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How much do sedentary people really need to move? It’s less than you think

<p>People who spend much of their day sitting may need to move around less than we thought to counteract their sedentary lifestyle, new research shows.</p> <p>Our research, published today in the <a href="http://www.onlinejacc.org/content/73/16/2062">Journal of the American College of Cardiology</a>, found about 20-40 minutes of physical activity a day seems to eliminate most health risks associated with sitting.</p> <p>That’s substantially lower than the one hour a day <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2018/06/05/bjsports-2017-098963">a previous study</a> has found.</p> <p>We spend almost all our waking day sitting, standing, or moving. The health impact of each one of these can be complex.</p> <p>For example, too much standing can lead to <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/3/176">lower back problems</a> and even a <a href="https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/187/1/27/4081581">higher risk of heart disease</a>. But sitting for too long and not moving enough <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2712935">can harm our health</a>.</p> <p>Then there are people who sit for many hours and also get in reasonable amounts of physical activity. For example, someone who has an office job but walks to and from work for 20 minutes each way and runs two to three times a week easily meets <a href="http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ti-18-64years">the recommended level of physical activity</a>.</p> <p>While we know moving is better than sitting, what is far less clear is how much of a good thing (moving) can offset the harms of a bad thing (sitting).</p> <p>That’s what we wanted to find out in our study of almost 150,000 Australian middle-aged and older adults.</p> <p>We followed people enrolled in the <a href="https://www.saxinstitute.org.au/our-work/45-up-study/">45 and Up Study</a> for nearly nine years. We looked at links between sitting and physical activity with deaths from any cause, and deaths from cardiovascular disease such as heart disease and stroke, over that time. We then estimated what level of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity might offset the health risks of sitting.</p> <p>This kind of activity is strenuous enough to get you at least slightly out of breath if sustained for a few minutes. It includes brisk walking, cycling, playing sports or running.</p> <p><strong>What we found</strong></p> <p>People who did no physical activity and sat for more than eight hours a day had more than twice (107%) the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease compared to people who did at least one hour of physical activity and sat less than four hours a day (the “optimal group”).</p> <p>But it wasn’t enough just to sit less. People who did less than 150 minutes of physical activity a week and sat less than four hours a day still had a 44-60% higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than the optimal group.</p> <p>We also calculated the effect of replacing one hour of sitting with standing, walking, and moderate and vigorous physical activity.</p> <p>Among people who sit a lot (more than six hours a day) replacing one hour of sitting with equal amounts of moderate physical activity like strenuous gardening and housework, but not standing, was associated with a 20% reduction in dying from cardiovascular disease.</p> <p>Replacing one hour of sitting with one hour of vigorous activity such as <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/10/812">swimming, aerobics and tennis</a>, the benefits were much greater, with a 64% reduction in the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease.</p> <p><strong>What does it all mean?</strong></p> <p>The great news for people who sit a lot, including sedentary office workers, is that the amount of physical activity needed to offset the health risks of sitting risks was substantially lower than the one hour a day <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2018/06/05/bjsports-2017-098963">a previous study</a> found.</p> <p>Even around 20-40 minutes of physical activity a day - the equivalent of meeting the <a href="http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ti-18-64years">physical activity guidelines</a> of 150 to 300 minutes a week – seemed to eliminate most risks associated with sitting.</p> <p>For people who sat a lot, replacing sitting with vigorous physical activity was better than replacing it with moderate activity; and replacing sitting with moderate activity or walking was better than replacing it with standing.</p> <p><strong>What’s the take-home message?</strong></p> <p>Our study supports the idea that sitting and exercise are two sides of the same <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2018/07/10/bjsports-2018-099640">health “coin”</a>. In other words, enough physical activity can offset the health risks of sitting.</p> <p>Should we worry about sitting too much? Yes, because sitting takes up valuable time we could spend moving. So too much sitting is an important part of the physical inactivity problem.</p> <p>We also know only <a href="https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-016-2736-3">a minority of adults</a> get enough physical activity to offset the risks of sitting.</p> <p>For those who sit a lot, finding ways to reduce sitting would be a good start but it is not enough. The most important lifestyle change would be to look for or create opportunities to include physical activity <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/02/15/bjsports-2018-100397">into our daily routine</a> whenever possible.</p> <p><strong>How to widen our activity “menu”</strong></p> <p>Not everyone has a supportive environment and the capacity to create opportunities to be active. For example, lack of time and physical activity being low on people’s list of priorities are the main reasons <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/5/3/47">why inactive adults</a> don’t exercise. Also, many do not have the motivation to power through a strenuous workout when they are juggling many other life challenges.</p> <p>There are no known remedies to a lack of time or low motivation. So, perhaps we need to add new approaches, beyond exercising and playing sport for leisure, to the “menu” of physical activity options.</p> <p>Incidental physical activity like active transportation – think <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/12/761">walking fast</a> or cycling part or all of the way to work – or <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/02/15/bjsports-2018-100397">taking stairs</a> are great ways to become or stay active without taking much extra time.</p> <p><em>Written by Emmanuel Stamatakis, Joanne Gale and Melody Ding. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/how-much-do-sedentary-people-really-need-to-move-its-less-than-you-think-114824"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Today host Deb Knight addresses Georgie Gardner feud rumours: "We're not schoolgirls"

<p>Deborah Knight has put rumours to rest claiming that she fails to get along with her <em>Today</em> co-host Georgie Gardner.</p> <p>Since the two made their side-by-side hosting debut at the beginning of the year, rumours have been rife saying that the journalists were battling it out for the top spot on the Channel 9 breakfast show, but speaking to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/stellar" target="_blank">Stellar</a> </em>magazine, Knight said that wasn’t the case.</p> <p>“We’re not schoolgirls in a schoolyard,” said Knight.</p> <p>“We’re professional people, and it shouldn’t matter that we’re two women. It disappoints me that has to be the focus.</p> <p>“Georgie and I have enormous respect for each other. We’re very different people, but I think that’s a good thing because we bring different approaches.”</p> <p>Also speaking to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/stellar" target="_blank">Stellar</a></em> was Gardner, who shared the same sentiments saying: “If people feel that because it’s two women that we couldn’t possibly get on and we need to be pitted against each other, then that’s a sad indictment of where we are at as a society.”</p> <p>Gardner was the one who put Knight’s name forward when her former co-host Karl Stefanovic was sacked from the show.</p> <p>But ever since the all-female show aired in January, it has been on the receiving end of enormous criticism.</p> <p>“A lot of it (the commentary) was just hateful, and you have to ignore it,” Knight told<span> </span><em>Stellar</em>.</p> <p>“The first day we were on air, we hadn’t even completed the first show and articles were appearing online writing us off and saying, ‘This is a dud’. It was silly and unfair. I realised I couldn’t control any of this, but what I could control was doing the best job I can.”</p>

News

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Meet the 59-year-old man who has the most piercings in the world

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rolf Buchholz, 59, has taken piercing to an extreme level – with a total of 453 metal piercings on his body, the German man is the Guinness World Record holder. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the world’s most pierced man, it may seem incomprehensible to many how he could carry out his day to day functions like any other normal person. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Buchholz has 278 metal piercings in his genitalia alone. It doesn’t stop there though as the German man also wears a number of tattoos with pride and even has horn implants on his head.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the 59-year-old insists his life is as normal as anyone else, including his sex life. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s not a problem at all. I have had the piercings already so long, if there was a problem, I would have got rid of them already long ago,” he told </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/3799724/worlds-most-pierced-man-boasts-of-great-sex-life-despite-having-278-piercings-in-his-penis/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as his downstairs area carrying an enormous number of piercings, Mr Buchholz also has 94 in and around his mouth. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs5a2UKH4x2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs5a2UKH4x2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Rolf Buchholz (@robuchholz)</a> on Jan 21, 2019 at 4:48am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the 59-year-old confirms he has no complaints in the bedroom, he says it’s a different matter entirely with airport security. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When travelling to the United Arab Emirates for an appearance at a nightclub in Dubai, he claims authorities turned the man away as they were terrified he practiced “black magic.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Those who escorted me back to the aeroplane said that it was because of the way I looked and that it was because I am black magic.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What do you think of Rolf Buchholz 453 metal piercings? Let us know in the comments below. </span></p>

Retirement Life

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Are cruise ship drink packages worth it?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruising always seems like a very cheap way to travel, but unfortunately your purchase price doesn’t always mean it is an inclusive cost. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your fare will include your meals on board, but with some</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">cruise lines</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">alcohol is a cost that is not included and you will have to pull out your onboard spending card for every single drop. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The prices for beer, wine, spirits and even soft drinks and water are high enough to make you consider jumping overboard and swim to that high-end restaurant in the city whose prices now seem like a bargain. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The question does beg though, is the drinking package (if it is available on your select cruise line) worth it? </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ultimately, it depends. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For some, a cruise getaway means being permanently tipsy with a drink in your hand at all times. For others, it might just be a glass of red on a nice night overlooking a black sea. You also could just be looking for a good, rowdy night </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">one </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">time on the cruise and plan to recover for the rest of the trip. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Drinking packages usually come at a heavily discounted price. If you plan to be drinking every day/night while onboard then perhaps exploring the drinking package options might be the way to get what you need at a good price. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is important to remember though, you will not be spending everyday onboard your cruise ship, and your drinking package purchase does not extend to the restaurants and bars on land. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Either way, it is extremely important to read the fine print carefully – there are always little hidden details in there you might not have been aware of. For example, your drinking package may not count on the days you are at port – which could make purchasing the package something you don’t want to do.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What are your tips to consider when wanting to purchase the cruise drinking package? Let us know in the comments below.  </span></p>

Cruising

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BIG W issues urgent recall for popular sunglasses

<p>The consumer watchdog has issued an urgent recall for a pair of Ray-Ban sunglasses sold at BIG W amid concerns the lenses could shatter and damage eyes.</p> <p>The Australian Competition &amp; Consumer Commission said consumers who bought the Ray-Ban brown tortoiseshell sunglasses at the discount department store should stop using the product immediately and return them for a full refund.</p> <p>The recall applies to the non-prescription sunglasses sold at BIG W optical stores in South Australia, Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales between November 2016 and January 2019.</p> <p>The style number RB4175 can be found on the inside of the affected Ray-Ban sunglasses’ left arm.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 278.129px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826199/sunnies.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5b16cba791eb44c082f9a6b296182765" /></p> <p>According to the ACCC, the lenses of the sunnies might not be strong or robust enough, increasing the risk for cracking or breakage under pressure, or there might be some variation between the left lens and the right lens.</p> <p>“BIG W apologises to its customers for any inconvenience caused by this recall,” the statement read.</p> <p><span>Last week, the retailer also issued a recall for the Little Tikes 4-in-1 Trike stroller and the Emma Wiggles </span><a rel="noopener" href="/finance/money-banking/big-w-safety-recall-check-your-grandkids-don-t-have-this" target="_blank">children pyjama set</a><span> sold in their stores.</span></p>

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The 5 most romantic cities in the world

<p>A dating website trawled social media for hashtags related to love. They found some cities are more romantic than others.</p> <p>SpaSeekers.com ranked 66 cities based on hashtags such as #engaged #Isaidyes and #love. You could argue the research is flawed because the more populated a city is, the more likely you will have a hashtag. </p> <p>These are the top 5 most romantic cities in the world.</p> <p><strong>1. New York, USA</strong></p> <p>New York, New York. Think Carriage rides around Central Park, Breakfast at Tiffanies and cool cocktails at dusk. If you’re looking to spice up your relationship, a trip here should do it.</p> <p>Keen on New York? <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/holidays/15-day-eastern-usa-canada-tour/">Check out this 15 day Eastern USA and Canada tour.</a>  You’ll discover a mix of natural, historic and modern attractions such as Niagara Falls, New York’s Empire State Building, Canada’s beautiful capital city Ottawa, Washington DC’s Capitol Hill and Lincoln Monument, and much more.</p> <p><strong>2. London</strong></p> <p>London is old-world charm, history and romance. It’s the setting for incredible tales of romance. Think Notting Hill, Shakespeare in Love and Bridget Jones’ Diary. Plus, it’s cold. You have to snuggle up.</p> <p>Travel here is easy with a <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/holidays/14-day-england-scotland-ireland-tour-save-410pp/">14 day England, Ireland and Scotland fully-escorted tour</a>. Discover London’s history and view iconic Big Ben. Step back in time as you discover Scotland’s rich heritage on a visit to Edinburgh Castle. Finally, journey to Northern Ireland and experience the charming waterfront of Belfast.</p> <p><strong>3. Los Angeles</strong></p> <p>Los Angeles – you either love it, or you hate it. LA is a city of secrets and luxury. Closed doors open up to incredible rooftop bars. Luxury hotel suites offer sweeping views of the sprawling city and you can order anything you want at any time – if you know how. It’s the perfect city for a surprise.</p> <p>To love LA, you need to go with someone who knows this city. They can show you its secrets. <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/holidays/12-day-western-america-tour/">Try this 12 day Western America tour.</a> It will take you through gorgeous national parks and thrilling cities in California, Arizona, and Nevada. Marvel at unique rock formations, scenic drives, deep canyons, and sparkling waterfalls. And then you can wrap up in La La land with expert help to see the best parts of this sprawling city.</p> <p><strong>4. Paris</strong></p> <p>Number four? We did say this list wasn’t statistically correct. Paris is the city of love. Wander the streets of Monmarte and the Left Bank, visit the Moulin Rouge or, for a real treat, try Georges Restaurant on top of the Pompidou Centre. The view of Paris is simply unbelievable.</p> <p><strong>5. Chicago</strong></p> <p>At number five, Chicago isn’t usually a city we associate with romance. But this city has a lot going for it. Chicago’s bold architecture, fabulous art and top-notch restaurants could just melt your heart.</p> <p>Looks like the USA is the most romantic nation. Want New York, Chicago and LA? Check out the<a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/holidays/24-day-trans-american-journey-ny-to-la/"> 24-day trans-American journey from New York to LA</a>. Beginning in New York, this adventure takes in North America’s must-see sights such as Niagara Falls, Yellowstone National Park, Empire State Building, Hollywood and the Grand Canyon, as well as visits some of the country’s most vibrant cities including Chicago, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/most-romantic-cities/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Travel Tips

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No scrubbing necessary! Genius way to remove stains from stainless steel pots

<p>Unfortunately, dirty pans and pots with impossible to remove stains are sentiments we know all too well in the kitchen.</p> <p>After a few uses or even after one bad mix up in the kitchen, our stainless steel appliances can become scorched and stained, and require a muscle workout to get them looking sparkling clean and brand new again.</p> <p>However, there is a solution that has become extremely popular on social media that has proven to work wonders – and the best part is the cleaning trick requires no elbow grease and zero scrubbing!</p> <p>To get a pot or pan back to its glorious original condition, all you need is a dishwashing tablet, a little time and boiling hot water.</p> <p>By placing a dishwashing tablet in your dirty pot with boiling hot water, the dirt, grime and hard-to-remove stains will lift and instead be replaced with a sparkling, unscratched surface.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7826196/dirty.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/666454068f4e41649065b66095be0cab" /></p> <p>Dishwashing tablets have proven to be a magic trick in the kitchen – and not just for the dishes.</p> <p>Not only are they reported to do wonders on your stainless steel kitchen appliances, cleaning whizzes say they're also able to transform a dirty oven door and also your clothes as a replacement for laundry detergent.</p> <p>Will you be using this simple trick in your kitchen anytime soon? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Home & Garden

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How to make free mulch

<p>Autumn leaves aren’t just pretty, they’re full of essential minerals for your garden.<br /> <br />The problem is they fall in such numbers that they can overwhelm the compost bin or form an impenetrable layer if left on the ground.<br /> <br />They are best composted separately in a leaf mould heap, where they break down via a special type of slow, cool decomposition driven mostly by fungi, rather than the warm, fast action of bacteria in a standard heap.<br /> <br />Leaf mould produces a wonderful end product that can be dug in to improve any soil, used as mulch or incorporated into potting mix.<br /> <br />And forget the balancing and turning of traditional compost, just pile up the leaves, wet and forget.<br /> <br />For the best leaf mould, use leaves from deciduous trees, leaving out any with fungal or viral infections.<br /> <br />If you don’t have enough in your own garden, collect them from footpaths and nature strips in the neighbourhood. Leaves from evergreen trees break down more slowly, so keep them to a minimum.<br /> <br />In six to 12 months you’ll have a rich mulch to use on pots and garden beds and within a year or two, a nutritious soil conditioner that also makes a brilliant addition to homemade potting mixes.<br /> <br /><strong>TIP:</strong> Large leaves left on the lawn block sunlight, which can weaken turf. Run the mower over the lawn with the catcher off and the shredded leaves will soon disappear into the grass.  </p> <p><strong>Make leaf mould</strong></p> <p>Although you can make leaf mould with just a heaped-up pile of leaves, the process is easier to manage with some sort of container.<br /> <br />In a small garden, use the bin bag method. Collect fallen leaves and save them in a garbage bag, hosing with water to soak the whole lot.<br /> <br />Make a depression in the top of the tied-off bag and punch a few holes to let in rain. Punch more holes at the base to let excess moisture drain out and keep the bag in a shady area.<br /> <br />If you have space, build a leaf bin, which will allow you to pile your leaves as high as possible. They’ll rot down, so don’t worry if your pile is tall to begin with.<br /> <br />Leaf mould can take two years to rot, so have more than one bin if you want to use it fully rotted.<br /> <br /><strong>TIP</strong>: Plane and sycamore leaves can take three years to rot. Shred them finely or run over the pile several times with a lawnmower to speed things up.</p> <p><strong>Feed the garden</strong></p> <p>Depending on how long you leave  it to break down, leaf mould has many uses in the garden.<br /> <br />It is ideal for use around trees, shrubs, perennials, woodland plants and ferns, while annuals and vegetables prefer the higher nitrogen available in normal compost.<br /> <br />Young leaf mould is usable after six to 12 months when the leaves start breaking up and crumble easily. Use this young product to mulch garden beds and around trees and shrubs, dig it into the soil to add organc matter before planting, or use it as topdressing for lawns.<br /> <br />Well-rotted leaf mould 
is a dark brown crumbly material that’s produced after one to two years, with no real sign of the original leaves.<br /> <br />This material can be used the same way as young leaf mould but also as seed-raising mix. Or combine it with equal parts washed sand, loam and garden compost to make potting mix.</p> <p>How to build a leaf compost bin</p> <p>To make leaf mould, build a bin in a sheltered part of the garden where rain can still get to the leaves, like next to a shed, as they decompose faster if kept damp.</p> <p><strong><u>Step 1:</u></strong> Measure out a square or rectangle to fit your space. Position a garden stake at least 1000mm high at each corner and hammer firmly into the ground.</p> <p><strong><u>Step 2:</u></strong> Secure chicken wire to the stakes with galvanised staples to enclose the bin on three sides. The front is left open so you can add the leaves to the bin.<br /><strong><u>Step 3:</u></strong> Pile up leaves to the top, wetting them down with a hose. When the bin is full, add a mesh front with tie wire so you can remove it to access the leaf mould.</p> <p><strong>Which leaves to use</strong></p> <p>These trees have mineral-rich foliage that breaks down slowly to make a rich soil conditioner. Small leaves rot faster, so shred large or thick leaves.</p> <ul> <li>Maple</li> <li>Liquidambar</li> <li>Oak</li> <li>Ash</li> <li>Poplar</li> <li>Elm</li> <li>Beech</li> <li>Birch</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Jecca Blake. Republished with permission of </em><a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/how-make-free-mulch"><em>Handyman Australia</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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“Let's just calm down”: Barnaby Joyce at the centre of heated and “shouty” interview

<p>Barnaby Joyce has been at the centre of a heated and “shouty” interview with ABC’s Patricia Karvelas.</p> <p>The Nationals backbencher was asked to address the controversial $80 million deal conducted by the government during his time as water minister, which has caused a major uproar on an otherwise smooth election campaign by the Coalition.</p> <p>The 20-minute long radio interview saw Joyce refuse to answer questions over the incident and whether he had determined where the profits of the taxpayer-funded water buyback would ultimately end up.</p> <p>Growing increasingly frustrated, Joyce began to raise his voice and proceeded to give the same response to each question, saying the questions should be forwarded to his Labor counterparts Tony Burke and Penny Wong.</p> <p>One of his answers to Karvelas’ questions was “Labor, Labor, Labor, Labor, Labor.”</p> <p>After having enough of Joyce’s behaviour, Karvelas requested: “Let’s just calm down.”</p> <p>“Let’s just do this respectfully,” she said, saying she wanted to avoid a “shouty interview”.</p> <p>Joyce defended the multimillion-dollar buyback, saying, “These are the people who were offering water for us to buy.”</p> <p>But he then repeated the same words uttered by Prime Minister Scott Morrison, saying that the deal took place at “arm's length” of himself and other ministers.</p> <p>“Are you taking me to confessional or do you want the water? The Labor Party bought water off these people, we bought water off these people … people at arm's length to me made the decision to buy this water,” he said.</p> <p>Joyce then declined to answer whether the buyback scheme was a wrong decision, forcing Karvelas to tell him that her listeners were “frustrated”.</p> <p>“I’m trying to be very patient,” she said.</p> <p>The former Deputy Prime Minister then accused the <em>Radio National </em>host of “ducking and weaving” as she asked about the people who profited off the scheme.</p> <p>“You’re ducking and weaving, go on, spit it out,” said Joyce.</p> <p>“Let me finish my question, you keep talking over me,” Karvelas responded. “I do need to finish and complete sentences.”</p> <p>Joyce, who claimed questions about government beneficiaries of the scheme were about Angus Taylor, said: “I wouldn’t know him if he stood up in my cornflakes”.</p> <p>Karvelas has been applauded for her handling of the situation, with listeners praising the host on Twitter. Joyce on the other hand, didn’t put on his best show.</p>

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Australia’s next tennis star! Lleyton Hewitt’s mini-me son hits first career milestone

<p>There’s a new Hewitt in town – and he may be giving the previous one a run for his money. </p> <p>Lleyton and Bec Hewitt’s son, Cruz, is already proving to be a force to be reckoned with on the tennis court after his latest achievement.</p> <p>The son of the Aussie tennis legend has reached his very first milestone in his blossoming tennis career at the tender age of 10.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram on Thursday, Cruz’s doting mum, Bec Hewitt made the exciting announcement.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWrW5-Jpig/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWrW5-Jpig/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Way to go Cruza!! So proud of your hard work! 💪🏼👏🏼 @cruzhewitt #firsttitle</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bechewitt23/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Bec Hewitt</a> (@bechewitt23) on Apr 17, 2019 at 4:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Way to go Cruza!! So proud of your hard work! @cruzhewitt #firsttitle,” she wrote.</p> <p>The photo shows the young tennis champ kissing his well-deserved trophy – an act that has been done by many greats before him, including his father.</p> <p>Cruz also took to his own Instagram to share the news.</p> <p>“So pumped to get my 1st  title. Thanks everyone for the help and support,” he wrote.</p> <p>Also taking part in the celebration was Cruz’s famous dad, who posted a photo of his own to his Instagram page.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWrYkOguHj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWrYkOguHj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">So proud of my lil’ mate @cruzhewitt #Vamos 💪</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lleytonhewitt89/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Lleyton Hewitt</a> (@lleytonhewitt89) on Apr 17, 2019 at 4:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“So proud of my lil’ mate,” wrote Lleyton.</p> <p>The father-of-three has previously opened up about his faith in his son’s tennis abilities, saying that by the age of 14, Cruz should be ready for the Australian Open.</p> <p>“Hopefully he gets a chance to play in this great event if he wants to. Hopefully he beats me,” he said.</p>

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Why this special photo taken outside Notre-Dame hours before the fire has gone viral

<p>A plea to find two people photographed outside the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris, France, hours before the fire has gone viral on social media.</p> <p>A picture shows what appears to be a father and a daughter playing outside the famous landmark less than half an hour before the fire that engulfed the 850-year-old church began.</p> <p>American woman Brooke Windsor, who took the photo, shared it on Twitter in a bid to find the duo.</p> <p>“Twitter if you have any magic, help him find this,” wrote Windsor, appealing for assistance from social media users in her search.</p> <p>“I took this photo as we were leaving Notre-Dame about an hour before it caught on fire. I almost went up to the dad and asked if he wanted it. Now I wish I had.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I took this photo as we were leaving <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NotreDame?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NotreDame</a> about an hour before it caught on fire. I almost went up to the dad and asked if he wanted it. Now I wish I had. Twitter if you have any magic, help him find this 🙏🏼 <a href="https://t.co/pEu33ubqCK">pic.twitter.com/pEu33ubqCK</a></p> — Brooke Windsor (@brookeawindsor) <a href="https://twitter.com/brookeawindsor/status/1117940714715930624?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 16, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The post has been shared by more than 178,000 people around the world at the time of writing.</p> <p>Windsor said on Twitter that the picture was taken at 5.57 pm local time, approximately half an hour before the fire that destroyed the spire of the cultural icon began.</p> <p>“If it were me, I’d want the memory,” Windsor told BBC. “Hoping he feels the same way.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">This is going to become THAT photo.</p> — Michelle Bhasin (@michellebhasin) <a href="https://twitter.com/michellebhasin/status/1117951419720585216?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 16, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">This photo is not only a keeper, it’s historic.</p> — Mike Beamish (@sixbeamers) <a href="https://twitter.com/sixbeamers/status/1117964153597992960?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 16, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The Monday evening fire lasted several hours and destroyed the cathedral’s roof and spire, likely damaging a number of thorns, relics and gargoyles. However, Notre-Dame’s heritage director Laurent Prades said many other relics and structures <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-17/notre-dame-cathedral-staff-took-23-minutes-to-discover-fire/11023332" target="_blank">have been saved</a>.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Fires coming out of the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Notre_Dame?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Notre_Dame</a> cathedral. <a href="https://t.co/zTxnf75nOS">pic.twitter.com/zTxnf75nOS</a></p> — Firas El Echi (@FirasElEchi10) <a href="https://twitter.com/FirasElEchi10/status/1117840294408593408?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 15, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“All the 18th-century steles, the pietas, frescoes, chapels and the big organ are fine,” said Prades.</p> <p>French president Emmanuel Macron has pledged to rebuild the church. “Notre Dame is our history, our literature, part of our psyche, the place of all our great events, our epidemics, our wars, our liberations, the epicentre of our lives,” Macron told reporters.</p> <p>“Let’s be proud, because we built this cathedral more than 800 years ago, we’ve built it and, throughout the centuries, let it grow and improved it. So I solemnly say tonight: we will rebuild it together.”</p>

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13 things smart travellers always do before a flight

<p><strong>1. Passport protocol</strong></p> <p>If you’re travelling internationally, you won’t get anywhere without your passport on-hand. So make sure to double check you have it in your carry-on bag before heading to the airport. “Make a copy of your passport to carry around at all times, and keep your real version in the hotel safe,” says Patricia Hajifotiou, who owns the small-group tour company The Olive Odysseys and has been leading tours in Europe for 21 years.</p> <p><strong>2. Protect against mishaps</strong></p> <p>So many things can go awry while travelling – trip delays and cancellations, delayed or lost luggage, travel accidents, emergency evacuations, and more. No, this doesn’t mean you should stay home and give up your dreams of seeing the world. “When I am booking an international trip with my family, I make sure to pay for our flights, lodging, and rental car with a credit card that offers reimbursement for these inconveniences,” says Leah Althiser, owner of travel blog The Frugal South. “Most premium travel rewards credit cards offer these benefits, some with an annual fee less than $100. These benefits can potentially save you thousands of dollars if something goes wrong on your trip.” If you don’t have a credit card that offers this peace of mind, consider purchasing separate traveller’s insurance.</p> <p><strong>3. Notify banks</strong></p> <p>Want to escape off the grid entirely? Even if you don’t tell your mother where you’re headed, you should tell your credit card company. “Banks take extra precautions to prevent credit card fraud and will block transactions that don’t fit your normal pattern,” says Tom Carr, founder and CEO of Preferred Vacations. “If you don’t travel often, it’s best to let them know where you’ll be so you’re not in the checkout line or at a restaurant without a way to pay until you can speak with your bank.” </p> <p><strong>4. Prevent jetlag</strong></p> <p>If your circadian rhythm is easily disturbed, a little foresight can help decrease your adjustment time. “Set your watch to the arrival time zone as soon as you sit in the plane,” says Mitch Krayton, CTA, owner of Krayton Travel. “Then eat, sleep, and act like you are already in the time zone. This will help you manage jet lag and keep you ready to go on arrival.”</p> <p><strong>5. Put on compression socks</strong></p> <p>They may not be sexy, but compression socks are a simple life-saving measure everyone should add to their wardrobe. “Especially during a long flight, remaining sedentary for extended periods of time can introduce problems,” says Dr. William Spangler, Global Medical Director with AIG Travel, who has more than 30 years of emergency medical experience. “One of the most common of these is deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which is the formation of blood clots, particularly in the lower leg or thigh. It doesn’t cause much pain, but when the clots break off and go elsewhere, they can create serious problems.” Aside from compression socks, which help to increase circulation, Dr. Spangler advises getting up at least every two hours, even if it’s only in your seat just to move your legs. If you can walk up and down the aisle a bit, that’s even better.</p> <p><strong>6. Avoid germs</strong></p> <p>In the natural course of your travel day, you’re going to be touching numerous surfaces – buttons, touch screens, escalator railings, security bins, armrests, seat belts and tray tables – that countless people have touched before you between cleanings. “Clean germs off your hands as frequently as possible, and carry a small bottle of antibacterial hand sanitiser for whenever you can’t wash with soap and water,” says Dr. Spangler. “Also, consider bringing a small packet of antibacterial wipes when you’re flying to wipe down the surfaces that will be in your immediate vicinity for the duration of your flight, particularly the seat-back tray table, which has been shown to harbour more germs than the aeroplane bathroom.” For the truly germaphobic, consider disposable aeroplane seat covers.</p> <p><strong>7. Charge electronic devices</strong></p> <p>Somehow, people used to fly without any electronics. Today that would be unheard of – unless you’ve run out of juice and downgraded yourself back to the stone ages. “Making sure your phone, laptop and other electronics are charged accomplishes two things,” says Christian Eilers, founder of the travel site Dauntless Jaunter. “First, it ensures you have enough power to keep you entertained or working during your flight. Secondly, it also forces you to know in advance where you have your batteries and cables, saving you from that last-minute scramble with the Uber waiting outside.” It’s also wise to travel with a portable charger just in case your battery wears out faster than you anticipated.</p> <p><strong>8. Real-time info</strong></p> <p>Great, did you just sprint all the way to your gate only to find out it was switched to one much closer to where you started? “Sign up for flight updates on your phone,” says Alissa Musto, a professional travelling musician and singer-songwriter. “If your flight is delayed or security lines are long, you’ll get updates in real time so you know what to expect when you arrive at the airport and can plan accordingly.” Along with signing up for text alerts, don’t forget to download your airline’s app, too. </p> <p><strong>9. Carry on must-haves</strong></p> <p>If you haven’t yet mastered the art of travelling with only a carry on, that’s OK – but there are certain things you must never check. “Pack your medication in your carry on,” says Jeff Miller, who co-owns the travel blog Our Passion For Travel with his wife and has visited 73 countries. “Depending on your destination, in the event of lost luggage, your medication may not be easily accessible or may cost a small fortune.” He also suggests bringing a change of clothes on board, so that you have a clean set if your luggage takes an accidental side trip and doesn’t arrive until the following day. The same goes for your passport, money, electronics, jewellery, lighters, and lithium batteries.</p> <p><strong>10. BYOF (bring your own food)</strong></p> <p>Unless the idea of a wilted aeroplane sandwich or waiting in a long line for a greasy burger excites you, it’s best to travel with your own food. “Airport food is notoriously overpriced and nutritious options are hard to find,” says Betsey Banker, owner of the travel blog Midlife Millennials and former wellness educator. “I plan ahead and bring my own snacks or meals. Nuts, fruits, and veggies are all good options. On a regular basis, I take my own salad in a sealed bag. Bringing your own food allows you to eat on your own schedule and according to your own dietary preferences, which is especially important on long days of travel, when you’re moving between time zones and when you have short connections.”</p> <p><strong>11. Choose seats wisely</strong></p> <p>You may think you’ve read the seat map correctly, only to find out you’re seated right next to the bathroom, have less legroom thanks to an equipment box, or inadvertently booked a seat without a moveable armrest (therefore reducing seat width). “Refer to website Seat Guru when booking your seats on your flight,” says Victoria Langmead, Safari Expert for travel company Scott Dunn. You’ll be able to consult a seat map for each specific aircraft and determine the ideal seat selection for your preferences.”</p> <p><strong>12. Visit an airport lounge</strong></p> <p>Whether you have a long layover or need to hop on a conference call in peace, an airport lounge can be your safe haven from all the chaos. “Take advantage of the airport lounges, because they’ll make your travel experience much less stressful,” says Yuichi Nishiyama, a pilot for All Nippon Airways. “Not only are lounges a nice place to retreat from the hustle and bustle happening at the gates, but they have a variety of services from dining to shower facilities to designated workspaces.” If you haven’t racked up enough airline status or your credit card doesn’t give you access, then many airlines will allow you to purchase a day pass.</p> <p><strong>13. Hydrate ahead of time</strong></p> <p>There’s a reason your lips feel chapped, your nose and throat feel dry, and your hands turn scaly on a flight – according to the Cleveland Clinic, roughly half of the air circulating in the cabin is pulled from outside air, and at 35,000 feet that air has very little moisture. “I always make sure to hydrate well before a flight,” says Anisa Alhilali, who co-owns the blog Two Travelling Texans and has stamps from 41 countries in her passport. “I try to drink as much water as possible for 24 hours before I travel. I also make sure to have water with me on the plane. It’s best to bring your own refillable water bottle, and fill it up after going through security, since buying water at the airport can be expensive.” Avoiding caffeine and alcohol on your flight will also help keep you hydrated. </p> <p><em>Written by Jill Schildhouse. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/flights/13-things-smart-travellers-always-do-flight">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Why should you visit McLaren Vale in South Australia?

<p>McLaren Vale is a magical region just 30 minutes south of Adelaide known for its many wineries, stunning vistas and amazing fresh produce.</p> <p>Always fancied going skinny dipping? Being a spectator at Australia’s nude games? Or a plane joyride in a Tiger Moth? There is certainly more to McLaren Vale than delicious wine and cuisine.</p> <p><strong>Planning a visit? Pick and mix your favourite experiences at McLaren Vale.</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Get on your bike!</strong><br />This delightful region is famed for its vineyards that run across rolling hills, friendly and passionate locals in quaint villages and spectacular ocean drives. All of these enticing images will be beamed around the world when<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://mclarenvale.info/towns-beaches/welcome-to-mclaren-vale/" target="_blank">McLaren Vale</a> hosts its stage of the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.tourdownunder.com.au/the-race/tour-details/stages/stage-5" target="_blank">Tour Down Under</a><span> </span>bike race in January 2016. Not visiting during the big race? Why not hire a bike for a leisurely three hours for $15 from<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.oxygencycles.com/" target="_blank">Oxygen Cycles</a>.</p> <p>More of a serious cyclist? Consider doing the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://mclarenvale.info/adventures/coast-vines-trail/" target="_blank">Coast to Vines trail</a> - a spectacular 37 kilometre journey through the area incorporating highlights such as Christies Creek Trail, and the Shiraz Trail, which runs from the town of McLaren Vale to Willunga. A community initiative, the Shiraz Trail offers a unique (and delicious) food and wine trail experience.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/338112/566543ad83cebcf3afeb16459f57a2a6_500x278.jpg" alt="566543ad 83cebcf 3afeb 16459f 57a 2a6 (2)" width="500" height="278" /></p> <p><strong>2. Discover wine and cheese to please</strong><br />With over 70 cellar doors across the region it is easy to spend your whole day sampling the regions many wines. Producers such as D’arenburg, Coriole, Kay Brothers and Chapel Hill have amazing cellar doors with friendly staff to help you to experience the liquid gold from the surrounding vineyards. A great place to start the day is at Blessed Cheese on the main street in McLaren Vale. Here you can collect a cheese tasting hamper full of goodies and get a map which will guide you through a trail of four wineries where you can taste wines matched perfectly with cheeses.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/338109/mclaren-vale_500x320.jpg" alt="Mc Laren -Vale" width="500" height="320" /></p> <p><strong>3. A very unusual sporting event</strong><br />Maslin Beach can lay claim to being one of the prettiest and most pristine beaches in South Australia yet has a further title of distinction as it is famed as Australia’s first official nude beach. It is proud home to Australia’s <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.pilwarren.com/pilwarren_maslin_beach_nude_games.htm" target="_blank">nude games</a>. Just in case you are interested this next unique event is scheduled for January 2016. Always wondered what a naked three legged race looks like?<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.pilwarren.com/pictures3.htm" target="_blank">See here!</a></p> <p><strong>4. Nude swimming for those who dare to bare</strong><br />If you aren’t around for this spectacular sporting event but are feeling game, a section at the southern end of this three kilometre long beach permits nude sunbathing and swimming. The waters are cool and inviting and the cliff top provides a great picnic spot or sunset viewing. The locals are friendly and if going skinny dipping has always been on your bucket list here is your chance!</p> <p><strong>5. Fly high in a Tiger Moth</strong><br />Imagine the joy and sheer romance of an open cockpit flight along McLaren Vale’s stunning coast line. Based at the charming Aldinga Airfield,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.adelaidebiplanes.com.au/" target="_blank">Adelaide Biplanes</a> offers scenic flights in a Tiger Moth. While sitting up front in this historic plane you will experience the wind in your hair and the romance of a bygone era. The flights take in the regions rich panorama of vineyards, rolling hills, unspoilt beaches and stunning cliff tops.</p> <p><strong>6. Produce the (fresh) goods</strong><br />Open every Saturday morning come rain, hail or shine the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.willungafarmersmarket.com.au/" target="_blank">Willunga Farmers Market</a> in the Town Square was the first farmers’ market to be established in South Australia and is considered to be the best. ‘Meet the grower and taste the region’ is the theme for this market which consists of more than 60 stalls showcasing fresh and seasonal produce from the regions farms. These markets are family friendly and certainly are a foodies nirvana!</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/338113/6a1a58a393f41d45fa108ff423f9b529_500x333.jpg" alt="6a 1a 58a 393f 41d 45fa 108ff 423f 9b 529" width="500" height="333" /></p> <p><strong>7. Take an idyllic beach drive</strong><br />Aldinga Beach allows vehicles to drive straight onto the beach. For a small donation to the local scouts or surf club volunteers who man the entry ramps you can drive right to your desired spot and unpack for the day. What’s not to love about that?</p> <p>In summer there are rows of families who set up mini compounds completed with cabanas for shade and plenty of cool refreshments to keep everyone happy. Games of beach cricket ensue along the beach and only stop when someone calls lunch or if a car is passing at low speed.</p> <p>This magnificent strip of white sand and clear blue water is a favourite summer holiday spot for Adelaide families to unwind and enjoy and even the family pooch gets to come along as this beach is pet friendly. Aldinga Beach is perfect for everyone as you don’t need a 4WD to enjoy a drive along the beach from Aldinga down to Sellicks beach where on a good day you can spot a number of hang gliders launching from the cliff tops and soaring in the thermals. However, take note of the high tide mark is as this will save you from the embarrassment of being woken from your afternoon snooze by the incoming tide flooding your picnic spot.</p> <p><strong>8. Experience spectacular cliff top dining</strong><br />Located just north of Aldinga beach, Port Willunga is home to the famous shipwreck<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://starofgreece.com.au/about.html" target="_blank">Star of Greece</a> and a <a rel="noopener" href="http://starofgreece.com.au/" target="_blank">restaurant</a><span> </span>of the same name. The restaurant was born from humble beginnings as a1950’s beach kiosk and is in tune with its cliff top surroundings by offering Mediterranean style of cuisine with plenty of local seafood options.</p> <p>The beach kiosk aspect of the Star of Greece offers simple fish and chips accompanied by the coldest of beers and certainly can bring back memories of beachside holidays from a bygone era and also create wonderful new memories. After lunch enjoy a dip in the cool blue ocean or a walk along the beach to explore the many caves that were dug out of the cliffs by fishermen long ago. These caves and the jetty ruins invoke childhood fascinations and images of shipwrecks and pirates.</p> <p><img src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/338114/sorimage10_495x160.jpg" alt="Sorimage 10" width="495" height="160" /></p> <p><strong>How to get there: stay and play</strong><br /><a rel="noopener" href="http://mclarenvale.info/" target="_blank">McLaren Vale</a> has plenty of accommodation options for you to stay and play in the region. Ranging from well appointed tourist parks and cosy bed and breakfast cottages to motels and beach house rentals there really is something for every budget and taste. Enjoy a weekend or stay for a week or two.</p> <p><em>Have you been to South Australia? What were the highlights? Join the conversation below…</em></p> <p><em>Written by Lynton Jones. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/why-should-you-visit-mclaren-vale-in-south-australia.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Which countries are the safest to visit?

<p>You may have an ideal list of places you want to visit, based on their cuisine, culture, history and sights.<br /><br />However, to be prudent, you should also factor in safety considerations, in order to minimise the risk of running into trouble while you’re travelling.<br /><br />With the 2018 Global Law and Order Index report from Gallup, you can find out exactly which countries are safe, and which you should leave off your travel bucket list for the time being.<br /><br />More than 148,000 people from 142 countries, aged 15 years old or older, were interviewed.<br /><br />Respondents answered questions that delved into their personal experiences and feelings of safety in the place they lived.<br /><br />The survey reveals the answers to the following questions:<br /><br />1) In the city or area where you live, do you have confidence in the local police force?<br /><br />2) Do you feel safe walking alone at night in the city or the area where you live?<br /><br />3) Within the last 12 months, have you had money or property stolen from you or another household member?<br /><br />4) Within the past 12 months, have you been assaulted or mugged?<br /><br />According to Jon Clifton, global managing partner at Gallup, the survey wanted to address the discrepancy between official statistics and people’s personal experiences.<br /><br />“The challenge is that in some dangerous societies, people don’t report if they’ve been mugged or assaulted, so the official data may not accurately reflect the security situation on the ground,” he says.<br /><br />The scores reflect the proportion of the country’s population who indicate that they feel secure.<br /><br />The higher the number, the more local residents report feeling safe.<br /><br />The country deemed safest in the world is Singapore, which is known for its low crime rate.<br /><br />This is followed by Norway, Iceland and Finland, which are all tied at second place.<br /><br />As for countries you should think twice before visiting: Venezuela, Afghanistan and South Sudan top the “least secure” list.</p> <div class="view view-article-slider view-id-article_slider view-display-id-article_slider_block view-dom-id-989be53767a54d0b0ee4627f311cb9d9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>The most secure</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Singapore (97)</p> <p>Norway, Iceland, Finland (93)</p> <p>Uzbekistan, Hong Kong (91)</p> <p>Switzerland, Canada (90)</p> <p>Indonesia (89)</p> <p>Denmark, Slovenia, Luxembourg, Austria, China, Netherlands, Egypt (88)</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>The least secure</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Venezuela (44)</p> <p>Afghanistan (45)</p> <p>South Sudan (54)</p> <p>Gabon (55)</p> <p>Liberia (56)</p> <p>South Africa, Mexico (58)</p> <p>Dominican Republic (60)</p> <p>Bolivia, Sierra Leone, Botswana (61)</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/which-countries-are-safest-visit"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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One of the world's biggest airlines collapses

<p>India’s Jet Airways has finally collapsed after months of speculation.</p> <p>The once iconic airline has been struggling for months to stay in business and the announcement follows weeks of questions over the fate of the airline.</p> <p>Jet Airways has failed to secure emergency funding from India’s banks and is suspending all flights.</p> <p>The collapse of Jet Airways is the biggest in India since the failure of Kingfisher Airlines back in 2012.</p> <p>The blow is massive to the Indian aviation industry, as demand soars for services. However, airlines are struggling to keep the prices low.</p> <p>Jet Airways explained in a statement their sadness.</p> <p>"This has been a very difficult decision but without interim funding, the airline is simply unable to conduct flight operations," Jet Airways said in statement.</p> <p>"Above all, the airline would like to express its sincere gratitude to all its employees and stakeholders that have stood by the company in these trying times."</p> <p>The airline was informed late on Tuesday by a range of lenders that are led by the government-run State Bank of India that the airline would not be receiving more funds.</p> <p>Passengers are being informed about the closure of the airline via email and text messages and are able to claim a refund.</p> <p>The airline’s operations had shrunk to 40 flights on 5 aircraft on Tuesday, before the closure was announced.</p> <p>However, the banks are continuing to search for a private investor to buy 75 per cent of the airline. The deadline for bids is May 10th.</p>

Travel Trouble

Health

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Why do eggs have a yolk?

<p><strong><em>Why do eggs have orange stuff inside? – Rafael, age 7.</em></strong></p> <p>This is a very interesting question. That orange stuff is called a yolk. It’s a great source of vitamins, minerals, fats and proteins packaged up by the female animal for an embryo (the developing cells that turn into a baby).</p> <p>You probably know that the yellow bit inside a <a href="https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/eggs/eggcomposition.html">chicken’s egg</a> is the yolk, but in fact a lot of animals lay eggs that have yolks in them. However, not all animal eggs have a yolk!</p> <p><strong>A contest called evolution</strong></p> <p>To understand why different animal species have different types of eggs, you need to know that all living things change slowly over time, through a process called evolution.</p> <p>When a living thing is born with a special difference – what we would call a “trait” – sometimes this trait helps them live and survive better than someone who doesn’t have that trait. This trait may help them live longer and have more babies.</p> <p>Because of these differences in survival, eventually, the trait that lets one individual living thing live and prosper will become quite common and be found all throughout a species.</p> <p><strong>Back to eggs</strong></p> <p>Imagine you are a worm living millions of years ago. You produce heaps and heaps of eggs that develop quickly into little worms. But most of the babies die because they are small and have to find food straight after hatching. They can’t go far because they are very little and so most starve to death (or are eaten by bigger creatures).</p> <p>But what if some of those eggs happened to contain a little bit of fat from the mother? Compared to its brothers and sisters, the fat will allow the worm to spend just a little bit more time growing inside the egg and less time looking for food after hatching.</p> <p>The worms that were lucky enough to have that fat inside the egg are more likely to survive long enough to have their own babies. And they pass on the fatty-egg trait to their own worm kids. Soon this fatty-egg trait becomes quite common.</p> <p>So the worm who was able to feed its babies when they’re still inside the egg had more babies survive, and a yolk evolved.</p> <p><strong>Which eggs have a yolk and why?</strong></p> <p>Eggs with tiny bits of yolk are found in animals such as earthworms, leeches, clams, mussels, starfish, sea urchins, and marine arthropods (shrimp, lobsters, crabs) and some insects. These animals produce huge numbers of eggs.</p> <p>Most of the babies that grow in these sorts of eggs have to go through a lot of steps before they reach the adult stage. First they have to grow into a larvae (which is what we call a junior body, and often looks a bit like worm).</p> <p>The babies have to change into a larvae so they can eat, and after having eaten a bit they develop into an adult (think of caterpillars that eventually turn into butterflies).</p> <p>Animals that produce eggs with a bit more yolk have babies that can fully develop and skip the larvae step, such as in hagfish and snails.</p> <p><strong>Big yolks for big babies</strong></p> <p>Eggs with really large yolks are found in animals that produce very few eggs, and the offspring can use the yolk to develop completely. These sorts of eggs are found only in cephalopods (squid, octopus and nautilus) and some vertebrates (animals with backbones).</p> <p>Vertebrates that produce eggs with large yolks include bony fish, cartilaginous fish (<a href="https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/science-environment/2018/08/the-weird-world-of-shark-eggs/">sharks</a> and rays), reptiles, birds and egg-laying mammals (platypus and echidnas).</p> <p>The rest of the mammals (animals that don’t lay eggs) have found a different system. They have a placenta, which is a kind of a feeding sack linking mother to embryo inside the mother’s body. This system allows the developing embryo or fetus to get nutrients straight from the mother. That’s how you were grown!</p> <p><em>Written by Maggie J. Watson. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-eggs-have-a-yolk-111605">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Body

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How Michael Schumacher's secret plan has tragically ended

<p>Michael Schumacher’s former manager has revealed the Formula One legend had a plan to manage his son Mick, until the 2013 skiing accident left him with severe brain injuries.</p> <p>In an interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.motorsport-total.com/formel-1/news/willi-weber-michael-wollte-micks-manager-in-der-formel-1-werden-19041801" target="_blank"><em>Motorsport-Total.com</em></a>, Willi Weber admitted the seven-time world champion wanted to help “his boy into Formula One and even manage him the way I used to manage him.”</p> <p>However, the December 2013 accident in the French Alps ended that big plan for the father and son duo. </p> <p>“Michael was anxious to get his boy into Formula One and even manage him,” Weber said. “That would have been a great story. He would have loved that.”</p> <p>Weber said Michael would have made a great manager due to his extensive experience in Formula One. </p> <p>“Michael knew which teams he could speak to and how it works because he garnered many years of experience. That was his grand ambition,” said Weber.</p> <p>Mick Schumacher has recently moved up to F2 racing after winning the European Formula Three Championship last year. Earlier this month, the 20-year-old drove in his first F1 test for Ferrari in Bahrain.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 333.496px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826186/schumacherjr.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/021b789d0df54401a9efac3773ff5a01" /></p> <p>Ferrari’s Formula One team leader Mattia Binotto said the way Mick works reminds him of the young racer’s father. </p> <p>“The very first time I saw him after many years … I looked at him, and I didn't think he’s really looking similar to Michael,” said Binotto, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/ferrari-schumacher-mick-michael-approach/4368738/" target="_blank"><em>motorsport.com</em></a>.</p> <p>“But the way he’s behaving is very similar, and the way he approached the exercise, the way he’s interested in the car, discussing with technicians.</p> <p>“And I think that’s a bit similar to his father.”</p> <p>Mick said he is looking to get into Formula One as “a complete racing driver”, but he is not in a hurry to do so.</p> <p>“Obviously it's my first year in F2, we'll see how it goes,” he said.</p> <p>“I want to arrive into F1 being a complete racing driver, being as prepared as possible … I think time will tell if that’s next year, if that’s the years to follow, really. So, I'm taking it one step at a time.”</p>

Caring

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Pets and owners: How you can learn a lot about one by studying the other

<p>There’s an old saying that pets and their owners become more similar as time goes by. There may be some truth in that, but can we use information about owners to improve veterinary care?</p> <p>Research is showing the health and welfare of pets can be influenced by personality traits in their owners.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211862" title="Owner personality and the wellbeing of their cats share parallels with the parent-child relationship">More than 3,000 cat owners</a> were measured across five areas: agreeableness, conscientiousness, extroversion, neuroticism, and openness.</p> <p>Those who scored highly on neuroticism were more likely to demonstrate a preference for pedigree rather than non-pedigree cats.</p> <p>Neuroticism is associated with emotional instability. People high on this trait tend to be generally more anxious and moody than others and may also respond more poorly to stress, often overreacting to small challenges.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, therefore, the same group were also more likely to report their cats were showing unwelcome behaviours. These included signs of aggression, anxiety and fearfulness and more stress-related sickness behaviours, as well as having more ongoing medical conditions and being overweight.</p> <p><strong>Other animal and human studies</strong></p> <p>Similar relationships have been observed elsewhere. Parents who score highly on neuroticism may be more likely to have <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002239999400097O" title="Effects of parents' psychological characteristics and eating behaviour on childhood obesity and dietary compliance">children with clinical obesity</a>.</p> <p>When it comes to dogs, our own studies have shown that working dog handlers who score highly on neuroticism <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1558787815001471" title="Dogmanship on the farm: Analysis of personality dimensions and training styles of stock dog handlers in Australia">report more attendance at competitions but no greater success in farm dog performance</a>.</p> <p>And male owners with moderate depression are at least five times more likely than those without depression to use <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0192846" title="Associations between owner personality and psychological status and the prevalence of canine behavior problems">punitive and coercive training techniques</a> such as hitting, kicking or yelling at their dogs.</p> <p>The same group of men also reported their dogs as showing significantly more house-soiling (urination and defecation when left alone) and aggression towards other dogs.</p> <p><strong>Animal welfare</strong></p> <p>These important differences in personality and ownership styles may have a bearing on the welfare of pets.</p> <p>The recent cat study shows owners high in neuroticism are more likely to keep their pets indoors or restrict their access to the outdoors.</p> <p>This may reflect heightened concern about the risk of road traffic accidents or other hazards. It could lead to improved cat welfare, but only if such diligence is accompanied by behavioural enrichment indoors, such as toys and puzzle feeders.</p> <p>Owner personality may also influence how often a cat is taken to a veterinary clinic. Owners who score highly in neuroticism may be hypervigilant in the way they scrutinise their cats, which can lead to extra trips to the vet.</p> <p>This could actually compromise cat welfare, because many cats don’t like trips to the vet. Even the sight of a carry-cage can cause increased anxiety and flight response in a cat.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4IajGu89jSU?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> </p> <p>On the other hand, such trips may lead to improved welfare if they result in better health, particularly if, upon arrival, the cats are subjected to <a href="http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/low-stress-handling-algorithm-key-happier-visits-and-healthier-pets">low-stress handling</a>.</p> <p>Other findings from the cat study suggest some owner attributes may be associated with an extremely positive attitude towards their pets.</p> <p>High scores for agreeableness were associated with cat owners tending to view their animals in a good light. These cats had fewer reported unwelcome behaviours and were less likely to be considered overweight.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20563903" title="Dog obesity: can dog caregivers' (owners') feeding and exercise intentions and behaviors be predicted from attitudes?">Previous studies</a> in dogs show owners are often poor judges of whether their pets are overweight or not.</p> <p><strong>Look to the owner</strong></p> <p>This evidence that attributes in the owner can influence how their pets are perceived, and the kind of life they experience, means anyone working with these animals needs some understanding of human psychology.</p> <p>Behavioural change is often the first sign that an animal is unwell. One of the most revealing aspects of a case history is the behaviour changes that owners report.</p> <p>The quality and accuracy of this information from owners on their pets is crucial. But this may be strongly influenced by the relationship that owners have with their pets, such as what they look for and the intensity of their appraisal.</p> <p>This evidence that owner characteristics may influence many aspects of their pet’s life – including potentially how the pet presents to a veterinary clinic – prompts us to consider how we can improve the quality of data.</p> <p>For clinical behaviour cases it is important to include video records of the animal’s unwelcome behaviour. Owners are already quite adept at capturing and supplying video evidence when consulting behavioural veterinarians.</p> <p>But this video evidence can also help with veterinary consultations about other conditions such as neurological disorders and intermittent lameness.</p> <p>There are tools that allow owners to capture and report data in real time, using apps such as <a href="http://www.doglogbook.com/">doglogbook</a>. They have the advantage of being simple to use and having a time/date stamp that may help to keep a chronological record of the owner’s observations.</p> <p><strong>A complex relationship</strong></p> <p>The relationship between owners and veterinarians can be extremely complex and take some time to mature. A veterinarian who knows both owner and pet well will be able to detect subtle clinical signs that may otherwise go unnoticed.</p> <p>Yet each clinical case must now be understood in the context of the human background baggage that enters the consultation room.</p> <p>It’s all too easy to overlook the role of the owner’s personality in their interactions with their pet, and how their personality may influence how they perceive the animals, how they manage the animals and how they concern themselves with the health status of the animals.</p> <p>Further research will undoubtedly continue to provide new insights into the fascinating world of owner-pet relationships.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/114167/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Paul McGreevy, Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science, University of Sydney and Pauleen Bennett, Professor and Head of Department, Psychology and Counselling, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/pets-and-owners-you-can-learn-a-lot-about-one-by-studying-the-other-114167"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Mind

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Why can't you tickle yourself?

<p>If you want to probe one of the great mysteries of the human mind, all you need is a feather duster and your feet. Sit back, take your shoes and socks off, and gently stroke the feathers against your sole. Now ask a friend to do the same for you. If you are like most people, you will be left stone-faced by one but convulsed in ticklish agony by the other. Why?</p> <p>Once the domain of childhood curiosity, the question of why we can’t tickle ourselves is now exciting neuroscientists. To understand their interest, consider this: every time your body moves, it creates sensations that could potentially confuse you in all kinds of ways. Just imagine the chaos if every time one of your hands brushed your leg, you assumed that someone was fondling or attacking you. Being able to distinguish between your movement and the actions of others is therefore a central part of our sense of self and agency, aspects of the psyche that even the smartest robots can’t replicate – yet.</p> <p>Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, of University College London, was one of the first to investigate the way the brain makes these lightning-fast decisions about the self and others. She scanned subjects’ brains as her colleagues tickled the palms of their hands and as the participants attempted to do so themselves. From the resulting brain activity, she concluded that whenever we move our limbs, the brain’s cerebellum produces precise predictions of the body’s movements and then sends a second shadow signal that damps down activity in the somatosensory cortex (where tactile feelings are processed). The result is that when we tickle ourselves, we don’t feel the sensations with the same intensity as we would if they had come from someone else, and so we remain calm.</p> <p>Blakemore suspected there could be ways to fool the process and allow people to tickle themselves. So she designed a machine that allowed her subjects to move a stick that gently stroked a piece of foam over their palm, sometimes instantaneously and at other times with a delay of up to 200 milliseconds. It turned out that the greater the delay, the more ticklish the foam felt, perhaps because the cerebellum’s predictions no longer matched what the person was actually feeling.</p> <p>Many others have since tried to find ways to trick the brain into tickling itself. For instance, controlling someone’s foot movements with magnetic brain stimulation, so that the hand tickles the foot against the person’s will, seems to do the trick.</p> <p>But other experiments have produced puzzling results. One study tried to give subjects an out-of-body experience before tickling them, by fitting them with video goggles that let them see from the eyes of the experimenter and by synchronising their movements. Even with the subjects confused about which body they inhabited, they were largely unmoved when they pressed a button that tickled both bodies simultaneously. Another experiment, in which expert lucid dreamers tried to tickle themselves in their sleep, also failed.</p> <p>It may seem random, but understanding the self-tickling barrier could answer more practical scientific questions, like why many schizophrenics can tickle themselves or whether robots ever could.</p> <p>“Your inability to tickle yourself suggests neurologically based definitions of self and other,” writes Robert Provine of the University of Maryland. “Developing a similar machine algorithm may lead to ‘ticklish’ robots [that can] distinguish touching from being touched and may provide a [new] construct of machine personhood.” If so, a featherduster could soon provide a bizarre new test for artificial intelligence: just aim for the robot’s feet and see if it laughs.</p> <p><em>Written by David Robson. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/Why-Cant-You-Tickle-Yourself"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"></a><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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Tasty and simple coconut and banana custards

<p>Simple to make, sublime and smooth to taste, without the dairy products and refined sugar that most custard desserts contain.</p> <p>You can sprinkle a few cubes of peeled mango, sliced strawberries or blueberries over each custard before serving, and a small teaspoon of maple syrup to make it look pretty.</p> <p>A sprinkling of cinnamon over the top adds to the flavour. Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>8 small custards</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p>2 cups coconut cream<span> </span></p> <p>¼ cup coconut nectar, or maple or rice syrup</p> <p>1 large banana</p> <p>1 tablespoon pure vanilla essence (vanilla extract)</p> <p>1 teaspoon agar-agar powder</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a small saucepan and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, stirring, for 4–5 minutes until it thickens slightly.</p> <p>2. Transfer the mixture to small moulds and allow to set in the refrigerator for a few hours.</p> <p><strong>Tips: </strong></p> <p>Agar-agar is a seaweed-based gelling agent used as a vegetarian replacement for gelatin. As a rule of thumb, to thicken 1 cup of liquid, use 1 teaspoon of agar-agar powder, 1 tablespoon of agar-agar flaked or ½ an agar-agar bar. Using the powder yields more consistent results.</p> <p>Substitute gelatin with the same amount of agar-agar powder. The solution you are trying to thicken with the agar-agar powder needs to be heated to boiling point and then allowed to simmer for about 5 minutes.</p> <p><em>Recipe extracted from Feed Your Brain: The Cookbook by Delia McCabe (RRP $34.99).</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/coconut-and-banana-custards.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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It's not just sex: Why people have affairs and how to deal with them

<p>Barnaby Joyce’s affair with his former staffer Vikki Campion, and his subsequent downfall from the position of deputy prime minister and head of the National Party, made headlines for weeks. It’s not surprising. From politicians to actors and entertainers, stories of high profile individuals caught “cheating” on their partner often make front-page news.</p> <p>We believe a romantic partner is there to provide us with love, comfort and security. So people are quick to make judgements and lay blame on perpetrators of what they see as a significant violation of relationship norms and betrayal of trust. Infidelity highlights the potential fragility of our closest and most important of relationships.</p> <p>But despite the blunt belief infidelity is the result of immoral and over-sexed individuals wanting their cake and eating it too, the reality is far more nuanced. For instance, infidelity is rarely just about sex. In fact, when it comes to purely sexual infidelity, the average occurrence <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Foundations-for-Couples-Therapy-Research-for-the-Real-World/Fitzgerald/p/book/9781138909632">across studies</a> is around 20% of all couples. However, this rate increases to around a third of couples when you include emotional infidelity.</p> <p>An affair is generally a sign things aren’t right with someone’s relationship. Without the necessary skills to heal the issues, a partner may engage in an affair as an ill-equipped way of attempting to have their needs fulfilled – whether these be for intimacy, to feel valued, to experience more sex, and so on. So, the straying partner views an alternative relationship as a better way to meet these needs than their existing relationship.</p> <p><strong>Who has affairs, and why?</strong></p> <p>Studies into why people cheat are many and varied. Some find <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/per.520/full">people who lack</a> traits such as agreeableness and conscientiousness are more likely to be sexually promiscuous, as are those higher in neurotic and narcissistic traits. Other studies find infidelity is more likely to occur among people who hold <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00224540903536162">less restrictive views</a> about sex, such as that you don’t have to limit yourself to one sexual partner.</p> <p>Other important factors relate to people’s commitment to their partner and relationship satisfaction. Those low on these measures appear more likely to have an affair. Recent work suggests one of the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X16300227">biggest predictors</a> of having an affair is having strayed before.</p> <p>A survey of <a href="https://www.relate.org.uk/policy-campaigns/publications/lets-talk-about-sex">5,000 people in the UK</a> found striking parallels between men and women’s reasons for infidelity, and neither prioritised sex. The top five reasons for women related to lack of emotional intimacy (84 per cent), lack of communication between partners (75 per cent), tiredness (32 per cent), a bad history with sex or abuse (26 per cent), and a lack of interest in sex with the current partner (23 per cent).</p> <p>For men the reasons were a lack of communication between partners (68 per cent), stress (63 per cent), sexual dysfunction with one’s current partner (44 per cent), lack of emotional intimacy (38 per cent) and fatigue or being chronically tired (31 per cent).</p> <p>So if we have difficulty genuinely communicating with our partner, or they don’t make us feel valued, we may be more likely to stray. People need to invest time and energy into their relationships. Experiencing chronic tiredness over many years means one’s capacity to put in the necessary work to keep a relationship strong is also compromised.</p> <p>While some couples report additional reasons, which can include a greater desire for sex, the majority speak to issues that reside either within the couple or outside the relationship. The latter can be stressors that challenge the couple’s ability to make the relationship work.</p> <p>If you’re experiencing relationship difficulties, getting help from a therapist may well short-circuit the risk factors that can lead to infidelity.</p> <p><strong>Disclosure and therapy</strong></p> <p>Some people choose to keep their affair secret because they may want it to continue, feel too much guilt or believe they’re protecting their partner’s feelings. But the secret only perpetuates the betrayal. If one is serious about mending their existing relationship, then disclosure is necessary, along with seeking professional guidance to support the couple through the turbulent period towards recovery.</p> <p>Most <a href="https://www.relate.org.uk/policy-campaigns/our-campaigns/way-we-are-now-2016">relationship therapists suggest</a> issues around infidelity can be improved through therapy. But they also report <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-05658-009">infidelity as one of the most difficult </a> issues to work with when it comes to rebuilding a relationship.</p> <p>There are various evidence-based approaches to dealing with infidelity, but most acknowledge the act can be experienced as a form of trauma by the betrayed person, who has had their <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Foundations-for-Couples-Therapy-Research-for-the-Real-World/Fitzgerald/p/book/9781138909632">fundamental assumptions</a> about their partner violated. These include trust and the belief that the partner is there to provide love and security rather than inflict hurt.</p> <p>But it’s not only the betrayed person who can experience mental health issues. <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1093/clipsy.bpi014/full">Research</a> has found that, when the affair is revealed, both partners can experience mental health issues including anxiety, depression and thoughts of suicide. There can also be an increase in emotional and physical violence within the couple.</p> <p>So a couple should seek professional help to deal with the aftermaths of an affair, not only to possibly heal their relationship but also for their own psychological well-being.</p> <p>There are many approaches to counselling couples after an affair, but generally, it’s about addressing the issues that precipitated and perpetuated the infidelity. One of the most <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Foundations-for-Couples-Therapy-Research-for-the-Real-World/Fitzgerald/p/book/9781138909632">well researched methods</a> of helping a couple mend these issues involves addressing the initial impact of the affair, developing a shared understanding of the context of the affair, forgiveness, and moving on.</p> <p><strong>Choosing to stay or go</strong></p> <p>Overall, therapy seems to work for about <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Foundations-for-Couples-Therapy-Research-for-the-Real-World/Fitzgerald/p/book/9781138909632">two-thirds of couples</a> who have experienced infidelity. If a couple decides to stay together, they must identify areas of improvement and commit to working on them.</p> <p>It’s also vital to re-establish trust. The therapist can help the couple acknowledge the areas of the relationship in which trust has already been rebuilt. Then the betrayed partner can be progressively exposed to situations that provide further reassurance they can trust their partner without having to constantly check on them.</p> <p>But if therapy works for two thirds of couples, it leaves another one third who experience no improvement. What then? If the relationship is characterised by many unresolved conflicts, hostility, and a lack of concern for one another, it may be best to end it. Ultimately, relationships serve the function of meeting our attachment needs of love, comfort and security.</p> <p>Being in a relationship that doesn’t meet these needs is considered problematic and dysfunctional by anyone’s definition.</p> <p>But ending a relationship is never easy due to the <a href="https://www.elsevier.com/books/adult-attachment/gillath/978-0-12-420020-3">attachment we develop</a> with our romantic partner. Even though in some relationships, our attachment needs are less likely to be fulfilled, it doesn’t stop us wanting to believe our partner will (one day) meet our needs.</p> <p>The impending end of a relationship fills us with what is termed “separation distress”. Not only do we grieve the loss of the relationship (no matter how good or bad), but we grieve over whether we will find another who will fulfil our needs.</p> <p>The period of separation distress varies from person to person. Some may believe it’s worth celebrating the end of a toxic relationship, but they will still experience distress in one form or another. If the couple decides to end the relationship and are still in therapy, the therapist can help them work through their decision in a way that minimises feelings of hurt.</p> <p>So infidelity is less about sex and more about matters of the heart and a misguided quest to have one’s relationship needs met. The problem is that some people choose to seek their relationship needs in the arms of another rather than working on their existing relationship.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/92354/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Gery Karantzas, Associate professor in Social Psychology / Relationship Science, Deakin University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/its-not-just-sex-why-people-have-affairs-and-how-to-deal-with-them-92354"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/its-not-just-sex-why-people-have-affairs-and-how-to-deal-with-them-92354"></a></p>

Relationships

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Hiramasa kingfish & petuna ocean trout ceviche

<p>If you're cooking for a fancier audience, try this delicious seafood combination.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p>200g Hiramasa kingfish fillets</p> <p>200g Petuna ocean trout fillets</p> <p>50ml apple cider vinegar</p> <p>75ml fresh lime juice</p> <p>30g sea salt</p> <p>50g sugar</p> <p>10 cherry tomatoes, sliced</p> <p>3 pickled turmeric onions (pickled onions, fresh turmeric, turmeric powder and green chilli)</p> <p>Black sesame seeds and baby coriander for garnish</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Slice the fish fillets into your desired shape. Cubes or sashimi-style will work.</p> <p>2. Combine the vinegar, sugar, salt and lime juice (check the mixture for taste, as some apple cider vinegars can be sweeter than others) and spoon over cut fish. Leave for 10 minutes to quickly cure.</p> <p>3. For the onions (this is the cheat version): take a standard jar of pickled onions and add 1 knob of fresh grated turmeric, 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder and 2 sliced green chillies and add to the pickling liquor from inside the jar, then spoon over onions. Leave for 10-15 minutes and you're good to go.</p> <p>4. Combine the rest of the ingredients and season with the same juice that has been curing the fish.</p> <p>5. Place the fish on top of the salad/onions and garnish with sesame seeds and coriander.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/hiramasa-kingfish-petuna-ocean-trout-ceviche.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Queen of style! Princess Mary’s 7 days of fabulous fashion

<p>Contrary to popular belief, being a royal isn’t easy. Just ask Princess Mary, who has had one royal engagement after another this past week. Thankfully, that means we can ogle at her fabulous style and chic aesthetic.</p> <p>Whether that was <a rel="noopener" href="/lifestyle/beauty-style/princess-mary-steps-out-in-stunning-style-with-queen-margrethe-for-royal-engagement" target="_blank">visiting Copenhagen Zoo</a> with her mother-in-law Queen Margrethe, or stepping out for the <a rel="noopener" href="/lifestyle/beauty-style/royal-style-watch-princess-mary-steals-the-show-with-stunning-look" target="_blank">opening of a special new museum exhibition</a>, the Crown Princess seems to always be on the go.</p> <p>Another major milestone the Danish royal family celebrated this week was the <a rel="noopener" href="/news/news/look-at-them-now-princess-marys-kids-are-so-grown-up" target="_blank">79th birthday of Queen Margrethe</a>, where the head of the monarch was joined by her son and Mary’s husband Crown Prince Frederik and his entire family including the couple’s four children.</p> <p>Earlier in the week, the 47-year-old revisited Copenhagen Zoo with her youngest children –twins Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine – so they could take a look at the brand new panda enclosure. </p> <p>The 8-year-olds could barely contain their excitement as they looked over at the bears, which were gifted to the zoo by the Chinese Government as a symbol of friendship between the two countries.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to take a look at Princess Mary's week of style.</p> <p>Do you have a favourite outfit? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Beauty & Style

Finance

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Tips for obtaining finance for over 50s

<p>If you are over 50 and want to borrow money for a mortgage or other major purchase, you might expect that lenders will want you to jump through more hoops than younger borrowers. While lenders will not discriminate based purely on age, it is true that there are certain qualification criteria that may naturally be increasingly more difficult to satisfy as you get older.</p> <p>So, what is it that lenders will be looking for and what can you do to improve your chances? Here are a few pointers that may help.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">The loan term is a critical factor</strong></p> <p>The most obvious factor that any lender must take into account is how long a potential borrower will remain working to earn an income. For borrowers over 50, a lender will naturally be asking themselves “how long will this person continue to be in the workforce?”</p> <p>If a borrower is aged 55, requires a loan term of 30 years, and is using employment income to service the loan repayments, then the simple math tells us that the borrower will need to work until age 85. In assessing such a loan request, a lender will need to consider the borrower's realistic working life.</p> <p>This may depend, among other things, on the type of work they do. For example, someone in a sedentary professional occupation, such as an accountant, may reasonably be expected to be able to work longer in life than someone doing manual labour.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">What if the term is too long?</strong></p> <p>If a lender considers that the loan term you require is unrealistic in relation to your projected working life, all is not necessarily lost. The lender may consider an alternative “exit strategy” for your loan, such as paying out the balance down the track using other assets that could be liquidated at that time. This could include items such as:</p> <ul> <li>Superannuation</li> <li>Savings</li> <li>Investment properties</li> <li>Shares</li> </ul> <p>By fully disclosing such assets, you will give the lender the opportunity to consider their value in assessing the loan application.<br /><br /><strong class="bigger-text">Improve your chances</strong></p> <p>Apart from loan term considerations, there are a variety of other issues that will impact your chance of a successful application.</p> <p>It’s always beneficial if you are able to contribute a substantial deposit toward the home or the item you are purchasing. Having significant equity in assets may also boost your chances.</p> <p>A healthy repayment record for servicing existing or previous loans is also a big tick for lenders. It may be worth accessing your credit report to make sure there are no inaccuracies on your record.</p> <p>Keeping your finances in shape by following a budget, demonstrating a regular savings pattern, and prioritising the repayment of high interest debts are all sound habits that will help build a picture for the lender that you are a responsible borrower.</p> <p>Your super assets and the retirement income that will generate is another important factor. That being said, be aware that lenders will also consider what will happen to your estate if you are to pass away. While your intentions may be to service a loan out of a private superannuation pension, some lenders will not want to get tangled up in estate negotiations if your assets are passed on via inheritance to other parties.</p> <p><em>* This information is provided as a general guide and is not to be reproduced or relied upon — all lenders will assess loan applications based on their own specific lending policy.</em></p> <p><em>Have you been able to secure finance after age 50? Tell us about your experience.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/financial-planning/tips-for-obtaining-finance-for-over-50s.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Buy up big! ALDI launches HUGE sale

<p>You may want to empty out your pantry, as ALDI is releasing an exciting new Special Buys sale, and it’s for those who enjoy stocking up.</p> <p>The German supermarket spoke to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/aldi-launches-bulk-food-sale/news-story/91573217863bf1f292ca5e39db438835" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a> that starting Wednesday, shoppers will be introduced to massive bargains on bulk item foods.</p> <p>Included in the line-up are biscuits, deli items, pantry essentials and massive bags of confectionary.</p> <p>Many are comparing the sale to bulk food outlet Costco.</p> <p>Those who shop in advance could land themselves a great deal, helping them feed their family for weeks to come.</p> <p>A jar of 400g Moccona coffee is on offer for only $15.99 – it originally retails for $24 at Woolworths and Coles.</p> <p>And honey lovers, it’s time to celebrate as a giant 1kg tub will cost you a mere $8.99.</p> <p>A box of 24 Carman’s muesli bars is being sold for $14.99 alongside family-sized packs of Arnott’s Mint Slices and Tim Tams for $3.49.</p> <p>Also available are large jars of olives, sun-dried tomatoes and sliced jalapenos.</p> <p>But you have to be quick, as people are already gearing up to get their hands on the coveted items.</p> <p>“Go Aldi, Go Aldi, I’m loving the savings since they arrived here in Australia, they’re getting better and better,” wrote on person.</p> <p>“It’s about time Costco got some competition,” said another.</p> <p>The range will hit stores around the country on April 24 and is available while stocks last.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see some of the things on offer this Wednesday.</p> <p>Will you be grabbing anything from this week’s ALDI Special Buys? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Money & Banking

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“World’s largest Officeworks” officially opens in Australia

<p>Officeworks has launched its biggest store yet in Australia and it has been dubbed the “megaworks” of all the office supply chain stores.</p> <p>At nearly 6,500 square metres, the new store in the south-eastern Melbourne suburb of Mentone in Victoria, is at least four times the size of an average Officeworks store.</p> <p>With over 35,000 different products, including a 3D print and copy centre and items that were only available online – the newest Officeworks has become a hub that supports shopping online as well as in store.</p> <p>Officeworks’ Corporate Affairs and Brand Manager, Alex Staley, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/a-current-affair-officeworks-super-store-open-melbourne-latest-news-australia/d380c7c7-e10b-4d5c-a809-5ab7ab73ce00" target="_blank">A Current Affair</a> the new store will complement the business’ online presence, which makes up about 20 per cent of all sales.</p> <p>“When you're shopping online you need to know what you want, but we still know a lot of our customers want to come in and actually see the product, touch the product and interact with the product,” Ms Staley explained.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7826140/big-officeworks.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/163110864f5b4a87bf4fd9064f5c03c0" /></p> <p>The newest store in Melbourne will act as a distribution centre for the city’s south-east suburbs, ensuring some online purchases are delivered within the same day.</p> <p>The superstore, which is similar to a “warehouse,” says Australian Retailers Association Executive Director Russell Zimmerman, could be a buffer against online retailers.</p> <p>“There are opportunities for retailers to use space, if they can get it at the right price and then use it as a warehouse-type setting so they can actually carry more product and then use the online capability to deliver it,” Mr Zimmerman said.</p> <p>However, Officeworks' decision to create a megastore comes at a time where big retailers are opening smaller stores in order to keep up with costs and make convenience a priority for shoppers.</p> <p>“Australia has one of the dearest rents in the world for retail floor space so they will look to reduce their size for that reason,” he said.</p> <p>“But equally so we are seeing an incredible growth in online and the need to have as many shops and as big shops is probably becoming more important in reduction.” </p> <p>Will you be visiting the new massive Officeworks store in Melbourne? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Money & Banking

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When patients read their medical records

<p>The woman was sitting on a bed in the emergency room, and I was facing her, typing. I had just written about her abdominal pain when she posed a question I’d never been asked before: “May I look at what you’re writing?”</p> <p>At the time, I was a fourth-year medical resident. In our emergency department, doctors routinely typed notes, placed orders, and checked records while we were in patients’ rooms. To maintain at least some eye contact, we faced our patients, with the computer between us.</p> <p>But there was no reason we couldn’t be on the same side of the screen. I sat down next to her and showed her what I was typing. She began pointing out changes. She’d said that her pain had started three weeks prior, not the previous week. Her chart mentioned alcohol abuse in the past; she admitted that she was under a lot of stress and had returned to heavy drinking a couple of months earlier.</p> <p>As we talked, her diagnosis – inflammation of the pancreas from alcohol use – became clear. I wondered why I’d never shown patients their records before. In medical school, we learn that medical records exist so that doctors can communicate with other doctors. No-one told us about the benefits they could bring when shared with patients.</p> <p>Access to medical records has changed dramatically over time and can differ widely between countries. Some countries see it as a right, others demand patients jump through legal hoops. In the US, patients generally have a legal right to their medical information. But when the process for obtaining records is cumbersome, few patients try to access them. In 2010, Tom Delbanco, a Harvard professor and internist, and Jan Walker, a nurse and researcher, started an experiment called OpenNotes that let patients read what their primary-care providers wrote about them. They hypothesised that giving patients access to notes would allow them to become more engaged in their care.</p> <p>Many doctors resisted. Wouldn’t open medical records inhibit what they wrote about sensitive issues, such as substance abuse? What if patients misunderstood the notes? Would that lead to lawsuits? What would patients do with all the information anyway?</p> <p>After the first year, the results were striking: 80% of patients who saw their records reported a better understanding of their medical conditions and said they were more in control of their health. Two-thirds reported that they were better at sticking with their prescriptions. And 99% of the patients wanted the programme to continue.</p> <p>That day in the emergency room was a turning point for me. Since I started sharing notes with my patients, they have made dozens of valuable corrections and changes, such as adding allergies and telling me when a previous medical problem has been resolved. We come up with treatment plans together. And when patients leave, they receive a copy of my detailed instructions.</p> <p>The record becomes a collaborative tool for patients, not just a record of what we doctors do to patients. When patients see their medical records, there’s more trust and more accuracy.</p> <p>It’s changed my practice and fundamentally transformed my understanding of whom the medical record ultimately belongs to: the patient.</p> <p>Should doctors routinely share medical records with their patients? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Leana Wen. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/4-Things-You-Should-Really-Never-Microwave"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Legal

Entertainment

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MKR’s Manu Feildel reveals shock offer to brothers Josh and Austin

<p>As controversial brothers Josh and Austin have left the <em>My Kitchen Rules</em> competition, French judge Manu Feildel has revealed a shocking offer he made if the brothers made it to the final.</p> <p>He admitted to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/reality-tv/my-kitchen-rules/my-kitchen-rules-2019-manu-feildel-55242" target="_blank"><em>TV WEEK</em></a> that after their disaster of an Instant Restaurant, he was so sure that they wouldn’t progress any further in the competition that he offered to double the show’s prize money if they reached the final.</p> <p>"Yes, I did mention that," he confirmed.</p> <p>"The food at their Instant Restaurant was terrible. I was angry because it was a waste of time for everyone.</p> <p>"They were lucky to stay as long as they did."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwOgkWiADj4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwOgkWiADj4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Josh &amp; Austin (@joshaustinau)</a> on Apr 13, 2019 at 11:57pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p> </p> <p>The grand final of the show is close by, and Manu has said that it’s anyone’s game. However, he’s not worried about the ratings of the show as it struggled to keep up with Nine Network’s <em>Married at First Sight</em>.</p> <p>"It doesn't bother me," he says. "It was nice to be number one for a long time, but everything in life is a competition.</p> <p>"We still rate well, and there's still demand for the show. I don't watch<span> </span><em>MAFS</em>... it's not the type of show I'd want to watch.</p> <p>"Ten years on TV is a really good thing and we're proud of that. We have another two years and hopefully there will be another two after that."</p> <p>Have you been watching the current series of<span> </span><em>My Kitchen Rules</em>? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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“I’m so sorry”: Kerri-Anne Kennerley's emotional moment during Studio 10 interview

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Studio 10 host Kerri-Anne Kennerley broke down in tears on the show this morning whilst interviewing Australia’s best known Invictus Games athlete.</p> <p>Former Special Forces sniper commander Garry Robinson lost his leg after a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in 2010.</p> <p>He was on the show talking about his injuries and explained how the Invictus Games has saved his life when it became too much for Kennerley.</p> <p>She burst into tears, before apologising to the guest.</p> <p>“I’m sorry, I’m so sorry,” Kennerley said as she grabbed Robinson’s hand.</p> <p>Her co-hosts appeared shocked.</p> <p>“I’m so sorry, everyone,” Kennerley said through tears. “I just know how painful everything must have been for you and your family. How did you cope with them and they with you?” she asked Robinson.</p> <p>Robinson then explained the situation, saying that “it’s been an emotional rollercoaster, my recovery.”</p> <p>After Kennerley composed herself, she tried to lighten the mood by asking about Prince Harry, who created the Invictus Games.</p> <p>“Let’s get to the fun part, I want to know about Harry," the legendary talk show host quizzed. </p> <p>“I have met Prince Harry many times and I was fortunate in Toronto when he brought Meghan out to the first sporting event … and he brought her over to me and introduced her to me,” Robinson said.</p> <p>“She’s very nice. A very pretty girl and he’s a lucky man.”</p> <p>The Invictus Games is an international sporting event that allows wounded, injured or sick armed services personnel to compete in a variety of different sports.</p> <p>Did you see Kerri-Anne Kennerley's emotional moment on Studio 10? Let us know in the comments.</p> </div> <div class="body_assets"></div> </div> <div class="details"><span class="detail_tools"><span> </span>6m<span class="who_watched"><span class="people_count_container"><span class="people_count current">2</span></span></span><a class="likebtn"><span class="post_like_button icon icon-dapulse-thumb"></span></a></span></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Royal birthday! Palace releases sweet new photos of Prince Louis as he turns one

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Kensington Palace has released three new images of the youngest child of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Louis, in celebration of his first birthday.</p> <p>While the world patiently waits for the newest royal, Baby Sussex, to make their debut into the world, Prince Louis and his family have just finished celebrating the youngest member’s first birthday, which is on April 23.</p> <p>The adorable photos were taken by none other than his talented photographer mother Duchess Kate at their Norfolk home Anmer Hall earlier this month. Shown is the beaming young prince posing in the Anmer Hall grounds on a moss-covered seat.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwkq68KF-xS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwkq68KF-xS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on Apr 22, 2019 at 2:30pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The family is enjoying their home away from home while Prince George and Princess Charlotte are on their three-week school break.</p> <p>The angelic tot sat happily dressed in his older brother’s hand-me-downs – a denim blue Thomas Brown Little Puppy knitted sweater and a plain collared shirt. While his gaze his more serious than in the other two images shared with the world, his two bottom teeth can be seen poking out.</p> <p>In another outfit where the young royal is pictured smiling excitedly in a cheeky and angelic grin, he is wearing a Rachel Riley Peter Pan collar shirt underneath a burgundy marl knitted jumper.</p> <p>While 5-year-old Prince George was often dressed in shorts as a baby, Prince Louis’ has been photographed in navy blue cords with matching tights.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to share three new photographs of Prince Louis ahead of his first birthday tomorrow 🎈<br /><br />The photographs were taken earlier this month by The Duchess at their home in Norfolk. <a href="https://t.co/VOJ7rhKthz">pic.twitter.com/VOJ7rhKthz</a></p> — Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1120439689251577856?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 22, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“Such a mix of Charlotte and George,” one excited royal fan commented.</p> <p>“Stunning little prince, resembling so much both his parents!” another comment read.</p> <p>“My heart is melting,” another added. “I need to give him a hug!”</p> <p>The first birthday portraits of the one-year-old royal member are reminiscent of the Cambridge family’s Christmas card photo where the happy group of five were pictured within the same grounds of Anmer Hall.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrXYSdHFcz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrXYSdHFcz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on Dec 14, 2018 at 3:00am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>It is not the only time the Duchess of Cambridge has polished off her camera and snapped pictured of her family's milestones over the years. Not only has she been behind the lens for Louis’ first official portraits, she was also taking snaps of her other two children Prince George and Princess Charlotte.</p> <p>Prince Louis Arthur Charles was born on April 23 at 11:01 at the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s hospital in Paddington.</p> <p>Prince William and Duchess Kate are travelling to New Zealand on Tuesday to honour those affected by the Christchurch terrorist attack that saw 50 lives lost.</p> <p>The couple are also set to celebrate eight years of marriage on April 29.</p> <p>Who do you think Prince Louis resembles? Let us know in the comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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These 3 medical advances could change your life

<p><span>From bioprinting a heart valve to isolating new treatments for diabetes, some of the most amazing and revolutionary medical research is going on right here in our own backyard. Here we look at three of the most exciting projects and how they’re going to change our lives for the better.</span></p> <p><strong>The research: 3D bioprinting human organs</strong><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Where:</strong><span> </span>The Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, Western Australia<span> </span></p> <p><strong>Research team:</strong><span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://vasclab.mech.uwa.edu.au/barry" target="_blank"><span>Dr Barry Doyle</span></a> (pictured above, left) and team</p> <p>Thanks to a revolutionary new bioengineering program, we may one day see human organs printed on demand and then transplanted into sick patients needing organ transplants.</p> <p>Dr Barry Doyle, head of the vascular engineering laboratory at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research says it’s still early days, yet he is hopeful that the new biomedical research facility that brings experts from many different disciplines together will help speed up the process to breakthroughs.</p> <p>“What’s possible at the moment around the world is that scientists can print crude structures with cells in them and keep that alive for a matter of weeks afterwards. To go from transplanting that into a human needs a lot more work, but one day hopefully we should be able to print all the major organs in the body such as the kidneys and liver,” he says.</p> <p><strong>What’s involved?</strong><span> </span></p> <p>At the moment Doyle’s team is focused on bioprinting a heart valve and keeping it alive long enough to implant it into an animal. A heart valve has been successfully printed before in the US, but researchers weren’t able to keep it alive long enough to implant it into a live host to see if it works.</p> <p>Doyle plans to reach this stage in the next couple of years, a goal he says would be a huge step forward towards the ultimate goal of producing other organs. “The heart valve is quite a complicated geometry but if we can create one and implant it into an animal, we’ll have a good shot at being able to extend on sections of the aorta and build towards the heart,” he says.</p> <p>Bioprinting organs that have been specifically printed from a recipient’s own cells could potentially replace the need for donor organs, not to mention the lengthy waiting times for suitable donor organs to be found.</p> <p>Since bioprinting involves using a patient’s own cells, it becomes less likely that the organ will be rejected by the body as well. Donor organ rejection is currently a major problem in transplant recipients after surgery with recipients required to take anti-rejection medications on an ongoing basis.</p> <p><strong>How do you bioprint an organ?</strong><span> </span></p> <p>The technology that will make all this possible is called a 3D bioprinter. A 3D bioprinter works by depositing layers of material on a flat surface. First, living cells are taken from a patient, cultured in the lab and mixed into a soft gel-like substance called a hydrogel, which is then put into a 3D bioprinter. Another stiffer material is added to the printer and two nozzles move back and forth depositing these substances to build up the structure of an organ, layer upon layer.</p> <p>“The printing process is quite easy to carry out, but it’s keeping the printed structures alive after printing that’s where the big challenge lies,” says Doyle.</p> <p>To overcome this hurdle, Doyle’s team needs to perform tests to better understand the mechanical properties of the substances they’re using. “You can make different blends of these materials and each blend changes the material properties slightly, so one of the challenges is really understanding the hydrogel that we’re working with,” he says.</p> <p>It’s a huge task but one that Doyle’s team is well qualified for. His team has already developed another promising technology called patient-specific modelling that will one day help cardiovascular specialists and surgeons better predict and personalise patient care.</p> <p>For example, by making 3D computer models of the heart or aorta from the images taken by heart surgeons, his team can simulate the way blood will flow out of a patient’s heart and down through the vessels using computers. With this information surgeons can better determine whether a patient will need an operation, what type of operation, and even where to operate.</p> <p>“Only one in ten aortic aneurysms rupture but a huge number of operations are performed each year that are probably unnecessary. But using these computer models we can very specifically predict if operations are even needed,” Doyle says.</p> <p><strong>The research: Fighting cancer with nanotechnology</strong><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Where:</strong><span> </span>University of Sydney Nanotechnology Hub, Sydney<span> </span></p> <p><strong>Research team:</strong><span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/zdenka.kuncic.php" target="_blank"><span>Professor Zdenka Kuncic</span></a><span> </span>and team</p> <p>At the University of Sydney Professor Zdenka Kuncic, director of the Australian Institute of Nanoscience and Technology (AINST) and her team are working on ways to detect and destroy tumour cells from cancers spreading around the body, known as metastasised tumour cells.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/2833592/heath-research-syd-wyza-com-au.jpg" alt="Heath -research -syd -wyza -com -au" width="500" height="300" /><br /><em>Professor Zdenka Kuncic and her team's research hopes to find a cure for cancer (Image: University of Sydney)</em></p> <p>This is a real problem in medicine because there are currently no imaging techniques that can detect metastasised tumour cells and no techniques that can specifically target and kill them. But using nanotechnologies like the ones being developed by Kuncic and her team, we might one day be able to detect them and even deliver drugs and therapeutic agents to destroy them. But what is nanotechnology and how does it work? </p> <p>Nanotechnology is a branch of science that uses tiny particles called nanoparticles. These particles are no bigger than the size of a single molecule of glucose. In fact, you can only see them with an electron microscope. They can be made of different substances and can even be changed and ‘programmed’ to carry out specific tasks.</p> <p>One of the most exciting applications for nanotechnology is in medicine because nanoparticles have different physical properties than normal sized objects. All of the biochemical processes that happen in our bodies every day occur because of nanoscience and by understanding the properties of nanoparticles, researchers can develop nanotechnologies that work in a non-invasive way in the body.</p> <p>Nanoparticles can move around the body using the body’s own systems and can be made virtually invisible to the body’s immune system.</p> <p>Professor Kuncic and her team are already quite advanced in programming (functionalising) nanoparticles to perform certain tasks. That’s when a nanoparticle is coated in a certain type of chemical coating or when it has an antibody or other small molecule attached to it to carry out a certain job in the body. But now her biggest challenge is trying to figure out how to control those nanoparticles once they go into the body. “It’s one thing to see the nanoparticles work in a lab in a petri dish, it’s another thing to actually make them work in a living person,” she says.</p> <p>To unlock the secrets to controlling nanoparticles, Kuncic says there is an enormous amount of testing still to be done. However she is hopeful for future breakthroughs. “There are a number of nanotechnology strategies that have passed through clinical trials already and they’re being used right now,” she says.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/2833595/heath-research-suits-syd-wyza-com-au.jpg" alt="Heath -research -suits -syd --wyza -com -au" width="500" height="300" /><br /><em>At the Sydney Nanoscience Hub researchers are trying to unlock the secrets to controlling nanoparticles (Image: University of Sydney)</em></p> <p><strong>What will nanotechnology do for us?</strong><span> </span><br />If Professor Kuncic and other researchers in this field succeed, treating cancer might one day be simply a matter of ingesting a pill or having an injection at the oncologists’ and letting the nanoparticles inside find and destroy the disease.</p> <p>But the potential benefit of this technology is not just in fighting cancer. Nanotechnology has far-reaching applications in medicine, according to Kuncic. It may one day also be used by GPs to detect if patients have taken their medicine, and even as a way to detect and treat diseases before they have surfaced. “The holy grail would be to detect the signs of disease in people and be able to nip it in the bud before it starts to become a problem and that’s more than a decade away,” says Kuncic.</p> <p><strong>The research: Finding out how exercise protects against diabetes and other diseases</strong><span> </span></p> <p><strong>Where:</strong><span> </span>The Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney NSW<span> </span></p> <p><strong>Research team:</strong><span> </span><span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.garvan.org.au/research/diabetes-metabolism/cellular-and-molecular-metabolism/marfeb" target="_blank">Professor Mark Febbraio</a></span> and team</p> <p>You’ve probably heard before that exercise can help protect you against a whole lot of diseases, but what you might not know is exactly how this happens.</p> <p>One way exercise helps protect you is that your muscles secrete protective substances while you’re exercising. These substances are called ‘myokines,’ and by identifying these molecular links, scientists can better develop ways to treat these diseases.</p> <p>This is the crux of Professor Mark Febbraio’s research as the division head of diabetes and metabolism and head of cellular and molecular metabolism at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.wyza.com.au/media/3342342/shutterstock_323905706.jpg" alt="Shutterstock _323905706" width="500" height="336" /><br />Febbraio says that lifestyle interventions like exercising and watching your diet are still the best way to prevent type 2 diabetes</em></p> <p>One area of his research is finding a molecular link for type 2 diabetes.<span> </span><span>Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, and although it can be initially managed through lifestyle changes, around one-in-two people will eventually need insulin. </span></p> <p>According to Febbraio, in healthy people, myokines can help protect you against diabetes by activating special kinds of fat cells in your body. Unlike white fat cells, brown fat cells chew up a lot of energy when they’re activated. Myokines turn white fat cells into brown fat cells – which may assist in counteracting the metabolic processes that leads to obesity and or diabetes.</p> <p><strong>How far along is this research now?</strong><span> </span></p> <p>At the moment Febbraio and his team have evidence that myokines can help protect us from disease, but they’re not quite sure exactly which substances do what, and that’s what they’re trying to work out, but not just for diabetes. They’re also trying to identify the molecular links in a range of other diseases too, such as in obesity, Alzheimer’s disease and some types of cancers.</p> <p>“By identifying the substances that have the most protective effects (the molecular links between exercise and this protective effect) we can then use medicinal chemistry and the pharmaceutical industry to come up with drugs that doctors can use to provide more personalised treatment options for people with these diseases,” says Febbraio.</p> <p><strong>How do we find myokines?</strong><span> </span></p> <p>Finding these substances is not easy. Febbraio and his team use what’s called proteomic and genomic techniques to screen for them. Once substances have been found, they then use bioinformatics – basically complex mathematics and statistics and mice models to help them determine which of the substances are the most important.</p> <p>One promising protective muscle substance recently discovered by his lab is a substance that helps protect women against breast cancer. If further trials in mice and humans prove successful, this could prove a huge step forward in breast cancer treatment.</p> <p>While finding the molecular links will almost certainly result in better pharmaceutical treatments, Febbraio recommends being physically active as a tried and true way to prevent disease.</p> <p>“In 80 per cent of [type 2] diabetes cases, if there was no obesity in those patients they would not have the disease. So lifestyle interventions like exercising and watching your diet is still the best way to prevent diabetes,” he says.</p> <p><em>What would you like medical researchers to investigate and why? Let us know in the comments section below.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Dominic Bayley. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/these-3-medical-advances-could-change-your-life.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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