Home & Garden

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Jacinda Ardern shows off thrifty item in dining room tour

<p><span>Sometimes, we seem to think we know everything about public figures, but it turns out until yesterday, we didn’t know Jacinda Ardern was a serious thrifter.</span></p> <p><span>During a Facebook Live video yesterday, the Prime Minister of New Zealand started off the live stream but giving a tour of her dining room, which she said was “pretty stock standard, really” despite living at Premier House, the PM’s official residence.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s just a table with some of the features that usually you find in a family home – chalkboard,” Ardern said, gesturing to a chalkboard behind her that had some scrawlings from (we assume) her two-year-old daughter Neve.</span></p> <p><span>However, Ardern showed off an “unusual” feature in her dining room, as she revealed her chairs lived a life before she got her hands on them. </span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 330.173775671406px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836759/screen-shot-2020-07-01-at-110755-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/35e256186ae44ac59de43d2be0d97c1e" /></span></p> <p><span>“Probably the one unusual piece of furniture that is here, I’ll share this with you,” she explained, gesturing to the red leather chairs.</span></p> <p><span>“These are the old Cabinet chairs from back in the day.</span></p> <p><span>“We of course make sure that nothing goes to waste so they’ve been recycled and they’re now our dining room chairs.”</span></p> <p><span>She was quick to admit the chairs weren’t the most comfortable, which is most likely why she added a cushion.</span></p> <p><span>“Not always the most comfortable,” she said, “which perhaps back in the day may have kept Cabinet meetings short.”</span></p> <p><span>Ardern appeared on Facebook to discuss the latest coronavirus developments for New Zealand. </span></p> <p><span>Like Australia, New Zealand was successful at flattening the curve of coronavirus cases early on but has faced challenges as restrictions lifted.</span></p> <p><span>While she had previously declared New Zealand coronavirus-free, a recent spate of cases thanks to travellers has seen her under increased pressure to keep the country’s borders closed.</span></p> <p><span>Speaking to reporters, Arden said opening New Zealand’s borders was “dangerous” and shouldn’t be considered until coronavirus cases drop around the world.</span></p> <p><span>“Any suggestion of borders opening at this point, frankly, is dangerous and I don’t think we should put New Zealand in that position,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>However Ms Ardern was open to the idea of travel between New Zealand and COVID-19-free Australian states, but it would be a matter for Australia when it opened its borders to international travel.</span></p> <p><span>“Ultimately, it’s up to Australia to decide whether or not they’ll go for a whole country approach or a state-by-state approach,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>“Obviously, where there is community outbreak, that is a no-go for New Zealand.</span></p> <p><span>“Where they have border controls in place and where they’ve had no community transmissions for sustained periods of time … that may be a different scenario.”</span></p>

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“Something hatched!" Mum’s disturbing backyard discovery

<p><span>A woman’s terrifying discovery in her yard has left a number of social media users baffled.</span></p> <p><span>The woman, believed to be from Australia, posted a video of a small black mound sitting on top of dirt to a Facebook group last week, as she asked members to help her figure out what it is.</span></p> <p><span>“Has anyone seen these before? Just appeared today in a few spots around the yard. It has been raining here overnight,” she said. </span></p> <p><span>In the footage, the woman touched the mound, causing what appears to be thousands of tiny alive bugs to move.</span></p> <p><span>They seem to go right back to where they were as she pulls her fingers back.</span></p> <p><span>Horrified users on Facebook jokingly told the mum to burn her house down or move away from the “alien eggs”.</span></p> <p><span>“I have never seen anything like that before!” one woman said.</span></p> <p><span>“It looks like kinetic sand,” another wrote. </span></p> <p><span>“Something hatched!” a third chimed in. </span></p> <p><span>But one person revealed that the bugs appear to be springtails, otherwise known as Anurida Maritima.</span></p> <p><span>“Springtails for sure! We have the same thing happen to us and know they come every year. Hate it lol,” someone responded to her. </span></p> <p><span>Springtails are a common occurrence in gardens, but they’re still relatively unknown due to their small size, according to the agricultural school of Texas A&amp;M University.</span></p> <p><span>“Springtails are common insects that live in leaf litter, compost piles and lawn soils, recycling dead plant material into nutrients to fertilise your lawn,” according to the school.</span></p> <p><span>“Only about a millimetre long, springtails are rarely seen, but given the right environmental conditions, they can multiply to become a nuisance.”</span></p> <p><span>They are not harmful and do not bite people, pets, spread disease or damage homes. </span></p>

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The $27 Bunnings cleaning hack that could save you thousands of dollars

<p>The coronavirus pandemic has got Australians cleaning around the house more than ever – and now, a shopper has come up with a cleaning hack that could have households save thousands of dollars.</p> <p>Reddit user <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/australia/comments/gtserm/lpt_go_to_bunnings_for_cleaning_supplies_that_30/">A_Cat_Named_Frank</a> advised visiting the cleaning aisle at Bunnings for a $27.44 product which could make up to 300 litres of spray and wipe.</p> <p>The user pointed out that an equivalent volume of the item – Peerles Jal 5L Active “O” Spray And Wipe Cleaner – could cost a customer $2,700 at Coles or Woolworths.</p> <p>They used the calculation based on a 500mL bottle of Dettol Healthy Clean Kitchen Spray, which retails for $4.50.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836354/jal.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a514c4e5d5ec45faa6955e371fecbbb5" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: Reddit / <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/australia/comments/gtserm/lpt_go_to_bunnings_for_cleaning_supplies_that_30/" target="_blank">u/A_Cat_Named_Frank</a></em></p> <p>The post soon attracted hundreds of comments, with people praising the trick.</p> <p>“Probably the greatest life hack I’ve seen in ages. Thank you!” one comment read.</p> <p>“I use this, great product,” another wrote.</p> <p>“Nice tip! I'm on this one next weekend,” one said.</p> <p>Another user pointed out that the hack also proved to be more affordable than home brand products. “It’s $1.80 for 750ml of Coles brand multipurpose spray. Which is $405 for 300L.”</p>

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The special meaning behind Queen Elizabeth’s favourite flower

<p>The Queen has revealed her favourite flower for the Royal Horticultural Society’s Chelsea Flower Show this year.</p> <p>In honour of the first day of the show, which was moved online this year in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the monarch shared that one of her favourite blooms was lily of the valley.</p> <p>“Members of the Royal Family are taking part in the #MyChelseaGarden campaign, sharing a selection of their favourite plants and flowers at this time of year,” an Instagram post on the Royal Family account read.</p> <p>“The Queen has chosen lily of the valley, pictured here in the Buckingham Palace gardens. Lily of the valley featured in Her Majesty’s coronation bouquet and has held special associations since.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAVRMEpHS4c/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAVRMEpHS4c/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">On the first day of the virtual Chelsea Flower Show, members of the Royal Family are taking part in the #MyChelseaGarden campaign, sharing a selection of their favourite plants and flowers at this time of year. 🌿🌸 . As this year's show coincides with #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek, @the_rhs are encouraging people to brighten their social media feeds with images of plants and gardens, to provide a moment of respite in these challenging times. The Queen has chosen lily of the valley, pictured here in the Buckingham Palace gardens. Lily of the valley featured in Her Majesty’s coronation bouquet and has held special associations since. Visit our website to see #MyChelseaGarden images shared by other members of the Royal Family (link in bio). . #MyChelseaGarden #VirtualChelsea #RHSChelsea</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 18, 2020 at 7:19am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The spring flower is the May birth flower, and is said to bring luck in love.</p> <p>The white buds were also featured in the wedding bouquets of many royals, including Queen Victoria, Princess Astrid of Sweden, Grace Kelly, and Duchess Kate.</p> <p>Other royals also shared their favourite flowers on the Royal Family website. The Queen’s daughter Princess Anne opted for hellebores, stating: “Not only do they flower early but they keep flowering for two months, and they are often beautifully marked with endless variations.”</p> <p>Prince Charles picked delphiniums, while his wife Duchess Camilla chose Alchemilla Mollis. The Duke of Gloucester celebrated daisies, and his wife the Duchess of Gloucester chose sweet peas.</p> <p>Her Majesty’s cousin Princess Alexandra picked the Golden Celebration rose, saying it “gives me great pleasure to look at and has the most extraordinary and unique scent”.</p> <p>The Queen released a special message of support for the show on Monday.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAU3LeuH3HI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAU3LeuH3HI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">The Royal Horticultural Society Chelsea Flower Show is moving online for the first time. 🌸💻 . Visit @the_rhs for a unique timetable of events from Monday 18th to Saturday 23rd May, including gardening advice and virtual sessions. The RHS have been supporting gardeners old and new, with more people than ever accessing the advice pages on their website over recent weeks. Her Majesty has been Patron of the Royal Horticultural Society since 1952 - she first attended the show as Monarch in 1955, and has visited almost every year since. The Queen has today sent her best wishes to all those associated with the RHS: ‘My family and I have always enjoyed visiting the Show, and I know that your Members and Supporters will be disappointed that they are unable to attend in person this year. . ‘I am sure that my grandmother, Queen Mary, who first attended the Chelsea Flower Show in 1916, would be delighted that many people today have an enthusiasm for horticulture, and that gardening remains a popular pastime in the United Kingdom.’ . #RHSChelsea #VirtualChelsea #ChelseaFlowerShow Images: ©️ @the_rhs Lindley Library</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 18, 2020 at 3:32am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I am sure that my grandmother, Queen Mary, who first attended the Chelsea Flower Show in 1916, would be delighted that many people today have an enthusiasm for horticulture, and that gardening remains a popular pastime in the United Kingdom,” she said.</p>

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​ALDI shopper goes viral with bizarre coronavirus headwear

<p><span>A UK man has gone viral on social media for his bizarre headwear during the coronavirus pandemic.</span><br /><br /><span>The man, who was shopping at ALDI, was pictured wearing a shed on his head and quickly after they were posted to Twitter, the images and the post went viral.</span><br /><br /><span>Stunned onlookers could be seen in the pictures.</span><br /><br /><span>Matt Read took the images outside of an ALDI supermarket in Bristol.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836096/twitter-bird-box-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b901ed6530214c1686fabb1e070a7c72" /><br /><br /><span>“Interesting take on PPE queueing to get into my local Aldi,” Matt captioned the snap.</span><br /><br /><span>The hilarious snap left people quite amused, with some calling the idea “impressive”.</span><br /><br /><span>“Well he’s staying at home, in a sort of way,” one person mused.</span><br /><br /><span>“Probably under there laughing at all the other idiots who forgot their houses,” another said.</span><br /><br /><span>A third quipped, “That was a Special Buy in Feb.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836095/twitter-bird-box-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/89112af07d4a4faa84839783b29c9cca" /><br /><br /><span>It seems however this is not the first time the man has been seen around town wearing a shed, and he is something of a local celebrity.</span><br /><br /><span>Shed by name, shed by nature, the clever dresser has been identified as one Michael Shedworth and he is often seen walking through the city streets with flashing lights upon his head. This newest creation, however, certainly turned heads a little more than usual.</span></p>

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Bunnings launches podcast series Staying Grounded

<p>Bunnings has launched a new seven-part gardening podcast series called <em>Staying Grounded</em>, offering listeners gardening advice from a host of well-known plant experts.</p> <p>With independent research commissioned by Bunnings, uncovering 2 in 5 Australians are planning on optimising their gardens in the coming months, the series aims to provide handy tips to help Aussie gardens thrive.</p> <p><em>Staying Grounded</em> episodes will be centred around slowing down, connecting with nature and doing more around the home and garden. The series will cover a range of plant themed topics including indoor plants, setting up an edible garden, shade friendly plants and more.</p> <p>Chloe Thomson of gardening and cooking show <em>The Gardenettes</em>, said she was excited to host the new Bunnings podcast series.</p> <p>"I love talking plants, it makes me so happy! I'm chatting with some incredible guests about all things gardening – from tools and tips to indoor plants and all your outdoor needs. This show will appeal to newbie gardeners and seasoned green thumbs alike, plus inspire you to get your hands dirty while <em>Staying Grounded</em>” Chloe said.</p> <p>Bunnings has launched the first two <em>Staying Grounded</em> podcast episodes which are available on your favourite podcast app including Apple Podcasts and The Podcast App. The launch episodes feature plant designer Jenna Holmes of @plantmama_ discussing all things indoor plants and <em>The Block’s</em> Dale Vine covering the tools you need for gardening success.</p> <p>For more information on the <em>Staying Grounded</em> podcast series, visit:</p> <ul> <li><a rel="noopener" href="https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/staying-grounded/id1509652105" target="_blank">Apple Podcasts</a></li> <li><a rel="noopener" href="https://podcast.app/staying-grounded-p1150581/?utm_source=and&amp;utm_medium=share" target="_blank">The Podcast App</a></li> </ul> <p> </p>

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Great news for Emma Watkin fans

<p>If your grandchild is forced to spend their birthday indoors this May then there’s good news.</p> <p>Emma Wiggle is gearing up to host a virtual birthday party concert on Saturday, May 16 for those children stuck inside during the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, over 700,000 Aussie kids have missed out on the chance to celebrate their special day with a party as a result of COVID-19 social distancing measures.</p> <p>In an initiative by Best&amp;Less, the Bestest Virtual Birthday Party event, which begins at 11 am via the retailer’s website, will feature Emma engaging in interactive games and singing songs for her fans.</p> <p>Best&amp;Less chief executive Rod Orrock revealed Emma was already preparing for the big day.</p> <p>“We know that many children have had to cancel their party, and with every child across Australia invited for a fun morning, we especially hope those with birthdays from March to June will be there to celebrate and make their birthday one to remember,” Mr Orrock said.</p> <p>Emma added, “Who doesn’t love a children's party? Together we can make this the biggest, bestest party ever! Can’t wait to see you all there!”</p> <p><em>To attend the event, parents and grandparents must register children at <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.bestandless.com.au/virtual-birthday?ict=WK31-homepage-kids-module&amp;icn=fullwidth-banner" target="_blank">www.bestandless.com.au</a> by May 10.</em></p>

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Michael Clarke called out for embarrassing detail in recent photo

<p>Michael Clarke can’t seem to catch a break.</p> <p>After dodging the paparazzi for weeks during his on-again-off-again relationship with Pip Edwards, the former Australian cricket captain is now being scolded for the state of his swimming pool.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram on Thursday, Clarke shared a photo showing his pool in the background, prompting his followers to remind him that it needed a “good scoop” because it was filled with leaves.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_lTktEJ_ur/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_lTktEJ_ur/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Preparing my little girls weekly vitamins to keep her happy and healthy (easier said than done) 😂 @chemistwarehouse #wagnervitamins</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/michaelclarkeofficial/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Michael Clarke</a> (@michaelclarkeofficial) on Apr 29, 2020 at 4:17pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Michael’s post was made in partnership with Chemist Warehouse and showed him organising his four-year-old daughter Kelsey Lee’s weekly vitamins on a coffee table.</p> <p>But many fans were distracted by the dirty backyard pool behind him, which could be seen through the glass sliding doors.</p> <p>“When you’re done, the pool needs a good scoop,” wrote one follower.</p> <p>Another added: “Got a few leaves in that pool there, Pup! Get the net out, dude.”</p> <p>“You need to clean the leaves in your pool,” wrote a third.</p> <p>The 39-year-old agreed with his critics, replying to one of them saying: “As soon as the rain stops, I’m on it.”</p>

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Top DIY turf tips from The Block’s Dave Franklin

<p>Since we find ourselves stuck on home turf more than we’d like to be, it’s time to put a silver lining around the cloud and get stuck into some DIY.</p> <p>One DIY task designed to get you outdoors is laying new turf - and The Block landscaper Dave Franklin has expert advice on how do it. Best of all, Kennards Hire’s contactless delivery and equipment hygiene measures mean you can still hire the equipment you need to lay turf like a professional.</p> <p><strong>Preparing the soil</strong></p> <p>With production of <em>The Block</em> on hold due to COVID-19, Dave says now’s the time for viewers to use the DIY skills they’ve learned from watching the show. And he believes turf laying is the perfect entry-level landscaping job.</p> <p>“We have apprentices in my landscaping business and if they can’t pick up laying turf in a day, then they probably aren’t going to make it as landscapers,” he says.</p> <p>When it comes to choosing the type of grass to use, Dave says it’s best to consult your local turf supplier. Because what works in Cairns is not going to work in Perth.</p> <p>“We have different turfs for different states, so the first thing to do is ring up your local turf supplier and listen to their advice,” he says.</p> <p>To make sure your turf starts out healthy, it needs clear, healthy soil. If grass is already growing, use a glyphosate product such as Round Up or Zero that kills it and makes it easier to remove. This also stops rogue grass and weeds from infiltrating the new lawn.</p> <p><strong>Remove the weeds</strong></p> <p>“You’ve got to get rid of those weeds,” Dave says. “You don’t want them returning once you’ve laid the turf.”</p> <p>Next, use your lawn mower at its lowest setting to scalp the lawn to its lowest point. Once this is done, the next task is to turn the soil. For this, it’s best to use the proper equipment.</p> <p>For soft, sandy soils, use a rotary tiller to turn the soil and aerate it. If the soil is a compacted clay, use a <a href="https://www.kennards.com.au/lawn-rotary-hoe-hydraulic-petrol.html?trackParams=1853-1-1-100.00">rotary hoe</a>. A tough, walk-behind, petrol-powered hoe breaks up the most difficult clay or sod.</p> <p><strong>Level out dips and bumps</strong></p> <p>Once you’ve turned the soil over, use a manual rake to removes stones and debris. If you have major dips in the surface, fill these in with a <a href="https://www.kennards.com.au/skid-steer-700-series.html?trackParams=249-7-8-98.21">skid steer</a> or <a href="https://www.kennards.com.au/mini-loader.html?trackParams=249-4-3-99.04">mini loader</a>.</p> <p>If they are minor ones, you can use a shovel to fill them in – but you must fill them.</p> <p>“If you’re preparing the surface and you’ve got holes and dints in there you are going to end up with an uneven lawn,” Dave says.</p> <p>“So you have to make sure that your surface preparation is the best you can make it. When you buy the turf you usually get a lawn starter, which you should add to the soil.”</p> <p>At this point you might decide to use turf underlay. This is soil that contains a large proportion of sand as well as organic matter, and helps the turf take to its new home. Add 50–150mm, using the higher amount if you have a very compacted clay soil.</p> <p>Next, use the easy level rake to get the surface even, and flatten everything with a roller. You are now ready to lay the turf.</p> <p>At this point, you can add fertilisers and conditioners to the surface as recommended by your turf provider. This helps your turf take root in the early stages.</p> <p><strong>Join the turf edges carefully</strong></p> <p>If you have a sloping lawn, start at the bottom. Lay a perimeter of turf then fill in the centre, taking care not to leave any gaps. Use an overlapping pattern like brickwork, so that the joints are staggered. When you trim the turf rolls, keep the offcuts for filling in awkward spots later on.</p> <p>Dave says using sand to sew together the pieces of turf and making sure that each piece butts up against the next firmly is important to stitch the pieces together into a seamless lawn. Finally, water the turf and roller it to make sure the turf’s roots are pressed firmly into the soil.</p> <p><strong>Rolling out the turf</strong></p> <p>One big tip for beginners is to use a <a href="https://www.kennards.com.au/lawn-roller-spike.html?trackParams=485-1-1-100.00">roller</a>.</p> <p>“I see all too many times people rolling out the turf and just kicking it in,” Dave says.</p> <p>“If you don’t roll the turf down there will be pockets and holes underneath where the roots aren’t in contact with the soil. That’s going to lead to problems.”</p> <p>Dave hopes to be back working on The Block soon, but in the meantime, he says DIY turf laying is not a bad way to spend the time for those of us at home.</p> <p>“It’s the perfect introduction to landscaping,” he says. “Anyone can give it a go.”</p> <p><em>Call your local Kennard Hire branch for advice on equipment hire to get your <a href="https://www.kennards.com.au/index.php/blog/How-to-Lay-Turf-Part-1-Soil-Preparation/">home turf</a> looking better than ever.</em></p> <p><em>This story was written by Dave Franklin.</em></p>

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Outrage over neighbour’s “unfair” letter to family working from home

<p>A mother in Victoria has vented her frustrations after receiving an anonymous note from her neighbours complaining about the noise that her children make in the backyard.</p> <p>The woman shared the note in a private Facebook group, which led to hundreds of people saying that the letter was “passive aggressive” and “unfair”.</p> <p>“As if life isn’t hard enough at the moment with work and home schooling,” the mother wrote.</p> <p>“But now I can’t let my kids in the back yard because they will make noise.”</p> <p>The letter was addressed to “residents at this address” and was signed by “your neighbours”.</p> <p>“Due to the current climate of COVID-19, I and a few other family members have been working from home,” the note reads.</p> <p>“This involves multiple phone calls, Zoom meetings and corresponding with colleagues in the day.”</p> <p>“We (myself and other neighbours) have found it difficult to be able to conduct our workday as per usual, due to the screaming and noise that your children make in the yard throughout the course of the day,” the letter said.</p> <p>“I know that it is great for children to be outside, and we praise you for the time that yours do spend outside, but it is extremely difficult when my colleagues on the other side of the screen are asking me to mute my microphone as they can hear your children in the background.</p> <p>“There is no need for the screaming to be so loud.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835767/note-from-neighbours.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9791766bcce542db820f4c26bf71ae2a" /></p> <p>The mother quickly clarified in the post that her children get 15 minutes outside for recess and half a hour for lunch when they learn from home.</p> <p>The letter asks if the noise can be avoided between the hours of nine to five so that the neighbours can “continue to be productive”.</p> <p>“We are all living together in this space and it is best if it works for all of us.”</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Not many people were sympathetic to the neighbours who wrote the letter.</p> <p>“Our kids can’t be held prisoners in their own homes more than they already are,” one woman said, pointing out the sun has usually set by 5 pm and most kids aren’t out of bed by 9am.</p> <p>“That is very unfair of them!” another person wrote.</p> <p>“If they are asking you to understand their current situation, then they should understand yours! I'd write back telling them to refrain from having conferences during recess and lunch time.”</p> <p>One woman wrote: “Full passive aggressive bulls**t excuse for communication”.</p> <p>“So sorry you’ve had to deal with this. Regardless of what you do, it must be so uncomfortable knowing that there is someone out there who would write this.”</p> <p>One woman explained that she was in a similar situation to the neighbours who wrote the note, saying that she can hear children “houses away” screaming.</p> <p>“Sorry, but it’s annoying,” she said.</p> <p>“I agree, it’s great that kids are outside, and I understand noise, but screaming continually is just not necessary.”</p> <p>Another woman added: “You can let you kids in the backyard, just teach them some common courtesy and keep the noise down”.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/mum-outraged-by-complaint-letter-from-neighbours-042500619.html" target="_blank">Yahoo! News</a>  </em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Doctor evicted from home over coronavirus fears

<p>A Queensland doctor has been evicted from her sharehouse after she refused to stop working.</p> <p>Hannah*, a doctor specialising in anaesthesiology, was working a 10-hour shift at a hospital near Brisbane when her landlord sent her a text message asking to talk about “isolating the house”.</p> <p>When she called her landlord after the shift, she was told she had to either stop working or move out.</p> <p>“He essentially said I could either stop working or I had to move out as soon as possible,” Hannah told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-22/coronavirus-fears-doctor-evicted-during-crisis/12162880">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p>“He felt that I was at high risk of being exposed and thus bringing COVID-19 back to the house, I suppose.”</p> <p>One of the text messages from the landlord read: “If you opt to stop work and isolate with the girls there is no need to move…”</p> <p>The landlord’s announcement came a day after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a six-month <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-01/coronavirus-eviction-moratorium-in-australia-what-does-it-mean/12105188">freeze on evictions</a>.</p> <p>Hannah said she was at the time helping out at the intensive care unit with one patient had COVID-19, but she did not have direct contact with the patient.</p> <p>“We are helping to provide a service through the COVID-19 crisis. So, I don’t think it’s fair to stop me helping with the delivery of that service because of his desire to protect the house,” she said.</p> <p>“It doesn’t seem that he quite made the connection that if he came in with a serious infection, it’d be people like me at work who would be looking after him and making sure that he got through that.”</p> <p>When Hannah told her landlord she was considered an essential worker and could not find a new residence due to having to work overtime, he said he was “very understanding” but maintained that he needed the house “isolated”.</p> <p>The landlord said she should cook, shower and brush her teeth at work and remain only in her room when at home. He also offered to help her look for a new place and asked if the hospital could provide her with accommodation during the pandemic.</p> <p>Hannah went on to contact a property lawyer who drafted a letter informing the landlord of the Prime Minister’s eviction moratorium, which was met with “a lot of anger”.</p> <p>Hannah said the landlord’s daughter, who was also her housemate, told her she was not wanted at the house.</p> <p>“She said, ‘stay if you want, but I’ll make sure it’s not pleasant for you’.”</p> <p>Hannah left the residence two days after the first text. She stayed at a motel which her hospital put up for one night and moved to her colleague’s accommodation the next day.</p> <p>According to the Residential Tenancies Authority, property owners and managers who are not “significantly impacted” by COVID-19 should continue to honour their responsibilities under the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.</p>

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Hugh Jackman to move home to Australia after years abroad

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Homegrown Aussie legend Hugh Jackman is reportedly missing home according to<span> </span><em>New Idea</em><span> </span>and is considering a move back to Australia.</p> <p>The 51-year-old actor is reportedly considering moving permanently to his home in Bondi after living with his family in New York City for years.</p> <p>“Hugh has privately considered a move back for years, but he never followed through with it because he has such a good life in the States,” a insider told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.newidea.com.au/" target="_blank">New Idea</a></em>.  </p> <p>“Besides his career, there's a solid support network and he and [wife] Deb are now die-hard New Yorkers. They love the spirit of the Big Apple, plus the pace and excitement of being in a city that never sleeps.”</p> <p>The insider said that he wants to be closer to his extended family as well as bring a boost to Australia’s film industry.</p> <p>“He was hugely impressed with how Chris Hemsworth managed to bring the Thor production to the country,' added the insider.</p> <p>“At the end of the day, he's an Aussie at heart. It's a no-brainer that he and Deb want to come home.”</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>X-Men­<span> </span></em>legend could be home for good with his wife of 24 years, Deborra-Lee Furness and their two children Oscar, 19 and Ava, 14.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-10q2BDURV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-10q2BDURV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Hugh Jackman (@thehughjackman)</a> on Apr 11, 2020 at 5:42am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Despite living in New York for a number of years, Jackman was awarded the Order of Australia in September last year for his contributions to the performing arts and work advocating the end of poverty.</p> <p>'I am an immensely proud Australian, and am so grateful for the opportunities I have received by being raised there,' he said in a statement at the time, as reported by <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/celebrity/hugh-jackman-receives-order-of-australia-medal-20190913-p52r5q.html" target="_blank">The Sydney Morning Herald</a>. </em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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The easiest foods to grow at home during quarantine

<p><strong>First, don't panic. There's no shortage of food</strong></p> <p>As alarming as it has been to see bare shelves in the supermarket, food producers and reports confirm there's plenty of food to go around. Unfortunately, news of the coronavirus has scared us into panic-buying and hoarding. Sometimes we can't find the basic foods we want, such as pantry staples like flour and rice. Then again, some of us are avoiding going into the stores at all, unsure how to protect ourselves from this invisible enemy. All this has led to a bump in buying seeds and plants and searching for gardening tips online, so we can grow our own foods at home. The good news is that many fruits and veggies are easy to grow, even for beginners, and they'll thrive whether you're gardening in a backyard plot or in containers on your patio, porch or apartment balcony.</p> <p><strong>Grow beans in a snap</strong></p> <p>You might be surprised to know you don’t need a big garden to grow green beans. Bush beans are space-savers, but you can also grow beans vertically, by choosing pole varieties and training their vines onto a trellis, fence, or other support. Full sun, regular waterings and moderately rich soil will pay off in a plentiful harvest, and beans don’t need much fertiliser, although they’ll benefit from a side-dressing of compost in mid-season if you didn’t work a lot of compost into the soil before you planted. Check your seed packet to know approximately when your variety will be ready to harvest, and keep the plants picked so they’ll keep producing. Freeze your green beans to enjoy them all year long.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-runner-beans" target="_blank">Find out more about how to grow runner beans. </a></p> <p><strong>Raise crunchy radishes</strong></p> <p>Many gardeners love fresh radishes for that crunch that you get when you bite into them – but these simple root veggies are good for more than eating. Because the seeds sprout quickly – often within a week – you can use them in the garden to mark the rows of other crops that don’t come up as fast. Simply sow the seeds outdoors about 1-2cm deep as the temperature cools. Wait ten days and plant again for a continuous crop. They’ll thrive in a sunny spot that has loose soil amended with organic matter. Thin the seedlings to 5cm apart, so their roots won’t be crowded, and keep the plants evenly moist. Some varieties are ready to harvest just three weeks after planting.</p> <p><strong>Cultivate cucumbers</strong></p> <p>Like zucchini, cucumbers are prolific and easy to grow. Just give them a spot with moist, fertile soil and lots of sunshine. Start the seeds a couple of centimetres deep into the ground. They’ll sprout in a few days. Keep them happy with regular waterings and, if you didn’t work a lot of organic matter into the soil before you planted, side-dress them with a balanced, soluble fertiliser when the fruits set. The cucumbers are ready to harvest when they’re still small and the skins are tender. To keep a steady supply for the table, make successive plantings. If you’re short on space, train vining cucumber varieties onto a support like a fence or trellis, or plant a bush variety in a container or raised bed. Use your cukes in salsas, salads, gazpacho and smoothies or turn them into pickles.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-cucumbers" target="_blank">Learn more about growing cucumbers. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Crack out some capsicum</strong></div> <p>Capsicums thrive in sunny climes, so make sure they have a warm, sunny spot not prone to wind or frost. They can also be grown in pots. Capsicums like a deep, warm, well draining soil, mulch and room to breathe, so leave about 50–60cm between your capsicums when planting out. Prepare the soil a month before planting by throwing in some fertiliser, then mulch.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-capsicums-chillies" target="_blank">Discover more about growing capsicums and chillies.</a></p> <p><strong>Plant tasty tomatoes</strong></p> <p>The hardest thing about growing tomatoes might be choosing your favourite kind. There are cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, heirlooms with rich flavours, Romas for stews, pasta and sauces, and hearty beefsteaks. Gardeners in cool regions may want to start with transplants to save time over growing tomatoes from seeds. The plants need full sun and soil that drains easily. For best results, your soil should contain lots of compost and be slightly acidic, with a pH of 6.2 to 6.8. As the plants grow, apply a fertiliser recommended for tomatoes as directed on the label. This raised garden bed with an automatic watering system makes it easy to grow compact or patio-type tomatoes, even in a small space.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-tomatoes" target="_blank">Here’s more great advice on growing tomatoes. </a></p> <p><strong>Sow lettuce for salads</strong></p> <div id="page8" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Lettuces are great for beginning gardeners. They grow fast, take full sun but tolerate some shade, and can be tucked between other fruits and veggies or into containers. They’re also available in lots of tasty, colourful varieties. If you don’t have an ideal garden spot – for example, your soil contains a lot of clay or rocks – use a raised bed instead. Add good quality planting soil, you won’t have to dig. The loose soil will also make it easy to pluck any weeds that pop up. Sow your lettuce seeds in early autumn or spring and keep the plants watered regularly. Lettuce started in spring will last until the summer heat arrives and autumn-sown lettuce will grow until a killing frost. Harvest the outermost leaves first but don’t pull up the plants, so they can keep producing.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardeing-tips/7-fertilizers-for-your-garden" target="_blank">Discover 7 surprising fertilisers for your garden. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Set out onions</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page9" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Make a little hole in the ground, tuck in a bare-root onion seedling, and stand back. In two or three weeks, the small plants will be ready to pull and use as green onions, or you can wait until the bulbs are bigger and then harvest them. Mature onions will let you know they’re ready when their tops turn yellow and bend over. Just brush off the soil and put the onions, with the tops still attached, in a warm, dry, well-ventilated place to cure for a week to 10 days. Then remove the top foliage and roots and store the onions in a cool, airy place until you’re ready to use them. Slice and fry them for onion rings, chop them for salsas and salads, or grill, roast or pickle them. Chopped or sliced onions can be refrigerated in sealed containers for seven to 10 days.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Fill a windowsill with herbs</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page10" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>During a quarantine, a herb garden makes a thoughtful gift for a housebound friend or a fun and easy growing project you can enjoy without leaving home. Although the types of herbs you’ll want to include may vary, good choices include basil to make into pesto, mint to steep for tea or dill to add flavour to homemade pickles. So many herbs are easy to grow, you may not want to stop.</p> <p><strong>Plant prolific zucchinis</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Zucchinis have a reputation for being so easy to grow, and so prolific, gardeners joke about having to leave their extras on a neighbour’s doorstep, ring the bell, and run away. Just one plant can yield 2.5-4.5kg of zucchinis in a single growing season. Plant their seeds directly in your garden or a large container. They need full sun and moist, easily-draining soil amended with compost. Give them a couple of centimetres of water each week, if there’s no rain, and harvest when the fruits are small (botanically speaking, zucchinis are fruits) and the skins are tender. You can freeze zucchinis or bake them into breads, slice them into strips for pasta, grate them for fritters or chop them into vegetable chillis. They’re also delicious when you know how to roast vegetables until they’re crispy and caramelised.</p> <p><strong>Grow a bagful of potatoes</strong></p> <div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Humble, nutritious potatoes are a great choice for beginning gardeners, especially when you use good potting soil and compost. Start with seed potatoes that haven’t been treated to resist sprouting. Cut them into chunks with two eyes per chunk and let them dry overnight before planting them. Then give them full sun and regular water. Add more soil to the bag when the plants are about 8 inches tall, leaving the top set of leaves uncovered. Add more soil when the plants grow another 8 inches tall and repeat this process until the bag is full. When the foliage turns yellow, stop watering and wait about a week before you dig up the potatoes with your gloved hands. Many grow bags are reusable and available in different sizes.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardeningtips/16-ways-to-kill-garden-weeds" target="_blank">Here are 16 ways to kill garden weeds. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Plant a bushel of peas</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page2" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>There are lots of delightful types of peas. Choose disease-resistant varieties, and you won’t need to do much more than plant them, water regularly and harvest them. Sow the peas in wide rows, covering them with an inch of soil and planting 5cm deep. Peas grow well during the cooler months but the flowers can be damaged by frost so, in very cold areas, wait until spring to sow. They don’t usually need fertiliser, but they do need a deep, weekly watering if rain is scarce. For best results, grow your peas, including dwarf varieties, on a trellis or other support. Read your seed packet to know when to harvest, and pick often, so the plants will keep producing. Fresh peas have the best taste, but you can freeze or dry them to use later.</p> <p><strong>Grow chillies for fiery flavour</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page3" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>You’ve heard that variety is the spice of life – well, so are jalapenos, habaneros and other spicy chillies. The seeds can be sown from August to December in temperate areas and from September to mid-November only in cold climates. They are also available as seedlings. Sow seeds 6mm deep in punnets, gently pricking out the seedlings and transferring them to 100mm pots, giving them a sunny position. Plant them in the garden in a sheltered spot in full sun when they are 150mm high. The soil should be free-draining and enriched with either compost, aged cow manure or Yates Dynamic Lifter before planting.</p> <p>Use scissors to snip off your chillies when they’re the size you want. Chillies don’t just add heat and flavour to your foods. They also contain capsaicin, which is thought to act as an antioxidant to help fight infection and prevent some types of heart disease.</p> <p><em>Source:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rd.com/home/gardening/easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home/" target="_blank">RD.com</a></em></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><em>Written by <span>Lynn Coulter</span>. This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>.</em></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Bunnings and Westfield launch genius new service with no fees

<p>Bunnings and Westfield have introduced new drive-through services amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>Bunnings has launched its contactless service, Drive and Collect, which is now available at 250 of its larger stores across Australia.</p> <p>The new service gives customers the option to order online and pick up their purchase from Bunnings car parks at a convenient date and time. Shoppers text or call the store team on arrival and their items are then brought outside and placed in their car boot.</p> <p>“We’re taking a commonsense approach to finding ways to quickly adapt our business so that we can continue to safely serve our retail customers and enable tradies to keep their businesses running,” Bunnings managing director Mike Schneider told <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/bunnings-westfield-offer-contactless-drivethrough-service-amid-coronavirus/news-story/b5ecf17f2ed8d272783aac990bbc8797">News.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p>“This is just another example of how we are adapting our business to this changing environment and our store teams are doing their best to provide customers with the best service, while keeping everyone safe.”</p> <p>Westfield is also offering a no-contact shop and collect service. Westfield’s parent company Scentre Group announced the new Westfield Direct on Thursday as “a new way for you to buy from your favourite stores and quick eats”.</p> <p>Shoppers are able to purchase items from multiple retailers through the Westfield Direct website and collect the order at the drive-through area.</p> <p>More than 350 retailers – including Harris Farm Markets, Donut King, Aesop and L’Occitane – are available through the service, allowing shoppers to access <a href="https://10daily.com.au/news/australia/a200415zuomk/drive-thru-pick-up-now-available-at-westfield-20200415">up to 8,000 products</a>.</p> <p>“From takeaway food to daily necessities and extras, simply order online, select your pick-up time, and collect your order at our designated drive-thru point – with no booking or delivery fee applied,” the company said.</p> <p>Westfield will also be expanding to other categories and retailers over the coming weeks and months.</p>

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Police remind residents to wear pants when getting the mail

<p>A US police department has reminded local residents to put on their pants when they go outside.</p> <p>The Taneytown Police Department, which serves about 7,200 citizens in the Maryland town, advised people who are obeying the stay-at-home order to wear their pants when they check their mailbox.</p> <p>“Please remember to put pants on before leaving the house to check your mailbox,” the department said in a Facebook post on Wednesday. “You know who you are. This is your final warning.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTaneytownPolice%2Fposts%2F2355019031463367&amp;width=500" width="500" height="173" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The post has since gone viral with more than 800 comments and 5,300 shares. Many responded with gif images with the caption “Life’s too short for pants”, while one commented that wearing underwear outside may not necessarily be in breach of the <a href="https://statelaws.findlaw.com/maryland-law/maryland-indecent-exposure-laws.html">law</a> on indecent exposure.</p> <p>In Australia, people have been getting creative with their looks on bin day as they dress up to take the rubbish out.</p> <p>Aussies have taken to the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/306002627033697">Bin Isolation Outing Facebook group</a> and other social media sites to share pictures of their outfits on their walk out, including graduation gowns, character costumes, animal onesies and more.</p> <p>“So basically the bin goes out more than us SO let’s dress up for the occasion!” the group wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-_K6tnhl8J/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-_K6tnhl8J/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Laura (@laurakeet101)</a> on Apr 14, 2020 at 8:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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“It works!”: Mum reveals genius hack to save toilet paper during pandemic times

<p>An Aussie mum has shared her latest hack that makes toilet paper last longer.</p> <p>She shared the hack on the<span> </span>Mums Who Budget &amp; Save<span> </span>Facebook page, the mum explained that she squashes the toilet paper roll down before placing it on the holder.</p> <p>This hack means that the toilet paper can’t spin easily on the holder, meaning her kids use less toilet paper with each trip to the loo.</p> <p>“Kids home from school?,” the mum wrote.</p> <p>“Going through toilet paper faster than usual?</p> <p>“Try squashing the roll - so it doesn’t spin so quickly and then not as much will be pulled off.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835581/toilet-paper-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a647a15db7834275bab8756cf6c8c96a" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p><em>Photo credit: New Idea Food</em></p> <p>Others described it as a game-changer and the hack has thrilled other mums.</p> <p>“Mind blowing!,” one mum said.</p> <p>“I’m definitely trying this - for me!”</p> <p>“Will be doing this for hubby,” another shared, adding: “I hear that toilet roll holder spin &amp; I just cringe!”</p> <p>“My kids would just pull it until it stops.”</p> <p>“How can something so simple be so genius,” a third person said.</p> <p>Others shared their hacks, including measuring a line that was three or four squares long.</p> <p>“Draw a line three or four squares down,” she advised. “Easy measurement for all.”</p> <p>One mum said that removing the roll all together is an easy fix.</p> <p>“[This is the same as] me putting the toilet paper out of my kids reach so he has to yell out to me to ration out to him,” she wrote.</p> <p>“We don’t put it on the roll as kids use a lot less when it not on,” another agreed.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Russell Crowe's figgy gift for Bindi Irwin: "You’ll always be part of our family”

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell surprised the world by getting married in an intimate ceremony at Australia Zoo before the lockdowns came into place in Australia.</p> <p>Russel Crowe, long-time friend of the Irwins, thoughtfully gifted the newlyweds a fig tree as a wedding present.</p> <p>As the coronavirus pandemic continues around the world, the pair decided to celebrate Crowe’s 56th birthday in a sweet way by hugging the tree that Crowe gifted them.</p> <p>“Happy birthday Russell. You'll always be part of our family,” Bindi, 21, wrote on Tuesday.</p> <p>She added: “Even though we can't see you right now, we're giving the beautiful fig you gifted us a hug and thinking of you. Hope your day is extraordinary!”</p> <p>Bindi then shared a second photo of the sweet gift tag attached to the Port Jackson fig tree.</p> <p>“Presented to Bindi and Chandler to commemorate their wedding.  Love from Russell Crowe and family,” it read.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-qt4W7BRyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-qt4W7BRyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">‪Happy Birthday, @russellcrowe 💙‬ ‪You’ll always be part of our family. Even though we can’t see you right now, we’re giving the beautiful fig you gifted us a hug and thinking of you.‬ ‪Hope your day is extraordinary.‬</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bindisueirwin/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bindi Irwin</a> (@bindisueirwin) on Apr 6, 2020 at 10:11pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Fans were quick to praise Crowe’s unique wedding gift to the newlyweds.</p> <p>“What an Amazingly thoughtful gift. The gift that keeps giving. Anniversary after anniversary. I’d take pictures of that tree it’s kinda symbolic it changes as it grows as will your marriage,” one fan wrote.</p> <p>The newlyweds tied the knot in front of only three people at the zoo, with Bindi’s mother Terri, brother Robert and Steve’s best friend Wes Mannion in attendance.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Bunnings to the rescue!

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>An emergency doctor has said that a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) has led to senior doctors sourcing supplies from hardware store Bunnings.</p> <p>Dr Stephen Parnis said that the lack of PPE is the “number one concern” for Australian healthcare workers on<span> </span>Q&amp;A<span> </span>on Monday night.</p> <p>Dr Parnis is an emergency doctor and former Vice President of the Australian Medical Association and is aware of “department directors” going to Bunnings to get PPE for their staff.</p> <p>He said that others are trying to source the vital equipment from overseas contacts.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">What is the government doing to supply health workers with ample hand sanitizer and PPE? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/QandA?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#QandA</a> <a href="https://t.co/Ykx91yOg0E">pic.twitter.com/Ykx91yOg0E</a></p> — QandA (@QandA) <a href="https://twitter.com/QandA/status/1247130244361777152?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 6, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>“It's probably the number one concern for health workers around the country at the moment,” Dr Parnis said.</p> <p>Q&amp;A host Hamish MacDonald was shocked and asked Dr Parnis to clarify what he meant.</p> <p>“Can I clarify? Department heads are going to Bunnings to try and find personal protective equipment,” MacDonald asked.</p> <p>“I've seen examples of that. Yes,” Dr Parnis said.</p> <p>General practitioner Dr Vyom Sharma said that the lack of PPE is “affecting the nature and care” being given to patients.</p> <p>“It’s correct what Steven said, we're very worried about the lack of personal protective equipment and it's been affecting the care we've been offering patients throughout,” Dr Sharma said.</p> <p>“When the criteria for COVID-19 had been changing gradually through February and March, a huge percentage of my (patients) were overseas students and travellers and tourists.</p> <p>“And you're rationing masks even then. And there are people coughing and sneezing one day who come from South Korea or Italy and a few day later the criteria changes and it says these people are high risk and you wonder should I have used a mask on them and I would have if I had enough.”</p> <p>Dr Sharma said that in his own practice, they were rationing out PPE and the number of masks has dwindled to about ten.</p> <p>“We are trying to save them for when we really need them.”</p> <p>The stress of the pandemic has resulted in doctors not being able to sleep.</p> <p>“It's a stressful time for us all … because we're making enormous numbers of changes in our hospitals, but also we've seen what's happened overseas,” he said.</p> <p>“And that's the sort of scenario that really worries us, the risk of being overwhelmed.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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DIY coronavirus masks: Are they doing more harm than good?

<p>The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way civilians protect themselves and over the course of a month we have seen a rise in DIY face masks.</p> <p>However there is concern surrounding whether it is necessary for healthy people to wear face masks despite advice via the United States government telling it’s citizens not to bother if they are healthy.</p> <p>With the thousands of videos popping up online teaching people how to make nonmedical face masks with paper towels, men’s underwear and even bras.</p> <p>But which one is best for you, and should you even be wearing a DIY mask?</p> <p>Medical experts and health professions across the globe say a homemade face mask or even a bandana may just prove to be helpful in protecting people from transmitting and getting the virus.</p> <p>Among the supports includes<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24229526" target="_blank">a 2013 study</a><span> </span>published in the journal Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness which found well-fitting homemade face masks made from cotton T-shirts will provide protection from droplet transmission.</p> <p>Epidemiologist and doctor at the University of New South Wales, Raina MacIntyre told<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/masks-diy-coronavirus/2020/04/01/20830f5e-7420-11ea-85cb-8670579b863d_story.html" target="_blank">The Washington Post</a><span> </span>there is “no evidence” pointing towards one type.”</p> <p>The health professions has completed research on the effectiveness of face masks.</p> <p>“These are all just common-sense approaches people are trying.”</p> <p>Here are the basic tips people should follow when deciding what face mask they should wear:</p> <ul> <li>A mask should provide good coverage for your face – reaching above the bridge of the nose and below the chin.</li> <li>A mask should be snug, not spacious, and it is noted fabric ties could work better than an elastic band.</li> <li>Rewash face masks after every use</li> <li>Layering a face mask at least three times is recommended to make an effective mask and it is helpful to include a small pocket or pouch so a filter may be inserted.</li> <li>Sunlight is “germicidal” MacIntyre noted, so hang the mask outside if possible.</li> <li>Cotton and cotton blends are highly recommended over cloth materials as cloth retains moisture and therefore can be harmful.</li> <li>Non-woven fabrics is also a recommended material to make a face mask, Peter Tsai, the creator of the highest quality of masks recommends.</li> <li>Non-woven fabrics are made of individual fibres that are bound together mechanically, thermally or chemically.</li> <li>Car shop towels are recommended as they filter droplets better than cloths.</li> </ul>

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Australia Post’s free new service amid coronavirus pandemic

<p>Australia Post has announced a new free service to help the vulnerable and those self-isolating access prescription medications without leaving their home.</p> <p>The Pharmacy Home Delivery Service, which started on Monday will allow pharmacies around the country to offer free delivery on prescriptions to their customers.</p> <p>The initiative will help support vulnerable Australians, including those self isolating themselves at home, people over 70 and people with chronic health conditions.</p> <p>The delivery service gives members of the community the option to receive medication and other essential supplies (under 500 grams) through Australia Post’s Express Post network once a month.</p> <p>Pharmacies can then receive the full cost back through government rebate.</p> <p>Christine Holgate, Group Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of Australia Post said coronavirus is having a major impact on the lives of Australians and it’s important to introduce a home delivery system for local pharmacies.</p> <p>“We know so many people rely on their local pharmacy for essential medication, particularly the vulnerable and elderly who may not be able to visit their local store. Making delivery to people’s homes is critical at this time,” Ms Holgate said.</p> <p>It’s hoped the new delivery service will also boost small businesses struggling as customers opt to stay home.</p> <p>“We also understand the challenges facing small business at the moment and we have designed a simple system that will allow pharmacies to offer Express Post delivery to their customers from Monday, allowing them to continue to trade,” Ms Holgate said.</p> <p>George Tambassic, National President of the Pharmacy Guild, said this important service w<span>ould add to the options available for the countless community members who rely on medication to maintain their health and wellbeing.</span></p> <p>“Pharmacies provide critical services to members of the community who require medicines and health advice, with many Australians reliant on continued medication to support their long-term health,” he said.</p> <p>“In any one year there are over 465 million individual patient visits to community pharmacies around the country.”</p> <p>Deliveries can be made to homes, or to a local Post Office or 24/7 Parcel Locker for pick-up.</p>

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