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Man’s hilarious response to “nosy” neighbour who complained about his fence

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A man has decided to hold a silent protest after receiving a zoning violation from the city of Santa Rosa, California, due to a neighbour complaining that his fence was too high.</p> <p>Jason Windus was the recipient of the violation after a neighbour reported his six-foot-fence for blocking a suburban corner and obstructing visibility for drivers at an intersection, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://abc7.com/" target="_blank"><em>ABC 6</em></a>.</p> <p>Speaking to the station, Mr Windus said that he was confronted with a warning informing him of a daily fine that will be put in place until the fence was taken down.</p> <p>“It is very serious,” he said. “They made me freak out.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Jason Windus. It's been four day since he put up the garden party. <br />"I'm waiting. If they didn't like the fence, how do they like this?" Neighbors love it. All except the one who initially complained. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Abc7now?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Abc7now</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/santaRosa?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#santaRosa</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SonomaCounty?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#SonomaCounty</a> <a href="https://t.co/eVYytalYvU">pic.twitter.com/eVYytalYvU</a></p> — Wayne Freedman (@WayneFreedman) <a href="https://twitter.com/WayneFreedman/status/1108107188147355648?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Mr Windus immediately took down the fence with some help from a friend, but due to height restrictions, the newly modified fence is unable to contain his two dogs.</p> <p>With the height of his fence being out of his control, the professional mover decided to take some control back in hilarious fashion – by rearranging an assortment of naked mannequins so it appears that they’re having a clothing-optional garden party.</p> <p>“I guess the average person would get angry and cop resentment?” said Mr Windus. “I throw a naked party in my yard.”</p> <p>And despite the height of his fence crossing the boundaries of legalities, his life-sized dummies are well within the law.</p> <p>To keep the display PG, Mr Windus even took the liberty to cover the mannequins' private parts.</p> <p>And the party was open for all, especially the “nosy” neighbour who reported the fence in the first place, with a sign reading: “Reserved seat for the nosy neighbour that complained about my fence to the city.”</p> <p>The anonymous neighbour is yet to respond and remains unidentified.</p> <p>But while the whistleblower may not be a huge fan of the installation, others cannot get enough.</p> <p>“I love it. I think it’s hilarious. More power to him,” a neighbour told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nbc.com/" target="_blank"><em>NBC</em></a>.</p> <p>The only regret Mr Windus has is that his two dogs have nowhere to run around.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">"I was going to use them for target practice," said Jason Windus of the mannequins in his front yard. There's a 3-way stop at the corner, but an unidentified neighbor complained about visibility. "The average person would get angry. I throw a naked party in my yard...” <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/abc7now?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#abc7now</a> <a href="https://t.co/iFjiXMtK0u">pic.twitter.com/iFjiXMtK0u</a></p> — Wayne Freedman (@WayneFreedman) <a href="https://twitter.com/WayneFreedman/status/1108145579345874944?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>But despite that, he’s having a grand ol’ time, saying he hasn’t decided on when the mannequins will be packed away.</p> <p>Joking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nbc.com/" target="_blank"> <em>NBC</em></a>, he said: “I was thinking of putting a barbecue out here next.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Jason told me this morning that he still does not know which neighbor reported the zoning violation with his fence. Feels pretty good about the reaction, he said. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/abc7now?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#abc7now</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/mannequin?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#mannequin</a> <a href="https://t.co/djNfUcISmG">pic.twitter.com/djNfUcISmG</a></p> — Wayne Freedman (@WayneFreedman) <a href="https://twitter.com/WayneFreedman/status/1108453104435920897?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">20 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Do you think Mr Windus has the right to be frustrated? Or was the neighbour right for reporting his fence? Let us know in the comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div></div>

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5 fascinating pollination facts

<p><strong>1. Pollination is an essential part of the fertilisation process </strong></p> <p>The movement of pollen from one flower to another flower of the same species is an essential step in the fertilisation of plants and the development of the fruit and seeds needed for reproduction.</p> <p><strong>2. 75% of flowering plants depend on pollinators for fertilisation </strong></p> <p>An overwhelming proportion of at least 75% of flowering plants depend on pollinators for fertilisation. It’s a good reason to encourage the birds and the bees into your garden to help it flourish.</p> <p><strong>3. Bees pollinate but so do other animals and insects </strong></p> <p>Birds, bees, bats, butterflies, moths, flies, beetles, wasps and small mammals are all common pollinators. Other animals, as well as the wind, can carry pollen from flower to flower as well.</p> <p><strong>4. Pollination leads to the creation of everyday essentials like coffee and tequila </strong></p> <p>About a thousand plants we rely on worldwide for the production of goods require pollinators. These include those grown for food, beverages, spices and medicines. Think coffee, chocolate and tequila!</p> <p><strong>5. Protect pollinators by planting native flowering plants </strong></p> <p>You can protect pollinators by planting native flowering plants, reducing your use of pesticides and telling others of the danger these animals and insects are in through chemical misuse, loss of habitat and diseases.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/5-fascinating-pollination-facts"><em>Handyman Australia</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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How to get the grandkids involved in gardening

<p>Gardening can be a lot of fun for kids, giving them the chance to get outside and grub around in the dirt. </p> <p>And if you give kids an area outdoors to call their own, they’ll be rolling up their sleeves in no time. </p> <p>The vegetable garden is a great starting point and a wonderful way for them to develop an understanding of where fresh food comes from. </p> <p>You’ll be surprised how many more vegies they are likely to accept on the dinner plate when they’ve grown them with their own hands.</p> <p>Let them add a scarecrow and it will become their favourite spot. </p> <p>Watering and weeding take up only so much time, so to really keep kids interested between sowing and harvesting crops they need to have a stake in the garden. </p> <p>The best way to do this is to create a kid-friendly landscape and this is possible whether you have a large garden, small courtyard or balcony. </p> <p>Use raised beds to give children a dedicated growing area, mark out kids-only spots using puppets, or decorate lights to hang outdoors and you won’t be able to keep them away.   </p> <p><strong>Watch a scarecrow </strong></p> <p>As a reward for the hard work of sowing garden beds and to give the vegie patch a guardian, help the kids make and dress a scarecrow to protect their crops from birds. </p> <p><strong><u>SINK A STAKE</u></strong> up to 3m high about 600mm into the ground, securing a crosspiece 300mm from the top.</p> <p><strong><u>ADD CLOTHES</u></strong> and stuff with grass clippings, woodchips or rags, tying the waistband and pant legs in place. </p> <p><strong><u>MAKE A HEAD</u></strong> from nylon tights or a hessian sack, stuffing it with plastic bags and securing to the stake with twine. Add a face and hat to finish. </p> <p><strong>TIP: </strong>Use bright colours to deter birds. </p> <p><strong>Garden craft </strong></p> <p>Take the time to look and you’ll find your garden is a great source of craft supplies, including seed pods, colourful foliage and flowers, twisted branches and straight twigs. </p> <p>A collection of goodies from the garden works well to create markers for paths and garden beds. </p> <p>Just add a few colourful pipe cleaners and Paddle-Pop sticks, then grab a hot glue gun and you’re all set to create anything your imagination can conjure up.</p> <p>This alien stick puppet was assembled using a glue gun, under adult supervision, to join porous materials and the shiny seedpods.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> When removing a part of a plant, trim it with secateurs rather than tearing it off by hand.</p> <p><strong>Designing a flower press</strong></p> <p>Pressed and dried flowers make beautiful keepsakes or additions to art and craft projects. </p> <p>A flower press is a simple device that features a rigid base and top plate with bolts through each corner. </p> <p>To make your own press, cut two 300 x 300mm squares from 9mm marine or exterior ply. </p> <p>Drill holes about 20mm in from the corners, insert the bolts and secure threaded drawer knobs over the top.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> You can also use wing nuts. </p> <p>To adjust the size of the press simply cut the plywood larger or smaller. For scrapbooks or albums you may want it A4 size. </p> <p>Position the flowers and leaves between layers of paper on the base plate then add the top plate.</p> <p>Wind the knobs to tighten the bolts and draw the top and base plates together, compressing the contents of the press. </p> <p>Change the paper every few days until the flowers or leaves have dried.</p> <p><strong>Watch the weather </strong></p> <p>Add a rain gauge to the garden and open up a new world for kids to explore. It is a simple and fun learning tool that helps children appreciate the importance of climate in their garden. The best spot is somewhere that’s frequently visited like the vegie garden.</p> <p><strong><u>POSITION THE RAIN GAUGE</u></strong> high enough so water won’t splash into it and in an area clear from overhanging buildings or trees. A large, securely mounted, seasoned hardwood garden stake is an ideal mounting point.</p> <p><strong><u>KEEP RECORDS</u></strong> to help kids learn how to track data and look at summarised results. Create a spreadsheet and graph that tallies the monthly and annual rainfall.  </p> <p><strong>Outdoor lights </strong></p> <p>Turn your garden into a fairy wonderland after dark by adding handmade lanterns. </p> <p>All you need is glass paint, LED tea-light candles and glass containers or bottles in just about any shape you can find.</p> <p>To hang lanterns from trees in the garden, decorate jars with wire handles. If you don’t have any, choose jars with a lip and make a hanger using galvanised tie wire from the hardware store.</p> <p>Paint markers make it easy to create pictures and patterns on glass candle holders of all shapes and sizes. </p> <p>They cost from $5 each, from Officeworks, resist fading and come in a range of colours including metallics. </p> <p>Get the kids to practise first on a piece of paper the same size as the surface to be painted.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> If using real candles, don’t paint on the side exposed to the flame.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/gardening-kids"><em>Handyman Australia</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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The terrifying moment two snakes battle to the death in Queensland

<p>A woman who stumbled upon a battle between two venomous snakes near her home managed to capture the thrilling moments on film.</p> <p>When Jenny Hillman came across a clash between a red-bellied black snack and a much larger snake near her property in Ballandean, Queensland, she could hardly believe it.</p> <p>Ms Hillman later reported to Facebook the event that unfolded before her eyes, posting footage which showed a brown-coloured snake latching on to the red-bellied reptile’s body with their fangs.</p> <p>“At the river this morning !!!!!!! A truly gargantuan battle,” the Queensland woman wrote.</p> <p>The video depicts the two unlikely foes fight in a thrilling clash, where the smaller, dark snake tries to slither away from the larger snake but is unable to unclasp from its grasp.</p> <p>Ms Hillman explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/" target="_blank"><em>ABC News</em></a> that the two foes battled for over an hour, with many rests in-between.</p> <p>“There were times when they would both just stop for five minutes and take a rest,” she explained.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjenny.hillman.739%2Fvideos%2F1909039719206399%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>Eventually, in the end though, the smaller red-bellied black could not fight off its bigger opponent.</p> <p>Ms Hillman says despite the larger reptile’s victory, she doubted it would survive due to the amount of bites it had gotten from the black snake.</p> <p>The post has received a lot of attention, mostly from astonished Facebook user, who just like Ms Hillman can hardly believe what was happening before their eyes.</p> <p>“That red belly put up a good fight,” a user wrote.</p> <p>“Was it just me or was anyone else barracking for the red bellied black? And I hate snakes!” another commented.</p> <p>A third person added: “Jenny great footage mate. That would have been amazing to witness.”</p>

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The genius $3 hack to clean your ceiling fans

<p>Some chores are less pleasant to deal with than others – and cleaning ceiling fans falls into that category. With the big size and the high position, they are one of the biggest dust traps in the house. It’s an ordeal to take out a ladder and clean them, but if left alone, they may spread dirt and dust around the room.</p> <p>A cleaning hack to solve the issue has gone viral, and it involves just one item – a pillowcase!</p> <p>To dust off the fans, simply cover a pillow case over the blades and slide it off. The dirt will get caught up inside the case instead of floating down in chunks, and all the corners of the blades will be covered.</p> <p>Afterwards, you can throw the dust and dirt off to the bin and wash the pillowcase.</p> <p>This trick will help you keep the fans spotless in your home, while giving an extra purpose to your old pillowcases. Alternatively, you can pick up a pillowcase from a discount store for as cheap as $3.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BHU58J9DJto/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BHU58J9DJto/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">We're huge fans of this technique! #chicago #cleaning #summer #easycleaning #cleaninghacks #fan #cleaningservice #appointmentsavailable #easyclean #quickclean</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/beltrancleaning/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Beltran Cleaning Service</a> (@beltrancleaning) on Jul 1, 2016 at 10:07am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Household tip: Do you dread cleaning your ceiling fan blades because of the mess? Try placing a pillow case over the blades then wiping the fan clean. No more dust in your face! So quick and easy too. <a href="https://t.co/7RoBJutPiZ">pic.twitter.com/7RoBJutPiZ</a></p> — Camden Hunters Creek (@CamdenHntrsCrk) <a href="https://twitter.com/CamdenHntrsCrk/status/930838642066706434?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 15, 2017</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The old pillow case over the ceiling fan blade cleaning tip is genius. 👌🏻👌🏻</p> — Abby Lucas (@YoitsAbbsC) <a href="https://twitter.com/YoitsAbbsC/status/1035903417670086658?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 1, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>For a tougher clean, add water and white vinegar into the mix. Fill a spray bottle with water and two tablespoons of vinegar, and spritz the mixture into the pillowcase.</p> <p>Do you have any tips for cleaning tricky items around your home? Share with us in the comments below. </p>

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6 steps to prepare the garden for winter

<p>At this time of year most gardens are on the cusp of going into their winter dormancy, or are at least having a well-earned slow down. Now is the time to get outdoors and make things neat and tidy.</p> <p>Many of the simple tasks done in autumn prepare the yard for winter and set it up for a cracker of a spring. There is really only one rule of thumb when it comes to the garden at this time of year.</p> <p>If a plant flowers in winter or early spring don’t prune, transplant or divide it in autumn.</p> <p>The exception to this, of course, is roses.</p> <p><strong>1. Know the season</strong></p> <p>We think of spring as planting time but autumn is also the season to plant and transplant many species. Before winter sets in, bulbs need to go in the ground, as do edibles and bare-rooted roses and trees. Many perennials can also be lifted, divided and replanted.</p> <p>Autumn is a good time for this as the soil is still warm, temperatures and evaporation are generally low and the days are still long enough for plants to develop new roots to see them through winter.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Species planted in autumn take off twice as fast when spring arrives.</p> <p><strong>2. Choosing cool bloomers</strong></p> <p>If there’s one group of shrubs that shine in the cooler months, it’s camellias. The three main types are sasanqua, japonica and reticulata, and they flower from as early as late summer right through to spring. </p> <p><strong>3. Pamper the lawn </strong></p> <p>Give the lawn TLC now to help it build resilience to the harsher conditions of winter and keep the grass looking better for longer. </p> <p>Putting in a little effort in autumn will also provide the lawn with enough energy to keep in reserve for its spring surge of growth. </p> <p><strong><u>FEED</u></strong> the grass with a slow-release lawn fertiliser specially formulated for autumn and winter.</p> <p><strong><u>APPLY</u></strong> a hose-on soil stimulant to the lawn such as Seasol to increase biological activity in the soil.</p> <p><strong><u>TREAT</u></strong> the lawn for weeds, looking out for bindii and wintergrass. Remove by hand if possible, otherwise apply a selective lawn weeder. </p> <p>If you have a buffalo type of grass such as Sir Walter or Palmetto, ensure you use a selective herbicide that is safe for the species.</p> <p><strong><u>RAKE </u></strong>the lawn to keep it free from fallen leaves, as even the slightest reduction in sunlight can reduce the ability of grass to photosynthesise<br />at this time of year. </p> <p><strong><u>MOW</u></strong> with the catcher if your lawn is prone to staying damp in the cooler months, as a build-up of organic matter in wintry conditions can lead to fungal problems.   </p> <p>Give plants a gentle feed to see them through the harsh winter months, to stimulate soil microbial activity and to allow plants to store away energy reserves for the coming spring. </p> <p>At this time of year, the new generation of biofertilisers and pelletised or powdered organic derived fertilisers are the best option, supplemented with an application of a seaweed tonic.</p> <p><strong><u>WATER </u></strong>the garden well before application or apply after an autumn rain shower.</p> <p><strong><u>SPREAD</u></strong> away from the trunk. The highest concentration of feeder roots is generally around and outside the drip-line of the canopy.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Water in dry products well to reduce the risk of scorching.</p> <p><strong>4. Plant and move </strong></p> <p>The right plants to get in the ground now include shrubs, both winter and spring flowering annuals, and edibles. But the varieties can vary dramatically with region so always check with your local garden centre. </p> <p>Here are a few simple guidelines to follow to ensure success when planting or transplanting in autumn. </p> <p><strong><u>DIG </u></strong>the planting hole double the size and slightly deeper than the rootball. </p> <p>Ensure the soil on the sides isn’t smooth and compressed. If it is, open it up with a fork or the roots will take much longer to colonise outside the planting hole.</p> <p><strong><u>WATER</u></strong> well before and after planting with a fertiliser that encourages root development or a seaweed tonic such as Seasol. </p> <p>This helps reduce transplant shock and speeds up establishment.</p> <p><strong><u>BLEND</u></strong> compost or soil improver into the planting hole, making sure the material suits the needs of the plant.</p> <p><strong><u>POSITION</u></strong> the plant so it’s no deeper in the hole than the top of the soil from its pot and gently backfill. </p> <p>Firm down the soil around the side of the rootball but don’t overly compress it then mound a 50mm high watering dam in a circle about 150mm out from the trunk. </p> <p><strong><u>FEED</u></strong> by spreading a slow-release product such as Scotts Osmocote on the surface, or apply a gentle organic fertiliser like blood and bone, before watering in. Don’t put fertiliser in the planting hole as this can lead to root burn. </p> <p><strong><u>MULCH</u></strong> well once planted, keeping it clear of the stems.</p> <p><strong>What to plant</strong></p> <ul> <li>Trees and shrubs </li> <li>Azalea</li> <li>Camellia</li> <li>Citrus</li> <li>Natives</li> <li>Bare-rooted or bagged roses, fruit and deciduous trees</li> <li>Annuals </li> <li>Penstemon</li> <li>Poppy</li> <li>Pansy and viola</li> <li>Lupin</li> <li>Calendula</li> <li>Marigold</li> <li>Chrysanthemum</li> <li>Vegies </li> <li>Winter lettuce</li> <li>Cabbage</li> <li>Kale</li> <li>Broad beans</li> <li>English spinach</li> <li>Onion and shallot</li> <li>Radish</li> <li>Prune and train </li> </ul> <p>To keep plants under control or to a desired form, you need to prune. But the type of pruning you do in autumn depends on the climate zone.</p> <p>In a frost-prone area don’t prune anything that will reshoot quickly, as new growth may be damaged by frost. </p> <p>And if a plant is going to flower in winter or spring, apart from roses, pruning now will be at the expense of the flowering display for this year.</p> <p>Specimen plants and hedges can be heavily pruned or lightly clipped. Each tip that is cut off will send out at least two new side-shoots, improving the density of the foliage of those plants grown for screening. </p> <p>On many shrubs the tips include the remaining stems of last season’s flowerheads, so cut them off to encourage new buds. With roses this may induce a late autumn flush of flowers, depending on the climate.</p> <p>Cut off any damaged or diseased material from hedges, tip-pruning to remove the affected leaves, then rake up and dispose of the clippings.</p> <p>Climbers throw out sprawling shoots over summer. Prune these back to encourage bushiness, then tie or train the remainder back. </p> <p>As many climbers flower on new growth tips, this pruning also ensures a full flush of flowers next season.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Don’t prune either ornamental or fruiting grapes until June and give roses an annual winter prune in July.</p> <p><strong>5. Mulch for health </strong></p> <p>The simplest, most effective and sustainable thing you can do in your garden is to mulch. </p> <p>Whether you use an organically derived mulch like leaf litter or an inorganic mulch such as pebbles, the benefits gained are huge. </p> <p>Mulch helps soil retain moisture, buffers it from temperature drops and suppresses weeds. At this time of year your mulch is likely to need a top-up. </p> <p>The best time to mulch is after feeding, especially with organic matter as the mulch suppresses its odour. </p> <p>Calculate the amount of mulch required by multiplying the square metres to cover. One cubic metre of mulch covers 20 square metres when spread 50mm deep, which is the recommended thickness. </p> <p>The cheapest way to buy mulch is to order it in bulk from a landscape supplier and have it delivered. </p> <p>If you don’t need a whole load, share the cost with a neighbour and you’ll both save. For smaller areas you can buy mulch by the bag from a garden centre.</p> <p><strong><u>WATER</u></strong> the soil well or apply mulch after rain, spreading any fertilisers first. If extra weed suppression is required, lay weedmat or old newspaper to five sheets thick.</p> <p><strong><u>SPREAD </u></strong>mulch to 50mm thick, keeping it clear of trunks as contact can allow fungus or rot to develop in the trunk or stem.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Cover all  exposed soil then water in the mulch well.</p> <p><strong>6. Divide and multiply </strong></p> <p>While transplanting in autumn take the opportunity to lift and divide summer flowering plants. One clump of plants with fleshy storage roots like iris, agapanthus or canna can give you enough new plants from old for an entire border.</p> <p><strong>Step 1. Clear the bed</strong></p> <p>Lift the plant by using a sharp spade to dig around and raise the biggest ball you can. Locate a point that will allow you to cut or break off a section with a strong point of leaf growth and good root mass.<br />TIP The plants to be lifted should be watered well the day before.</p> <p><strong>Step 2. Split the crown</strong></p> <p>Split the crown or the rhizome into suitably sized pieces using a sharp spade, secateurs or garden knife. Each divided section will need to have a reasonable amount of foliage and clump of roots and or rhizomes attached. Discard any obviously dead bits from the divided plants.</p> <p><strong>Step 3. Trim the foliage</strong></p> <p>Trim the foliage back by up to half and reduce the root size to encourage new leaves, as well as minimise division and transplant shock by reducing moisture lost through transpiration. Replant or pot up the divided plant in fresh mix then water in gently with a seaweed tonic.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <span><a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/preparing-garden-winter">Handyman Australia</a></span>.</em></p>

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How to repot a plant the right way

<p>Plants are often left in the pots they came home in, but those plastic containers don’t do much for outdoor aesthetics and nursery sizes are only to be used for a limited period.</p> <p>When a plant outgrows its pot, it becomes hard for it to take up oxygen, moisture and nutrients, so growth may suffer, and the plant could die.</p> <p>When choosing a container, the main points to consider are drainage, the weight after potting mix is added and how porous the material is.</p> <p>“Consumer tastes have evolved from basic terracotta and glazed pots, with the new products made from composite materials now in demand,” says Simon Hupfeld of Northcote Pottery.</p> <p>“Lightweight materials like fibre clay and glass reinforced cement are especially popular and offer many practical benefits given their increased manoeuvrability and functionality.”</p> <p>When it’s time to repot, use the opportunity to update your containers, selecting colours, shapes and sizes that can be used to create a few showpieces in the garden.</p> <p>“We have noticed a move away from plain finishes on pots towards textured surfaces and the addition of subtle details that accent the pot and add character,” says Simon. </p> <p>“Our latest range features a wide variety of finishes and details, from stone and rustic textures to scrolls and floral patterns.”</p> <p><strong>Choosing a container </strong></p> <p><strong><u>Terracotta containers</u></strong> are porous and dry out quickly, making them perfect for plants and herbs that need good drainage such as lavender and rosemary. Painting the interior walls with a pot sealer can reduce evaporation for thirstier plants.</p> <p><strong><u>Plastic pots</u></strong> are lightweight, inexpensive and easy to move around but don’t provide protection against temperature extremes. Plant roots can get hot in summer and cold in winter, which can affect growth.</p> <p><strong><u>Stone, ceramic and concrete</u></strong> pots are heavy, but less likely to dry out on hot or windy days than terracotta and are good at keeping an even temperature in the soil.</p> <p><strong>Drainage solutions </strong></p> <p>Pots can provide excellent drainage, but the plants depend on you for water and nutrients. </p> <p>Consider each plant when repotting, choosing a slightly larger container with good drainage. </p> <p>Five to seven holes around the edge of the pot base provide better drainage than one in the middle.</p> <p>Drill extra holes or pop a smaller well-draining pot into a container with no holes, elevating it slightly.</p> <p>Regularly empty the excess liquid that collects in the larger pot to stop mosquitoes breeding and reduce the risk of stagnant water smells.</p> <p><strong>Recycled Planters </strong></p> <p>Another option for growing in pots is to make use of recycled objects. Take a creative approach and mix a random collection for a display that dazzles.</p> <p>Wheelbarrows, buckets and even an old laundry tub can all be turned into homes for plants. Whatever the container, the size determines the type of species that can be grown.</p> <p>Shallow-rooted vegies like lettuce or chives grow well in small vessels about 200mm deep. Plants with long root systems like carrot and parsnip need larger, deeper containers. </p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> To improve drainage, add a layer of gravel to the base of the container.</p> <p><strong>Repot a root-bound plant </strong></p> <p>Before repotting, soak the plant in its pot in a bucket of diluted Seasol for 10 minutes to reduce the stress of the procedure. TIP Don’t repot plants on a very hot day.</p> <p><strong>Step 1. Trim the roots</strong></p> <p>Trim the roots growing out of the drainage holes using sharp secateurs for a clean cut.</p> <p><strong>Step 2. Tease the rootball</strong></p> <p>Tease out the rootball by hand to encourage roots to grow down rather than around the pot wall.</p> <p><strong>Step 3. Plant and water</strong></p> <p>Water in well after planting into a slightly larger pot with fresh potting mix and firming it down.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/how-repot-plant">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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Brace yourselves: 3 new species of Aussie spiders have just been discovered

<p>Three new species of spiders have been discovered – and thankfully, they are "completely harmless" to humans.</p> <p>The three peacock spiders were found and hand-collected by Project Maratus in the Lake Jasper and Mount Romance regions of southwestern Australia.</p> <p>Joseph Schubert, spider taxonomist and research assistant at Monash University, announced the discovery on Twitter this week.</p> <p>"They are officially named: Maratus aquilus, Maratus felinus, and Maratus combustus," wrote Schubert.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Meet Australia's three newest species! Here are three brand new peacock spiders that I described from Southwestern Australia, discovered by Project Maratus. As of today they are officially named: Maratus aquilus, Maratus felinus, and Maratus combustus. <a href="https://t.co/eDV6JeCMAp">pic.twitter.com/eDV6JeCMAp</a></p> — Joseph Schubert (@j_schubert__) <a href="https://twitter.com/j_schubert__/status/1102825908526768128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">5 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The critters, which are about the size of a rice grain, have brightly coloured markings on their abdomens.</p> <p>"They're incredibly small but so charismatic and so colourful," Schubert told<span> </span><a href="https://10daily.com.au/news/australia/a190305euv/new-aussie-spiders-are-the-size-of-a-rice-grain-and-harmless-20190306"><em>Ten Daily</em></a>.</p> <p>"Each species has a specific pattern that is different on their abdomen."</p> <p>The name aquilus was based on the markings that resemble an eagle’s face, while felinus referred to the pattern’s resemblance to a cat. On the other hand, combustus reflected the marking’s similarity to a "fiery explosion".</p> <p>Schubert said these three spider species will not be able to bite or hurt people due to their small size.</p> <p>"Fear of creepy crawlies in Australia is somewhat irrational," said Schubert, explaining that only a handful of spider species in the country pose a significant threat to a human's life.</p> <p>Schubert said 73 Maratus species have been identified and named so far.</p> <p>The discovery brought the tally of described peacock spiders to 74, of which 29 are exclusively found in Southwestern Australia. Schubert referred to the areas in Western Australia as "biodiversity hotspots".</p>

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A quick guide on growing rhododendrons

<p>Stealing the show in spring, rhododendrons are covered with large clusters of flowers, and many keep their foliage year-round.</p> <p>Autumn is the best time to plant them, so the roots develop before winter sets in. Avoid planting in midsummer.</p> <p>Most varieties prefer lightly shaded areas sheltered from the wind. </p> <p>The soil should be well-drained, so if it is heavy, loosen it and dig in organic matter like leaf mould or pine needles and a generous amount of potting mix. </p> <p>Plant the rootball just below the surface, taking care not to stamp on it when firming up the soil. </p> <p>If the plant is looking unhappy after a year or so, it can be moved to another spot. Ensure the rootball is moist, dig it out and replant, then water in and add mulch. </p> <p><strong>1. Test the soil </strong></p> <p>Rhododendrons like an acidic soil with a pH level of 4.5-5.5. If it’s too alkaline, growth will be stunted, and the leaves will turn yellowish.</p> <p><strong>2. Plant in pots </strong></p> <p>If the soil in your garden is high in lime, don’t plant rhododendrons in the ground, grow them in large pots.</p> <p><strong><u>USE </u></strong>a potting mix with a high acidity to provide the correct soil conditions.</p> <p><strong><u>MAKE</u></strong> a hole twice the size of the rootball and tease out the roots. </p> <p><strong><u>WATER</u></strong> the shrub in well to remove air pockets and keep the roots moist. </p> <p><strong>3. Keep them flourishing </strong></p> <p>Rhododendrons are shallow-rooted and don’t like the ground beneath them to be overly raked or dug over. </p> <p>In prolonged dry periods, water regularly and mulch with pine needles. </p> <p>To prepare them for the cooler weather, water well in late autumn if there hasn’t been much rain. </p> <p>They generally don’t freeze in winter, but they will dry out if the leaves lose water through evaporation and the roots are in frozen ground. </p> <p>For healthy growth, cut off dead flowers in late spring and spread a thick layer of bark mulch. </p> <p>They don’t need regular pruning, but tip pruning while the plant is still small encourages bushy growth.</p> <p><strong><u>GROW TIP:</u></strong> Apply an acidifying fertiliser in spring or add a 50mm layer of half-rotted compost, taking care not to disturb the roots of the rhododendrons. </p> <p><em>Written by Lee Dashiell. Republished with permission from <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/how-grow-rhododendrons">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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A quick guide to growing frangipanis

<p>Plant a frangipani and bring a wonderful heady perfume to the garden, especially in the evening. And the long flowering period ensures you can enjoy the scent for many months. </p> <p>The beautiful flowers set against exotic, large green leaves will also add a touch of tropical splendour.   </p> <p>Native to South and Central America, Mexico and the Caribbean, frangipanis (Plumeria) are at home in any warm climate garden and are very common in coastal suburbs. </p> <p>Depending on the species, they grow into small trees from 3-6m tall with a wide umbrella-like habit that’s ideal for providing shade. </p> <p>There are both deciduous and evergreen species, with dwarf and semi-dwarf cultivars being suited to containers and small gardens. </p> <p>To decorate the bare winter branches, use them as a support for bromeliads and orchids. </p> <p><strong><u>TIP:</u></strong> Grown out of the tropics, most evergreens drop some leaves in winter. </p> <p><strong>1. Choose a colour</strong></p> <p>In Australia, frangipanis are sold by colour and variety, and the further north you go, the wider the choice. </p> <p>Breeding has resulted in more than 350 varieties in different colour forms, including shades of pink, red, yellow, orange and purple, as well as bicolours.</p> <p>The hardiest frangipani in climates like Sydney is the deciduous Plumeria rubravar. acutifolia. It bears creamy white flowers with yellow centres from late spring, and there are breeds with different-coloured centres.</p> <p>The evergreen white-flowering Plumeria obtusa, commonly known as ‘Singapore White’, grows best in semi-tropical and tropical areas. </p> <p>Recent breeding of ‘Singapore White’ with other species has produced a range of colours</p> <p><strong>2. What's in a name </strong></p> <p>The scientific name for frangipani is Plumeria. Plumeria is the genus name of frangipani and pays tribute to 17th century French botanist Charles Plumier, who documented many South American plants and animals. </p> <p>The common name, frangipani, was the name of an Italian perfume that was created by the Marquis Frangipani and used to scent gloves in the 16th century. </p> <p>When the frangipani flower was discovered, its fragrance reminded people of the scented gloves, which is how the flower got its name. </p> <p><strong>3. Raising in pots </strong></p> <p>Frangipanis are slow growing, so they’re perfect for pots on sunny balconies and courtyards.  </p> <p>To make sure they don’t blow over, plant them in wide-based pots with good drainage and use a premium potting mix.  </p> <p>Water pots every 2-3 days in summer, but let the potting mix nearly dry out in winter in between waterings. </p> <p><strong><u>TIP:</u></strong> Apply a controlled-release fertiliser in spring and summer. </p> <p><em>Written by Cheryl Maddocks. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/quick-guide-frangipanis">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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Never iron again! The $35 Kmart hack that will change your life

<p>It might be time for you to pack away the ironing board and throw out the iron that has ruined many family’s days – this new ironing hack can lighten your workload in no time.</p> <p>Do you have a work shirt that needs the creases taken out? Or how about a grandkids uniform that didn’t come ironed when they were dropped off before school? </p> <p>Kmart's garment steamer, which is only $35, might be able to solve all the issues you could be facing – it can remove creases and wrinkles from clothing to home linen, and even curtains. </p> <p>This home product is lightweight, compact and easy to use – and it's ready to go in just 30 seconds after turning it on. The steamer also claims to remove odour from your garments too.</p> <p>One user of the product, Elizabeth, says the steamer has replaced her iron at home.</p> <p>“It works on every type of garment, even curtains. I was a bit wary of having this break down, but it has defied expectations and been steady and reliable,” she said in an online review.</p> <p>“It’s nice and sturdy and should last. No staining or damage to clothing at all. I recommend this product,” another fan of the time-saving invention said.</p> <p>If you’re willing to splash out an extra $14 for the product, then you can get the standalone steamer for $49, which gives you 50 minutes of continuous steam.</p> <p>This product might be the miracle you’ve been looking for to lighten your load at home.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the steamer everyone is going crazy for. </p> <p>Will you be trying out Kmart's $35 laundry hack to ease your load at home? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Woman discovers nasty surprise in her dryer: "My heart was racing"

<p>A woman from Florida in the US has experienced a nasty surprise as she unloaded her washing from the dryer.</p> <p>Amanda Wise explained that she had made her coffee on Monday morning and went to unload the clothes from the dryer.</p> <p>It was when she reached the bottom of the dryer that she found a corn snake.</p> <p>“If there’s one thing I am terrified of (other than flying) it’s snakes,” she shared on Facebook.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Famanda.smith.731572%2Fposts%2F10216791492011510&amp;width=500" width="500" height="764" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Although corn snakes are believed to be harmless, Wise described the experience as a “near-death” one due to her intense fear.</p> <p>“I have never run so fast in my life. My heart was racing, my legs were shaking and I burst into a sweat,” Wise explained.</p> <p>She eventually saw the funny side and shared her reaction to the snake, which was caught on security cameras within her home.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Famanda.smith.731572%2Fvideos%2F10216792351312992%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="470" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>“I apologise in advance for my mouth but this was too funny not to share (after the fact),” said Wise.</p> <p>“We have security cameras in the house – which just happened to catch me running in from the garage.”</p> <p>The snake was quickly removed outside thanks to Wise’s husband “the snake tamer”.</p> <p>Have you ever found an unexpected guest in your home? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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5 ways to make cut flowers last

<p>Creating an eye-catching floral arrangement isn't as easy as bunching a few blooms together.</p> <p>A well-considered yet relaxed large display of flowers takes time and planning but will be a visual treat that makes a statement in the room with its burst of colours, textures and heights.</p> <p>But all this preparation can go to waste quickly if you don't prepare them to last as long as possible.</p> <p>These five easy tips will make your investment in real flowers pay off.</p> <p><strong>1. Slice the stems</strong></p> <p>Put freshly cut flowers in a bucket of lukewarm water for several hours.</p> <p>Next, working underwater, cut 25 to 50mm off the stems on a 45° angle using sharp, clean scissors.</p> <p><strong>2. Avoid overcrowding</strong></p> <p>Don’t jam a bunch of flowers into a vase that’s too small, as the stems need to breathe.</p> <p>If they’re crammed together, the stems wilt quickly and release bacteria into the water.</p> <p><strong>3. Pick the spot</strong></p> <p>Keep flowers out of direct sunlight and away from cigarette smoke and the fruit bowl, as ripening fruit gives off a gas that causes flowers to wilt faster.</p> <p>Remove any spent blooms.</p> <p><strong>4. Spray them fresh</strong></p> <p>A spritz of hairspray can help preserve the colour and shape of flowers.</p> <p>Hold the can 300mm away from the arrangement and spray the undersides of the leaves and petals.</p> <p><strong>5. Make sugar water</strong></p> <p>Dissolve three tablespoons of sugar and two tablespoons of white vinegar per litre of lukewarm water.</p> <p>Cover the stems by up to 100mm of the sugar water and change it every few days.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to gather inspiration for your own flower arrangements.</p> <p><em>Written by Daniel Butkovich. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/5-ways-make-cut-flowers-last">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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Mum "blown away" by $1.25 ALDI hack that removes marker from her favourite chair

<p>Nothing says destruction like a child with a marker. It’s surprising just how quickly they can wreak havoc, as within a split second your previously immaculate walls and furniture are now covered in different coloured scribbles that are impossible to remove.</p> <p>But one mum from Western Australia found a solution to the sneaky habit and revealed that a $1.25 Di-San pre-wash stain remover from ALDI is the perfect way to remove unwanted markings.</p> <p>“And this is why I constantly recommend ALDI’s stain remover spray,” Nicola Joanne wrote in Facebook group Mums Who Clean.</p> <p>“Haven’t found a stain it hasn’t removed yet.”</p> <p>Nicola – who posted a photo of her beloved Kmart velvet chair covered in scribbles – revealed the back story behind the piece of furniture.</p> <p>“Miss 2 snuck into miss 7’s room and into her art supplies while I was cooking dinner and used the beloved Kmart blush velvet chair as her canvas.”</p> <p>Speaking to<em> </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://homes.nine.com.au/2019/02/22/17/05/mum-removes-marker-from-favourite-kmart-chair-with-dollar-aldi-product" target="_blank"><em>9Honey Homes</em></a>, Nicola says that in as little as 10 minutes, her chair was as good as new.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7824030/scribble.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8a5f7899748b410085137f74a8be9c7f" /></p> <p>“I have two children, so stains are a common thing in my house,” said Nicola.</p> <p>“The process I used was fairly simple: I sprayed the chair with the Di-San and with a slightly wet sponge wiped the chair.</p> <p>“The coloured Texta came off fairly easy, the black needed a little more persuasion.</p> <p>“Once the Texta was off, I went over the chair with a clean damp microfiber cloth to clean off the product, then I used a clean towel to help dry the chair a little.</p> <p>“I left it overnight to dry completely, but the cleaning process probably took about ten minutes or so.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Be4v4S5FX1n/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Be4v4S5FX1n/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Charlotte Launa (@charlottelauna)</a> on Feb 6, 2018 at 11:13pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Nicola’s post has been considered a lifesaver for many families around the country, as it has racked up over 1000 likes with many thanking her for the tip.</p> <p>“I love this spray … works like a dream!” said one user.</p> <p>“It’s the best stuff we use it on our clothes that have had stains we couldn’t get out for ages and they’re gone!” said another.</p> <p>Nicola says that even if the product doesn’t work the way you want it to, at that price, you really cannot go wrong.</p> <p>Will you be trying out this genius ALDI hack to remove unwanted stains? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Do it yourself: Plant bare-root roses

<p>The best time to plant roses is winter, when they are in a period of dormancy. It’s also when roses are readily available as budget-friendly bare-root plants. In this form they look just like a bunch of thorny sticks, so read the plant tag carefully. The tag gives you a good description of what the rose will look like in bloom, and the conditions in which it should be grown.</p> <p>Rose breeders are constantly coming up with beautiful new colours, scents and forms, and enthusiasts look forward to seeing what’s in store for next season. There are also trends in growing, so a type of rose that was popular decades ago can make a comeback. Think about what you want from a rose before you head to the nursery. To cover a wall or fence you should choose a climber rather than a shrub rose. But to create big blocks of colour or mass plantings, use floribunda rather than miniature varieties.  <br /> <br />Before planting, cut back the stems to above a healthy bud and remove any spindly looking shoots. Cut back long shoots by a third to a half, and trim excessively long roots to about 250mm so they fit in the planting hole.</p> <p><strong>Growing guide:</strong></p> <p>Follow these simple steps on how to plant and care for roses for years of beautiful blooms.<br /> <br /><strong><u>PLANT</u></strong> in well-drained soil with a pH of 5.5 to 6 and added organic material.<br /> <br /><strong><u>CHOOSE </u></strong>a sunny, sheltered position and do not underplant.<br /> <br /><strong><u>SPACE </u></strong>plants about a metre apart for good air circulation to help prevent fungal diseases.<br /> <br /><strong><u>WATER </u></strong>regularly the first year and deeply in hot, dry weather.<br /> <br /><strong><u>CHECK</u></strong> regularly for pests or diseases and treat immediately. <br /> <br /><strong><u>DEADHEAD </u></strong>flowers as they finish blooming to encourage more flowers and tear off any suckers as they appear.<br /> <br /><strong><u>PRUNE</u></strong> in winter and apply a preventative fungicide.<br /> <br /><strong><u>FERTILISE</u></strong> regularly for healthy growth and plenty of blooms.<br /> <br /><strong>TIP:</strong> Companion plant roses with chives to avoid powdery mildew.</p> <p><strong>Types of Roses:</strong></p> <p>A single rose flower is normally made up of five petals, where you can see the centre of the bloom. A double has the appearance of another flower inside the five petals. There are seven types of roses, with various sizes and habits.</p> <p><strong>1. Species rose</strong></p> <p>A single flower of five petals, some double flowered. Blooms in spring with ferny foliage. Varieties include: Moyesii, Primula and Rugosa. </p> <p><strong>2. Climbing and rambling roses</strong></p> <p>Climbing plants that can reach up to three metres in height. Climbers have a single fragrant bloom while ramblers have trusses of flowers. Flower display in spring.</p> <p>Climber varieties include, Clair Matin, Climbing Iceberg and Golden Showers. </p> <p>Rambler varieties include, Albertine, Dorothy Perkins and Excelsa. </p> <p><strong>3. Floribunda rose</strong></p> <p>Large clusters of flowers that may be single, semi-double or double. Blooms throughout the year. Varieties include, Apricot Nectar, Iceberg, Sexy Rexy and Satchmo. </p> <p><strong>4. Modern shrub rose</strong></p> <p>Bushy plant with an average height and width of two metres. Single or double flowers that repeat-bloom. Flower display in spring, summer and autumn. Varieties include, Autumn Delight, Golden Wings, Felicia, Titanic and Uncle Walter. </p> <p><strong>5. Old rose</strong></p> <p>Double flowers with strong fragrance. Blooms in late spring and early summer. Varieties inlcude, Charles de Mills, William Lobb, Celsiana Cecile and Brunner. </p> <p><strong>6. Miniature rose</strong></p> <p>Semi-double or double flowers 20 to 40mm in diameter with bushes 200 to 500mm high. Blooms in spring, summer and autumn. Varieties inlcude, Beauty Secret, Gold Coin, Rise ’n’ Shine, Starina and Love Potion. </p> <p><strong>7. Hybrid tea rose</strong></p> <p>Deeply scented double flowers that are up to 150mm across. Blooms in spring, summer and autumn. Varieties include, Double Delight, Fragrant Cloud, Mister Lincoln and Pascali. </p> <p><strong>How to plant bare root roses:</strong></p> <p>Before planting, cut back the stems to above a healthy bud and remove any spindly looking shoots. Cut back long shoots by a third to a half, and trim excessively long roots to about 250mm so they fit in the planting hole.</p> <p><strong><u>Step 1. Position the plant</u></strong></p> <p>Position in a hole that’s twice the width and the same depth as the bud join on the stem, spreading out the roots.</p> <p><strong><u>Step 2. Backfill with soil</u></strong></p> <p>Backfill a little at a time and use your fingers to gently work the soil under and around the roots to eliminate air pockets.</p> <p><strong><u>Step 3. Firm the soil</u></strong></p> <p>Firm down the soil when the hole is completely filled and water deeply to ensure there are no air pockets below the surface.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/plant-bare-root-roses">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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See the flower that has been named after Duchess Meghan

<p>A flower has been named in honour of Duchess Meghan.</p> <p>The Royal Horticultural Society has officially named a flower after the Duchess of Sussex.</p> <p>The Clematis Meghan flower, bred by New Leaf Plants, is described as “an exquisite new large-flowering clematis” with “rich and opulent magenta-purple” colour that “will really make an impact when planted in borders or larger pots”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">"The flower is a purple-pink clematis flower, known as the clematis Meghan. But unlike the Duchess, who blooms all the time with her gorgeous smile and super sweet personality, this clematis only blooms two times a year."<a href="https://t.co/a3RVj49B6D">https://t.co/a3RVj49B6D</a> <a href="https://t.co/7FS6ypGVgX">pic.twitter.com/7FS6ypGVgX</a></p> — Duchess Meg (@DuchessMegFan) <a href="https://twitter.com/DuchessMegFan/status/1096830484070494208?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 16, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The flower will have its official launch at the charity’s Chelsea Flower Show in May.</p> <p>It is not the only royal attraction at the upcoming flower show. Also set to make its debut is the RHS Back to Nature Garden, which is <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/the-palace-announces-duchess-kates-surprise-new-project/" target="_blank">co-designed</a> by Duchess Kate with landscape architects Andrée Davies and Adam White. The garden is based in a woodland setting and aimed as a space for families.</p> <p>Clematis Meghan is the latest flower to be named in honour of a royal family member. The latest royal-named bloom was Clematis ‘Prince Louis’, a violet-blue clematis that flowers in the summer. Queen Elizabeth also received her namesake rose in recognition of her ascension to the throne in 1952, while Princess Diana has a dahlia named in her memory.</p> <p>Click through the gallery above to see the royal flowers.</p> <p>What do you think of the namesake flower? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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"What is the correct amount of towels to own?" Man sparks heated online debate

<p>A man has accidentally started a Twitter debate with an innocuous question.</p> <p>Photographer Abdul Dremali took to the social media platform to settle a discussion between himself and his partner.</p> <p>"My girlfriend and I have a question," he wrote. "What is the correct amount of towels to own? I said 10 and she looked at me like I was crazy. We have zero frame of reference on the appropriate amount of towels in a household of two."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">hello fellow adults. my gf and i have a question... what is the correct amount of towels to own? i said 10 and she looked at me like i was crazy. we have zero frame of reference on the appropriate amount of towels in a household of two.</p> — abdul (@Advil) <a href="https://twitter.com/Advil/status/1097218169062731776?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The post has garnered more than 10,000 likes at the time of writing, attracting arrays of responses and opinions on the appropriate number of towels to have.</p> <p>Some answered Dremali's question with the correct number.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">10 is appropriate</p> — jerm (@yung__father) <a href="https://twitter.com/yung__father/status/1097219654597201922?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">plus another two or three per dog</p> — 🌈fat bottomed squirrels (@squilax_mcg) <a href="https://twitter.com/squilax_mcg/status/1097220589188608000?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">10-15 for two people is appropriate. You could never have too many towels. I believe I have 12 for two people and I wish I had more. I could not stress this enough. YOU CAN NEVER HAVE TOO MANY TOWELS.</p> — Tommy Tucker (@Always_Business) <a href="https://twitter.com/Always_Business/status/1097310751633653760?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">6 big nice towels<br />6 nice hand towels<br />4 - 6 fancy hand towels<br />6 washcloths <br />3 gross towels doe dogs/mud/whatever <br />2 backups just in case</p> — Lizzie O'Leary (@lizzieohreally) <a href="https://twitter.com/lizzieohreally/status/1097313037642543105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Some gave practical tips.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">12+<br />My father's rule of thumb was to have enough to skip laundry for 2 weeks. I keep enough for at least 3. <a href="https://t.co/NOwxrDcvlg">https://t.co/NOwxrDcvlg</a></p> — R. A. Scientist (@CoquiTalksTrash) <a href="https://twitter.com/CoquiTalksTrash/status/1097495810261114880?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">You’re overthinking this. Are your closets overflowing with clean towels that never get out into rotation? Too many towels. Are you always rushing to launder towels? Too few towels.</p> — Peter Conley (@talkinaway) <a href="https://twitter.com/talkinaway/status/1097226765771116544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>And as the debate went on, quibbles over towel categories emerged.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">What’s the difference between a bath sheet and a bath towel??</p> — Asha Rangappa (@AshaRangappa_) <a href="https://twitter.com/AshaRangappa_/status/1097330266899730432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Bath sheet: An extra-large bath towel.<br /><br />Bath towel: Thing your tall friends never “borrow” from hotels. <a href="https://t.co/To6mdli1bZ">https://t.co/To6mdli1bZ</a></p> — Dictionary.com (@Dictionarycom) <a href="https://twitter.com/Dictionarycom/status/1097514381099831297?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Bath Sheets are actually a thing. Though these days not many people use them regularly as most people use a combination of bath robes + head towel + bath towel etc. Here’s a visual comparison of bath towel vs bath sheet <a href="https://t.co/gmm0OzBkVw">pic.twitter.com/gmm0OzBkVw</a></p> — Purva 🇨🇦🇬🇧🇫🇷🌈 (@purva_creations) <a href="https://twitter.com/purva_creations/status/1097398193611046912?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">2. For those asking what a bath sheet is, here’s a handy chart. <br /><br />cc: <a href="https://twitter.com/Advil?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Advil</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/jbillinson?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jbillinson</a> <a href="https://t.co/p2oYTD0bGI">pic.twitter.com/p2oYTD0bGI</a></p> — Yashar Ali 🐘 (@yashar) <a href="https://twitter.com/yashar/status/1097313460654813184?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>How many towels (or bath sheets) do you own? Share with us in the comments.</p>

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"Everything's big here": North Queensland mum unfazed by huge 5m snake

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p style="text-align: left;">A resident of Mission Beach, Queensland, says she was unfazed after spotting a five-metre long python weighing close to 40kg in her laundry.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Lee-Ann Kennedy recalled the story of how she and her husband woke to the barking of their dog at 4:30 am on Friday – a warning that she “initially ignored” before her husband urged her to come and see what he had found.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Coming across a giant python consuming a baby wallaby in their shed, the couple say they weren’t shocked in the slightest and had a “quiet drink” afterwards.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">“It went to go out of the shed but then it moved into the laundry … we thought it was better to close the doors and keep him there because at least we knew where he was,” said Ms Kennedy.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Ms Kennedy then called a snake catcher after locking the serpent in the laundry. The people behind the heroic capture were Charlie Bear and her nephew Tom Geary who lent a helping hand.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Sharing the video to Facebook, the snake can be seen being dragged by two people as it refuses to be captured.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fmegan.prouse%2Fvideos%2F10155757262347373%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=267" width="267" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe> <p>When the catchers finally got their hands on the massive snake and placed it in a bag, the reptile managed to escape with the bag on the verge of ripping due to the sheer size of the reptile.</p> <p>After two unsuccessful attempts, the snake managed to remain in the bag after trapping it with a sheet.</p> <p>Ms Kennedy thanked the two catchers, who then relocated the snake to a national park.</p> <p>The python is said to be around 30-40 years old.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="/media/7823702/snakee.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f60ebe45258e495fb2f5e39a8fb16352" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/megan.prouse?eid=ARB-6GQbpFkbamCe_CnWN7B7Xs3rzGmFB7o33HdXZJSd2UAQq-yusD9hYcAxVuEGePJCQd76f9ISHX3_">Facebook</a></em></p> <p>“Charlie said it was great to see a snake that big, at least humans haven’t killed everything yet,” she said.</p> <p>She said the ordeal was an “amazing” experience, but something that is not out of the ordinary in far North Queensland.</p> <p>“It’s really great advertising for far North Queensland, come here and you’re bound to have a great experience, whether it be pythons, Hercules moths, Ulysses butterflies or crocodiles."</p> <p>Ms Kennedy added, “Everything’s just big here.”</p> <p>She also confessed that the terrifying experience wasn’t her first.</p> <p>“I’ve had another snake in my bathroom, he was a bush python too and all he wanted to do was look at himself in the mirror, it was really funny,” said Ms Kennedy.</p> <p>“After Cyclone Yasi, my son heard noises at his home and went looking outside and found a python killing a wallaby.</p> <p>“Far North Queensland is a little bit different isn’t?” she said. “We just take it in our stride.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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5 ways to attract birds to your garden

<p>Birds can be assets in the garden. They assist in pollination, aid in pest control and are generally pleasing to the eye and ears, if you are a fan of birdsong, that is. </p> <p><strong>1. Add native shrubs</strong></p> <p>Plant grevilleas, kangaroo paws and banksias in the garden. These natives are favourites with honeyeaters and rainbow lorikeets, as their beaks are perfectly shaped to get nectar from the blooms. </p> <p><strong>2. Don’t feed them </strong></p> <p>Giving birds food can have a negative impact on their health if it doesn’t provide adequate nutrition. Feeding stations can also cause diseases to spread. So stick to native plants and a supply of clean water.</p> <p><strong>3. Quench their thirst</strong></p> <p>Birds feel safer if their water source is elevated, with a tree near, so they can escape from predators. Keep a birdbath full of clean, fresh water so they know it’s always available and to help reduce the spread of disease.</p> <p><strong>4. Give them shelter</strong></p> <p>Areas with dense foliage make birds feel secure, so combine native grasses with shrubs and flowering gum trees. This will provide a safe haven for them to build nests and forage for seeds, fruit and insects. </p> <p><strong>5. Put up a nest box</strong></p> <p>Certain birds like nesting in tree hollows, but these are often hard to find. Install nest boxes with entrance holes suitable for the local birds, but ensure they’re not too big, as predators can attack the birds or steal the eggs.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/5-ways-attract-birds-your-garden">Handyman Australia</a>.</em></p>

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