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Princess Margaret’s grandson is in love!

<p>Now that Prince Harry is well and truly off the market after marrying Meghan in May this year, there were hopes that Princess Margaret’s grandson Arthur Chatto would be the next in line to take the crown for the most eligible royal bachelor.</p> <p>However, the son of Lady Sarah Chatto, who is 23<sup>rd</sup> in line to the throne, seems to already have found love, after he shared a sweet photo of himself with girlfriend Lizzie Friend for the first time on Instagram.</p> <p>The 19-year-old, who is the Queen’s great-nephew, is seen with Lizzie perched on his knee and her arm draped around his shoulder.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn8iGjAAhmU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn8iGjAAhmU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Arthur Chatto (@artchatto)</a> on Sep 20, 2018 at 4:13am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>A royal insider previously told <em>Daily Mail </em>about the couple's budding romance, “They hit it off straight away. She’s really sweet and they make a very nice couple. He took her to Royal Ascot this summer as his date.”</p> <p>It appears Arthur’s followers on Instagram are not so happy the royal is no longer an eligible bachelor, with one writing “broken heart”.</p> <p>Apart from being a royal, there is no doubt Arthur is popular on social media thanks to his cheeky Instagram photos, not to mention his collection of shirtless selfies showing off his muscular physique.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnBu1wRAVVx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnBu1wRAVVx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">There are worse places to have glandular fever</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/artchatto/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Arthur Chatto</a> (@artchatto) on Aug 28, 2018 at 8:09am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Following in the footsteps of his cousins Prince William and Prince Harry, Arthur graduated from Eton this summer, where he was in the Combined Cadet Force learning various military skills. He has now continued on to Edinburgh University, where his older brother Sam studies.</p>

Family & Pets

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14 essentials for a successful relationship

<p><strong><em>Susan Krauss Whitbourne is a professor of Psychology and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She writes the Fulfilment at Any Age blog for Psychology Today.</em></strong></p> <p>With the number of theories about relationships proposed by psychologists, not to mention poets, philosophers, and playwrights, it may seem impossible to come up with anything approaching a reasonable number. Boldly going where few psychologists may venture, Northwestern University’s Eli Finkel and colleagues have done just that by proposing that there are 14 basic principles underlying all of psychology's relationship theories. The 14 gets reduced further, actually, because they fall into four categories of questions concerning different aspects of relationships, from their formation to their end. </p> <p>The underlying basis for this work is <strong>relationship science</strong>, which the authors refer to as “an interdisciplinary field that employs diverse empirical methods to understand the initiation, development, maintenance, and dissolution of interpersonal relationships." These aren’t just any relationships, but the ones people consider their closest. Yours is most likely to be the one with your romantic partner, or the person you’re in a committed relationship with.</p> <p>Finkel and his collaborators approached the classification of relationship principles as they would a “culinary” task in which “each theory is a dish (e.g., a curry) composed of discrete ingredients (e.g., a grain, a protein, a vegetable, several spices).” They set for themselves “the task of extracting the core principles" — the basic ingredients — and then determining which principles cut across theories.</p> <p>As you consider these 14 principles, try applying them to your own close relationships, particularly those that have meant the most to you over the course of your life. We’ll look at these principles according to the set into which they fit in the Finkel et al. scheme:</p> <p><strong><u>Set 1: What is a relationship?</u></strong></p> <ol> <li><strong> Uniqueness: </strong>A close relationship isn’t just a combination of the qualities that each partner possesses; it reflects the special interaction that occurs when you’re with your partner. You behave differently with your partner than you do with other people, and so does your partner. Perhaps you’re rather quiet and a bit of an <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/introversion">introvert</a></span>, and so is your partner, but when the two of you are together, you can talk nonstop about the slightest thing. Your relationship reflects, then, something special that happens when you’re in each other’s presence.</li> <li><strong> Integration:</strong>Your sense of self is deeply embedded in that of your partner. Each of you has your own <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/identity">identity</a></span>, but sometimes it’s hard to tell where one ends and the other begins. People think of you as a couple, and it’s hard for anyone, including yourselves, to imagine you not being together.</li> <li><strong> Trajectory: </strong>Your relationship with your partner has a history that has evolved over your time together, so that it’s not the same as it was when it started. On a day-to-day basis, you may not notice those changes, but when you think back on even a couple of years ago, you realise it’s developed from there. The chances are good, as well, that your relationship will continue to evolve in the future. Relationship theories have at times proposed that there are fixed stages, such as those that occur with the birth and development of children, but many theories propose instead a more fluid set of dynamic changes.</li> </ol> <p><strong><u>Set 2: How do relationships operate?</u></strong></p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Evaluation:</strong>You and your partner often think about how you feel about both your relationship and each other. Some theories divide these feelings into simple positive and negative dimensions, but others propose a more complex set of evaluations, such as the <em>triangular theory of love</em>, which suggests that relationships vary according to <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/relationships">intimacy</a></span>, passion, and commitment. In any case, you bring these evaluative lenses to your relationship, whether you realise it or not.</li> <li><strong> Responsiveness:</strong>The way you respond to your partner influences the relationship quality that both of you feel. Is your partner sensitive to your needs and feelings? How do you respond to your partner’s? The more this occurs, Finkel et al. propose, the better your relationship will function.</li> <li><strong> Resolution:</strong>How do you and your partner resolve conflict? It’s well-known from research on couple conflict that there are constructive and destructive patterns of getting through difficulties. The constructive ones, as the term implies, promote or at least don’t detract from the relationship; the destructive ones condemn it to a less positive fate.</li> <li><strong> Maintenance:</strong>A long-term close relationship is one that both partners want to see continue. You will therefore work with your partner to keep it alive, even if it has problems. Sometimes outsiders look at a couple and wonder how it is that they remain together, but from <em>inside</em>the relationship, these problems don’t seem all that significant.</li> </ol> <p><strong><u>Set 3: What tendencies do people bring to their relationships?</u></strong></p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> Predisposition:</strong>You and your partner each have personalities that lead you to behave in certain ways within your relationship. <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/attachment">Attachment</a></span>theory, for example, proposes that people’s early <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/child-development">childhood</a></span> experiences shape the views of close relationships that they carry into adulthood. Those with an insecure attachment style will be clingy or perhaps dismissive, and those more securely attached will be able to relate in a more even-keeled manner.</li> <li><strong> Instrumentality:</strong>You and your partner each have <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/motivation">goals</a></span>that you wish to pursue, and in an ideal world, you are both able to fulfil those goals. At times, you may rely on your partner to help you achieve your personal goals. Perhaps you wish to adopt a healthier lifestyle, eating fewer carbs or exercising more. Does your partner work with you to help achieve these changes or fight you every step of the way by, say, bringing home fresh bread every night? At a deeper level, everyone has a need for intimacy and connection, and your partner can also help you fulfil this basic goal.</li> <li><strong> Standards:</strong>Everyone has a certain set of standards or values that they hold about what a relationship should be and provide. You may expect, for example, that a close relationship involves you and your partner being faithful to each other. You might also have a certain standard about how smart, attractive, and successful a good partner should be. Relationship theories propose that you constantly monitor the reality against your standards, and when they come close to each other, you’re more satisfied, all other things being equal. However, if your relationship is gratifying in general, you’ll be willing to adapt your standards to meet your partner’s reality.</li> </ol> <p><strong><u>Set 4: How does context affect relationships?</u></strong></p> <ol start="11"> <li><strong> Diagnosticity:</strong>Some situations will give you a very clear view of your partner and your relationship. A number of theories in social psychology examine the way we make attributions about others. If you see someone cheating, stealing, or <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/deception">lying</a></span>, you’ll think less of that person, unless you know about mitigating circumstances. In a relationship, you’ll also see your partner in a variety of situations. The critical ones allow you to see your partner’s true qualities: For example, when you really need your partner to be there for you, will your partner rise to the occasion? If so, this willingness of your partner to act on your behalf will help cement your relationship.</li> <li><strong> Alternatives: </strong>Is there someone else who presents an attractive option to your current partner? Or might you rather not be in a relationship at all? The existence of these alternatives will threaten the quality of your relationship, or perhaps lead to its demise.</li> <li><span><strong><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/stress">Stress</a></strong></span><strong>:</strong>When a situation challenges your ability to cope, you’ll experience stress. In a relationship, couples must cope together with situations that test their resources. How well do you and your partner handle these exigencies? If you do it well, that is a sign of a healthy relationship.</li> <li><strong>Culture: </strong>Looking more broadly outside the relationship, the social context of your family, cultural traditions, and beliefs help shape who you and your partner are and how you relate to each other. Some of these are theoretically quite obvious, such as celebrating holidays and getting together for reunions. Others might not be so apparent, such as the state of the economy, social attitudes toward monogamy, or historical trends in <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/divorce">divorce</a>rates, employment of women outside the home, and even needs for <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/art-therapy">self-expression</a>. You don’t usually pay attention to these factors, but they influence your relationship nevertheless.</li> </ol> <p>Now answer the question of how well you thought your relationship stacked up when evaluated according to each principle. There’s no such thing as a perfect relationship but seeing whether yours has the 14 “ingredients” may be just what’s needed to help yours be as fulfilling as possible over time.</p> <p><em>Written by Susan Krauss Whitbourne. Republished with permission of <strong><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/">Psychology Today.</a> </strong></em></p>

Relationships

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The "naughty” habit that keeps 73-year-old Rod Stewart young

<p>Although he was known for his adulterous behaviour and bad boy image, British rock icon Rod Stewart has traded his wild antics to slow down and focus on his career and family.</p> <p>However, while speaking to <a href="https://www.9now.com.au/60-minutes/2018/extras"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">60 Minutes</em></strong></span></a> reporter Liam Bartlett, Stewart’s wife Penny Lancaster, revealed the one naughty habit that keeps the 73-year-old musician young.</p> <p>Lancaster described her husband of nearly 20 years as a “doting father” to their sons Alastair, 12, and Aiden, 7.</p> <p>"He's a pushover," his ex-model wife told Bartlett.</p> <p>"He teaches them the naughtiest things. We'll be in a restaurant and he'll put a pea on the end of a fork and bang it, see how far it gets across the restaurant.</p> <p>"So, he is naughty," she said to which Stewart responded: "I will grow up one of these days."</p> <p>Although Stewart has eight children born to five mothers, he is adamant that his two youngest sons will grow up in England.</p> <p>"I want my kids to be brought up in this country.</p> <p>"I've seen with kids being brought up in Beverly Hills, I've seen a lot of damage."</p> <p>Stewart’s eldest son, Sean, 37, starred in a reality TV show showcasing spoilt rich kids in Hollywood.</p> <p>"It's difficult isn't it, for kids to have high profile parents, someone like you?" asked Bartlett.</p> <p>"It's a double-edged sword," Stewart replied.</p> <p>"Because when they go through their school days, it's difficult for them. 'Your dad this, your dad that,' you know."</p> <p>"But then the other side of it is they're always going to be financially well off, you know. </p> <p>"I'm not going to give them tonnes of money, but they're going to be okay."</p> <p>Sean also battled drug addiction in the past, which is a sensitive topic for Stewart and the topic of his first single ‘Didn’t I’ on his new album <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Blood Red Roses.</em></p> <p>During the interview, Stewart also discussed the longevity of his marriage with his third wife, Lancaster.</p> <p>"Go out, get drunk, pull a load of birds … I was that," the rock singer said.</p> <p>"[Now] the soldier is back in the barracks; the banana is back in the fruit bowl ... the cue is back in the rack."</p> <p>Lancaster said: “I think the truth and secret behind our longevity ... is just honesty and communication.”</p> <p>Despite the success of his relationship, Stewart said that after all these years, his greatest pleasure is still performing on stage.</p> <p>The musician, who has amassed earnings of more than $300 million in his career, said: “I love it. It's not only a pleasure being up there, but I can see the pleasure that I give other people and that is just, there's no drug in the world as good as that."</p> <p>Are you a fan of Rod Stewart? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Music

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Why the controversy around Princess Eugenie’s extravagant wedding keeps getting bigger

<p>As the upcoming wedding of Princess Eugenie and fiancé Jack Brooksbank looms closer, more information has been released about the granddaughter of the Queen's lavish plans.</p> <p>It has been revealed that Eugenie’s celebrations will take place over two days, October 12th and 13th.</p> <p>On October 12, Eugenie will wed Jack in a ceremony at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, the same church where Prince Harry and Meghan said their vows earlier this year.</p> <p>After the ceremony, Eugenie and Jack will have a carriage procession at midday from the Royal Mews out of Windsor Castle and on to part of the High Street.</p> <p>Although many have questioned why the ninth-in-line to the throne is having a carriage procession, it will give members of the public the chance to see the couple.</p> <p>However, unlike the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, the carriage will not travel along the Long Walk.</p> <p>Following the carriage procession, a reception and lunch for guests will be hosted by the Queen before the wedding party moves to the Royal Lodge in Windsor that evening for a black-tie party.</p> <p>The Royal Lodge is owned by Eugenie's parents Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson despite the couple divorcing in 1996.</p> <p>The second day of celebrations has caused the most controversy as the couple plan to host a festival-themed event at the Royal Lodge.</p> <p>A royal source told <a href="https://dailytelegraph.co.uk/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>The Daily Telegraph</u></em></strong></a>: "After the more formal celebration at Windsor Castle, the Saturday bash will be a relaxed party.    </p> <p>“There will be dodgems and funfair rides, coconut shies, lots of food stalls, loads of cocktails, Bloody Marys for the hangovers and a festival vibe.”</p> <p>It is expected that Eugenie’s guest list will include stars such as George and Amal Clooney, Cara Delevingne, Ed Sheeran and Sienna Miller.</p> <p>The 28-year-old’s wedding extravaganza will reportedly cost taxpayers $3.4 million to cover security charges such as getting extra patrolmen, overtime charges, as well as additional firearms.</p> <p>Earlier this year a royal spokesperson said: “Costs for security will be shared by individual police forces and the local council but all other costs for the wedding will be met privately.”</p>

Relationships

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The bizarre vehicle found cruising on an Aussie road – can you guess what it is?

<p>A video uploaded to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=23&amp;v=Okp8XYj3Uik" target="_blank">Dash Cam Owners Australia </a>is making waves online after footage shows an unlikely vehicle cruising on an Aussie road.</p> <p>A surprised driver captured the vehicle gliding down the street – but can you guess what it is?</p> <p>The video shows a bright yellow jet-ski casually making its way past traffic. The driver, who was dressed in protective leather and a helmet, was easily sticking with the flow of traffic.</p> <p>The vehicle was also spotted by Gold Coast drivers earlier this month, with those having witnessed the bizarre form of transport left scratching their heads after the jet-ski manoeuvred its way around a roundabout.</p> <p>Believe it or not, this isn't the first time a jet-ski has been spotted on the road. In a video uploaded to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news4jax.com/news/florida-man-beats-the-heat-with-makeshift-jet-ski-scooter" target="_blank">News 4 Jax</a></em> in Jacksonville, Florida, on September 18, a car is seen driving alongside a motorised jet-ski.</p> <p>The driver can also be seen wearing a helmet for safety and finishing off his look with a pair of fluorescent and reflective sunglasses.</p> <p>The driver gave a friendly thumbs up as the car passed him.</p> <p>A child can be heard from the backseat of the car saying, “That’s meant to be in the water.”</p> <p><span>In another video uploaded to </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJxrYo1Nf0Y" target="_blank">ViralHog</a><span>, a teen is seen taking his new toy for a spin down his driveway.</span></p> <p>“We built it because I woke up one day thinking about such a thing and I decided it had to happen,” the driver wrote.</p> <p>At this current moment, there is no law that prohibits drivers to use jet-skis on Australian roads.</p> <p>However, pocket bikes, motorised scooters and golf carts are banned.</p>

Legal

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Road rule test: Is it against the law to cross an unbroken double line?

<p>You would hope that licenced drivers would be aware of the road rules that are currently in place, but it turns out there is one rule that a surprising number of motorists aren’t aware of, and it has to do with road markings.</p> <p>So, if you’re one of the people that believed you were never able to cross an unbroken double line while driving, then you are not alone.</p> <p>In NSW, there are many circumstances in which drivers are allowed to cross unbroken double lines, with the most surprising being to enter or leave a road.</p> <p>The idea that it is illegal to cross a continuous double or single line when driving off or on to a road is a myth.</p> <p>Under NSW road rules, you are permitted to cross a dividing line when entering or leaving a property or road “by the shortest route”.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820974/capture.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4c925f97f74c4f1f9a84a3926f4a15e5" /></p> <p>For example, it is legal to turn right over dividing lines when coming out of a petrol station or shopping centre, unless there is a sign specifically saying you can’t.</p> <p>The rule applies to both double and single unbroken road markings.</p> <p>Drivers are also allowed to cross any type of dividing line when turning right at an intersection.</p> <p>The only other instances where NSW motorists are allowed to cross unbroken lines is to maintain a safe distance when overtaking a bicycle rider or to avoid obstruction on the road.</p> <p>If passing a cyclist, drivers must leave a one metre gap in a 60km/h or less speed zone or 1.5 metres when the limit is above 60km/h.</p> <p>When deciding whether a road obstruction permits someone to cross double lines, drivers must check if they have a clear view of oncoming traffic, and if it is “necessary and reasonable in all circumstances” to cross the dividing line and if it is safe to do so.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/on-the-road/the-double-dividing-line-rule-many-aussie-drivers-are-getting-wrong/news-story/9baa90c6155e10810b64a83ea99348a0">news.com.au</a></em>, Transport for NSW said that it is critical that all drivers are aware of the road rules, and update themselves regularly if any changes are made.</p> <p>“It is important that all road users know the rules and abide by them,” a Transport for NSW spokesperson said.</p> <p>“We will include this rule in the next Road Rules Awareness Week in early 2019.”</p> <p>Drivers in the Northern Territory and Western Australia are also allowed to turn right across double dividing lines when entering or leaving a property.</p> <p>It is illegal in Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania to cross a double dividing line when entering or leaving a road.</p> <p>Motorists in Victoria are only permitted to cross double lines to avoid a potential hazard, while those in Queensland are only allowed if overtaking a cyclist.</p> <p>Tasmanians and South Australians are able to cross the line in both of these situations.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://mylicence.sa.gov.au/road-rules/the-drivers-handbook/driving-road">MyLicenceSA</a>, a “slower moving vehicle or a vehicle stopped in a line of traffic” is not considered an obstruction.</p> <p>But if a situation occurs where a driver is faced with a fallen tree, crashed vehicle or broken down car, then it is permitted to cross an unbroken line.</p> <p>In NSW, illegally crossing an unbroken like could cost you two demerit points and a $263 fine.</p> <p>Victoria and South Australia have the highest penalties for illegally crossing an unbroken line, with fines of $322 and $446 and both costing three demerit points.</p> <p>Queensland also has a three-demerit point penalty, along with a $234 fine.</p> <p>Drivers in Tasmania are subjected to a $203.75 fine and two demerit points while Western Australia has the lowest penalties at $150 but will cost drivers three demerit points.</p>

Legal

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The Barefoot Investor Scott Pape's 3-minute money hack

<p>Barefoot Investor Scott Pape is on a mission to create a generation of kids who know how to handle their money and make smart financial decisions.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of people out there who are highly-educated but they are still stupid with money,” says Pape, who has thousands of people following his advice after becoming a financial phenomenon.</p> <p>And according to Pape, learning how to deal with cash starts at a young age and in the home – with basic rules a lot of fun.</p> <p>In his new book, <em>The Barefoot Investor for Families: The Only kids’ Money Guide You’ll Ever Need</em>, the farmer and stockbroker writes about a simple approach that every Australian family should follow.</p> <p>His game plan includes three things: Three jam jars, three jobs and three minutes.</p> <p>He says that’s all it takes for kids to become successful money managers.</p> <p>The jars are responsible for separating money into three categories: Splurge, smile and give.</p> <p>“Three jam jars, three jobs that can be done on a Sunday afternoon and three minutes for the parents to check it all off,” Pape said.</p> <p>How money jars really work</p> <p>Mother-of-three Teira Jansen says she taught her children from a young age that “money doesn’t grow on trees".</p> <p>Mrs Jansen’s children each have a spend, save and give jar, and they must do small tasks to earn money.</p> <p>“We are fortunate in our situation that we have a reasonable amount of money and I don’t want my children to take advantage of that,” Mrs Jansen, of Forestville in NSW, said.</p> <p>“If they want to earn money, they need to do jobs and work for it.”</p> <p>Jobs include emptying out the dishwasher and taking out the rubbish.</p> <p>Each time Chloe, 3, Alana, 6, or Lachlan, 8, completes a job they earn one marble – this is converted into 10 cents at the end of the week.</p> <p>“We also give them interest on their save jar, so they get rewarded for that,” said Mrs Jansen.</p> <p>“It’s simple, and it does take a bit of discipline but it’s important to talk about money.”</p> <p>And Mrs Jansen isn’t the only parent finding the hack successful as mother-of-two Niamh Gantley says the activity has helped her sons learn about money.</p> <p>Drew, 7, and Sean, 4, have three jam jars each – a spend, save and give jar – and each time the boys complete a task they are then rewarded with coins to add to their relevant jars.</p> <p>“They do jobs like emptying the dishwasher, feeding the dogs and simple things,” she said.</p> <p>“They might only get 15 cents – five cents for each job – and they drop it into each of the jars.”</p> <p>Mrs Gantley believes it’s important to teach children to be financially smart from a young age.</p> <p>“They have a comprehension that they have to do something to earn money,” she said.</p> <p>“They know they have to work even at age four to earn money.”</p> <p>Mrs Gantley and her husband Andrew Inglis have both picked up tips and tricks after reading the Barefoot Investor's book, saying it has helped them become better money managers.</p> <p>Will you be trying out the 3-minute money hack with your grandchildren? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Money & Banking

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Prince George and Princess Charlotte steal the show at wedding

<p>Prince George and Princess Charlotte had all eyes on them when they featured in the wedding party of Prince Harry and Meghan earlier this year and now, the young royals have stolen the spotlight at another wedding.</p> <p>On Saturday, George and Charlotte acted as a pageboy and bridesmaid for one of Duchess Kate’s closest friends, Sophie Carter.</p> <p>Five-year-old George looked happy on the day as he wore a collarless white shirt, sky-blue knickerbockers, white stockings and white loafers.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoFD6YAFATi/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoFD6YAFATi/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Cambridges (@teatimewiththecambridges)</a> on Sep 23, 2018 at 11:42am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The third-in-line to the throne was seen poking his head out of the church porch as they waited for the bride to arrive and led his fellow pageboys in a game of soldiers after the ceremony.</p> <p>“George is a real star, quite the little chap,” a royal insider told <a href="https://people.com/royals/prince-george-princess-charlotte-sophie-carter-wedding/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">PEOPLE</em></strong></span></a>. “He was having a great time, running around like the leader of the pack.”</p> <p><span style="font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit !important;">Charlotte, who usually warms to attention, looked unimpressed with her brother’s antics and was seen frowning while she wore a white dress with blue piping and circlet of flowers.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoDeqolh0CE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoDeqolh0CE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by DuchessofSussex MeghanMarkle (@duchessofsussexmeghanmarkle)</a> on Sep 22, 2018 at 8:57pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The young royal siblings, who were among seven children taking part in the wedding, were accompanied by their parents the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.</p> <p>The wedding of Sophie Carter and Robert Suggs took place at St Andrew’s Church in Norfolk.</p> <p>For the special occasion, Kate wore a blue dress and jacket by Catherine Walker with a blue headpiece believed to be by Jane Taylor.</p> <p>Kate’s brother James and their parents Michael and Carole Middleton also attended the wedding, however, Pippa, who is due to give birth to her first child, was absent. </p>

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The tense moment between Lisa Wilkinson and Serena Williams: “I’ll walk out”

<p>In an interview with <em>The Project’</em>s Lisa Wilkinson, Serena Williams has opened up about her chaotic US Open final.</p> <p>The 23-grand slam champion had agreed to chat to the Channel 10 host prior to her defeat to Naomi Osaka, however, the interview had various strings attached.</p> <p>The tennis star’s publicist warned that if she asked any questions about the controversial <em>Herald Sun</em> cartoon, the interview would end immediately.</p> <p>Wilkinson also found herself in hot water after she asked Williams several questions regarding her outburst at the US Open.</p> <p>After kickstarting the interview with questions on motherhood and her rise to stardom, Wilkinson then asked Williams if she regretted smashing her racket in the second set – a move that saw her receive a code violation and provoked her outburst to the umpire Carlos Ramos.</p> <p>Before Williams had a chance to answer the question, her publicist interrupted: “That’s four questions about the US Open so ... change topic.”</p> <p>“I’m totally in your hands, Serena,” Wilkinson responded, asking the tennis star if she was comfortable to answer more questions.</p> <p>Williams, who initially labelled her treatment from the umpire as “sexism”, said she wished to put the incident behind her.</p> <p>“If as a man you want to express yourself, without profanity, you should be able to. As a woman you should be able to do half of what a man can,” she said.</p> <p>“But I’m just trying to recover from that and move on.”</p> <p>Following the interview, Wilkinson revealed to her co-hosts on the Channel 10 show that she was instructed to keep clear of any questions about Mark Knight’s controversial cartoon depicting her outburst.</p> <p>“I was told in no uncertain terms before I sat down in that room (that) if I brought up the Mark Knight cartoon, she would have got up and walked out,” Wilkinson said.</p> <p>“There would be no ifs or buts. And I know that would have been great tabloid TV to have her walk off but I was actually more interested in her answers to the US Open questions.”</p> <p>Williams reiterated to Wilkinson that she was unaware coach Patrick Mouratoglou was coaching her throughout the match, despite him admitting to making hand signals.</p> <p>“We don’t have signals, we’ve never had signals,” she said. “It was just a really confusing moment.”</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://mamamia.com/"><strong>Mamamia</strong></a>’</em>s Mia Freedman, Williams touched on the emotional moment she shared with her daughter following the incident.</p> <p>“For me I feel like we should lift each other up and support each other, and not tear each other down, and that’s something I’ve always tried to do,” Williams said.</p> <p>“I got in the car, and Olympia was in the car. It was so weird, and she started giving me kisses, she never gives me kisses. She doesn’t even know to give kisses, and she just grabbed me, and I was like this little baby is so smart. It’s just hard to be too down when you have a little one … when you have someone to take care of.</p> <p>“Like I have to take care of this person, and I have to do this type of stuff, it puts everything in perspective.”</p>

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The weird thing spotted on PM Scott Morrison's desk

<p>Scott Morrison, who became the 30th Prime Minister of Australia after a recent Liberal Leadership spill, appears to be proud of his past as the former immigration minister.</p> <p>In an article published by the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/15/opinion/columnists/trump-finally-makes-a-friend.html"><em><strong><u>New York Times</u></strong></em></a> earlier this week, it was revealed that the Prime Minister’s office "features a model migrant boat bearing the proud declaration 'I Stopped These'."</p> <p>The claim generated a stir online, with many surprised Mr Morrison would be so proud to remind himself of the “stop the boats” campaign which saw thousands placed into Pacific Island detention camps and the controversial turn-back of boats.</p> <p>Others were curious to see the alleged model as it had not been widely reported by other journalists.</p> <p>However, on Wednesday the photo of the model was captured by AAP photographer Lukas Coch to confirm that it does exist.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Goodness me. <a href="https://t.co/OySZEn9smi">pic.twitter.com/OySZEn9smi</a></p> — Pat Caruana (@patbcaruana) <a href="https://twitter.com/patbcaruana/status/1042231747188912128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 19, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The photo appears to show a laser-cut block of metal depicting an Asian fishing boat riding over a wave, with the words: “I stopped these”.</p> <p>“His office features a model migrant boat bearing the proud declaration ‘I Stopped These,’ and a cabinet adorned with a Jesus shrine and a biblical proverb to ‘Trust in the Lord',” the Times journalist wrote.</p> <p>The trophy drew criticism online with one person saying: “It looks like a novelty bottle-opener.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">It looks like a novelty bottle-opener <a href="https://t.co/aqe9gYChoV">https://t.co/aqe9gYChoV</a></p> — James Jeffrey (@James_Jeffrey) <a href="https://twitter.com/James_Jeffrey/status/1042239043772149760?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 19, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In an interview with Channel Nine, Mr Morrison revealed how he got the trophy. </p> <p>“It was given to me by a mate down in the Shire who runs a sign business. He loved the fact that we did that,” Mr Morrison said.</p> <p>“It has been sitting in my office, by the way, for about five years. I don’t think that there is anything terribly new about it.”</p> <p>The Prime Minister regularly mentions the “stop the boats” campaign, making reference to it three times during his first major speech as a leader.</p> <p>On Wednesday he told the chamber: "The Australian people know about me, that they can trust me on the borders and they can trust me on the budget, because that's my record."</p>

News

Travel

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Inside Serena Williams’ $14 million LA mansion

<p>Tennis champion Serena Williams has slashed the price of her six-bedroom, seven-bathroom Bel-Air mansion in Los Angeles, after spending almost one year on the property market.</p> <p>Originally for sale with an asking price of <span>US$12 million (AUD $16.4 million), the price has now been slashed to US$9.99 million (AUD$13.8 million), after not getting any interest in the lavish home. </span></p> <p>Set on one of the largest lots in the local neighbourhood of Stone Canyon, the private, tree-lined residence is equipped with everything a sporting star could need, including a personal gym, a large swimming pool and a number of private hiking trails surrounding the home.</p> <p>However, there is something rather important missing from the property: a tennis court. Perhaps the new mum likes to keep her work and home lives separate?</p> <p>Built in 1935, the 556-square metre traditional home boasts high ceilings, a private salon, bar and numerous delicate chandeliers.</p> <p>Williams purchased the home in 2006 for US$9.5 million.</p> <p>At the time the tennis legend put the sprawling property on the market, she was rumoured to be searching for a new, family-friendly home to move into with her baby daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr, and husband, Reddit founder Alexiz Ohanian. </p> <p>Maybe her new home will have a tennis court this time around? You can view the incredible Bel-Air property in the gallery above. </p> <p> </p>

International Travel

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Flyers furious over Qantas's latest move

<p>Qantas passengers have expressed their despair after the airline announced that it will no longer be offering music on domestic routes.</p> <p>Qantas explained that after a “comprehensive review” of its entertainment offering, music has been removed from domestic flights because not enough people use it.</p> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://www.news.com.au"><strong><u>news.com.au</u></strong></a>, a Qantas spokesperson said: “Our research showed on average less than 10 per cent of customers per flight were tuning into the radio and music channels."</p> <p>“It also indicated that many passengers on both domestic and international flights bring their own device with music already downloaded.”</p> <p>Qantas said most passengers on domestic flights preferred to watch movies or TV shows, so the airline would focus on expanding these offerings instead.</p> <p>The airline also has an Apple Music offering, where passengers can download songs through the app or on domestic flights using Wi-Fi.</p> <p>Qantas will still offer podcasts and audiobooks on domestic flights and music will still be available on international flights.</p> <p>However, the 10 per cent of those who enjoy listening to the in-flight radio and music channels have expressed their disappointment with the decision.</p> <p>Australia’s peak music body APRA AMCOS described the move as a devastating blow to the music industry.</p> <p>Passengers have also criticised the decision to axe music on domestic flights.</p> <p>One passenger wrote: “I used to love the world music channel curated by Annette Shun Wah on @qantas flights. How can they axe music altogether? Can it be that hard/expensive? Ten per cent of the customers pissed off is a significant percentage.”</p> <p>Another said: “I’ve had times where during stressful landings the albums available have made a huge difference! Axing it is a real shame.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Damn shame! I think I’ll cancel my q club membership!<br />Who sings the sing with the lyrics “...burn my hand off..”? Beautiful female voice.</p> — Maurice J Day Jr (@JerryDay19) <a href="https://twitter.com/JerryDay19/status/1041962347345014784?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 18, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>But another flyer said the backlash was uncalled for as passengers could instead use their own devices to listen to music.</p> <p>“Never thought of iTunes or music on your own phones people?”</p> <p>What are your thoughts on Qantas’s decision to axe music on domestic flights? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Travel Trouble

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5 travel hacks to stretch your holiday budget

<p>Unless you’re a trust fund kid or you have a bottomless bank account, you need to keep to a budget while travelling. Here are 5 hacks to help you stretch your holiday budget.</p> <p><strong>1. Buy travel insurance</strong></p> <p>When you’re planning a trip, you will look at all the ways you can save money, such as not paying for additional baggage or looking for low-cost carriers.</p> <p>However, you should never, ever scrimp on travel insurance.</p> <p>Travel insurance will save you money should you encounter any emergencies while overseas.</p> <p>For example, if you have a medical emergency while travelling, you can seek treatment at the hospital without worrying if you can afford it as you will be able to claim part of the cost.</p> <p>Buy the best travel insurance you can afford and make sure you read the terms and conditions to understand what it covers.</p> <p>Ensure you <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/Top-5-Travel-Insurance-Tips">read the small print carefully</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>2. Make use of free Wi-Fi</strong></p> <p>Unless you need to constantly be on call (and let’s be honest, that kind of defeats the purpose of a holiday), you don’t need to pay for a roaming phone plan or even a local SIM card.</p> <p>You can just rely of free Wi-Fi that’s provided at most cafes and restaurants, and at your accommodation.</p> <p>With apps like FaceTime and WhatsApp for texting and making calls, you don’t have to spend any money to keep in touch with people back home.</p> <p>Check out our tips and tricks for helping stretch your <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/How-to-Manage-Your-Phone-Data-Use">mobile phone dollar further</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>3. Look for free or cheap activities</strong></p> <p>You don’t have to book expensive tour packages to enjoy your vacation.</p> <p>Instead, look for cheap or free activities.</p> <p>This is especially easy to do in larger cities.</p> <p>London, for example, has over 23 free museums, such as the Tate Modern, British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum.</p> <p>And the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, offers free entry for the last two hours of every day.</p> <p>Search online for more such options.</p> <p>And there’s no better way to really get to know a place than to explore its streets.</p> <p>You can check online for free walking tours that are usually organised by experienced guides.</p> <p>You are free to tip the guide any amount you want at the end of the tour.</p> <p>If money is no object, check out these <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/diet/10-leisure-activities-burn-more-calories-you-realise">10 holiday activities that burn calories fast</a></u>. </p> <p><strong>4. Book accommodation with a kitchen</strong></p> <p>This is especially useful in cities where it’s expensive to eat out, such as Paris or London.</p> <p>Even eating in just one meal a day can save you a significant amount of money.</p> <p>The moment you settle in, go for a grocery run to buy ingredients for the duration of your stay.</p> <p>Ingredients like milk, juice, eggs, bread and sandwich meats can help you put together a great and satisfying breakfast.</p> <p>Planning a family trip or solo holiday anytime soon?</p> <p>You may have booked your plane tickets and accommodation, but that doesn’t mean you’re all set to go.</p> <p>Go through this travel checklist to make sure <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/avoid-pre-holiday-anxiety-our-travel-tip-checklist">you’ve got everything planned</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>5. Download apps for good deals</strong></p> <p>If you do want to have a little splurge while on holiday, use apps that can help you locate good deals.</p> <p>Sick of homemade sandwiches for lunch?</p> <p>Treat yourself to a great meal in London by using <span><a href="https://www.bookatable.co.uk/">Bookatable</a></span> by Michelin.</p> <p>The app lets you find good value set meals from popular restaurants and even those owned by celebrity chefs.</p> <p>For example, you can enjoy a meal at a Michelin Bib Gourmand restaurant for under £28 (AUD$50), which is a steal!</p> <p>Do some research before you reach your destination to find more such apps.</p> <p>Check out these 5 clever mobile travel apps that will assist you on <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/Useful-Travel-Apps">your next big adventure</a></span>.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/5-travel-hacks-stretch-your-holiday-budget?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></em></strong></span><em>. For more of what you love </em><em>from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><strong><em><u><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></u></em></strong><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Travel Tips

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8 magical reasons to visit Ireland

<p><strong>1. Blarney Castle</strong></p> <p>In County Cork, it is famous for the Blarney Stone – kiss it for the gift of eternal eloquence, legend says. Visitors literally bend over backwards to smooch this fabled rock set into the castle’s wall. The 15th-century castle also offers gardens, caves and battlement views.</p> <p><strong>2. The Guinness Storehouse</strong></p> <p>At the St James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin welcomes over a million visitors each year to the on-site stout-producing plant. The Guinness Storehouse gives a behind the scenes look into the brewing process – over three million pints are brewed here daily. At the end of the brewery tour, visitors can relax with a pint while taking in the stunning 360-degree views of Dublin from the Gravity Bar.</p> <p><strong>3. Brú na Bóinne in County Meath</strong></p> <p>Is a Neolithic site of henges, standing stones and burial chambers, built about 3200 BC. Immensely popular year-round, Brú na Bóinne gets extra attention during winter solstice when, for a few dawns in late December, a beam of sunlight pierces a mysterious opening in one passage tomb, Newgrange, illuminating its chamber for a few minutes. So great is the demand to see the winter solstice sunrise at Newgrange that an annual lottery is held for chamber access.</p> <p><strong>4. The Rock of Cashel</strong></p> <p>(Or St Patrick’s Rock) in County Tipperary dates to the 12th and 13th centuries. The formidable fortress boasts a round tower, cathedral and chapel with priceless Celtic art and medieval architecture. In the fifth century, legend has it that St Patrick converted Aengus, the King of Munster, to Christianity at this very spot.</p> <p><strong>5. Experience the Festivals</strong></p> <p>From St Patrick’s Day to Galway International Arts Festival, Ireland has hundreds of cultural celebrations every year. The most anticipated is St Patrick’s Festival (around St Patrick’s Day, March 17), when parades and a carnival atmosphere will leave you spellbound.</p> <p><strong>6. Visit Dublin</strong></p> <p>The capital of the Republic of Ireland, Dublin buzzes with lively pubs, beautiful architecture and fine museums. A Dublin Pass will gain you entry to more than 30 top Dublin attractions, plus discounts for restaurants, shops, theatre, tours and transportation (and a free guidebook).</p> <p><strong>7. Revel in Irish Folklore</strong></p> <p>The World Heritage-listed Giant’s Causeway on the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland was, legend says, built by a giant, Fionn Mac Cumhail (Finn McCool), to keep his feet dry while walking to Scotland. Geologists suggest volcanic activity 60 million years ago created the 40,000 interlocking basalt columns that amaze visitors today.</p> <p><strong>8. Dine on Irish Cuisine</strong></p> <p>Traditional dishes such as Irish stew, soda bread, farmhouse cheese, and colcannon (cabbage/kale and potatoes) are still on the menu, but the new wave of Irish cooking focuses on fresh local ingredients and the catch of the day. Seafood options include wild Atlantic salmon, oysters, scallops and lobster, Dublin Bay prawns, chargrilled swordfish and grilled sole. The Galway International Oyster &amp; Seafood Festival celebrates this bounty every September.</p> <p><em>Written by Jackie Middleton. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/8-Magical-Reasons-to-Visit-Ireland">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

Health

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Body language expert shares verdict on Prince Harry and his mother-in-law

<p>A body language expert has weighed in on Prince Harry’s relationship with his mother-in-law, Doria Ragland, after the duo spent the day together to support Meghan at her charity cookbook launch.</p> <p>While Prince Harry has been known to have a shy demeanour in the past, Meghan appears to take after her mum’s ability to appear natural in the spotlight.</p> <p>Speaking to The Sun, body language expert Judi James said the 34-year-old appeared “shy and a little bit intimidated” by the company of his mother-in-law.</p> <p>Judi said: “Doria and Meghan seem to form a really tight double act, with both women displaying signals of elegant confidence.”</p> <p>She added, “Meghan’s attention is clearly primarily on her mother here which might be a huge shift for Harry who has so far been bathing in her flattering eye contact and touch rituals.”</p> <p>When the trio arrived at the event, Harry was seen walking a few steps behind Doria and Meghan.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7820937/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/043fb367b4354591bfb5860c5f81ca6b" /></p> <p>“Harry’s body language suggests he’s stepping back slightly to allow the real power double act to shine,” she explained.</p> <p>“He walks behind Doria and Meghan, using a small self-comfort barrier ritual with one hand touching his belt, and when he stands with Doria he keeps a space between them rather than being more tactile or engaging with her.</p> <p>“Harry's dad Prince Charles used far more reassurance and touch rituals with Doria on Harry and Meghan's wedding day but Harry seems more compliant and just a tiny bit intimidated like most new husbands are by their mothers-in-law.</p> <p>"He looks happy to allow his very confident-looking wife and mother-in-law do their own thing while he watches in admiration.”</p> <p>Despite his reportedly “shy” demeanour, Harry didn’t mind showing off his cheeky nature when he was caught stealing extra samosas from the marquee.</p> <p>When he noticed he had been caught out, he flashed a wide grin at the camera.</p>

Body

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Here’s what happens to your body after you have a soft drink

<p>Half an hour after finishing a can of soft drink, your blood sugar has spiked.</p> <p>So you're probably feeling pretty good. Your cells have plenty of energy, more than they need.</p> <p>Maybe that soft drink had some caffeine as well, giving your central nervous system a kick, making you feel excitable, suppressing any tiredness you might have.</p> <p>But a<span> </span><a href="https://baker.edu.au/news/media-releases/soft-drink-metabolic">clever new study</a>, published on Monday, nicely illustrates that while you're feeling good, strange things are going on inside your blood vessels – and in the long run they are not good for you.</p> <p>For this study, 28 obese or overweight young adults agreed to sit in a lab for a whole day while having their blood continuously sampled.</p> <p>The volunteers ate a normal breakfast, lunch and dinner. At morning tea and afternoon tea, researchers from Melbourne's Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute gave them a can of soft drink.</p> <p>Their blood samples revealed exactly what happened next.</p> <p>Sugar from, say, a chocolate bar is released slowly, as your digestive system breaks it down.</p> <p>With a can of soft drink, almost no break-down time is needed. The drink's sugar starts to hit your bloodstream within about 30 minutes. That's why you get such a big spike.</p> <p>Your body responds to high levels of blood sugar by producing a hormone called insulin.</p> <p>Insulin pumps through the bloodstream and tells your cells to suck in as much sugar as they can. The cells then start burning it, and storing what they can't burn.</p> <p>That quickly reduces the amount of sugar in the blood, and gives you a burst of energy. So far, so good.</p> <p>But the sugar keeps coming. High levels of blood sugar will quickly damage your blood vessels, so the body keeps making insulin.</p> <p>In fact, just having two cans of soft drink meant the volunteers' insulin stayed significantly higher than usual - all day.</p> <p>After lunch, and another soft drink for afternoon tea, their sugar and insulin levels spiked again.</p> <p>And, once again, over the next few hours blood sugar dropped but insulin levels stayed stubbornly high – right through to late afternoon, when the study finished.</p> <p>The study demonstrates that two cans of soft drink is all it takes to give your pancreas – the crucial organ that produces insulin – a serious workout, says Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, the study's senior author.</p> <p>"If you did this day in, day out, your pancreas would be under considerable stress – and this is how diabetes can develop," says Kingwell. "Having a little can of soft drink in the morning is going to have lasting effects throughout the day."</p> <p>If your diet has too much sugar in it, forcing your body to keep your insulin high all the time, eventually your cells will grow insulin-resistant. That forces the pancreas to make even more insulin, adding to its workload. Eventually, it will burn out.</p> <p>But something else interesting is happening inside your body as well. Insulin tells your body to burn sugar, but it also tells it to stop burning fat.</p> <p>Normally, the body burns a little bit of both at once. But after a soft drink, your insulin stays high all day – so you won't burn much fat, whether you're on a diet or not.</p> <p>One of the study's participants, Michelle Kneipp, is now trying as hard as she can to kick her soft-drink habit.</p> <p>She's switched soft drinks for flavoured sparkling water. "It still tastes like soft drink, and it's still got the fizz," she says.</p> <p>"But it's hard, because sugar's a very addictive substance."</p> <p><em>Written by Liam Mannix. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Stuff.co.nz.</strong></span></a>  </em></p>

Body

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The pain of being misdiagnosed with Alzheimer's

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">Martin can recall, all too clearly, the day he received the devastating diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's. He left the consultant's office, trying to understand how profoundly his life was going to change.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It is 10 years since Martin, who "does not want to use my full name in case people who do not know me well start wondering if I really am all right", had become anxious enough about his forgetfulness and short-term memory loss to go to his GP.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He was referred to the dementia clinic under a consultant at a London teaching hospital and in 2010 began two years of regular brain scans, while a psychiatrist performed detailed yearly cognitive tests.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He was reassured by the knowledge that if something serious was taking place it would be identified. But during this time, Martin, 74, and his wife agree, his memory and cognitive ability did not seem to deteriorate.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The consultant who had been monitoring his condition said she wanted to put Martin on galantamine, medication that is supposed to slow the progress of Alzheimer's, but is not a cure. In order to do this she had to give a formal diagnosis: "She said my hippocampus was riddled with sticky plasma of the kind indicating Alzheimer's, and I felt I had to trust her judgment."</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Martin and his wife asked to see the scans showing how the disease had progressed so they could understand. The consultant said she did not have the equipment to show them. At this point, Martin said he wanted a second opinion, but, while he waited for a referral, his wife remembers he "became depressed and withdrawn; neighbours commented on it, too. I can see now what a profound effect the diagnosis had on him psychologically."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He adds: "From the moment I saw myself as an Alzheimer's patient, I began to dismantle my life and my dreams of the future."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He retired from publishing three years early and cut back on plans he had made, from voluntary work to adventurous holidays.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It was several months before his first appointment with consultant neurologist Dr Catherine Mummery at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London – when things changed quite dramatically. "She spent an hour talking with me, discussing a range of topics, and asking other testing questions. At the end, she said she did not believe I had Alzheimer's."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">As the hospital's clinical lead for dementia services, Mummery "quite regularly" sees people who have been misdiagnosed with dementia. Alzheimer's, she explains, is only one form of brain disease causing dementia and globally there is misdiagnosis of between 20 and 30 per cent of dementia cases.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Alzheimer's can be a complex condition to diagnose and there are no clear national figures on misdiagnosis," says Mummery. "Nor is there such a thing as a 100 per cent test. Martin was given a diagnosis on the basis of a PET scan of his brain; however, there are a number of conditions from menopause to depression or schizophrenia, where changes may take place in brain metabolism, so caution is needed.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"If someone comes to me with an Alzheimer's diagnosis, I believe in doing my own tests and making my own judgment," she says. "Individuals will often not question the diagnosis they are given, as they expect the doctor to be accurate, due to their expertise. I would estimate that we see several cases a month where the diagnosis [should be] of another dementia, or where we have to retract the dementia diagnosis [altogether]."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In Martin's case, she says: "I saw him three times and there were no changes, so I felt confident telling him categorically he did not have Alzheimer's. I continue to see him and there are no changes six years after the initial diagnosis."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Unhelpfully for those living in the shadow of the disease, post-mortem diagnosis is still the "gold standard for providing definitive evidence of Alzheimer's", Mummery explains. Yet, as no cure or effective treatment for the disease exists, early diagnosis is essential because some drugs can delay its progress and help preserve quality of life for as long as possible.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Dr Sara Imarisio, head of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, says that with "only 60 per cent of those estimated to be living with dementia having a formal diagnosis, and rates varying across the UK, it's important that healthcare professionals understand the signs. Memory tests, brain scans and spinal fluid samples taken by lumbar puncture can reveal changes linked to the early stages."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It is estimated that by 2025 there will be one million people in the UK with dementia, and it is the thing over-60s fear most, which means the importance of investment into improving diagnosis of Alzheimer's cannot be overstated, says Dominic Carter, senior policy officer at the Alzheimer's Society.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We have made big progress in getting accurate diagnosis, but there are not enough of the best clinical tools for getting the most accurate information," he says. "And further research is needed into how we approach misdiagnosis with all the distress it causes."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In 2016, researchers from St Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada, revealed the results of a preliminary study of inconsistencies between clinical and autopsy diagnoses in more than 1000 people listed in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Even with all the latest diagnostic methods, the discrepancy between the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and the pathological diagnosis is about 20 per cent," said adjunct scientist Dr David Munoz, the senior researcher.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He and his colleagues found that 78 per cent of the patients they studied had a correct diagnosis in the clinic, which was confirmed in an autopsy of the brain. Nearly another 11 per cent didn't have a formal Alzheimer's diagnosis, yet were found to have had the disease. Roughly the same percentage of those diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the clinic did not actually have the disease.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A false positive diagnosis can occur when, for instance, someone has depression and exhibits symptoms very similar to Alzheimer's. Others may have brain markers of Alzheimer's but never go on to develop the disease.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Distress doesn't begin to describe the despair Martin felt at his diagnosis, but nor, he says, did having it revoked instantly make everything all right. "In one sense it was a relief, of course, but in another I just didn't know what to think. Could I really trust that Dr Mummery had it right?" he says.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I felt very bewildered, unsure of everything and my mood remained low, which is not like me. I've always been very upbeat, busy, interested by life."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">When Martin's confusion and sense of being psychologically displaced did not lift, Mummery referred him on to a clinical psychologist, with whom he has rebuilt his confidence and faith in a good future. "She helped me see that when something like my diagnosis happens, you have to regain the ability to be the person you were before."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It was tough for his wife as well: "I felt a sense of relief but I had also had to adjust to the idea that Martin would become less and less of the man I knew. A diagnosis like that is such a weight to bear."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A weight that has been lifted sufficiently, at least, for the couple to be taking a special holiday next month. A full stop at the end of an ordeal, it is, they say delightedly, "a celebration of getting back a life we thought had been taken away".</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Angela Neustatter. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/107159531/the-pain-of-being-misdiagnosed-with-alzheimers">Stuff.co.nz</a>. </em></p> </div>

Mind

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Cadbury vows to change packaging after death of 9-year-old in Australia

<p>Confectionary giant Cadbury has promised to implement changes to its packaging, following the death of a 9-year-old girl due to unclear labelling.</p> <p>Isabel Marrero died from an anaphylactic reaction in March this year after her mother gave her what looked like her favourite biscuit.</p> <p>Helen Marrero has been buying Cadbury choc chip cookies for years without problems, until recently. Helen had accidentally picked up the wrong variety of biscuit because the packets were almost identical.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820894/e7019d47a79957e7de1106fa40717094-79612.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7e109f9f5aa24b309b611fe9e8bc9d41" /></p> <p>“They both look like choc chip cookies to me even when you open them up they look pretty identical, but one has the allergen egg and one doesn’t,” she said.</p> <p>After her daughter’s tragic death, Ms Marrero went head on with food manufacturers in the hope to strengthen allergen labelling laws.</p> <p>Now, Cadbury has responded to the heartbroken family, promising to change its packaging so it’s easy to distinguish which biscuit is which.</p> <p>The company said it would add additional colour and descriptions to help separate the packets.</p> <p>“The aim is to highlight further that the products are different,” the company said in an email to the family.</p> <p>But it will take a while for the final product to reach our shores, as the new product is expected to hit Australian shelves next year.</p> <p>“As mentioned previously, the product is made overseas and shipped to Australia, so it does take some months to make it here,” Cadbury said.</p> <p>Ms Marrero still struggles with the loss of her daughter to this day, saying it’s a difficult feeling to describe. For her, life without Isabel “has been very hard, just every second thinking about her and trying to implement change so this doesn’t occur again".</p> <p>She asks all parents to remain vigilant and to always check the ingredients list before purchasing products.</p> <p>“Please, which I have learnt now, please read every single time you have purchased a product, even if you’ve been buying it for five years.”</p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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The Block judges' brutal feedback after labelling one room “disastrous”

<p>Contestants felt the pressure more so than usual on <em>The Block</em> this week as they had just four days to complete three rooms, alongside the added stress of a water leak drama.</p> <p>But Sara and Hayden, who garnered praise from the judges for their high scoring master bedroom reveal last week, seemed to have strayed the complete opposite direction as they went way back down the leaderboard, with a score of just 18.</p> <p>The judges were in agreement as they found more wrongs than rights in their hallway, laundry and powder reveal.</p> <p>While the NSW couple started the week confident, the situation slowly started getting out of hand as they were ordered to clean up their mess or face being shut down – Sara went ballistic – and unfortunately for the pair, they weren’t able to finish everything as they originally hoped, causing major ramifications.</p> <p><strong>Hayden and Sara – 18</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height:280.52550231839257px;" src="/media/7820967/sarahayden.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/13c80d4ff35347059f25ccac6fbfa74c" /></strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height:280.1857585139319px;" src="/media/7820966/sarahayden-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9e2e6aa30d6146aea221e6873d97b183" /></strong></p> <p>Despite Sara desperately hoping the judges would see past their “filthy” unfinished rooms, even going so far as to interrupt host Scott Cam during the judges' feedback session to defend their actions, the judges were not having any of it.</p> <p>The judges started off with praise as they complimented the couple on the nice soft glow and drama of the space in their hallway.</p> <p>“I love the step lights all the way down the hallway; I love the shape they make on the floor, it’s very beautiful and I love the light behind the art, it’s dramatic and classy,” Darren Palmer said.</p> <p>But that’s where the positives ended.</p> <p>“It’s dirty,” Shaynna Blaze said.</p> <p>“The floor is filthy, and it really lets it down – there’s no excuse for not cleaning your spaces in time for delivery,” Neale added.</p> <p>He was bewildered as he couldn’t seem to figure out how the couple got some things so right and other things so wrong.</p> <p>“When I look at the left-hand side of the hallway I think it’s lovely, the artworks give off this beautiful rich, warm glow, then I look at this shelf (pointing to the other side) and it’s a disaster.”</p> <p>“To me that looks like a garage sale,” Shaynna said, adding its among the worst styling she’s seen on <em>The Block</em>.</p> <p><strong>Kerrie and Spence – 29</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height:279.7527047913447px;" src="/media/7820962/kerrie-spence-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7c8de03bb28f49b5b5499ff59ecfed2a" /></strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820963/kerriespence2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94f81a43cddb4c80b01858863cbedf45" /></strong></p> <p>Kerrie and Spence have done it again, as they topped the leaderboard for the second week running.</p> <p>Scoring just one point below a perfect score of 30, the pair didn’t gain the attention of the Buyers Jury as they felt uninspired by their apartment, but they did hit all the right buttons when it came to the judges.</p> <p>“There is nothing I like more than a hallway that looks like a gallery,” Neale said.</p> <p>All three judges applauded the pair on their choice of artwork. Neale loved the simplicity of the design statement – it was all about the art and the lighting for him and “that takes amazing confidence,” he said.</p> <p>The praise continued into the laundry with Darren asking: “Is this what laundries have become that they are this glamorous almost kitchen like finesse … it’s just beautiful.” Shaynna agreed with those sentiments as she seemed visibly proud of Kerrie, saying she had come a long way.</p> <p>“I don’t think I have yet seen them as good as this,” Neale said.</p> <p><strong>Courtney and Hans – 24</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820960/courneyhans1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7ccc2ad392b0469f80aa3309f25d4d31" /></strong></p> <p>With the largest hallway on <em>The Block</em>, Courtney and Hans won Neale over with the quirky art pieces, but Darren wasn’t 100 per cent sure about the cabinets, as he found it looked out of place with the furniture in the living room.</p> <p>“I think it’s got a glamorous eccentricity about it that really appears to me. It’s a bit kooky,” Neale said.</p> <p>Darren said the artworks could do with being closer together.</p> <p>For Shaynna the laundry was not on the luxury level of Kerrie and Spence’s – but said it wouldn’t lose them any buyers either.</p> <p>The powder room did grab their attention with Shaynna describing it as glamorous, particularly the vanity.</p> <p>The WA couple came second last, but they were still six points ahead of Sara and Hayden.</p> <p><strong>Norm and Jess – 25</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820965/norm-jess.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1b203089b5ed4342a9bfb7e8d4321d72" /></strong></p> <p>Starting off the week with a rough start, especially when their plasterers pulled out before finishing the job, the Queensland couple still managed to make a comeback, with Jess also managing to secure some great local artwork.</p> <p>Darren was impressed the moment he walked through the doors, stating “this marble is exquisite” and loved how the shelf tied in with the kitchen bench.</p> <p>Darren thought it’s a lesson in styling 101 – “don’t crowd it and let the marble speak for itself".</p> <p>They all loved the simple arrangement of the room and agreed that the hero was the ceiling with its heights and choice of pendants. They loved the offset skylights and how it sent light down the hall.</p> <p>They also loved the laundry, finding it beautiful and compact.</p> <p>“It’s obvious there was no luxury of space to work with and small space solutions should have been put into play there,” Shaynna said, referring to the powder room which she thought lacked good orientation with the toilet pointing directly at the people in the dining room.</p> <p>“Execution is terrible, it’s really bad,” Shaynna said.</p> <p><strong>Bianca and Carla – 27.5</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820964/last-one.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2a190c68a8f74c8eb81fd51f2c394061" /></strong></p> <p>Netballers Bianca and Carla had problem after problem with their rooms from waterproofing issues to tiling dramas. They even copped a $1000 fine because their electrician was painting when he shouldn’t have been. The girls redeemed themselves though, proving they’re still the styling queens.</p> <p>“Oh, that’s sexy,” Shaynna said as she walked into their hallway. “And so is that carpet runner,” Neale added.</p> <p>The judges were impressed by the choice of skylights and how the art lights were in the well. Shaynna also thought their signature cabinet by the front door was beautiful and consistent with the rest of the apartment.</p> <p>“It’s nicely styled too. It takes restraint and purpose to have good style,” Darren said.</p> <p>Looking at the art choices, Shaynna thought it made the apartment feel a bit more fun and quirkier.</p> <p>“The lounge and dining areas are very contemporary, very modern, I feel this hallway adds that sense of quirkiness the apartment didn’t have,” she said. “This is a stunning hallway, I love it.”</p> <p>But Shaynna was critical of one thing, and that was the execution of the paint.</p> <p>The judges went on to praise the laundry as they loved the tiles and timber laminate on the bench.</p> <p>“It ticks boxes of functionality and amenity, but they have done it with finesse,” Neale added.</p> <p>Which team's hallway, laundry and powder room reveal gets your vote? Tell us in the comments below.</p>

Home & Garden

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So grown up! Sophie Delezio’s fairytale school formal

<p>The smile etched on Sophie Delezio’s face as she stood there, standing confidently in an elegant floor-length dress and sky-high heels, showed the world that this was a girl who looked radiant and felt beautiful.</p> <p>Absolutely ecstatic about “all the girlie stuff” which she used to reference her bright coloured lipstick, her glitter eye shadow that brought out her eyes and the stunning wrist corsage of hot pink roses, the Year 12 student admitted she had well and truly caught “formal fever”, especially when a giant limousine pulled up outside her home.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820953/1537501436179_dog.jpg" alt="Credit: Woman's Day" data-udi="umb://media/ecfb3a0af0ce4fe0bc0d2fa0db4eab4b" /></p> <p>“The night is finally here!” an excited Sophie told <a href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/celeb-news/sophie-delezio-formal-51383"><em>Woman's Day</em></a>. </p> <p>“I’m so happy – this is about celebrating with my friends, and the best time of my life so far!” the 17-year-old added.</p> <p>Her senior formal is not only a momentous moment for Sophie, but also for those who have watched her blossom in the public eye.</p> <p>Many still remember her as the bandaged little girl who inspired all those following her heart-wrenching journey, by keeping her head held high after surviving two near-fatal childhood accidents.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820954/1537501646019_family.jpg" alt="Credit: Woman's Day" data-udi="umb://media/18d8b2fb1bcf49d4b34f6d447fcb52fb" /></p> <p>The first occurred nearly 15 years ago when a car crashed into Sophie’s childcare centre and burst into flames on top of her, leaving her with burns to 85 per cent of her body, and the then-two-year-old losing most of her skin, right ear, the fingers on her right hand and both lower legs.</p> <p>Due to the incident, Sophie spent most of her time in and out of intensive care. Tragically, two years after the first incident, she was hit by a car on a pedestrian crossing that left her with bleeding on her brain and other trauma.</p> <p>But despite the tragic circumstances, Sophie always managed to keep a positive outlook on life, and never once questioned, “What if?” </p> <p>Rather she approaches each day as if she has no disability.</p> <p>This includes “being a super-organised freak” and doing all her own washing, working two to three shifts at her local Coles and training and competing in rowing regattas. She is also contemplating on whether she wants to attend university next year in the UK.</p> <p>“In my mind I’m not ‘Sophie the girl with no legs’ but someone completely normal,” she explained to <em>Woman's Day</em>. “I think of myself as Sophie the chatterbox, the socialite, the girl who loves a good hamburger and enjoys each day as much as she can.”</p> <p>While the teenager still has the added stress of the upcoming HSC exams, Sophie seems unfazed and her active contribution on her school’s formal committee made sure the celebratory night was a success. From the decorations to the class awards, Sophie managed to organise everything to perfection while still finding a dress weeks in advance.</p> <p>The dress, which Sophie says was her top priority, was a bargain at $29.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820952/1537501233816_couple.jpg" alt="Credit: Woman's Day" data-udi="umb://media/57a2eb5507f846caa58ad3eb391d3bb4" /></p> <p>“At first I was obsessed with red, my favourite colour, but you can never be too sure of the true shade of that on a screen, [so] I went with a light grey instead,” she revealed to the women's magazine, of her “perfect” halter-necked and fishtail-skirted gown, which features intricate lace detailing down the back.</p> <p>To help accommodate her evening stilettos, Sophie wore her prosthetic legs fitted with adjustable soles.</p> <p>And while they have proven to be uncomfortable in the past, Sophie planned to soldier on the dance floor.</p> <p>“I wear my legs way more than I’m supposed to, anyway, because I’m stubborn and I value my independence,” Sophie shrugged.</p> <p>The worst memory she has of her prosthetic legs is in February of this year, when Sophie attended the Ed Sheeran concert while she was standing in the mosh pit.</p> <p>“I couldn’t wear them at all for the next week and the wound in my right thigh was so deep it took four months to heal. But I did end up with Ed’s guitar pick that he threw into the crowd, and that made me so happy I bawled my eyes out on the spot,” she revealed.</p> <p>“It was agony later but definitely worth it – I would go through it all again 1000 times over!”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820955/1537501750814_limofriends.jpg" alt="Credit: Woman's Day" data-udi="umb://media/4c53a92315264f91837d368f6df351ff" /></p> <p>Sophie is also grateful for the decision she made during her pre-teen years where during a painful series of operations, a section of her scalp was stretched with a tennis ball-like object to allow hair follicles to be transplanted. The resulting extensions she can support thrill her on a daily basis.</p> <p>“Never mind how much it hurt at the time!” said Sophie, who loves looking in the mirror and seeing the long, thick hair she has always lusted after.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: <a href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/celeb-news/sophie-delezio-formal-51383">Woman's Day</a></em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Shocked guest shares bridezilla's outrageous wedding day "rules and regulations"

<p>A shocked wedding guest has shared the bizarre list of rules that were emailed to her prior to her friend’s nuptials.</p> <p>The bemused guest shared the lengthy list of instructions from the bridezilla’s wedding coordinator, describing the rules as “hilarious”.</p> <p>After introducing themselves as the marriage planner, the sender said they were emailing all guests to confirm final numbers for the day.</p> <p>However, what followed in the email is what caught the guest by surprise.</p> <p>Attached in the email was a list of “rules and regulations”, starting with a request for all attendees to arrive between 15 and 30 minutes before the ceremony.</p> <p>Guests were banned from wearing white, cream or ivory, while full faces of makeup were also banned.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 389.43488943488944px; height:500px;" src="/media/7820949/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6deccdcd41f54aa8abe5a192f2e51c87" /></p> <p>“'Do not record during the seramony” and “do not check in on Facebook until instructed”  were limitations placed upon guests.</p> <p>“DO NOT TALK TO THE BRIDE AT ALL,” the list also instructed, as well as guests being told to bring a gift valued at $75 or more to gain admission.</p> <p>The post quickly garnered a lot of attention online, with many users poking fun at the lengthy list of demands.</p> <p>“The best way to respond to this is to RSVP yes and then not attend – that would make the bride so furious she would probably send a bill,” one user said.</p> <p>Another wrote: “Sending a list like this is just going to guarantee that your guests won't follow common wedding etiquette.”</p> <p>One user joked: “'I would wear my own wedding dress with a full face of makeup, hair in an up-do and trainers while screaming gibberish at the bride and take a whole photo team with me.”</p> <p>What are your thoughts on this lengthy list of wedding demands? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Beauty & Style

Finance

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Why ALDI doesn’t sell roast chooks

<p>Despite Woolworths and Coles selling 90 million roast chickens a year, ALDI has refused to offer customers the same product.</p> <p>Now, the ALDI Australia chief executive Tom Daunt has revealed the reason why the German retailer has stayed away from selling roast chooks.</p> <p>In an interview with <a href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>The Australian</u></em></strong></a>, Mr Daunt said the hassle of sorting out logistics, storage and the sale of roast chooks will spoil the secret ingredient of the ALDI business model: simplicity.</p> <p>“Our philosophy is, let’s focus on what matters and do the right thing about the cost,” he told the publication.</p> <p>“It is choosing what not to do, right? And we decide everyday things not to do because that keeps our business simpler and more efficient. And that efficiency … is what underpins a very low cost of doing business, which underpins our ability to serve great quality products at the lowest price.”</p> <p>When Coles and Woolworths increased the price of roast chickens from $8 to $9, it was described by one retail analyst as an “industry-changing event” that could signal the end of the “race to the bottom”.</p> <p>“From our estimates, at $8 no supermarket makes any profit from selling barbecue chickens and Woolworths sells around 50 million chickens annually and Coles sells just over 40 million,” Bank of America Merrill Lynch analyst David Errington said.</p> <p>“A $1 price move is material but more importantly to us is a likely symbol that Coles and Woolworths are now looking at ways to improve profitability without compromising competitiveness.”</p> <p>Last year, ALDI hit annual sales of $8 billion for the first time and holds about 12.1 per cent market share of Australia’s grocery sector, according to Roy Morgan.</p> <p>Although the German retailer has grown significantly in the space of 17 years, expanding from two stores in Sydney to 500 nationally, the supermarket still faces criticism from some.</p> <p>Earlier this year, Aussie entrepreneur Dick Smith slammed ALDI for being overly “secretive” and blamed the company for the closure of his Dick Smith Foods business.</p> <p>He issued an <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/dick-smith-lashes-out-at-aldi-when-will-enough-be-enough"><strong><u>open letter</u></strong></a> to owners Karl Albrecht Jr and Beate Heister, asking the duo to explain their “long-term plans” for ALDI Australia.</p> <p>Mr Smith said the supermarket’s continued discounting would force local producers of out business.</p> <p>However, those claims were rejected by ALDI, who revealed that the supermarket employs more than 11,500 Australians and partners with over 100 Australian suppliers.</p> <p>Last month, Mr Daunt admitted that the mystery surrounding ALDI's operations had led to “inaccurate and misinformed information".</p> <p>“We’ve definitely been guilty in the past of focusing on running the business, on taking care of customers, and we’ve invested no time or effort in informing interested parties in what on earth we’re doing,” he said.</p>

Money & Banking

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69-year-old shares terrifying dashcam footage of moment she fell asleep behind the wheel

<p>Terrifying dashcam footage has been posted online showing the moment a woman lost control of her car while driving in Western Australia due to exhaustion.</p> <p>The woman encouraged Police to share the footage in the hopes to spread awareness of the dangers of driving while tired.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="360" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" src="https://au.news.yahoo.com/tired-wheel-205819716.html?format=embed" allowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" webkitallowfullscreen="true" allowtransparency="true" allow="autoplay; fullscreen; encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Video of the crash on the Great Southern Highway at Murdong, in Western Australia, begins with the car travelling in the correct lane but it veers onto the wrong side of the road, before moving onto the dirt strip next to the highway.</p> <p>The 69-year-old then crossed back over to the other side of the highway and collides side-on into a power pole.</p> <p>“She believes she fell asleep, but says she doesn’t really know what happened, thinking it could possibly be medically related,” explained a post on the Western Australia Police Force Facebook page.</p> <p>“The driver realises she was lucky to survive and asked us to release her dashcam vision to warn other drivers of the dangers of fatigue.”</p> <p>The 69-year-old suffered minor injuries in the accident, which occurred on Wednesday, September 12.</p> <p>In the post, police said the woman would not be facing any charges but will have to undergo a Fitness to Hold test, to prove she is fit enough to own a driver’s licence.</p> <p>WA Police are now using this opportunity to remind drivers of the dangers of fatigue, saying to watch out for early signs such as wandering thoughts; missing a gear, road sign or exit; slowing unintentionally or braking too late.</p>

Legal

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7-Eleven scam exposed

<p>The nation’s second-largest coffee chain has been accused of misleading its customers by overcharging by 50 to 100 per cent with its $2 and $3 “large” and “super” coffee cups.</p> <p>Melbourne filmmaker Tommy Jackett exposed service station 7-Eleven in an Instagram video, showing that the contents of a $3 cup easily fit into a $2, while a $2 “almost” fits into a $1 cup.</p> <p>“I love @7elevenaus coffee, so you can imagine my upset, confusion and OUTRAGE when I discovered their $3 coffee SCAM,” Jackett wrote. “Shout out to @ryan.jon for helping me blow this wide open. #CoffeeSizeMatters.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn4mxBRn8VJ/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bn4mxBRn8VJ/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" target="_blank">I love @7elevenaus coffee, so you can imagine my upset, confusion and OUTRAGE when I discovered their $3 coffee SCAM. Shout out to @ryan.jon for helping me blow this wide open. #CoffeeSizeMatters</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tommyjackett/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" target="_blank"> TOMMY JACKETT</a> (@tommyjackett) on Sep 18, 2018 at 3:40pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Mr Jackett, who is a former breakfast radio announcer and currently runs his own media company where he hosts <em>The Daily Talk Show </em>podcast, said he went down the 7-Eleven coffee “rabbit hole” when he noticed a line heading out the door on Bourke Street of people waiting to use the machine.</p> <p>“It blew me away how big it was getting,” he said. Jackett said he and his co-host “talk a lot about 7-Eleven coffee” on their podcast. “I drink long blacks from there all the time.”</p> <p>His love for the coffee persuaded him to grab a bag out of a 7-Eleven bin to find out where it comes from.</p> <p>“They’ve got their own blend of coffee, I saw the address of where they roast it in Preston,” he said.</p> <p>“I went to the coffee factory and asked them if I could buy a bag. They said they don’t sell it, but I got to talking with a lady who works there. It turns out the same place that does the 7-Eleven coffee also roast the McDonald’s beans.”</p> <p>A spokesman from 7-Eleven said that the convenience chain’s coffee was “outstanding value for customers and the simple $1, $2, $3 price points are based around industry standard cup sizes".</p> <p>“Depending on the product the customer selects, there are different ratios of coffee, hot milk and milk foam – proportionately more for each cup size – and of course the foam does settle over time, or when being re-poured as in this example,” he said.</p> <p>“One of the reasons we introduced other sizes is because our customers told us they wanted the convenience of a range of sizes to choose from. But customers are welcome to super-size the value they get from our coffee by purchasing three $1 coffees instead of the $3 size.”</p> <p>He then added that 7-Eleven would “also encourage filmmakers, and all our customers, to use our in-store cup recycling units and rescue their cups from ending up in landfill.”</p> <p>Are you a fan of 7-Eleven coffee? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Money & Banking

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Price hike: The cost of milk set to increase in Coles and Woolworths

<p>Supermarket giants Coles and Woolworths have announced that they will be hiking up the price of milk by 10 cents per litre, in the hopes that it helps struggling Australian farmers.</p> <p>Both stores have promised that the extra money will go directly to dairy farmers affected by the current drought.</p> <p>Yesterday, Woolworths said it would raise the price of its own brand of 3L milk to $3.30 today, and its special range of drought relief milk that hits shelves next month would be the same price.</p> <p>But many were outraged at Coles, as at that time, the supermarket had remained silent on the issue and had not agreed to get on board.</p> <p>“We’re calling for it across the whole of Australia on all milk. It’s a start, it’s not enough but the really sad fact is we haven’t heard a whisper from Coles,” dairy farmer Joe Bradley told the <em>Today</em> show.</p> <p>But a short while after, Coles had also announced that it will follow suit, introducing the exact same levy – 30 extra cents on its 3L milk.</p> <p>In a statement, Woolworths said it plans to work with dairy farmers to set up a drought relief committee that would provide independent oversight to ensure the extra 10 cents per litre goes to dairy farmers in drought-affected areas.</p> <p>To regulate where the money is going, representatives from the dairy industry and an independent auditor will sit on the committee.</p> <p>The milk will be available to purchase in Queensland, New South Wales, ACT and Victoria from mid-October “to help provide short-term relief".</p> <p>“There’s no doubt many dairy farmers are doing it tough in the face of the drought and we’re keen to support them through this difficult time,” Director of Woolworths Fresh Food, Paul Harker, said.</p> <p>“Many of our customers have told us they want to help and are willing to pay more for their milk to do so.”</p> <p>Until the drought-relief range hits stores, Woolworths will increase the price of its 3L milk, the most popular dairy item offered by the supermarket.</p> <p>Woolworths was recently involved in an ACCC inquiry into the nation’s dairy industry in the so-called milk wars.</p> <p>In a statement, Woolworths said it knew the 10-cent levy “won’t solve the wider structural issues facing the dairy industry, given Woolworths branded milk accounts for less than five per cent of Australia’s total milk production.”</p> <p>The supermarket is also asking shoppers to support other dairy brands who have already put measures in place to help drought-affected farmers.</p> <p>The decision comes after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a national drought summit will be held next month.</p> <p>Morrison said that putting plans in place for drought-relief was his top priority, as well as making sure communities are able to rebuild and start over.</p> <p>“That (summit) will provide an opportunity to get a status update on everything that is being done both at the state and commonwealth level,” he said.</p> <p>“We can’t make it rain but we can support those regional and local economies in those towns.”</p> <p>Do you support Woolworths' and Coles' decision? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Money & Banking

Entertainment

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The secret behind Hugh Jackman and Deborra-lee Furness' 22-year marriage

<p>Hollywood is notorious for short-lived marriages, but one celebrity couple seem to be pulling all the right strings after remaining committed for the last 22 years.</p> <p>Being a part of the minority of long-lasting marriages in Hollywood, Hugh Jackman recently shared the secret behind his 22-year union with his wife Deborra-lee Furness.</p> <p>The actor opened up about an agreement he and Deb, 62, made when they tied the knot back in 1996 in Toorak, Victoria.</p> <p>“When Deb and I got married, we made a pact that we would look at each other at every turning point in our lives and would ask ourselves if this is good or bad for our family,” the 49-year-old told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.who.com.au/" target="_blank">Who</a></em>.</p> <p>The Oscar-nominated actor also praised his wife for her selflessness towards him and their two children, Oscar, 18, and 13-year-old Ava.</p> <p>So much so, that Deb put her dream of accepting a place at her dream directing school to put Hugh’s career first.</p> <p>“There’s a time no-one knows about when I was offered<span> </span><em>Oklahoma</em><span> </span>in London and she was offered a spot at the prestigious directing school at the Victorian College of Arts – and that’s impossible to get into,” he explained.</p> <p>Despite Hugh insisting the pair stay in Australia, Deb was the one that made the push to go to London.</p> <p>“I never forgot her selflessness in saying that because I know she always wanted to direct, and that was a big moment for her,” he added.</p> <p>The couple celebrated their 22-year wedding anniversary earlier this year, with Hugh posting a touching tribute about Deb on his Twitter account, saying their connection “only gets deeper.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I believe in life we need to see and truly be seen by the most important people in our lives. Deb, from day one, we had that. 22 years later ... it only gets deeper. You and the kids are the greatest gift I will ever receive. I love you a gazillion times around the world. <a href="https://t.co/VsoDq4HxDw">pic.twitter.com/VsoDq4HxDw</a></p> — Hugh Jackman (@RealHughJackman) <a href="https://twitter.com/RealHughJackman/status/984032979411505153?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">11 April 2018</a></blockquote>

Movies

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The 10 best romance novels of all time

<p>Books in which man meets woman, man woos woman (or woman woos man), and man and woman live happily ever after are a dime a dozen. Enjoyable, for sure, but not what you'd call memorable. So, Reader’s Digest have come up with a list of 10 of the best romance novels that tell favourite, and timeless, love stories, each of which goes above and beyond basic romance.</p> <p>Whether it’s glimpsing 19th-century Russia in <em>Anna Karenina</em> or witnessing endless family drama on the Australian outback in <em>The Thorn Birds</em>, each of these fabulous books has something special.</p> <p>“These are much more than love stories; they are life stories,” says US Select Editions editor-in-chief Laura Kelly.<br /><br />“If you like a good love story, books are so much more satisfying than movies,” she continues.<br /><br />“Books take you into the minds of all the characters, where their hopes and dreams will really fire up your own imagination.”</p> <p><strong>1. <em>The Thorn Birds</em> by Colleen McCullough (1977)</strong></p> <p>Set in 1915 Australia, this remarkable saga chronicles the forbidden love between a beautiful, headstrong young girl and a priest.</p> <p>You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you’ll stay up way too late reading this fabulous story.</p> <p><strong>2.<em> Jane Eyre</em> by Charlotte Brontë (1847)</strong></p> <p>“Reader, I married him.” Charlotte Brontë’s gothic masterpiece, with its unyielding heroine, dashing love interest Mr. Rochester, creepy manor house, and foggy English countryside, has become synonymous with 19th-century romance.</p> <p>And writing love stories ran in the Brontë family – Charlotte’s sister Emily’s classic <em>Wuthering Heights</em> is also a strong contender for this list of best romance novels.</p> <p><strong>3. <em>This Is How You Lose Her</em> by Junot Díaz (2013)</strong></p> <p>Technically a collection of short stories, <em>This Is How You Lose Her</em> counts as a novel because the stories all somehow connect back to the same one character’s life.</p> <p>The impressive way the Pulitzer Prize-winning Díaz weaves together multiple love stories – happy and sad, fleeting and lasting – from all around the world makes this one of the best romance novels of the 21st century.</p> <p><strong>4. <em>The Notebook</em> by Nicholas Sparks (1996)</strong></p> <p>Nicholas Sparks has made a name for himself as the writer of some of the best romance novels in recent years.</p> <p>Though he’s written more than 20 books, his first has stood the test of time for a reason.</p> <p>Noah and Allie’s tear-jerking, decade-spanning story remains the wonderfully escapist romantic read it was 20 years ago.</p> <p><strong>5.<em> Call Me By Your Name</em> by André Aciman (2007)</strong></p> <p>Even if you’ve seen the Academy Award-winning film, this enchanting story of first love and self-discovery is still more than worth a read.</p> <p>Prepare to fall just as in love with the magnificent Italian setting as with the story of summer romance and intoxicating attraction.</p> <p><strong>6.<em> The French Lieutenant’s Woman</em> by John Fowles (1969)</strong></p> <p>A Victorian gentleman is engaged to a wealthy and suitable woman, but when he encounters a beautiful, mysterious woman rumoured to be the forsaken lover of a French lieutenant, he becomes utterly smitten.</p> <p>Truly magnificent entertainment.</p> <p><strong>7. <em>Beautiful Disaster </em>by Jamie McGuire (2012)</strong></p> <p>With an edgy, modern twist on the good-girl-meets-bad-boy theme, <em>Beautiful Disaster</em> has topped must-read romance lists for a reason.</p> <p>After reinventing herself just before college, Abby finds herself involved in a tantalising bet with her school’s resident tattooed player.</p> <p>Neither of them is prepared for the results.</p> <p><strong>8.<em> The Time Traveler’s Wife</em> by Audrey Niffenegger (2003)</strong></p> <p>Every love has its challenges, and while your husband being an unwitting time traveller may not be one you’re familiar with, this four-hanky tale will still tug on your heartstrings.</p> <p><strong>9. <em>Anna Karenina </em>by Leo Tolstoy (1877)</strong></p> <p>Trapped in a loveless marriage, Anna Karenina succumbs to temptation and embarks on a dangerous affair with the handsome Vronsky.</p> <p>Tragedy unfolds amid the canvas of 19th-century Russia, in the most famous of doomed love stories.</p> <p>A memorable and enduring classic.</p> <p><strong>10. <em>Outlander </em>by Diana Gabaldon (1991)</strong></p> <p>A powerhouse time-travel romance, this is the first in Gabaldon’s hugely successful series.</p> <p>Strong, beautiful Claire Randall leads a double life, married to a man in one century, with a lover in another century.</p> <p>Filled with humour, passion, wit and wonderful Scottish scenery, this is one fast read for a 600-plus page book.</p> <p>Enjoy the wallow!</p> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/book-club/10-best-romance-novels-all-time">Reader’s Digest</a></em></span><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><strong><em><u><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></u></em></strong><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Books

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Have a healthier relationship with your phone

<p>If you find yourself checking your phone several dozen times a day, don’t worry, it’s not quite your fault.</p> <p>Lots of apps and programs, especially social media apps, have been designed to capture your attention and make it difficult for you to put your phone down.</p> <p>Unfortunately, though, there’s a down side to all this connectivity.</p> <p>A study released last year showed that people with a longer average screen time, and those who used their phones close to bedtime, had poorer sleep quality.</p> <p>Another recent study, released in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the use of your phone in the wee hours of the morning could increase the chances of developing psychological issues such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.</p> <p>While the phone is undoubtedly important in our daily lives, we can all agree that we shouldn’t have to pay such a steep price for it in terms of compromising our health. It’s time to take some steps to cultivate a healthier relationship with our phones.</p> <p>Here are a few dos and don’ts: </p> <p><strong>DO</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Turn off app notifications</strong></li> </ul> <p>Every time a notification goes off, it serves as a trigger for us to immediately pick up our phones.</p> <p>Turning off notifications will ensure that we don’t constantly feel pressured to check what’s going on.</p> <p>If you must, just leave notifications on for chat functions so you don’t miss important messages.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Go grayscale</strong></li> </ul> <p>Setting your phone to grayscale can help you reduce the number of times you check it.</p> <p>This piece of advice comes from Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who co-founded The Center for Humane Technology.</p> <p>The reason behind this is that certain colours used by the apps, such as red and bright blue, subconsciously excite us and entice us to check our phones.</p> <p>By going grayscale, you lose such triggers.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Leave your phone behind</strong></li> </ul> <p>Spend some time physically apart from your phone.</p> <p>Start small by first leaving your phone in your bag when you work out at the gym, and work towards leaving your phone at home when you have a jog around the neighbourhood.</p> <p>After a while, you may get more comfortable with the idea of spending more time apart.</p> <p><strong>DON'T</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Charge your device in the bedroom</strong></li> </ul> <p>Alternatively, make sure your phone is out of reach or placed at the other end of the room.</p> <p>This makes sure that you don’t check it first thing in the morning before even getting out of bed.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Place your favourite app shortcuts on your home screen</strong></li> </ul> <p>With such quick access to these apps, you’ll be tempted to constantly check in.</p> <p>Instead, keep only important tools on your home screen and relegate the other apps to the back pages.</p> <p>This way, you have to type the app name and do a search whenever you want to launch it, which just might be enough to discourage you from using it.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/have-healthier-relationship-your-phone?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Technology

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Sally Field opens up about her controlling relationship with Burt Reynolds

<p>Sally Field is revealing more about her one-time relationship with the late Burt Reynolds in her new memoir, <em>In Pieces</em>.</p> <p>Released on Tuesday, the book exposed the pair's tumultuous relationship as Field described the actor – who she dated for several years since the beginning of 1977 – as controlling and distant.</p> <p>“By the time we met, the weight of his stardom had become a way for Burt to control everyone around him, and from the moment I walked through the door, it was a way to control me. We were a perfect match of flaws,” she wrote. “Blindly I fell into a rut that had long ago formed in my road, a pre-programmed behaviour as if in some past I had pledged a soul binding commitment to this man.”</p> <p>Reynolds, who first met Field on the set of <em>Smokey and the Bandit</em>, told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2015/11/burt-reynolds-on-career-bankruptcy-regrets" target="_blank">Vanity Fair</a> </em>in 2015 that Field was the “love of my life".</p> <p>“I was always flattered when he said that,” Field told Diane Sawyer on <em>Good Morning America</em>. “But he was a complicated man.”</p> <p>Field has previously spoken to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/books/sally-field-burt-reynolds-in-pieces-memoir.html" target="_blank"><em>The New York Times</em></a>, saying she was “glad” Reynolds wasn’t around to read her book. Reynolds died on September 6 at the age of 82.</p> <p>“This would hurt him,” she said in the interview last week. “I felt glad that he wasn’t going to read it, he wasn’t going to be asked about it, and he wasn’t going to have to defend himself or lash out, which he probably would have.”</p> <p>Field opened up about her dark past in her book as she revealed that she had been molested by her stepfather during her childhood, something that later on affected the relationship she shared with Reynolds.</p> <p>She told <em>The New York Times</em> that her time with Reynolds was “confusing and complicated, and not without loving and caring, but really complicated and hurtful to me.” </p>

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