. Take them on board and share them with friends and family to help those you love also avoid scams and fraudulent operators.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Be realistic about the offer:</strong><span> </span>If it looks too good to be true it probably is.</li> <li><strong>Seek independent advice from legal counsel or your business planner:</strong><span> </span>From large investments to odd commitments made online, independent advice can make all the difference.</li> <li><strong>Never agree to an investment on the spot:</strong><span> </span>Take the time to carry out your due diligence and contact your independent professionals.</li> <li><strong>Don't ever send money or share your credit card details with people and sites that you don't know or trust:</strong><span> </span>If they're not known to you, do not proceed to pay an online vendor or contact of spurious origin.</li> <li><strong>Keep your bankcards safe and maintain a good ATM safety regime:</strong><span> </span>With cameras and other scamming devices built into many publicly accessible ATM's, it is best to cover your hands while entering your PIN. Also, never keep a copy of your PIN inside your wallet.</li> <li><strong>Remember that you can always contact the ACCC, ASIC and your state-based office of fair-trading:</strong><span> </span>If you suspect that something is awry, make contact with the authorities and crosscheck your experiences with them. </li> </ol> <p><strong>Identity Theft<br /></strong>It sounds like something from a movie (actress Melissa McCarthy gave it a funny take in her 2013 movie<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO12W35DpsQ" target="_blank">Identity Thief</a> yet in real life it isn’t quite so hilarious). It is difficult to believe that one of the most common and invasive scams is identity theft. This involves dedicated scammers targeting your finances and personal security. It is a dangerous process often resulting in depleted bank accounts and strange financial events being attributed to the victim.</p> <p>To help avoid identity theft, always keep a close eye on where your personal details are entered, and only give out your personal information if it is necessary and if you trust the recipient. The ACCC advises that people shred or cut-up their old bills and personal documents, no matter how insignificant. Really don’t want to get a paper shredder? At least reduce the risk by cutting or tearing up bills with personal details and putting them out in different sections of the rubbish on different days. Or take them in to work to use the paper shredder there. By using a paper shredder your paper documents will not be able to be accessed by scammers. The ACCC watchdog also advises consumers to regularly check their credit report and double-check bank statements for odd purchases.</p> <p><strong>Money transfers<br /></strong>Be wary of sending any money in order to 'claim' or 'win' more money, as this is often a false promise. Be aware of chain letter systems or pyramid schemes; these are often pitched as 'get-rich-quick' systems. In addition to real-world scams, there are many online and phone based deceptions designed to elicit your banking details, so please be aware that any contentious purchase or subscription (mostly online) can come back to bite you. Love entering great competitions? Ensure you only enter on trusted sites.<a target="_blank"></a></p> <p><strong>Phone and Mobile Scams<br /></strong>Whether it's a text from an unknown number, or a seemingly innocuous chat with an over friendly or inquisitive call centre operator based overseas, there are many grifts that target consumers over the phone.</p> <p>Though many telemarketing calls are still legitimate, it is relatively simple to separate the wheat from the chaff by asking the speaker to provide you with their name and the name of the company they represent. Note these details and proceed to finish the conversation. If they say they are calling from the tax office or even a mobile phone company you are with say you’ll call them back through the number you know to be correct from the official website. If they baulk it is an instant sign they can not be trusted so get off the phone immediately. Do not agree to any changes or deals from just a phone call, unless you can definitely trust the caller or verify their connection to you. Unless from a veritable source, never provide the caller with your credit card details or even mobile phone number or email. </p> <p>Identifying mobile SMS and MMS scams are easier to spot: phone numbers beginning with '190' are dubious, as are SMS and MMS messages from numbers beginning with the digits '19'. </p> <p><strong>Online Security<br /></strong>This is an incredibly pertinent issue, given that the majority of our modern communications and transactions take place on the Internet. Even major banking, security and governmental institutions are capable of being penetrated by hackers or being copied by fraudsters. However, with a few simple tips, you can safely browse the web without worrying about breaches of security. </p> <p>Spam and analytic filtering software is the best starting point to limit your exposure and offer protection from those dreaded cyber-thugs. Get an anti-virus program for your operating system and let it manage your security in a simple and easy-to-interpret manner. If you can, add a few extensions to your browser and limit those nasty analytics and advertising bots from peeping into your browsing. <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ghostery.com/en/" target="_blank">Ghostery</a> is a great free resource to block trackers, and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere" target="_blank">HTTPS Everywhere</a><span> </span>is an advantageous application that encrypts your communication. In doubt? Next time you get your computer serviced or have a professional update your computer system speak to them about what you need to install to help protect yourself and your bank balance.</p> <p>In terms of browsing, never enter your personal details in pop-ups or sidebar advertisements. Be wary as many of these look like a regular system warning. Similarly, do not follow links within spam emails or communications from unknown sources. Harmful programs can be automatically downloaded to your computer without you knowing, and the end result can be disastrous. Try not to access any sensitive sites in a public Internet cafe or library, and make sure that your passwords are case sensitive, inventive and use different passwords for all of your accounts.</p> <p>Financial security is a major issue for all of us, requiring a good deal of vigilance and attention to detail. With a bit of experience and these simple tips, you'll easily be able to distinguish the scam from the genuine offer. </p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/financial-planning/how-to-avoid-common-financial-scams.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Police crackdown on little known road rule that could cost you $448

<p>Police are getting stricter on a road rule most people aren’t even aware they’re breaking.</p> <p>Authorities in Northern NSW have started a campaign to increase public awareness on level crossings.</p> <p>In the Tamworth area, law enforcement is keeping a keen look out for risky motorist behaviour around railway crossings.</p> <p>Residents living in nearby suburbs were informed of the enforcement period through letterbox drops.</p> <p>Electronic billboards are also now in the area, reminding motorists to take care when driving through level crossings.</p> <p>In a new initiative to raise awareness for road safety relating to level crossings, NSW law enforcement are cracking down on motorists who do not leave a 20 metre distance when stopping at train tracks.</p> <p>While stopping at flashing lights and stop signs at train tracks is not something on driver’s minds and something we rarely even think twice about – there are motorist’s putting themselves and others in danger by ignoring these rules.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824923/ra.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/99f4cced27374654964d109c18905c52" /></p> <p>Greg Rolph, the Traffic and Highway Patrol Command’s acting Assistant Commissioner told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/on-the-road/nsw-police-cracking-down-on-bad-drivers-at-level-crossings/news-story/e0f3a62dc28386d3320baa1e99bdbaf4" target="_blank">news.com.au</a> </em>that drivers who ignore any of the rules are putting themselves in an extreme amount of danger.</p> <p>“In the past month, there have been two incidents where vehicles are queuing too close to the tracks, forcing the drivers of approaching passenger trains to apply emergency brakes,” Mr Rolph explained.</p> <p>“In one case, a boom gate came down on the cabin of a truck, and it was only good fortune that the vehicle involved was able to clear the tracks before trains appeared.”</p> <p>Police will keep an eye out for motorists who queue over railway tracks, speed near level crossings, disobey flashing lights and stop signs and use their phones when approaching level crossings.</p> <p>Drivers who get caught will be hit with a pricey AUD$448 fine and have three demerit points scraped from their license.</p> <p>Almost 1000 penalty notices for level crossing traffic offences state-wide have been issued in the last two years.</p> <p>“This is why we need to continue running these localised campaigns and reinforce our Train to Stop message to motorists at level crossings,” Mr Rolph said.</p> <p>11 people have died between July 2001 to June 2018 from collisions between trains and vehicles in NSW, the Centre for Road Safety executive director, Bernard Carlon said.</p> <p>“This enforcement operation is all about saving lives and preventing injuries,” Mr Carlon explained.</p> <p>“But we need drivers to be responsible and play their part in reducing trauma at level crossings.”</p>

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Warning: The new Coles scam you need to be aware of

<p>Shoppers have gone absolutely nuts over the new Coles collectables, but customers are being warned of the new scam preying on those collecting the mini figurines.</p> <p>The supermarket giant has caused a frenzy thanks to their Stikeez range of miniature fruits and vegetables, with a select few being “ultra-rare” and coveted, such as the golden banana.</p> <p>The golden banana is in such high demand, they are fetching for more than AUD$20,000 online. With only 100 circulating through stores for customers to get their paws on, it is no wonder fans of the Stikeez range are going crazy over this rare find.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7824921/stikeez-golden.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/61e0f711024e496b92e9c71fd3dd3fff" /></p> <p>With over 25 collectable items, there are an additional five rare Stikeez including metallic Eddie, see-through Brodie, sparkly Cooper, glow in the dark Carlo and the rarest item – Golden Billy Banana.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824922/golden-banana-stikeez.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7692ae91c3054506b047fbc970229a39" /><em>Prices for the Golden Bily Banana has been auctioned for AUD$10,000.</em></p> <p>With rare treats like these, scams are bound to arise. The popularity of the collectable items and the determination to land one of the 100 golden bananas by customers has not gone unnoticed, as it has left fraudulent figurines to be sold to unsuspecting collectors for hefty price tags.</p> <p>Retail Analyst Barry Urquhart told<a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/shoppers-warned-latest-coles-collectables-scam-230506590.html"> <em>7News</em></a> the latest scam is a reminder of the previous tricks pulled during the sale of the extremely popular Little Shop promotion.</p> <p> <img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7824920/stikeez.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/155756ad48a143cdb8f51344c89777fb" /></p> <p>“In all three incarnations of the Stikeez promotion there has been that sort of behaviour arise very quick,” he explained.</p> <p>Coles has urged shoppers of the Stikeez promotion to be diligent when purchasing the rarer items, saying that every golden banana comes with a certificate of authenticity.</p> <p>Would you pay $20,000 for a Coles collectable? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Madeleine McCann mystery at centre of new Netflix documentary

<p>A new documentary on Madeleine McCann is coming out today on Netflix.</p> <p><em>The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann</em> promises a detailed look at the case of McCann, a three-year-old British girl who disappeared from a Portuguese resort in 2007.</p> <p>The true crime documentary, which follows Netflix hits <em>Making A Murderer</em> and <em>The Keepers</em>, features 40 experts and key figures involved in the case.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tBnarCTOiCY" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>"We’re trying to lay out as much detail as we can about the case – and if it could jog someone’s memory in some way then that would be amazing," executive producer Emma Cooper said.</p> <p>"Keeping any search for what happened to Madeleine in the consciousness – particularly globally – is something that's so important. As we show in the documentary, other children are found – so you have to hope."</p> <p>However, the missing child’s parents Gerry and Kate McCann did not participate in the film.</p> <p>"We are aware that Netflix are planning to screen a documentary in March 2019 about Madeleine's disappearance," the pair said in a statement.</p> <p>"We did not see – and still do not see – how this programme will help the search for Madeleine and, particularly given there is an active police investigation, it could potentially hinder it."</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/mar/13/netflix-to-stream-madeleine-mccann-series-after-delays-and-disputes" target="_blank"><em>The Guardian</em></a>, the parents also urged those around them to reject interview offers with Pulse Films, which produced the documentary on behalf of Netflix.</p> <p>In May 2007, Madeleine was reported missing from her holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Alvarez, Portugal. She was <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/a-madeleine-mccann-documentary-is-coming-everything-you-need-to-know" target="_blank">last seen</a> in her bedroom before her parents left to dine with family friends nearby.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8637550/disappearance-of-madeleine-mccann-netflix-doc-pic-maddie-playing-snatched/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a> reported that the documentary explores more theories behind Madeleine’s disappearance. One of the leading explanations is that she was taken by human traffickers and transported to another country.</p> <p>Investigation into the case is still ongoing in the UK.</p> <p>Will you be watching the highly anticipated documentary? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The road rule sparking furious debate: Who has the right of way?

<p>What is perhaps one of the most confusing road rules yet has left some drivers stumped.</p> <p>The Department of Transport in Western Australia posted a graphic to Facebook of three vehicles at an intersection, asking motorists which order each car must go in.</p> <p>The post shows three cars – silver, blue and red – at an uncontrolled three-way intersection.</p> <p>The road has no clear line markings, although each car indicates with arrows which way they intend to travel.</p> <p>The blue vehicle wants to turn right across the silver car’s path who intends to drive straight.</p> <p>A red car also wants to turn right and sits on the opposite side of the road from the silver car. The red car intends to cross the paths of both the silver and the blue car.</p> <p>Many Facebook users believed the silver car had the right of way, insisting the answer is quite obvious.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTransportWAgov%2Fphotos%2Fa.1670878236508284%2F2190591834536919%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="614" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“If anyone doesn't know the answer to this basic question, they should hand their licence back,” one person wrote.  </p> <p>“First - Silver is continuing on the same road. Second- Red turning from the continuing road,” another user said.</p> <p>“Third - Blue. That road is terminating and must wait until the intersection is clear before continuing.”</p> <p>Other motorists made a joke of the quiz, commenting whichever driver went first was simply the quickest.</p> <p>“Silver, red, blue... but because we're in Western Australia all three will go at the same time,” one user wrote.</p> <p>“Depends on who has the bigger vehicle doesn't it?” another comment read.</p> <p>The post amassed over 90 comments from Facebook users around the country, some consisting of confused motorists, others sure of their answers.</p> <p>Transport WA put the matter to rest though.</p> <p>“Great to see so many of you get this one right!” Transport WA wrote.</p> <p>“The order is grey, red and blue. At an uncontrolled three-way intersection, you must give way to all vehicles travelling on the continuing road.”</p> <p>Did you guess the correct vehicle? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Tips and traps when moving in with your children

<p>The Australian Bureau of Statistics tells us that 6.9% of people aged 65+ already live with their children. No doubt many more are actively considering it as an option, but before making the move it’s important to consider the pros and cons.</p> <p>The reasons for moving in with children may vary widely. It could be a financially based decision, helping one or both parties to consolidate their cost of living. For others it may be due to the adult children deciding to offer care for a parent with a physical impairment or illness. On the other side of the coin, it may be driven by the adult children needing the assistance of retired parents in taking care of grandchildren. Think back to the hilarious movie (pictured), Parental Guidance.</p> <p>While there are some obvious benefits to sharing living costs and improving family connections, there are some issues and difficulties that may not be so apparent at the outset. Here are some handy hints on what you need to consider doing to make it a success.</p> <p><strong>The danger of making assumptions</strong></p> <p>The concept of moving in with your children may happen in a number of ways. You might offer to use your own money to build a granny flat on their property or to make renovations or extensions onto their home to accommodate you. Another scenario is for both parties to sell their homes and buy a new property together, which is better suited to shared living.</p> <p>While these arrangements may seem fair and practical for both parties it is vital that great care is taken to protect your financial stake in the venture. While things may start out rosy, the reality is that there can be conflicts, misunderstandings, divorce or other family disruptions that can put your financial contribution at risk if things are not spelled out clearly at the outset.</p> <p>Imagine if the child you move in with ends up in an acrimonious divorce. The property settlement may involve the need to sell the home and if there is no documented evidence of your stake in the ownership, there could be a risk of you losing your money or having to go through legal action to reclaim it.</p> <p><strong>Make sure there is an agreement in writing</strong></p> <p>Any arrangement that involves a large amount of money or the exchange of property needs to have a written agreement drawn up. It doesn’t matter how good the family relationship is or how much trust exists, it is simply a matter of practicality. A written agreement does not indicate a lack of trust, but simply makes it clear to both parties what the expectations are. It brings clarity and prompts both sides to more fully consider all future possibilities.</p> <p>Putting things in writing will naturally help everyone to look at things objectively. Once it is in writing and signed by both parties then there is a basis for impartially sorting out future eventualities and a clear reference for any possible legal claims.</p> <p><strong>Obtain your own legal advice </strong></p> <p>Getting legal advice on the written agreement can help uncover issues you may not have considered and will help to express the spirit of the agreement in concrete and unambiguous terms.</p> <p>In doing this, however, don’t simply rely only on one side making the legal arrangements. You should enlist your own legal adviser who you consult separately and privately to ensure your needs and wishes are properly reflected in the agreement. This may seem pedantic at the time, but can prevent a lot of heartache down the track if the unexpected happens.</p> <p><strong>Some of the major areas that an agreement should cover:</strong></p> <ul> <li>What will happen if relationships change, such as you or your children going through divorce or starting new relationships?</li> <li>What is the nature of your financial contribution? Is it a gift or a loan? Should the property title be changed to recognise your shared ownership?</li> <li>How will you be compensated if you change your mind and want to move out? How will financial interests be calculated? </li> <li>What will be done financially and practically if your health deteriorates and you need extra care to stay in your shared accommodation or if you need to move to residential aged care?</li> <li>If there are other children outside of the agreement, how will their inheritance be affected by the agreement? Is there a need to adjust wills to reflect the desired outcomes?</li> <li>Is there an expectation of personal care being supplied by the child as part of the agreement? How will this be dealt with if your personal needs change or increase in the future?</li> </ul> <p><strong>Your pension may be impacted too</strong></p> <p>If you are receiving a pension, the written agreement may also be important for the purposes of calculating your pension entitlements. Centrelink have specific rules on granny flat arrangements that need to be considered. More information on this can be found at their website.</p> <p><strong>What should you do if disputes do occur? </strong></p> <p>It is important to get prompt legal advice as soon as any disagreement arises. Any delay may reduce your ability to protect your legal interests. Sharing accommodation with children can have many mutual benefits, but planning is essential to make it a successful move.</p> <p>Do you feel that shared accommodation is a workable alternative? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/tips-and-traps-when-moving-in-with-your-children.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Borce Ristevski sensationally pleads guilty to killing wife Karen

<p>A day before he was going to stand trial for murder, Borce Ristevski has pleaded guilty to killing his wife Karen.</p> <p>Karen disappeared on the morning of June 29, 2016 only for investigators to discover her lifeless body at Mount Macedon Regional Park eight months later.</p> <p>Despite Ristevski being a prime suspect in the harrowing case, he has firmly maintained his innocence, saying his 47-year-old wife walked out of their Avondale Heights home after an argument and never returned.</p> <p>In came one bizarre theory after another, as Ristevski was seen putting on an act of deep emotion when speaking of his late spouse. He and his family made countless assumptions of the events that led to her disappearance – one of them being that Karen left the country on a fake passport.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center " data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Borce Ristevski has appeared in the Melbourne Magistrates court charged with the murder of his wife Karen. <a href="https://t.co/MtMiedb03g">https://t.co/MtMiedb03g</a> Report on 7 News at 4pm and 6pm. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BorceRistevski?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BorceRistevski</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/7News?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#7News</a> <a href="https://t.co/dkh3EruslL">pic.twitter.com/dkh3EruslL</a></p> — 7 News Adelaide (@7NewsAdelaide) <a href="https://twitter.com/7NewsAdelaide/status/940728267287302144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>After her body was found, Ristevski still claimed that he was innocent, even going as far to carry her coffin out of her funeral service.</p> <p>The ceremony was shrouded with emotion as mourners listened to a eulogy that recalled Karen’s love for her husband, who was described by friend Anica Naumovski as “the love of her life”.</p> <p>The couple had two children together, who were clearly shattered after receiving the tragic news of their mother's death. </p> <p>He kept up with his performance of the grieving husband as he broke down in tears during church and had a pained expression while escorting her coffin on his shoulders.</p> <p>But that all changes after his chilling confession as the harrowing image of him at her funeral service has taken on another meaning.</p> <p>It didn’t take long for those on the case to grow suspicious, as they alleged that the 54-year-old had murdered his wife and transported her body in her Mercedes-Benz Roadster to dump it.</p> <p>And yesterday it all came to light as the father-of-two finally confessed to the murder of his wife, a day before his trial was to commence.</p> <p>Ristevski told authorities that he originally sat in the car to go get fuel but changed his mind when the faulty fuel gauge showed it wasn’t needed.</p> <p>He said that he was driving towards his wife’s dress shop Bella Bleu, but after missing the turn-off he went back home.</p> <p>But his story failed to match up, as detectives claim that he lied about his whereabouts and switched off his and Karen’s mobile phones to avoid being traced.</p> <p>During a committal hearing last year, Karen’s injuries were described by a forensic pathologist. Professor Stephen Cordner revealed to the court that she had an irregular break in her hyoid bone – a bone in the neck – that could have occurred due to blunt force trauma.</p> <p>Though despite the gruesome details, Professor Cordner couldn’t identify exactly what occurred the time of her murder, as her body was discovered much later.</p> <p>Soon, evidence started coming forward with neighbours stating that the couple could be heard “yelling and screaming” the day of her disappearance.</p> <p>Police discovered that the couple were dealing with piles of debt and assigned Gerard Curtin from Victoria Police to dig deeper into their financial situation.</p> <p>During the committal hearing, Mr Curtin said the business “had serious cash flow issues” and was failing to cover the “rent, wages and stock”.</p> <p>“You’ll see there was a constant struggle,” he told the court.</p> <p>Ristevski will appear at his sentencing hearing on March 27.</p> <p>What do you think about Borce Ristevksi finally confessing to killing his wife Karen? Share your thoughts with us in the comments below. </p>

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Woman’s bizarre excuse for going over the speed limit

<p>A Melbourne woman has left police officers stumped after she gave a very obscure reason for going 137km/h in a 80km/h zone.</p> <p>The female driver of a Jeep Cherokee was pulled over on Sydney Rd in Campbellfield on Monday afternoon for speeding.</p> <p>The woman, 38, claimed to have no idea why she was pulled over, insisting to the officers she was only going 75km/h.</p> <p>After a close inspection of the vehicle, a very unusual detail was revealed about the car.</p> <p>“Okay this is a first for us. Car checked at 137 on Sydney Road in 80 zone. Driver swore she was doing 75,” the Moreland Police wrote on their Facebook page.</p> <p>“A closer inspection of the car shows the driver had changed the car settings from metric to imperial.”</p> <p>Her claim was accepted by police who converted her recorded speed on the dash board of 85 miles per hour to the real speed of 137 km/h.</p> <p>The woman believed her husband must have changed the speedometer from metric to imperial without her knowledge.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Feyewatchmoreland%2Fposts%2F1291214907697926&amp;width=500" width="500" height="727" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“Either way it was incredibly fast and dangerous,” the post read.</p> <p>Social media users were not too convinced by the 38-year-old’s excuse, quickly pointing out 137km/h feels much too fast and different to be confused with 80km/h.</p> <p>“137 felt like 75! Hard to believe if you are a driver! Cops obviously didn’t,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“If you can’t tell your speeding by flying past almost every other car then you shouldn’t have a licence,” another said.</p> <p>The car has since been impounded and the driver was charged $896.10 for towing costs.</p> <p>The woman is also expected to be charged with speed-related felonies.</p>

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BREAKING: George Pell sentenced for child sexual abuse

<p>Disgraced cardinal George Pell has been sentenced to at least three years and eight months in prison due to the “brazen and forceful” sexual abuse of two teenage boys.</p> <p>Handing a maximum sentence of six years, Chief Judge Peter Kidd announced the verdict in Melbourne’s County Court this morning as he stated that Pell was “breathtakingly arrogant” in his offending.</p> <p>In December, Pell was found guilty of orally raping a 13-year-old choirboy and molesting another during a Sunday mass in 1996 at St Patrick’s Cathedral.</p> <p>One of the victims passed away in 2014 due to a drug overdose, with the surviving victim in his 30s.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center " data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">A minimum sentence of 3 years and 8 months down from a total of merely 6 years as most of his sentance is to be served concurrently. You were not an old man when you did this, just because you're old now, you get off so easily. May you rot. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/pell?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#pell</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/pellsentencing?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#pellsentencing</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/CardinalPell?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#CardinalPell</a> <a href="https://t.co/nV2oNWSeki">https://t.co/nV2oNWSeki</a></p> — Sophie (@SophieMaher8) <a href="https://twitter.com/SophieMaher8/status/1105626247986503681?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“In my view, the first episode in the priest’s sacristy involved a brazen and forceful sexual attack on the two victims,” said Judge Kidd.</p> <p>“The acts were sexually graphic. Both victims were visibly and audibly distressed during this offending.</p> <p>“There is an added layer of degradation and humiliation that each of your victims must have felt in knowing that their abuse had been witnessed by the other.”</p> <p>Though due to his age, Judge Kidd said he's handed a shorter sentencing than usual "to increase the prospect of you living out the last part of your life in the community".</p> <p>"You are one of the most senior figures within the Catholic Church globally. You remain a cardinal of the Catholic Church. You are a figure of significant interest to those of the Catholic faith, and to those throughout Australia more generally," Judge Kidd said. </p> <p>"As I directed the jury who convicted you in this trial, you are not to be made a scapegoat for any failings, or perceived failings of the Catholic Church."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center " data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I actually feel sick. Six years. Out in three. A lifetime of abuse and cover ups and that's it? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PeterKidd?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PeterKidd</a> should be ashamed of himself. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GeorgePell?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#GeorgePell</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/CardinalPell?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#CardinalPell</a></p> — Emily Kiko Komiyama (@emmy_kiko) <a href="https://twitter.com/emmy_kiko/status/1105622860381351936?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center " data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Can't accuse this judge of not being thorough. Gives you an appreciation for the extraordinary level of work that's gone into his sentencing <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/CardinalPell?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#CardinalPell</a></p> — David Taylor (@DaveTaylorNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/DaveTaylorNews/status/1105619144098013184?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Pell is the highest-ranking Catholic to be charged with child sexual abuse and until late-February was the treasurer of the Vatican.</p> <p>Pell has full intentions to challenge the verdict in the Court of Appeal as he claims he is innocent. The hearing will take place in June.</p> <p>What do you think of George Pell's sentence? Do you think it's fair?  Share your thoughts with us in the comments below. </p>

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Aussie family’s fight to remove ridiculously placed tree

<p>A frustrated West Australian family have been forced to do “20-point turns” to reverse out of their driveway due to their local council refusing to remove an obstructive tree.</p> <p>Natalie Quadrio and her family purchased the Coodanup home two years ago but had concerns over the giant tree sitting in the middle of the driveway.</p> <p>But despite their qualms, they believed the location of the tree was a part of their property as it was sitting directly behind the mailbox.</p> <p>However, they were in for a rude awakening when their request to get the tree removed was denied, as The City of Mandurah, the local council informed them that the tree was on council land.</p> <p>Ms Quadrio claims that the inconveniently placed tree has caused a host of problems for the family, and as its root system grows, things are only going to get worse.</p> <p>The driveway is virtually unusable as the sap that falls from the tree damages vehicles. And when someone does decide to park their car, they’re forced to manoeuvre their way out to avoid hitting the tree.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:372.8813559322034px;" src="/media/7824729/tree.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9797d532318a4be397d1ea932dc1f03e" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Channel Seven</em></p> <p>And it isn’t just a headache for drivers, as debris falls onto the solar hot water system and into the gutters.</p> <p>“I would like to see it removed, it is impractical. It blocks off our left-hand side of our garage so we can’t actually use that,” Ms Quadrio told<span> </span><em>Today Tonight</em>.</p> <p>“You can put two cars in there, but you have to pull one out first and then you have to do a 20-point turn to get it in and out.</p> <p>“And hubby for the whole two years has had to empty the gutters every two weeks because it’s a fire hazard. We’re in a fire zone.”</p> <p>Ms Quadrio acknowledges that she should have considered the location of the tree before buying the home, but also claims that it wasn’t so simple.</p> <p>“People are saying you shouldn’t have bought the house if you didn’t like the tree out the front, but we honestly did think it was in our boundary,” she said.</p> <p>“I would be quite happy if they removed it and put another tree exactly the same, further down on the verge.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:371.7156105100464px;" src="/media/7824730/tree1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9eb04bf98377479ea02c5e1bd04b8355" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Channel Seven</em></p> <p>Issuing a statement, CEO of The City of Mandurah Mark Newman said: “It is important residents considered existing infrastructure, including trees, when buying and building homes.”</p> <p>They stated that the removal of trees only takes place when “absolutely necessary” or if they have died or carry a disease.</p> <p>“Residents can request a tree inspection or maintenance should they have concerns but as a general rule pruning only occurs every one to five years,” said the council.</p> <p>But according to Ms Quadrio, she did exactly that but still received little to no cooperation from the council.</p> <p>“I rang and asked them could they come and prune it, or can we remove it and about two weeks later I got a letter back saying sap, leaves, pollen, branches that fall are not their issue,” she said.</p> <p>“I’ve been here two years and I’ve never ever seen them tree lop or maintain these trees.</p> <p>“I like trees, the reason we picked this area, it’s a lovely area and it is all tree lined but there’s no maintenance.”</p> <p>Ms Quadrio says her family are now anxious as it won’t be long before the tree’s root system starts to lift up the driveway.</p> <p>“There is movement in the pavement already so the next issue will be for us if it starts ripping up pavers more or if it’s going to get under our house, then what damages and costs are we up for,” she said.</p> <p>Speaking to the previous owners of the WA home,<span> </span><em>Today Tonight<span> </span></em>was told that the residents were forced to build their driveway around the tree as the council refused to touch it.</p> <p>Do you think Ms Quadrio has the right to be frustrated? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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What we know about the little-known twin siblings of Madeleine McCann

<p>Madeleine McCann is possibly one of the most famous faces in the world.</p> <p>Three-year-old Maddie, who famously disappeared on May 3, 2007 while visiting Portugal with her family, has been publicised in the hopes to eventually locate her whereabouts.</p> <p>But despite being the most reported missing person in modern history, investigators and her parents have had no luck in finding the little girl.</p> <p>Maddie’s parents, Gerry and Kate McCann, have campaigned tirelessly to find her, but while the world knows everything about young Madeleine, not much is known about her twin siblings, who were only two years old when their elder sister vanished.</p> <p>Now, 12 years later, 14-year-old Sean and Amelie are aspiring athletes, but tend to keep an extremely low profile as there are no public photos of the siblings as they are today.</p> <p>The only photographs of the two are from when they were younger.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 335px;" src="/media/7824679/twins1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/692ac17740024ab6adefc8c179fe4778" /></p> <p>Sean is an unbeaten swimming champion and also takes part in cross country and triathlons in his local area. So far, he has competed in 14 championships, runs and leagues.</p> <p>And his sister is also a force to be reckoned with, as she took part in nine athletic and triathlon competitions in 2018.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5473303/madeleine-mccanns-parents-celebrate-twins-becoming-teens-with-prayers-for-missing-daughter-wherever-she-is/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, a guest at their 13th birthday party last year said that the teenagers had one wish; “for their big sister to come home".</p> <p>“Kate and Gerry want to give the twins a memorable occasion, they’re teenagers now and that’s a big deal,” the guest said.</p> <p>While Maddie hasn’t been around to watch her younger brother and sister grow up, the 14-year-old's are reminded of their loss every day.</p> <p>Madeleine’s bedroom remains untouched, just the way it was when she was three – bright pink.</p> <p>Her parents, who purchase Christmas gifts for her every year, make sure to leave them in her room, in case she returns home.</p> <p>The twins attend a Catholic secondary school located 12 kilometres from the family home, in Loughborough, UK.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 327.7255639097744px;" src="/media/7824680/maddie.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8fc3c69506b14d4890abb4c42b3dc1d7" /></p> <p>Kate, who works in the medical sector, has previously stated that the family regularly pray for Maddie’s safe return.</p> <p>She said the twins have “grown up essentially without knowing Madeleine but knowing their sister is missing and they want her back".</p> <p>“They have their own friends, and they keep busy and they’re really sporty, but their only wish is for their big sister to come home. We miss our complete family of five,” Kate told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5473303/madeleine-mccanns-parents-celebrate-twins-becoming-teens-with-prayers-for-missing-daughter-wherever-she-is/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>.</em></p> <p>On the 10th anniversary of Maddie’s kidnapping, Kate took to Facebook to write: “I truly hope that those reporting on the ‘story’ over the next couple of weeks will have a conscience. Even if little consideration for Gerry and me is shown, they will at least bear in mind the effect such unfounded and unwarranted negativity could have on our other children.”</p> <p>Sean and Amelie were only metres away from Maddie in a peaceful slumber when she was allegedly taken. British police and Scotland Yard have yet to locate her, despite their ongoing efforts.</p>

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Chemist Warehouse workers go on indefinite strike

<p>Employees at Chemist Warehouse's distribution centre have launched an indefinite strike over their wages and conditions.</p> <p>About 100 staff across Victoria and Queensland participated in the strike today to demand higher pay, better job security and “an end to the toxic culture of bullying and harassment”.</p> <p>“This is a David and Goliath struggle,” said Tim Kennedy, national secretary at the National Union of Workers (NUW).</p> <p>“It is a struggle between haves and have-nots. Worker’s wages are declining while wealth and power continues to grow at the top end of town.”</p> <p>Kennedy said it is a “matter of justice” for the company, which brands itself as “Australia’s Cheapest Chemist”, to treat their workers with respect and meet the industry standard.</p> <p>According to the union, the company currently pays its workers 25 per cent lower than competitors. Apart from salary increase, the workers are also looking to increase the proportion of permanent staff from 25 per cent to 70 per cent, <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.pharmacynews.com.au/news/chemist-warehouse-faces-strike-workers-demand-25-pay-increase" target="_blank">Pharmacy News</a> </em>reported.</p> <p>On Thursday, a day before the International Women’s Day, NUW members also occupied Chemist Warehouse stores to protest “the ongoing sexual harassment of our sisters working in Chemist Warehouse distribution centres”.</p> <p>Staff also called for more respectful treatment. </p> <p>“Labour hire casuals are treated as disposable machines, not like people,” the union said. “Often they are expected to wait on unpaid standby without any guarantee of their next shift.</p> <p>“Chemist Warehouse could provide people with decent, safe and secure jobs – but they choose not to.”</p> <p>The pharmacy is not the only Australian company dealing with strike action today. Telstra is facing a nationwide strike until 11.59 pm tonight over wage increases.</p> <p>The strike will affect NBN and broadband installation, as well as phone and mobile service maintenance, Communications Electrical Plumbing Union (CEPU) state secretary Shane Murphy told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/telstra-workers-on-strike-today/news-story/79353d571d41465efc415dcb75ba4d02" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>. It will not impact the Triple Zero service.</p> <p>The telco giant is offering workers a 4.5 per cent pay increase over three years, but unions argue that it is well below inflation rates. The Australian Trade Council of Unions (ACTU) described the offer as “effectively a pay cut”.</p> <p>“It is disgraceful Telstra is offering a real wage cut while their top six executives collectively take home what would take the average Telstra worker 200 years to earn,” said ACTU secretary Sally McManus.</p>

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Shock jock Alan Jones donates $10,000 to One Nation

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>One Nation have been on the receiving end of a very generous donation thanks to veteran Sydney broadcaster Alan Jones.</p> <p>Mr Jones confirmed to the <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-11/alan-jones-donates-10000-dollars-to-one-nation/10890034"><em>ABC</em></a> that he made a contribution of $10,000 to the party, saying he was “supporting a mate” referring to One Nation’s New South Wales leader Mark Latham.</p> <p>A thrilled Latham said the donation was a “very strong endorsement of the One Nation’s policy approach”.</p> <p>“We are indeed very happy that someone of Alan Jones’ standing and experience in public policy in Australia is supporting us,” he said.</p> <p>“Alan’s backing our policies, particularly cutting immigration and ending overdevelopment in Sydney.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center " data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">No one in Aust media has a bigger, thoroughly researched interest in public policy debate than Alan Jones.<br />My campaign is honoured to have received his donation support and I aim not to let him and other supporters down as I pursue our policy agenda in NSW Parliament, if elected.</p> — Real Mark Latham (@RealMarkLatham) <a href="https://twitter.com/RealMarkLatham/status/1104888666911006720?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>It is predicted that Latham will be elected to the state’s Upper House following the March 23 election.</p> <p>Jones and Latham have held a close relationship with each other for a number of years, with the radio host appearing at many Liberal Party fundraisers in the past.</p> <p>They sealed their friendship last year when they released a cookbook titled <em>Conversations in the Kitchen: Good Food, Great Friends</em>, which asked readers to “share in their world of good food, their friendship and their views”.</p> <p>Jones provided the generous donation in instalments of $5000 – with one contribution under his name and the other under his company Belford Productions.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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These insider tips will help your adult children buy a property

<p>The facts are many of us will need to help their kids get into the property market. Without that help, the maths doesn’t work and many of our adult children just may not be able to ever own a property.</p> <p><strong>Family pledge and limited guarantees</strong></p> <p>Another way of using the equity in your home to help the kids is by providing a limited guarantee or what is being called a family pledge. Your child may need say $60,000 to get them over the line especially if that amount was required to avoid the cost of mortgage insurance.</p> <p>Well, a family pledge, secured via mortgage (including a second mortgage) against the home which has ample equity in it, might just do the job.</p> <p>It may only need to be temporary because if the value of the properties rise, then you can have them revalued and have the pledge released, provided the new loan to value ratios are adequate.</p> <p><strong>Joint borrower</strong></p> <p>You could choose to jointly buy a property with them. It could be 50/50 or 60/40 or whatever percentage works for your situation. You are on title and you are jointly responsible for the loan.</p> <p>For them, owning 50% of something is better than owning 100% of nothing.</p> <p>You obviously are taking on the risk of the loan if your child fails to keep their end of the bargain, but there are varying degrees of risk within all these ideas and there is an assumed level of trust and reliability between parents and children for any of these strategies to work.</p> <p><strong>Parental equity and cross collateralisation</strong></p> <p>Cross Collateralisation is a mouthful, but it simply means using the equity in your home to support a loan that your kids could use to buy a property. It is not a gift or a loan, but really a guarantee or a promise that if your child doesn’t pay back the loan, you will take ultimate responsibility. You are ‘giving’ them your financial firepower or credit.</p> <p>Imagine that you have a $1m unencumbered home and your son, who has no deposit but a good income wants to buy his first home for $600,000. If the two assets are ‘crossed’, your son would be able to get the loan.</p> <p><strong>Helping them get government help</strong></p> <p>Unfortunately, Government support has been skewed towards new properties only, but it’s still better than nothing for some. The First Home Owner Grant, which has just been reduced to $10,000 in NSW (it was $15,000 last year) is available if your first property is a new one. You could choose to help the kids buy a new property to access the grant.</p> <p>There is also the First Home – New Home Scheme (again biased towards new property only) where the stamp duty is waived or reduced for properties up to $650,000 (in NSW). This can be quite significant as the stamp duty on a $550,000 property in NSW is about $20,000.</p> <p><strong>Cash-flow contribution</strong></p> <p>Instead of a capital contribution, you could choose to help with cash-flow and assist with the mortgage repayments (or part thereof) until their income reaches a point where they can comfortably pay the mortgage.</p> <p>So, how did the bank lend them the money if they are struggling to pay it back? Well, it happens more than you think.  People over-extend themselves all the time and are able to find a bank that lends them more than they really should be borrowing.</p> <p><strong>Helping them to compromise</strong></p> <p>Too many people are struggling to make concessions to get into the market. If you have grown up in your parents’ home, near the city, near amenities, near the beaches etc. you might be finding it hard to make the necessary concessions to moving out and being an hour away from work. But that is the journey many will need to take if they want to get into the market. If a $1m property is simply not within your reach (with or without parents’ support) then you have to go looking at suburbs or property types that fit your (and your parents’) budget.</p> <p>Parents may need to make their support conditional on some compromise.</p> <p>The journey may begin in an area that is less than ideal, but you can then work your way up the ladder over time and get closer to the city or work and lifestyle.</p> <p><strong>Renting and investing</strong></p> <p>For a variety of reasons, your children may not want to buy a property to live in. Maybe they want to live close to you so you can stay in touch with the grandkids (and do the babysitting!) or they want the flexibility of being able move around with work or as their needs change.</p> <p>Financially, renting and not investing is a problem in an environment where asset prices keep rising. But renting and investing is a perfectly legitimate wealth creation strategy for many and compares favourably with more traditional home ownership. Helping them buy an investment property can be just as profound a step in the long run to their financial well-being.</p> <p>There is a variety of ways of doing this. What it really comes down to beyond capacity, is intent. Where there is a will, there is a way.</p> <p>Making any or a combination of these ideas work for you, requires customisation to your individual circumstances. There will be tax, legal and liability considerations for many of them and you would be well advised to first canvass the viability of an idea with a financial adviser. They are best suited to navigate you through the varied and interconnected areas of expertise that are required to solve this type of problem.</p> <p><em>Written by Frank Paul. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/investment/insider-financial-tips-to-help-your-adult-children-into-the-property-market.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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"Born out of wedlock": Liz Hurley's son set to inherit nothing

<p>The biological grandfather of Liz Hurley’s son is doing everything within his power to stop Hurley’s son from getting any of the family fortune.</p> <p>Damian Charles Hurley was born in 2002 after Liz Hurley was romantically involved with US businessman Steve Bing.</p> <p>As Steve has an estimated net worth of $USD600 million ($AU853 million), with the bulk of his wealth coming from his grandfather, Leo S. Bing, a New York real estate baron, it makes sense that the family would want to protect the fortune.</p> <p>The grandfather, Dr Peter Bing, is trying to prevent Damian from getting involved with the family trust.</p> <p>Peter Bing has argued that Damian and Steve have never met since he was born, and that Damian isn’t eligible for the trust as he was “born out of wedlock”.</p> <p>Although that rule might sound old-fashioned, the trust was established in 1980 and states, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/elizabeth-hurleys-son-damian-to-14097520" target="_blank"><em>The Mirror</em></a>:</p> <p>“[The trust] would not benefit any person bought out of wedlock unless that person had lived for a substantial period of time as a regular member of the household.”</p> <p>The legal battle began after another of Steve Bing’s illegitimate children, Kira Bing, claimed she was a beneficiary of the trust and wanted information on it.</p> <p>Despite Steve Bing demanding paternity tests for both children, they confirmed that Kira and Damian are his children.</p> <p>Peter Bing’s claim is that since Damian and Kira have never lived with Steve, they do not have rights to the trust.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7824541/liz-hurley-steve-bing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0e2a1c2fa12a413da8e49e6094726a09" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Elizabeth Hurley with boyfriend Steven Bing in 2001.</em></p> <p>In Peter Bing’s affidavit, he claims:</p> <p>“l know that neither of them has lived with Stephen while a minor as a regular member of his household,” the affidavit states.</p> <p>“To the best of my knowledge, Stephen has never met Damian, and Stephen only met Kira after she became an adult.</p> <p>“Regardless of whether, when and if Stephen met with or had any relationship with Damian or Kira while they are or were minor because neither was raised by him during their formative years l do not consider them my grandchildren.</p> <p>“Even were Stephen to develop a relationship with Damian now, l would not consider him my grandchild because he is nearing adulthood.”</p> <p>As the legal battle continues, it is unknown whether Damian and Kira will benefit from the family’s trust.</p>

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New scam warning for ANZ bank customers – beware of this email

<p>ANZ are warning customers of a new email scam that’s targeting their internet banking login details.</p> <p>This is a sophisticated email scam, as the email address that’s being used looks similar to ANZ’s support email. The scam email address is: @anzsupport.cf. </p> <p>The body of the ANZ-branded email goes into detail, explaining that the bank will be introducing “challenge questions” to protect customers and add an extra layer of security.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Warning: Be wary of this <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/phishing?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#phishing</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/email?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#email</a> scam mimicking <a href="https://twitter.com/ANZ_AU?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ANZ_AU</a> . Directing users to confirm their ‘challenge questions’, the emails look legitimate, complete with the bank’s branding &amp; logos. Don’t click on any <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/links?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#links</a>. More details in our blog soon <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/fastbreak?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#fastbreak</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/zeroday?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#zeroday</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hacked?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#hacked</a> <a href="https://t.co/TOLJvzVUr9">pic.twitter.com/TOLJvzVUr9</a></p> — MailGuard (@MailGuard) <a href="https://twitter.com/MailGuard/status/1103064693629845505?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 5, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Once you click on the link to confirm your challenge questions, customers are taken to an authentic ANZ login page, which asks for your customer registration number and password.</p> <p>Naturally, once you enter these details in, the hackers have your internet banking login details and the sensitive information is handed over.</p> <p>Once the details are entered, customers are then taken to a page where you can choose your three challenge questions and provide answers.</p> <p>Once you’re finished with the questions, you’re taken back to the official ANZ AU page, which makes the scam even more convincing to customers due to the consistent ANZ branding all the way through.</p> <p>Email security firm <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mailguard.com.au/blog/warning-anz-bank-impersonated-in-phishing-email-that-asks-users-to-confirm-challenge-questions" target="_blank">MailGuard</a> explains why the criminals have gone into such great detail.</p> <p>“Cybercriminals have taken great pains to replicate official landing pages from ANZ – including incorporating the bank’s branding and logo using high-quality graphical elements.</p> <p>“If you tell the scammers your security question, it allows them to attempt other fraudulent actions, such as calling them back and trying to access your accounts.”</p> <p>ANZ have advised their customers to be on the lookout, as they do not send emails asking for personal information or security credentials.</p> <p>If you’ve received an ANZ scam email, here’s some steps you can take</p> <ul> <li>Do not open any attachments or enter in any personal information.</li> <li>Forward the suspicious email to <a rel="noopener" href="mailto:hoax@cybersecurity.anz.com" target="_blank">hoax@cybersecurity.anz.com</a>.</li> <li>Delete the message from your inbox.   </li> </ul> <p>Have you received this scam ANZ email? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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The 3 factors that could see George Pell freed

<p>Cardinal George Pell has been found guilty of child sexual abuse, but a new appeal by his lawyers could see this conviction overturned.</p> <p>Pell’s lawyers have filed three grounds for his appeal based on the evidence that’s been relied upon to convict Pell of the charges.</p> <p>University of Sydney Professor David Hamer is an expert in evidence law and does not have detailed knowledge about the case. However, he spoke to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/national/victoria/courts-law/the-factors-that-could-see-george-pell-freed/news-story/bc9c9674b425afdefd4b832e500fbca0" target="_blank">news.com.au</a> about some of the legal aspects of the case.</p> <p><strong>1. Will the first mistrial be used as evidence?</strong></p> <p>Some people think that as the first trial was unable to reach an unanimous decision as to whether or not Pell was guilty could play in his favour. However, Hamer doesn’t think that the appeal judges will take this into account when assessing the verdict of the second case.</p> <p>“There isn’t much scope for the court to consider this,” he said.</p> <p>“They will focus on evidence presented at the trial and whether a reasonable jury would have convicted him.”</p> <p><strong>2. Is the use of video evidence significant?</strong></p> <p>Footage of Pell’s complainant giving evidence was recorded at the first trial and played to jurors of the second trial.</p> <p>This is a new occurrence in the courts, which allow complainants in sexual abuse cases to record their testimony, so they don’t have to relive the traumatic experiences. It can also be intimidating to be cross-examined.</p> <p>Hamer said: <span>“This suggests the evidence in the two trials was very similar, but it’s still unlikely the appeal court would consider the mistrial in its decision”.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Was the decision unreliable?   </strong></p> <p>Pell lodged his appeal based on three grounds, including that it’s “unreasonable” to convict him based on the testimony of one victim.</p> <p>The first appeal ground has said: <span>“The verdicts are unreasonable and cannot be supported, having regard to the evidence … it was not open to the jury to be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt on the word of the complainant alone."</span></p> <p>The second ground is that there is a “fundamental irregularity” in the trial process as Pell was unable to enter a not guilty plea in front of the jury.</p> <p>The third ground is that his defence lawyer should not have been stopped from using a “moving visual representation” in his closing statements.</p> <p>Hamer said this case will be difficult as it’s a word against word case with Pell. Instead of the case being about complicated legal questions to consider, this is more about who is more credible: the victim or Pell.</p> <p>Hamer said: <span>“Appeal courts don’t like to assess credibility. That’s why we have juries — to assess credibility.”</span></p> <p>Hamer also said that even if the appeal judges do come to a different verdict, they could be reluctant about overturning the conviction.</p> <p>“They may say, ‘Why should our opinion be valued over and above 12 members of a jury?'”</p> <p>What do you think? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Self-serve checkout cheaters – watch out!

<p>Many people enjoy using the self-serve checkout as it allows them to swipe a bargain whilst they are getting their groceries. What’s common is to choose a lower priced item, such as a tomato, and nab the higher priced item at the lower price.</p> <p>One in 10 shoppers admit to doing this and the “micro-thefts” cost $9 billion to retailers. Scanning the wrong item can be categorised as fraud and is punishable by the law, but it’s still a problem for many major retailers.</p> <p>A new technology is set to combat this problem. Tiliter Technology have developed a range of cameras that are fitted into the self-serve checkouts and are able to tell the difference between the onions you’ve selected and the avocados you’re swiping.</p> <p>With successful trials in supermarkets across Europe and the United States, <a rel="noopener" href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/consumer/2019/03/05/supermarket-checkout-cheaters-beware/" target="_blank"><em>The New Daily</em></a> have said that many Australian retailers are considering adopting the technology later on this year to combat the theft.</p> <p>Tiliter co-founder Martin Karafilis said that each checkout would be fitted with a small camera that is able to detect food products without needing to scan a barcode.</p> <p>“This automatic-detection and product-recognition technology reduces the opportunity to scan through expensive items as cheaper ones, for example, placing through avocados or expensive meats as cheap onions,” Karafilis said.</p> <p>“[Scanning fresh produce] is the real pain point for cashiers and consumers [because it takes time] at the self-service checkout, as well as a major area of fraud for supermarkets,” he explained.</p> <p>Queensland University of Technology senior research fellow Dr Paul Dootson has explained why Aussies don’t seem to feel guilty when they steal from supermarkets.</p> <p>“There are probably a lot less thefts at farmers’ markets because you can see the victim right there in front of you,” Dr Dootson said.</p> <p>“If you’re not being served by a human, you don’t feel so bad about it.”</p> <p>“People find it hard to comprehend all the different players involved in the supply chain.</p> <p>“They think, how can stealing a couple of grapes really impact a multibillion-dollar company?”</p> <p>Have you used a self-serve checkout before? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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“Are you angry? I certainly am!” Pauline Hanson furious over Julie Bishop's $210K a year pension payout

<p>One Nation’s Pauline Hanson is furious that parliamentary pensions are as lucrative as they are, and demanding that they be scrapped.</p> <p>Hanson is openly outraged at former foreign minister Julie Bishop’s retirement benefit, which is going to be amount to a lofty $210,000 a year once she leaves federal parliament.</p> <p>Defence Minister Christopher Pyne was also in the firing line, as he will receive $140,000 a year from his time as a minister.</p> <p>This is due to the rule that Federal MPs who were elected before October 2004 are entitled to a lifelong parliamentary pension.</p> <p>Hanson posted a video of a <em>Sunrise</em> interview, with the caption:</p> <p>“Sorry in advance for getting so fired up but the thought of Julie Bishop walking away and pocketing a political pension of $200,000 plus makes my blood boil!</p> <p>“One Nation has consistently fought for a freeze on politicians' pay but every other political party, including Derryn Hinch, has voted against us! Politicians should be leading by example.</p> <p>“We have pensioners unable to pay their bills to keep the lights on yet politicians keep giving themselves fat pay rises, it is no surprise Aussies think most politicians are parasites.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Federal Politician's Pay: "I gave my pay increase to a charity" - Senator <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulineHansonOz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PaulineHansonOz</a>. "Anybody elected, like me, after 2004 gets no pension at all...not one dollar, you will not get a pension" - Senator <a href="https://twitter.com/HumanHeadline?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@HumanHeadline</a>. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/7News?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#7News</a> <a href="https://t.co/WC27FnszmQ">pic.twitter.com/WC27FnszmQ</a></p> — 7 News Sydney (@7NewsSydney) <a href="https://twitter.com/7NewsSydney/status/1102322876537987072?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p><em>Sunrise</em> hosts David “Kochie” Koch and Samantha Armytage watched on as Hanson and Australian Senator for Victoria Derryn Hinch fought about the large superannuation payout before things got personal between Hanson and Hinch.</p> <p>“We've got two days left in parliament. Move the bill to freeze this payout of the previous superannuation that Julie Bishop, Christopher Pyne and eight Labor MPs who are resigning from Parliament are entitled to,” Hanson said.</p> <p>“It is disgusting and does not pass the pub test.”</p> <p>Hinch agreed but pointed out that himself and Hanson do not get any pension at all due to coming into parliament after 2004.</p> <p>“Anybody elected, like her, like me, after 2004 gets no pension at all. Not one dollar. You will not get a pension.”</p> <p>The superannuation statements resonated with many Australians, who have made their thoughts clear in the comments.</p> <p>“These people have NOT retired! They are changing employers! This pension scheme needs to be abolished! These people are not for Australia, only for themselves!” said one commenter.</p> <p>Another agreed, calling for politicians to be asset tested.</p> <p>“If politicians were asset tested, they wouldn’t be eligible for a pension, simple as that. The gravy train needs to be derailed and these pensions stopped.”</p> <p>Do you think the superannuation payout is too high for politicians? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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