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Stay younger for longer – why travelling is a must

<p>Seasoned travellers may understand the excitement of landing in a new city or country for the first time, and all the benefits that come from exploring new sights, sounds and tastes. But for those who have yet to embrace travel, the benefits might not be as obvious. For retired Australians, now is the perfect time to get travelling. With your work life behind you, and a new, relaxing chapter ahead, travel has numerous benefits.</p> <p>Make the most of your golden years, and maybe even delay the move to <span><a href="https://www.agedcareprepare.com.au/">aged care</a></span> a little longer with some local, or even international travel. In collaboration with Aged Care Prepare, here are a couple of reasons why travel can help you stay younger for longer.</p> <p><strong>Healthy body</strong></p> <p>We all know that increased physical activity helps keep your body in shape, and your blood pressure low, but regular travel helps your body even further. Studies have shown that by taking a complete break from your everyday environment through regular travel, you can make a positive impact on your risk of heart disease.</p> <p>The well-known <span><a href="https://www.framinghamheartstudy.org/">Framingham Heart Study</a></span><u>,</u> which began in 1948, took 5,209 participants and gathered information about their lifestyle and behaviour. The results of their 20-year study on women aged 45 to 64, found that those who took a holiday at least twice a year had a much lower risk of having a heart attack or heart-related death compared to women who only travelled every six years or so.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the results of a nine-year study on men found that those who took a holiday every year had 20 per cent less chance of a heart-related death than those who did not. These studies took into account previous health issues, as well as wealth, and concluded that travel was the factor that contributed to a decreased risk of heart-related issues.</p> <p>While travelling does increase the amount of daily activities you do, and keeps you in shape in the present, it also contributes to the long-term wellbeing of your heart. This is because it has a positive effect on stress levels. As you take time out from the daily routine, whether it be with family, friends or just your loved one, your body takes a well-deserved break from potentially stressful demands and activities.</p> <p><strong>Healthy mind</strong></p> <p>While travel increases physical activity, so too does it increase mental activity. Research from the <span><a href="https://globalcoalitiononaging.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/destination-healthy-aging-white-paper_final-web-1.pdf">Global Coalition on Aging</a></span> has found that travel provides a level of mental stimulation necessary for prolonged brain health. A walk in the park may lift your spirits, but travelling to an entirely new place, where your brain has to take in and process new sights, smells and cultures, challenges it at a cellular level. Challenging your brain in this way fights off the onset of brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, keeping your brain fitter for longer.</p> <p>Within this research, Dr. Paul D. Nussbaum, a clinical neuropsychologist and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery, states that, “Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behaviour that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.” Novelty is a brain stimulator, the perfect requirement in maintaining and improving cognitive health.</p> <p>Whether it’s a short local holiday to a new part of Australia every six months, or an annual or two-yearly trip to a new country, taking a break from the everyday has far-reaching benefits on your life. While it reduces any current feelings of stress and provides a new, stimulating experience, it also improves long-term heart and brain health.</p> <p><em>This is sponsored content brought to you in conjunction with </em><span><a href="https://www.agedcareprepare.com.au/"><em>Aged Care Prepare</em></a></span><em>. </em></p>

Retirement Life

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9 clever ways to make your kitchen safer

<p>No matter how prepared we are, there comes a point where we need to accept and work with the limitations and restraints of our bodies. The good news is, we can do this by removing any unnecessary strain required to perform everyday household tasks in our home, as well as eliminating or reducing risk factors like slippage or other hazards.</p> <p>If you find it difficult to manage regular day-to-day functions in the kitchen, you can use the following strategies to make using the hub of the home both a safer and more practical environment. When the kitchen is easier and safer to use, everyone can benefit from cooking healthy home-cooked meals like this <a href="https://www.hellofresh.com.au/recipes/mushroom-risotto-579eff2477d68df04d8b4568">delicious mushroom risotto</a>.</p> <p>Here are 9 ways you can make the kitchen safer and easier to use.</p> <p><strong>1. Install easy-hold handles on doors and cabinets</strong></p> <p>As we age and become more fragile, what may seem like minor falls and bumps can result in injury or even death for some people. A fall that causes someone to seriously injure themselves often results from them failing to hold onto a surface they’ve leveraged their weight against.</p> <p>A common-sense approach to reduce the risk of this happening in the kitchen is to invest in easy-hold handles that can easily replace existing handles. These easy-hold handles are designed to be non-slip so anyone with wet hands can still maintain a strong grip.</p> <p><strong>2. Adjust the height of the dishwasher</strong></p> <p>If you would like to continue using and <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/home-garden/the-ultimate-guide-to-stacking-your-dishwasher">stacking the dishwasher</a>, then it’s a smart idea to raise the height of it so there’s no need to bend as much. It’s no secret that back problems are a common issue as we age, so this strategy can do you a lot of good.</p> <p><strong>3. Remove carpets and rugs</strong></p> <p>While carpets and rugs can look and function beautifully as furnishings in your home, they present a significant hazard to anyone in wheelchairs or who have difficulty walking. We can often slip on loose or soft surfaces, and wheelchairs can get tangled in the frayed textiles.</p> <p><strong>4. Install brighter light bulbs</strong></p> <p>Visibility is another area that’s important for safety in a kitchen, particularly as our eyesight naturally deteriorates over our lifetime. The utility of brighter lights is pretty obvious; it will mean having an easier time seeing what we’re doing and are less likely to injure ourselves with a misstep.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828022/hello-fresh-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9b78d95992f449b6a5a10e9ba6fb7df1" /></p> <p><strong>5. Invest in appliances that can turn themselves off automatically</strong></p> <p>Ever feel like you may have forgotten to switch off the stove or some other appliance and you might burn the house down? Even things like kitchen sink faucets can pose a significant risk if left running, as they could wet the floor and create a trip hazard.</p> <p>This is why it’s a good idea to invest in <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/the-13-kmart-kitchen-item-shoppers-are-loving">new kitchen items</a> that are able to automatically switch themselves off after they detect a period of inactivity. These features are also great because they help reduce power and water wastage, reducing utility bills.</p> <p><strong>6. Adjust the height of countertops</strong></p> <p>Just like the dishwasher, countertops can be raised or lowered to a more convenient height for anyone that may require the use of a wheelchair or need to be seated whilst performing certain tasks in a kitchen. It can also be useful to modify the edges of the countertops with distinct colours so that anyone with poor vision can distinguish certain areas of the kitchen.</p> <p><strong>7. Install anti-slip flooring</strong></p> <p>Marble or tiled flooring is popular in many kitchens for its aesthetic quality, but it actually presents a big slip risk hazard. When these slick surfaces get wet, they become a major accident waiting to happen for anyone with unsure footing.</p> <p><strong>8. Install extra railings and hand bars</strong></p> <p>While they aren’t the most aesthetically pleasing home inclusions, assistive bars and <a href="https://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Temporary-Handrail-System">handrail systems</a> have saved lives and shouldn’t be overlooked. Basically, you can install extra surfaces that you can grip around the kitchen so that you can more easily and confidently navigate the space.</p> <p><strong>9. De-clutter the kitchen</strong></p> <p>Removing unnecessary things from the kitchen can make it safer to use, as there will simply be less opportunities for something to go wrong. The biggest benefit is that you create more physical space to move around in, meaning you are less likely to bump into something.</p> <p>Built-in appliances, such as a microwave that’s built into a cabinet nook, are great as they free up some surface space on the countertops. All of this means less hazards are present and there’s less risk of something going wrong.</p>

home & Garden

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Why these 2 people are suspected to be baby Archie’s godparents

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The next time royal fans and watchers will get to see Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor will be at his christening in July.</p> <p>A question that continues to loom is who exactly the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will choose to be their first child’s godparents?</p> <p>Royal biographer Angela Levin believes it is likely the new parents will opt for two people Prince Harry relied on during his younger years when he experienced some of the most difficult times of his life.</p> <p>Back in 1996 when his parents Prince Charles and Princess Diana divorced, and later in 1997 when his mother passed away.</p> <p>“I think there are two people who were in Harry's life who saved him when his mother died or when his parents divorced,” Levin explained to Yahoo's, <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://uk.style.yahoo.com/tagged/royal-box/?guccounter=1&amp;guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&amp;guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAI-3SnxF9NQzWUesJZDAHy3OMjQn7IG4DRV12zoWkUpCQ6iJyDNPBAiGsfYeL8Y_ZTCne-Xy4OaEBIw7ZZ33i6I9s_Ib8EUk9KGpDmOsOr9LdscmCrq6B9mh_Qrj9pSR9ahUtKGJYLvyRXDuhQAQujsvj6f-7DXlJoDxxSuvvVEa" target="_blank">The Royal Box.</a></em></p> <p>“One is Tiggy and the other is Mark Dyer, who took over as a sort of male nanny – a grown-up, male nanny.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828034/harry.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/037bfe404d9740ab9a226f5a1cd472fb" /><em>Mark Dyer and Prince Harry</em></p> <p>In the '90s, Mark Dyer was appointed as Prince Harry’s “equerry” or “surrogate father” and accompanied the royal to Africa following the tragic death of Princess Di.</p> <p>It is believed this safari trip is what sparked a love for Africa in the Prince, who even took Duchess Meghan to the continent when they had first started dating.</p> <p>Tiggy Legge-Bourke is another fixture in Prince Harry’s life as she joined the royal household in 1993 and served as a nanny to both the princes until 1999 and was a comfort to them while they felt the loss of their mother.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.3333333333333px;" src="/media/7828033/harry-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/247452ddc9f44900929dde07440846df" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Tiggy Legge-Bourke and Prince Harry</em></p> <p>Their close relationship is apparent, even going as far to make both Prince William and Prince Harry godfathers to her two sons: Fred and Tom.</p> <p>It is speculated Archie will be christened at St George’s Chapel in Windsor, where his parents were married in 2018.</p> <p>The ceremony is likely to be conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

family & Pets

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Workers exposed to unsafe radiation at Sydney nuclear facility

<p>Production has been halted at a newly opened nuclear facility in Sydney’s Lucas Heights after two workers were exposed to an unsafe amount of radiation.</p> <p>The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has confirmed production was stopped at its $168 million nuclear medicine facility after three of its staff were “attended to by radiation protection personnel” following a contamination on a container carrying Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) on Friday morning.</p> <p>Initial assessments found that two of those workers were exposed to “a radiation dose above the statutory limit”.</p> <p>“Early calculations indicate that the radiation dose received by two of the workers involved in medicine processing was equivalent to that of a conventional radiation therapy treatment,” an <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-24/lucas-heights-nuclear-facility-workers-exposed-to-radiation/11242278" target="_blank">ANSTO spokesperson said</a>.</p> <p>“An occupational physician will continue to provide ongoing observation. All three workers involved are receiving ongoing support from ANSTO.”</p> <p>The spokesperson said an investigation is underway, and the manufacturing of their Mo-99 would take place at other facilities in the meantime.</p> <p>The incident came less than two weeks after ANSTO was granted a licence to enter into full production of Mo-99, which is the parent isotope of Technetium-99m used in hospitals and nuclear medicine centres to diagnose a range of heart, lung, organ and muscular-skeletal conditions.</p> <p>It is the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jun/24/two-workers-exposed-to-unsafe-radiation-dose-at-lucas-heights-nuclear-facility" target="_blank">second contamination scare</a> at the Lucas Heights facility in recent months. In March, three employees were taken to the hospital after being exposed to a sodium hydroxide spill.  </p>

Caring

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"I never saw any evidence of marriage": New book claims Donald and Melania Trump lead separate lives

<p>A new book on Donald Trump has claimed that he and his wife Melania Trump live separate lives, with the 45th US President and First Lady only remaining together out of an arrangement.</p> <p>Following his commercially successful expose <em>Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House</em>, Michael Wolff has released another book on Trump’s presidency.</p> <p>In new book <em>Siege: Trump Under Fire</em>, Wolff claims that the speculations surrounding the First Lady – including rumours of a body double, an extended hospital stay, delayed relocation to the White House and multiple on-record slip-ups – are indications that the Trumps’ relationship is merely for publicity purposes.</p> <p>Wolff told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/world/north-america/inside-the-trump-marriage-michael-wolff-book-claims-donald-and-melania-lead-separate-lives/news-story/782af09528c7696217d116fd1460ff7d"><em>The Australian</em></a> that the couple’s marriage is a “deal” that is akin to the rumoured relationship contract between Hollywood stars Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes.</p> <p>The book, which cites more than 100 sources, features Trump’s former director campaign and adviser Steve Bannon. </p> <p>“I never saw any evidence of a marriage,” Bannon said as quoted in the book. </p> <p>He told Wolff that most mentions of the First Lady “drew a puzzled look from Trump, as if to say, ‘How is she relevant?’”</p> <p>Wolff also claimed that the First Lady’s delayed move from New York to the White House also spoke volumes.</p> <p>“Indeed, a distraught Melania, repeatedly assured by her husband during the campaign that there was no possibility he would win, had originally refused to move to Washington,” Wolff wrote.</p> <p>“And, in fact, the First Lady was not really in the White House. It had taken Melania almost six months to officially relocate from New York to Washington, but that was in name only.”</p> <p>However, many news outlets have expressed doubts over the claims in Wolff’s new book. </p> <p>“The book is full of stuff that is lurid and sensational, but so dubious in its attributions that even in a review setting I’m afraid to repeat them,” wrote Matt Taibbi of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/michael-wolff-siege-book-taibbi-review-844398/" target="_blank"><em>Rolling Stone</em></a>.</p> <p>According to CNN political analyst Ryan Lizza, the book also contains “factual errors that mar the author’s credibility”.</p> <p>While Trump has not commented on the new <em>Siege</em> book, he rejected Wolff’s claims in <em>Fire and Fury</em>, describing the book as “the Fake Book of a mentally deranged author, who knowingly writes false information”.</p>

Books

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5 films not to miss from the 2019 Sydney Film Festival

<p>A “top five” list from a major film festival will inevitably annoy many people, because, by necessity, there are many films that one is not able to see, and the scheduling at this year’s Sydney Film Festival involved significant clashes.</p> <p>Still, perhaps the best thing about large film festivals is that they make people watch films they normally wouldn’t. Of the 30 or so I did catch, there were fewer spectacular ones - and notably, fewer duds - than in years past. Here are my five stand-outs.</p> <p><strong>1. School’s Out</strong></p> <p>Directed by Sébastien Marnier, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7175992/">School’s Out</a> was my pick for best film at the festival. The narrative follows Pierre (Laurent Lafitte), a substitute teacher who takes over a class of elite students at a French private school, after the suicide of their teacher in the film’s opening scene. What begins as mere attitude from the arrogant students, led by Apolline (brilliantly played by Luàna Bajrami in her first feature film), turns into something more menacing as the film progresses.</p> <p>For the most part, the film is told from Pierre’s point of view, and this creates a sense of claustrophobic paranoia as he feels increasingly threatened by his students. We can never quite put our finger on the reason for this and this interplay between his sense of danger and the objective perspective of the other teachers regarding the saintliness of the elite students drives the tension.</p> <p>The whole thing is undergirded by a deep ecological anxiety that endows the film with a sense of significance greater than the ostensible clash between a teacher riven with an inferiority complex and his precocious students. It is as if we are watching a staging of the struggle between entrenched power, which continues to destroy the planet, and the nihilistic youth who are in tune to this, following their final, fatal attempts to do something about it.</p> <p>This thematic material is engaging enough. But it is the sheer control with which Marnier manages the tension and manipulates the viewer (whilst avoiding thriller cliches) that makes School’s Out a masterpiece. A magnificently wrought, flawless film, it also happens to be incredibly engaging at an affective level.</p> <p><strong>2. Bacurau</strong></p> <p>The “people hunting people for sport” sub-genre has produced some of the most disturbing – and effective – films in genre cinema, dating back to The Most Dangerous Game of 1932. Cornel Wilde’s The Naked Prey (1965) remains one of the best, as does John Woo’s Hard Target (1993), one of the only genuinely good Jean-Claude Van Damme films. <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2762506/?ref_=rvi_tt">Bacurau</a>, an excellent genre thriller from Brazilian writer-directors Juliano Dornelles and Kleber Mendonça Filho, marks another entry on this continuum.</p> <p>Set sometime in the near future, the film revolves around a hamlet of the same name in the sertão in north-east Brazil. The inhabitants notice that Bacurau has disappeared from GPS mapping. This is quickly followed by a series of murders of the inhabitants, the victims of a squad of mercenary killers led by Michael (played by the inimitable Udo Kier). Most of these killers are from the US, and, whilst there are political motivations underpinning their invasion of the town, they seem to be mainly doing this for the fun of it (which includes only hunting with old-fashioned weapons such as Tommy Guns!).</p> <p>The inhabitants catch wind of the situation pretty quickly, and, led by guerrilla freedom fighter Lunga (Silvero Pereira), organise their resistance to the coloniser, which, needless to say, involves a great deal of blood. The second half of the film, channelling the films the directors clearly love in staging this struggle (ie those made by Sam Peckinpah and John Carpenter), is more effective than the first half, which is a little meandering in its kind of loose, new wave style.</p> <p>It is an extremely violent – and extremely funny – film, with bad taste aplenty. And this will, surely, alienate many viewers. But Bacurau will not disappoint those of us who like trashy genre films.</p> <p><strong>3. The Brink</strong></p> <p>The Brink follows alt-right puppeteer Steve Bannon, after his dismissal as Trump’s Chief Strategist, as he sets about fostering a populist, anti-immigration movement uniting Europe and the US in the lead up to the US congressional election of 2018. Filmmaker Alison Klayman is given extremely close access to Bannon, and we see him strategising in meetings with European leaders of far-right parties, in “fly-on-the-wall” style – there is no clear exposition, and no talking heads and voice-overs here.</p> <p>The viewer (like Klayman) simply accompanies Bannon throughout his self-styled campaign. The intimacy she is granted is, perhaps, testament to Bannon’s vanity - he and his team are very open about their activities (for instance, they laugh at a supporter’s house at one point), and he does seem to be performing for the camera a lot of the time.</p> <p>What is particularly interesting, though, is the insight the film gives into Bannon and his motivations. Often presented as a kind of fringe lunatic and extreme right zealot in the popular media, Bannon is revealed here as little more than a cynical Machiavellian who will do whatever he can to maintain his power – and class privilege. (Like Trump, he pretends he is an outsider who appeals to blue collar workers but most of his support comes from white collar workers. He is, after all, the ex vice-president of Goldman Sachs, and was educated at elite universities.)</p> <p>We see, perhaps more than anything, how Bannon relies on personal charm, irony and humour to try to disarm his critics and opponents. Bannon appears as a man desperate to be liked – a bit of a loner, a nerd – unwilling to face any direct confrontation or challenge of his views. When a Guardian reporter, for example, challenges his antisemitic rhetoric, Bannon responds by touching the man’s arm and trying to laugh it off in a blokey way.</p> <p>The Brink offers a thrilling, energising insight into political strategy. To call Bannon deceptive – or to moralise about his actions – would be to miss the point. The film suggests Bannon’s aim is to consolidate power, and the ways he goes about this reveal important lessons for anyone interested in politics and populism.</p> <p><strong>4. The Mountain</strong></p> <p>American indie director Rick Alverson’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7950334/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">latest film</a> is an exquisitely photographed and scored exercise in weirdness featuring Jeff Goldblum as a kind of snake-oil salesman who drives around the American west in the 1950s hawking lobotomies and electroshock therapy treatments to willing hospitals. Andy (Tye Sheridan), a young man with his own mental health issues, is employed as his photographer, visually documenting his surgeries and his patients’ experiences.</p> <p>There is an eerie starkness to the film – the white of winter snow (with faint echoes of The Shining), of lab coats, of asylum walls – that grounds its at times heavy-handed attempts at strangeness.</p> <p>Although a little pretentious in places, The Mountain is so beautifully made, and the story offers such an effective mixture of comedy and horror, that it is one of the strongest “strange cinema” films of recent years. At the same time, The Mountain, for all its hammy weirdness, does mark an effective intervention into narratives of medical progress through its measured depiction of the brutal treatment of mental illness in America.</p> <p><strong>5. God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya</strong></p> <p>Despite the irritating title (which perhaps works better in its native language, Macedonian), <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8054608/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1">God Exists, Her Name is Petrunya</a> is a delightful parable from Macedonian writer-director Teona Strugar Mitevska. Set in a small Macedonian town, the film follows the social ostracism and persecution of unemployed Petrunya (Zorica Nusheva), when she wins a religious game traditionally played by men involving the retrieval of a cross cast by a priest into a freezing cold river. She is hounded by police, representatives of the Church, and an increasingly violent mob of men, yet refuses to return the cross to the Church.</p> <p>Her persecution is in tandem with journalist Slavica (played by the director’s sister, Labina Mitevska) and her attempts to present the hapless Petrunya as some kind of champion of womens’ rights, a modern day feminist martyr suffering for gender equality in the Balkans.</p> <p>Despite the incisive points the film makes about small town politics in general, it has a whimsical and gentle humour. Every image is beautifully framed, and realised with a subtlety rare in films on the festival circuit. Remarkably, the film is based on real events that happened in the town in which it is set and shot.</p> <p><strong>And the rest</strong></p> <p>There are, of course, several other excellent films that screened at the festival. Some of these, like Meeting Gorbachev, Werner Herzog’s latest documentary, could easily have been in the top five. Herzog’s study of the Soviet leader shows his usual cruel and absurd brilliance. It interweaves footage from 1980s USSR and US with commentary about the fall of the Soviet Union and contemporary interviews with Gorbachev himself and figures from the time who worked against or alongside him.</p> <p>Peter Strickland’s In Fabric – a demented tale involving a coven-like department store and a demonic red dress – could also feature in the top five, and is definitely something to watch and re-watch.</p> <p>Other highlights included the anime film Children of the Sea – typically enigmatic, and great to watch on a big screen – the bloody and comical horror thriller Come to Daddy, starring Elijah Wood as a son returning to his prodigal father, the intense, extremely well-made French cop thriller Les Misérables, the ambitious Australian medieval fantasy, Judy and Punch, the sentimental but effective film from Emilio Estevez about the position of the public library in an America of have-nots, The Public, and Pedro Almodovar’s Pain and Glory, a stately reflection on ageing with Antonio Banderas playing a subdued filmmaker reflecting on his childhood and career.</p> <p>The only real disappointment was Claire Denis’ High Life, a space film starring Robert Pattinson and Juliette Binoche that seemed to confuse being obscure with being interesting. This film has all the right elements. Its premise is great – deep space experiments into sexual reproduction involving death row inmates – as is its cast (and budget). But nothing really works, and, aside from a moderately interesting final 20 minutes or so, the whole thing was something of a bore.</p> <p>One of the annoying aspects of festivals playing across multiple screens – and Sydney has been expanding its number of screens in recent years – is that one seldom gets to see everything one wishes to see. Some of the bigger films I missed, this year, which are, from all reports, excellent, include: Thomas Vinterberg’s submarine thriller, Kursk, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s Never Look Away, Korean auteur Joon-ho Bong’s Parasite – which won the festival prize – the Mongolian thriller Öndög, and the Jim Jarmusch zombie film The Dead Don’t Die.</p> <p>Most of these will see general theatrical release in Australia, so perhaps festival tickets are better used catching films otherwise impossible to see on a big screen.</p> <p><em>Written by Ari Mattes. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/five-films-not-to-miss-from-the-2019-sydney-film-festival-118775"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Movies

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Circular fashion: Turning old clothes into everything from new cotton to fake knees

<p>Australia has a fashion problem. More than <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-28/the-price-of-fast-fashion-rivers-turn-blue-tonnes-in-landfill/8389156">500,000 tonnes</a> of clothing waste is sent to landfill each year. But a new way of recycling could redirect some of our unwanted textiles from polluting the environment, by repurposing cotton waste into anything from new clothes to prosthetic knees.</p> <p>Developed by our team at Deakin University, where we work on designing materials and processes for a circular economy, this solution for recycling textiles involves dissolving cotton and regenerating it into brand-new cellulose – a complex, strong carbohydrate with many industrial uses.</p> <p>With the textile industry generating so much waste, the only way to keep up with the demands set by fashion trends and the wear and tear of our clothes is to make the industry sustainable.</p> <p><strong>The cost of clothes</strong></p> <p>Textile waste <a href="http://worldwearproject.com/about-us/global-responsibility">consumes nearly 5% of all landfill space</a>, and 20% of all freshwater pollution is a result of <a href="https://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/timber/meetings/2018/20180716/UN_Partnership_on_Sustainable_Fashion_programme_as_of_6-7-2018.pdf">textile treatment and dyeing</a>. Growing cotton requires harmful pesticides and fertilisers, and textile-manufacturing plants release hazardous waste into the nearby land.</p> <p>Synthetic dyes also come at a cost to the environment. The dyeing process involves a lot of water, and not all of it is efficiently cleaned before re-entering our environment.</p> <p>Waste water from textile dyeing can affect the entire water ecosystem. This is because some dyes don’t ever degrade in water. Those that do degrade produce harmful byproducts – sometimes carcinogenic.</p> <p>Importantly, despite the energy and resources used in the production process, not all cotton produced makes it into our clothes. Around <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/263055/cotton-production-worldwide-by-top-countries/">23.6 million tonnes</a> of cotton is produced each year, but the weight of stems, leaves and lint from the plant amounts to <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0144861714006973">18-65% of each bale of cotton</a>.</p> <p>From what is left, even more cotton fibre is lost in the process of spinning cotton buds into yarn because some fibres break during spinning. Some of this raw material waste can be used to make products such as soaps, animal feed or cotton seed oil, but the rest is thrown away.</p> <p>Wasted raw cotton material aside, it can take nearly <a href="https://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/the-impact-of-a-cotton-t-shirt">2,700 litres of water</a> to produce a single cotton T-shirt and more than <a href="https://stephenleahy.net/2014/10/07/sneak-peak-of-my-new-book-your-water-footprint/">7,600 litres</a> to make a pair of jeans.</p> <p>It’s no wonder that we want greener clothes!</p> <p><strong>How we’re closing the cotton circle</strong></p> <p>To counter the fast-fashion industry, circular fashion is taking off. Textile waste can now be recycled into usable products.</p> <p>Cotton fibres are almost purely comprised of cellulose and can therefore be turned into other cellulose-based products.</p> <p>At Deakin University’s Institute for Frontier Materials we have developed a chemical-based recycling process to produce high-quality, regenerated cellulose from cotton.</p> <p>The regenerated cellulose can be used in many ways. It can be used in textile manufacturing again, in the production of cellophane and paper, insulation and filtration, or in biomedical applications such as drug delivery and tissue engineering.</p> <p>Cotton waste has traditionally been recycled through a mechanical process that produces <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921344907002078">poorer-quality recycled cotton</a>. Only a small fraction of recycled cotton could be incorporated into new garments.</p> <p>But our recycling process dissolves the cotton waste and regenerates it as cellulose. Even cotton-blended fabrics, such as cotton-polyester blends, can be recycled in this process, so nothing goes to waste.</p> <p>This regenerated cellulose has many different possible uses. It can be spun into a textile fibre similar to native cotton or used to make aerogels – synthetic, ultralight materials comprised of a network of micron-sized pores and nanoscale tunnels.</p> <p>The aerogels produced from our recycling process can be moulded into a structure almost identical to cartilage in the joints of the body. We manipulate the size and distribution of tunnels to mould the aerogel within into synthetic cartilage with an ideal shape to replace damaged knee cartilage in arthritic patients.</p> <p>While we haven’t used them in patients yet, we’ve found that the aerogels have a remarkable similarity to cartilage tissues when tested. They can replicate the type of lubrication mechanism used by cartilage in joints to protect against wear and damage.</p> <p><strong>Rescuing dyes</strong></p> <p>We can also shred cotton fabrics and mill them into coloured powders to dye new clothes. Since 2017, many Chinese factories that produced synthetic dyes for textiles <a href="https://www.sciencealert.com/china-shutting-40-factories-massive-effort-cut-pollution-carbon-pm2-5">were shut down</a> following environmental inspections, highlighting the need for change in dyeing practices.</p> <p>We need new textile dyeing methods that save water, reduce pollutants, save energy and protect human health.</p> <p>Our recycling process offers an environmentally friendly alternative. This process not only gives purpose to old clothing, but also eliminates much of the energy and water involved in the normal dyeing process.</p> <p>We are rescuing denim and other cotton-based clothes from landfill to create cellulose fibres, aerogels and dyes from 100% of the waste.</p> <p>Textile waste is a global challenge with significant environmental issues. We’ve created a recycling solution to tackle this pollution head-on.</p> <p><em>Written by Catriona Vi Nguyen-Robertson and Nolene Byrne. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/circular-fashion-turning-old-clothes-into-everything-from-new-cotton-to-fake-knees-115636"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

beauty & Style

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Sarah Ferguson reunites with Prince Andrew at Royal Ascot – and shares royal secret

<p>Sarah Ferguson has added a colourful flair to royal life – from her outfit choices to her relationship rollercoaster with Prince Andrew, 59.</p> <p>It would be easy to assume the royal could tell a few juicy stories about her life as a member of one of the world’s most well-known and documented families.</p> <p>However, one secret the Duchess of York is ready to tell has little to do with her and instead is an in-depth look into one of the royal family’s most heart-wrenching tragedies.</p> <p>Almost two centuries since the death of the Queen’s great-great-great grandmother Princess Louise – mother to Queen Victoria’s husband Prince Albert – a history of the royal’s sad and troubled life has been documented by Fergie.</p> <p>The Princess was separated from her two young sons and banished to a German hamlet where she would never be allowed to see her children again.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828019/princess-louise-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0223f29a543140f4b6f2a3dbc79d360a" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Princess Louise</em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">In an exclusive interview with <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/royalty/2019062374448/sarah-ferguson-exclusive-interview-hello-documentary/" target="_blank">Hello</a>!</em>, Sarah revealed she has made a documentary in Germany with the aim of uncovering Princess Louise’s footsteps through historical archives, and a visit to her tomb.</p> <p>"She was discarded by her husband – Ernst I, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld – and sent to St Wendel," Sarah said.</p> <p>"Whatever she had done to upset Ernst – who it seems was tired and bored of her and wanted to divorce – to have to leave her two boys and never see them again was, for me, beyond words.</p> <p>"I wanted to know what Louise had done so terribly wrong that she should be taken from her children on that dank, rainy 26 August day – Albert's fifth birthday – put in a carriage, discarded and written out of history."</p> <p>During filming, the 59-year-old was hit with emotions, as her own mother, Susan Barrantes, left her family when she was just a young girl.</p> <p>"I just don't know what it would be like for me to not be with my girls. I really couldn't fathom it," the Duchess said, who is mother to Princess Beatrice, 30, and Princess Eugenie, 29.</p> <p>"One of the best things I've done with my life is that my daughters and I are like a tripod. The girls are very supportive of me and I am very supportive of what they do.</p> <p>"The key is to always be there, but never to wrap them in cotton wool. We work in unity and [ex-husband Prince] Andrew and I are focused on being good parents together.</p> <p>“We are bigger than friends. We learn from each other, support each other and understand it's about communication, compromise and compassion."</p>

Relationships

News

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Awkward interrogation: Lisa Wilkinson's brutal Israel Folau question on The Project

<p>The leader of the Australian Christian Lobby has faced an awkward interrogation from Lisa Wilkinson on <em>The Sunday Project</em>, as he refused to answer whether or not he agrees with sacked Wallabies star Israel Folau’s statement that gay people are going to hell.</p> <p>Martin Iles is responsible for the contentious and enormous crowd funding campaign that raised close to $700,000 for Folau’s legal proceedings against Rugby Australia and Rugby NSW.</p> <p>The controversial leader wasn’t expecting the line of questioning Lisa Wilkinson undertook as she asked what everyone at home was thinking.</p> <p>Folau was sacked from Rugby Australia in May after posting a homophobic rant on Instagram saying “hell awaits” for gay people. A tribunal found him guilty of a “high-level” breach of the organisation’s code of conduct, terminating him from his $4 million contract.</p> <p>He has retaliated by seeking up to $10 million in damages, and has launched legal proceedings in the Fair Work Commission.</p> <p>“Martyn, just quickly before we let you go – speaking of feeling marginalised, do you believe homosexuals go to hell?” asked Wilkinson.</p> <p>To which Iles responded: “Mainstream Christian belief on this is that all of us are born going to hell.</p> <p>“We’re all sinners and I don’t think it’s helpful to say that Israel Folau’s post targeted homosexuals – it didn’t,” he said.</p> <p>“I was on the list. I think each of us were on the list. We’re all sinners. We will be judged by God and we will be found wanting. I think that’s something that some Australians find offensive.</p> <p>“But it is actually a Christian belief which runs to the very heart, soul and core of Christianity. And yeah, we’ll be judged on our sexual behaviours. Me, as a straight man, will be judged on my sexual behaviours and found wanting.</p> <p>“And that’s what Israel was saying when he was talking about salvation in Jesus Christ available to all, and millions of Australians believe that. So if we want to argue about that set of beliefs, we should actually argue about it.</p> <p>“But I don’t think that the politically correct baseball bat should be wielded to do a guy out of a job, pull the rug from under his feet, get rid of his salary, then drag his name through the mud in the media. That’s not the kind of society I think we should live in to deal with issues like this.”</p> <p>His answer then triggered co-shot Hamish McDonald, who publicly came out as gay at the<span> </span><em>GQ</em><span> </span>Gentleman’s Ball earlier this month, as he asked, “I’m not clear what you think. Do you think homosexuals go to hell or not?”</p> <p>Iles replied: “I don’t think it’s that simple. I think we decline the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross, and will be judged.”</p>

News

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“Incredible human being”: Ash Barty’s heartwarming act after becoming World No. 1

<p>Instead of taking in her incredible achievement of becoming Australia’s first female World No.1 tennis player since 1973, Ash Barty’s immediate thoughts were with her defeated opponent.</p> <p>The pair put their special bond aside for a moment as they went head to head in Sunday’s final of the Birmingham Classic.</p> <p>The match ended in a stunning defeat for German Julia Goerges 6-3 7-5, leaving the Aussie athlete not only securing the world No. 1 ranking but also top-seeding status for Wimbledon starting on July 1.</p> <p>But despite her accomplishment, the 23-year-old remained humble as she paid tribute to her opponent in her victory speech.</p> <p>“I couldn’t think of a better person to share the court with,” she told Goerges, who was in tears.</p> <p>“You’re one of my best friends on tour and you’ve been there for me since I was a little ‘tacker’.”</p> <p>“She’s the most incredible human being with the most amazing team.”</p> <p>The dynamic duo then shared a heartwarming embrace, garnering praise from around the world.</p> <p>The tennis champion also had a slew of famous faces impressed by her performance, such as Hugh Jackman and Russell Crowe tweeting their congratulations.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Ash Barty. <br />#1. <br />Brilliant.</p> — Russell Crowe (@russellcrowe) <a href="https://twitter.com/russellcrowe/status/1142789849654673413?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 23, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Barty is the fifth Australian tennis player to be given the title of World No. 1 since 1973, when rankings were first introduced. She joins the likes of Evonne Goolagong Cawley, Pat Rafter, Lleyton Hewitt and John Newcombe.</p>

News

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The heartfelt reason why the royal family wore blue to Royal Ascot

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge made international headlines for her heavenly Elie Saab blue look for the very first day of Royal Ascot.</p> <p>The dreamy ensemble was not the only blue look we saw the royal members flaunt during the annual ceremony – Queen Elizabeth, Princess Eugenie, Princess Beatrice and Zara Tindall all wowed royal watcher with their striking blue outfits.</p> <p>The strange occurrence is not at all common within the royal family – as two members being seen in the same colour can be considered as a fashion faux pas.</p> <p>In fact, royals make a conscious effort to dress in strikingly different outfits so seeing five popular royal family members rocking the same vibrant colour is an extraordinary and rare event</p> <p>However, it has been revealed the colour choice was on purpose – and indeed for an incredibly heartfelt reason.</p> <p>The colour blue is believed to be a favourite of the Queen’s, as she wears the shade nearly three times more than any other, according to <em>Vogue</em>.</p> <p>The monarch chose to don the hue for 29 per cent of royal engagements in 2012.</p> <p>Royal insiders suggest the beautiful blue tone worn by five royals during Royal Ascot this year is a nod towards their ultimate Queen and grandmother.</p> <p>The colour blue also has history within the British Royal family, as it is a shade commonly associated with royalty, art, military, business and art.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the royal family members wearing heavenly blue during 2019 Royal Ascot.</p>

News

Travel

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An unforgettable pilgrimage to the world's oldest living city

<p>Throughout history, travellers who seek a sense of enlightenment and spirituality have found themselves drawn to the north Indian city of Varanasi.</p> <p>Mark Twain described Varanasi as “older than history, older than tradition, older even than legend and looks twice as old as all of them put together”.</p> <p>Varanasi, erstwhile known as Kashi, has been the hub of Indian culture, spiritualism and meditation since time immemorial. The city with its vibrant Ghats, narrow lanes, decorated boats and colourful bazaars presents a large canvas for siteseeing.</p> <p>Lying in the south of the Uttar Pradesh state, Varanasi is one of the world’s oldest living cities, as well as one of Hinduism’s holiest places. Having been continuously inhabited for more than 5,000 years, it has become a centre for Hinduism, just as Jerusalem is for Christianity and Mecca is for Islam.</p> <p>The city is situated by the sacred Ganges River, where locals and pilgrims from across the globe come to wash their sins away in the holy waters, pray, or lay the ashes of their loved ones to help them reach the heaven and escape the cycle of rebirth.</p> <p>The great river Ganges can also be explored by boat. One of the classic Ganges experiences includes watching the sunrise on a boat as the golden glow from the daybreak shines over the constructed riverbanks, the Ghats and the rest of the old city.</p> <p>Upon going back to the land, the Ghats will be alive as various groups of people go about their activities – priests performing rituals, bathers washing up and collecting sacred water, locals practicing meditation and yoga, and visitors strolling around the surrounding pavilions, palaces, temples and terraces that rise from the water’s edge.</p> <p>One of the most venerated temples is the Kashi Vishwanath Temple, which is dedicated to the presiding deity of the City of Lights, Lord Shiva. It is also known as the Golden Temple, as its dome and tower are coated in 800kg of gold plating. Out of the 12 jyotirlinga shrines around <span><a href="http://www.incredibleindia.com/">India</a></span>, Kashi Vishwanath is said to be the dearest to Shiva, as the city it presides in is said to be the point at which the first jyotirlinga – the fiery pillar of light by which Shiva manifested his supremacy over other gods – broke through the earth’s crust and flared towards the heavens. On holy days, devotees may spend 48 hours in lines to enter the temple in order to give offerings and touch the lingam for absolution of sins.</p> <p>Inside the same compound also lay the shrines of the wrathful protectors Mahakala and Dandapani, as well as the lingam of Avimukteshvara, the Lord of the unforsaken.</p> <p>On the way in to and out of the temple, visitors can go through the Vishwanath Gali, a street filled with market stalls to purchase pooja (prayer) items and sweets.</p> <p>From there, you can venture 10km northeast to Sarnath, one of the world’s most revered Buddhist pilgrimage centres. This is where Buddha came to preach his first sermon after achieving enlightenment at Bodh Gaya, on his way to Nirvana. Various stupas and structures of great historical significance, dating back to as far as the third century BC, stand on this serene village – the Chaukhandi Stupa, where Buddha met his first five disciples; the engraved Ashoka Pillar which marks foundation of Buddhist Sangha; and Dhamekh Stupa and monastery ruins with beautiful geometric carvings and brickwork from as old as 200 BC.</p> <p>Make your way back south to Tulsi Manas Mandir, a famous temple dedicated to Rama of the Ramcharitmanas, a retelling of Sanskrit epic Ramayana. The white marble walls are engraved with verses and scenes from the ancient Hindi tale, which was originally written at the site by Hindu Vaishnava saint and poet Goswami Tulsidas.</p> <p>Another site nearby is the Sankat Mochan Temple, one of the city’s oldest temples. Situated on the banks of river Assi, the temple was founded by Tulsidas and is dedicated to Lord Hanuman, another main character from the author’s epic.</p> <p>As the sun sets, stroll back to the Ghats to witness Ganga aarti, a religious prayer that takes place at dusk every day, be it rain, hail or shine. During the spiritual ceremony, a group of young, saffron-clad pandits (priests) hold up large brass lamps and move to the rhythm of chants and mantras in honour of the River Goddess Ganga. The heady scent from sandalwood fills the air as incense sticks are waved in elaborate patterns and flower Diyas (lights) are floated into the river.</p> <p>The lanes of Banaras form a maze parallel to the river, running between homes, palaces and places of worship. They run serpentine or jagged, rarely at right angles to each other, and only those born within them know their eccentricities by heart. They are paved with fine-grained sandstone quarried from the nearby hills of Chunar.<br />Walking through them, you lose your sense of time, place, and self, and are accompanied by a constant sense of discovery. </p> <p>Enjoy the life and hustle and bustle you see in every street of Varanasi.</p> <p><em><span>This is sponsored content brought to you in conjunction with India Tourism. </span></em></p>

International Travel

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3 simple cruise packing hacks you need to know

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Packing for a cruise may seem like the same ritual as it is for a holiday, however that couldn’t be further from the truth. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unlike resort getaways or adventure travelling, cruising can, for the most part, be a pretty isolated experience when thinking about how close your ship is to land. A quick trip to the local supermarket for a bottle of sunscreen and a floppy hat or a stop at the chemist to stock up on medicine is not possible when you are on a cruise if you are not willing to pay the hefty price tag.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So without further ado, here are some simple cruise packing hacks so you’re not left stranded without your swimmers or a spare pair of undies while you’re thousands of kilometres away from shore.  </span></p> <p><strong>1. Pack your carry-on like it is the only bag you’re taking on your trip</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise lines do warn travellers to pack similarly to this tip, however, many overlook it although they NEVER should. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">When you climb aboard, it is important to keep in mind that your carry on is mostly the only bag you’re allowed to keep with you when you first step on the cruise vessel as your big luggage filled with all your necessities are delivered to you by stewards. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While this may seem convenient, it means your bags may not get back to you for hours or even days (depending on the cruise line’s size and efficiency). </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So make sure you are prepared to go the distance with your small backpack, sun bag or mini suitcase. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A carry-on can be the lifesaver you didn't know you needed if your bags decide to take a vacation on their own. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Pack all sorts of outfits</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Packing for a cruise can be pretty straightforward but you must come prepared for any occasion because depending on the length of your stay on board, there will be plenty of festivities guests are welcome to dress up or down for. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So whip out those heels and the gorgeous gown you’ve been wondering if you’ll ever get to wear again and pull out the suave leather shoes because most cruise lines famously host “formal” nights which ask guests to dress to the nines. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Depending on the itinerary as well, cruisers will be asked to bring supplies and a special outfit for themed holiday nights such as “Mexican Fiesta” or “‘80s disco.”</span></p> <p><strong>3. Bring the jacket you didn’t think you would need</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">No matter how hard the sun promises it will beat down throughout your trip, it is always essential to bring a jacket as those long, drawn-out nights at sea can get pretty chilly. It can also be a lightweight jacket and a windbreaker just to ensure those heavy winds are no match against you. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Most importantly, be safe and don’t pack what you’re not allowed to.</span></p>

Cruising

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Mile high club: Pilot reveals the truth about what REALLY goes on

<p>Former navy pilot Chick McElwee started a company called Air Australia International that offers chartered flights, patient transfer and repatriation, as well as flight instruction.</p> <p>However, he offers something else that has piqued people’s interest – mile-high flights, which are f<span>lights where p</span><span>assengers are encouraged to have sex in the air, and they have sent his bookings through the roof.</span></p> <p>The idea came from someone making a passing comment about what the bed was for on board the plane.</p> <p>McElwee thought on his feet and didn’t mention it was for transporting unwell passengers, and said it was for couples wishing to join the mile-high club.</p> <p>He shared with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-advice/flights/air-australia-international-pilot-reveals-what-really-goes-on-during-milehigh-flights/news-story/09e39f25b41104efd5444920c9e6a8d4" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>: </p> <p>“I said we’d done about 25 flights,” the pilot recounted.  </p> <p>“And then, suddenly, we started getting heaps of inquiries.”</p> <p>He’s improved the original cabin design, but the basics are still there: a double bed with fresh linen and pillows, a bottle of champagne, chocolates and the privacy curtain drawn between the cabin and the cockpit.</p> <p>For those who are worried about the pilot hearing your rendezvous, you needn’t worry.</p> <p>“You don’t really hear anything because the engines are so loud,” McElwee said about piloting the mile-high flights, “but you do feel it move because the plane is balanced. So when people move back and forward – you feel it.”</p> <p>Air Australia’s mile-high club is open to anyone over the age of 18 and who has a spare hour and $750 to spend for the flight.</p> <p>McElwee’s passengers have included celebrities, sportspeople as well as glamour models.</p> <p>“The customer base is not what you think it is,” he laughs.</p> <p>The customer base in question includes a 70-year-old woman who has flown multiple times with her much younger lovers as well as a naked man who was so desperate for another bottle of champagne, he burst into the cockpit searching for one.</p>

International Travel

Health

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Ash Barty's injury setback: Pulls out of tournament one day after becoming World No. 1

<p>Australian tennis star Ash Barty has suffered a flare up of an existing arm injury and has withdrawn from the Eastbourne International to recover ahead of Wimbledon.</p> <p>The new World No. 1 female tennis player insists she will be fit to enter the line up as the number one seed for the event.</p> <p>"It's an injury I've had to manage since I was 16 years old," Barty said to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-25/ash-barty-pulls-out-of-eastbourne-to-rest-ahead-of-wimbledon/11243222" target="_blank">The ABC</a>.</p> <p>"It happens when I have a spike in load, it's just a bone stress injury and I need to look after it.</p> <p>"We know how to manage it but it is important to get on top of it straight away.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bx-lSOSoWRj/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bx-lSOSoWRj/" target="_blank">🔲 Black and white 🔲</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/ashbar96/" target="_blank"> Ash Barty</a> (@ashbar96) on May 27, 2019 at 12:33pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Barty was set to play her second-round match on Tuesday, but is instead taking it easy and is hoping to catch Australia’s Cricket World Cup clash with England at Lord’s instead.</p> <p>"If it works out, we'll try and get to the cricket, If not, we'll be watching on telly," Barty said at Devonshire Park on Monday.</p> <p>"I've been in touch with most of [the players]. I heard from JL [Justin Langer] yesterday and we've been in touch over the last few months.</p> <p>"Hopefully I can get there."</p> <p>However, Barty is aware that a potential injury flare up could impact her chances at Wimbledon.</p> <p>"I really need to look after it, particularly in the first few days.</p> <p>"We pulled out of the doubles [in Birmingham] to give it the best chance to be ready for singles.</p> <p>"It's about rest, time off court and then monitoring how many balls I do hit when I am on court.</p> <p>"It's just certain times of the year I need to be careful."</p>

Caring

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How imaginary friends from our childhood can continue to affect us as adults

<p>Crabby crab is my four-year-old son Fisher’s imaginary friend. Crabby appeared on a holiday in Norway by scuttling out of his ear after a night of tears from an earache. Like other childhood imaginary friends, Crabby should be an indication that Fisher’s mind <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-imaginary-friends-could-boost-childrens-development-108525">is growing and developing positively</a>. Indeed, research shows that invisible companions can help boost children’s social skills.</p> <p>But what happens when children grow up and their imaginary friends disappear? Will Crabby have influenced Fisher into adolescence or adulthood? And what if you continue to have imaginary friends as an adult? The <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/imaginary-companions-and-the-children-who-create-them-9780195146295?cc=gb&amp;lang=en&amp;">vast majority of the research</a> on imaginary friends looks at young children as this is the time when these playmates are most likely to appear. But researchers have started looking into the impact of imaginary childhood friends in adolescence and adulthood.</p> <p>Imaginary friends in childhood <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/archneurpsyc/article-abstract/646325">are classified</a> as invisible beings that a child gives a mind or personality to and plays with for over three months.</p> <p>It is very rare that adults have imaginary companions. But there are a few different types of behaviour that could be considered a form of imaginary friendship. For example, adult authors can be seen as prolific creators of imaginary friends in the form of characters. That’s because their characters <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.2190/FTG3-Q9T0-7U26-5Q5">have personalities and minds of their own</a>, and authors often report their characters leading the writing rather than vice versa. Tulpas, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulpa">objects created</a> through spiritual or mental powers in mysticism, are also a sort of imaginary friend.</p> <p><strong>Social skills in adolescence</strong></p> <p>Research has shown that the positive effects of having imaginary friends as a child continue into adulthood. Adolescents who remember their imaginary playmates have been found to use <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/12097456_Dear_Kitty_you_asked_me_Imaginary_companions_and_real_friends_in_adolescence">more active coping styles</a>, such as seeking advice from loved ones rather than bottling things up inside, like their peers. Even adolescents with behavioural problems who had imaginary friends as children have been found to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20677857">have better coping skills</a> and more positive adjustment through the teenage years.</p> <p>Scientists think this could be because these teens have been able to supplement their social world with imagination rather than choosing to be involved in relationships with more difficult classmates. It could also be because the imaginary friends help to alleviate these adolescents’ loneliness.</p> <p>These teens are also are more likely to <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-03619-001">seek out social connections</a>. Some older research suggests that such adolescents have higher levels of psychological distress than their peers who do not remember having imaginary playmates. But the majority of research being done points to mainly positive outcomes. Current research being done now by my student, <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Tori_Watson">Tori Watson</a>, is taking this evidence and looking at how adolescents who report having imaginary friends as children deal with bullying at school. We suspect that teens who remember their imaginary friends will be better at dealing with bullying.</p> <p><strong>Creativity and hallucinations</strong></p> <p>Adults who had imaginary friends, meanwhile, report that <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/47348555_The_personality_correlates_of_adults_who_had_imaginary_companions_in_childhood">they are more creative and imaginative</a> than those who did not. We also know that they are <a href="http://dro.dur.ac.uk/18217/">better at describing a scene</a> that they have constructed in their imagination. This could be because they were more imaginative to start with and/or that playing with an imaginary friend in childhood helped boost such capabilities.</p> <p>There are also other discrepancies in how adults see and interact with the world around them that scientists think stems from the use of imagination when playing with an invisible friend as a child. For example, adults who had imaginary friends <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-09526-001">talk to themselves more</a>. This is thought to be because they have grown up being more comfortable talking when no one else real is around. Interestingly, research has shown that talking to yourself <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-talking-to-yourself-a-sign-of-mental-illness-an-expert-delivers-her-verdict-77058">can be a sign of high cognitive functioning</a> and creativity.</p> <p> </p> <p>Adults who had imaginary companions as children may become used to seeing things that aren’t really there and explaining them to people. For this reason, imaginary friends have been looked at as a type of hallucination that is experienced by normally developing children. Importantly, the children know that these friends <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17995485">aren’t actually real</a>. Adults similarly can have hallucination experiences when going in or coming out of a deep sleep. We sometimes also see or hear things that aren’t there, for example in the corner of our eye – knowing it’s our mind playing tricks on us.</p> <p>My team and I recently investigated whether people who had imaginary friends as children also report more such hallucination experiences. Interestingly, our study, <a href="https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/adult-report-of-childhood-imaginary-companions-and-adversity-rela">published in Psychiatry Research</a>, found that this actually is the case. Importantly, these individuals were not a greater risk of developing psychosis or schizophrenia, they were just more likely to have common forms of hallucinations. We know that because we also tested other perceptual experiences like unusual thoughts and ideas as well as symptoms of depression. These experiences, in combination with more intense hallucinations, can put people at higher risk of developing schizophrenia.</p> <p>But people who had had imaginary friends didn’t show this combination of symptoms. There was one exception, though – individuals who had also suffered child abuse. These people were more likely to have both unusual thoughts and ideas, and depression, possibly making them more vulnerable to psychosis. It’s unclear whether this link has got anything to do with imaginary friends or whether it is all down to the trauma of having suffered child abuse, with imaginary friends instead playing a comforting role.</p> <p>So while we know a lot about childhood imaginary friends such as Crabby Crab, and the positive effects they can have, there is still a lot to learn about imaginary friends and how our childhood experiences with them might make us see the world differently.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/113064/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Paige Davis, Lecturer in Psychology, York St John University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/how-imaginary-friends-from-our-childhood-can-continue-to-affect-us-as-adults-113064"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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What you can do to resist fake news

<p>Although the term itself is not new, fake news presents a growing threat for <a href="https://qz.com/africa/1473127/africas-fake-news-problem-is-worse-than-in-the-us/">societies across the world</a>.</p> <p>Only a <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0207383" title="Information-theoretic models of deception: Modelling cooperation and diffusion in populations exposed to fake news">small amount of fake news is needed</a> to disrupt a conversation, and at extremes it can have an impact on democratic processes, <a href="https://theconversation.com/trump-may-owe-his-2016-victory-to-fake-news-new-study-suggests-91538">including elections</a>.</p> <p>But what can we do to avoid fake news, at a time when we could be waiting a while for <a href="https://en.unesco.org/fightfakenews" title="Journalism, Fake News and Disinformation: A Handbook for Journalism Education and Training">mainstream media</a> and <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/08/fake-news-is-going-to-get-worse-unless-companies-take-action-dnc-cto.html">social networks</a> to step up and <a href="https://www.marketplace.org/2018/08/24/tech/one-problem-fake-news-it-really-really-works">address the problem</a>?</p> <p>From a psychology perspective, an important step in tackling fake news is to understand why it gets into our mind. We can do this by <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-two-people-see-the-same-thing-but-have-different-memories-104327">examining how memory works</a> and <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Memory-Distortion-Brains-Societies-Reconstruct/dp/0674566769">how memories become distorted</a>.</p> <p>Using this viewpoint generates some tips you can use to work out whether you’re reading or sharing fake news – which might be handy in the coming election period.</p> <p><strong>How memory gets distorted at the source</strong></p> <p>Fake news often relies on <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/200105/the-seven-sins-memory">misattribution</a> – instances in which we can retrieve things from memory but can’t remember their source.</p> <p>Misattribution is one of the reasons advertising is so effective. We see a product and feel a pleasant sense of familiarity because we’ve encountered it before, but fail to remember that the source of the memory was an ad.</p> <p><a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Rand2/publication/327866113_Prior_Exposure_Increases_Perceived_Accuracy_of_Fake_News/" title="Prior Exposure Increases Perceived Accuracy of Fake News">One study</a> examined headlines from fake news published during the 2016 US Presidential Election.</p> <p>The researchers found even one presentation of a headline (such as “Donald Trump Sent His Own Plane to Transport 200 Stranded Marines”, <a href="https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/donald-trumps-marine-airlift/">based on claims shown to be false</a>) was enough to increase belief in its content. This effect persisted for at least a week, was still found when headlines were accompanied by a factcheck warning, and even when participants suspected it might be false.</p> <p>Repeated exposure can <a href="https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/10/5/16410912/illusory-truth-fake-news-las-vegas-google-facebook">increase the sense that misinformation is true</a>. Repetition creates the perception of group consensus that can result in collective misremembering, a phenomenon called the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-mandela-effect-and-how-your-mind-is-playing-tricks-on-you-89544">Mandela Effect</a>.</p> <p>It might be harmless when people collectively misremember something fun, such as a <a href="https://www.buzzfeed.com/christopherhudspeth/crazy-examples-of-the-mandela-effect-that-will-make-you-ques">childhood cartoon (did the Queen in Disney’s Snow White really NOT say “Mirror, mirror…”?)</a>. But it has serious consequences when a false sense of group consensus contributes to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/the-signal/are-anti-vaxxers-having-a-moment/10957310">rising outbreaks of measles</a>.</p> <p>Scientists have investigated whether <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/acp.3274" title="Public Attitudes on the Ethics of Deceptively Planting False Memories to Motivate Healthy Behavior">targeted misinformation can promote healthy behaviour</a>. Dubbed false-memory diets, it is said that false memories of food experiences can encourage people to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/11/magazine/falsememory-diet-the.html">avoid fatty foods</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3627832/" title="Queasy does it: False alcohol beliefs and memories may lead to diminished alcohol preferences">alcohol</a> and even <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25116296" title="Asparagus, a love story: healthier eating could be just a false memory away">convince them to love asparagus</a>.</p> <p>Creative people that have a strong ability to associate different words are <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Thomas_Ormerod/publication/251531367_Convergent_but_not_divergent_thinking_predicts_susceptibility_to_associative_memory_illusions/" title="Convergent, but not divergent, thinking predicts susceptibility to associative memory illusions">especially susceptible to false memories</a>. Some people might be more vulnerable than others to believe fake news, but <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/24/world/asia/pakistan-israel-khawaja-asif-fake-news-nuclear.html">everyone is at risk</a>.</p> <p><strong>How bias can reinforce fake news</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/200105/the-seven-sins-memory">Bias</a> is how our feelings and worldview affect the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-two-people-see-the-same-thing-but-have-different-memories-104327">encoding and retrieval of memory</a>. We might like to think of our memory as an archivist that carefully preserves events, but <a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781351660020/chapters/10.4324/9781315159591-4" title="New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory">sometimes it’s more like a storyteller</a>. Memories are shaped by our beliefs and can function to <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/autobiographical-memory">maintain a consistent narrative rather than an accurate record</a>.</p> <p>An example of this is selective exposure, our tendency to seek information that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4797953/" title="Feeling Validated Versus Being Correct: A Meta-Analysis of Selective Exposure to Information">reinforces our pre-existing beliefs</a> and to avoid information that brings those beliefs into question. This effect is supported by evidence that television news audiences are <a href="https://www.journalism.org/2014/10/21/political-polarization-media-habits/">overwhelmingly partisan</a> and exist in their own echo chambers.</p> <p>It was thought that online communities exhibit the same behaviour, contributing to the spread of fake news, but this <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-myth-of-the-echo-chamber-92544">appears to be a myth</a>. Political news sites are often populated by people with <a href="https://www.academia.edu/34506137/The_Myth_of_Partisan_Selective_Exposure_A_Portrait_of_the_Online_Political_News_Audience">diverse ideological backgrounds</a> and echo chambers are <a href="https://medium.com/trust-media-and-democracy/avoiding-the-echo-chamber-about-echo-chambers-6e1f1a1a0f39">more likely to exist in real life than online</a>.</p> <p>Our brains are wired to assume things we believe <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0146167203259933" title="Evolving Informational Credentials: The (Mis)Attribution of Believable Facts to Credible Sources">originated from a credible source</a>. But are we more inclined to remember information that reinforces our beliefs? <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/247781236_Do_Attitudes_Affect_Memory_Tests_of_the_Congeniality_Hypothesis" title="Do Attitudes Affect Memory? Tests of the Congeniality Hypothesis">This is probably not the case</a>.</p> <p>People who hold strong beliefs remember things that are relevant to their beliefs but they remember opposing information too. This happens because people are motivated to defend their beliefs against opposing views.</p> <p>Belief echoes are a related phenomenon that <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/why-correcting-donald-trump--or-anyone-else--doesnt-work/2016/01/08/9e5ef5d4-b57d-11e5-a842-0feb51d1d124_story.html?utm_term=.912e5b8e4409">highlight the difficulty of correcting misinformation</a>. Fake news is often designed to be attention-grabbing.</p> <p>It can continue to shape people’s attitudes after it has been discredited because it produces a vivid emotional reaction and builds on our existing narratives.</p> <p>Corrections have a much smaller emotional impact, especially if they require policy details, so should be <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/258180567_Misinformation_and_Its_Correction_Continued_Influence_and_Successful_Debiasing" title="Misinformation and Its Correction Continued Influence and Successful Debiasing">designed to satisfy a similar narrative urge</a> to be effective.</p> <p><strong>Tips for resisting fake news</strong></p> <p>The way our memory works means it might be impossible to resist fake news completely.</p> <p>But one approach is to start <a href="https://qz.com/858887/how-to-know-if-fake-news-is-fake-learn-to-think-like-a-scientist/">thinking like a scientist</a>. This involves adopting a questioning attitude that is motivated by curiosity, and being aware of personal bias.</p> <p>For fake news, this might involve asking ourselves the following questions:</p> <ul> <li> <p><strong>What type of content is this?</strong> <a href="https://theconversation.com/australians-born-overseas-prefer-the-online-world-for-their-news-84355">Many people rely on social media and aggregators as their main source of news</a>. By reflecting on whether information is news, opinion or even humour, this can help consolidate information more completely into memory.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Where is it published?</strong> Paying attention to where information is published is crucial for encoding the source of information into memory. If something is a big deal, a wide variety of sources will discuss it, so attending to this detail is important.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Who benefits?</strong> Reflecting on who benefits from you believing the content helps consolidate the source of that information into memory. It can also help us reflect on our own interests and whether our personal biases are at play.</p> </li> </ul> <p>Some people <a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3023545" title="Who Falls for Fake News? The Roles of Bullshit Receptivity, Overclaiming, Familiarity, and Analytic Thinking">tend to be more susceptible to fake news</a> because they are more accepting of weak claims.</p> <p>But we can strive to be more reflective in our open-mindedness by paying attention to the source of information, and questioning our own knowledge if and when we are unable to remember the context of our memories.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/114921/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Julian Matthews, Research Officer - Cognitive Neurology Lab, Monash University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/how-fake-news-gets-into-our-minds-and-what-you-can-do-to-resist-it-114921" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Queensland mother hits back at critics over $8 Kmart pram hack

<p>A Brisbane mother, who shared a pram hack to keep her child occupied during shopping trips, has had to defend herself after social media users called her out for “bad parenting”.</p> <p>21-year-old Tayla Hutchinson shared an $8 trick from Kmart to keep her son Western, who has severe developmental delays, calm during outings on her Instagram and Facebook pages.</p> <p>She explained that she uses an $8 Smartphone Flexi Tripod from the discount department store to hold her phone on the pram or trolley to keep Western entertained while she finishes her shopping.</p> <p>“The legs on the tripod are completely flexible, so you can adjust it to your pram or trolley,” she told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/kids/mum-hits-back-at-criticism-of-genius-8-kmart-pram-hack/news-story/6f058d93f1bff2f9cb108aa5c16b0e4a" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">A Gold Coast mum has defended herself after copping criticism over her $8 Kmart hack for her son’s pram - <a href="https://t.co/qEeAcE9ycw">https://t.co/qEeAcE9ycw</a></p> — Rhian Deutrom (@Rhi_lani) <a href="https://twitter.com/Rhi_lani/status/1141835615777935362?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 20, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“The hack doesn’t hurt his neck, he can’t throw my phone, and it’s not sitting so close to his face. Not to mention it distracts him from everything else going on around him that might make him unsettled.”</p> <p>Some fellow mothers applauded the “brilliant” hack, saying that it will help many parents avoid public meltdowns. </p> <p>“We need more love and less judgment. Anything to help another parent out,” one commented.</p> <p>However, Hutchinson said she also received “nasty” comments for exposing her young child to too much time in front of screens. </p> <p>“They were mainly about how technology has so much radiation, and how we’re growing a generation that’s always on their phones,” said Hutchinson.</p> <p>“I get judged a lot for the way he behaves in public, and now I’m getting judged for trying to prevent it … Oh well, you can’t please everyone.</p> <p>“I’m not worried about people calling my hack ‘bad parenting’, all I care about is keeping my child calm and happy.”</p> <p>Earlier this month, a two-year-old Chinese girl was <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.asiaone.com/china/2-year-old-girl-china-smartphone-addiction-develops-severe-myopia-900-degrees" target="_blank">reported</a> to develop severe myopia following prolonged use of a smartphone to watch shows.</p> <p>Studies have suggested that high screen time on TV or computers may have detrimental effects on children’s development, including issues with attention, problem solving, memory and communication skills.</p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.schn.health.nsw.gov.au/fact-sheets/screen-time-and-children" target="_blank">American Academy of Pediatrics</a> advises against media use for infants younger than 18 months, and recommends to limit children aged 2 to 5 to an hour of screen time per day.</p> <p>Many parents have found this recommendation to be incompatible with the reality of parenting today. </p> <p>“It's kind of like McDonald’s,” father-of-one Steve Molloy told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/7.30/how-much-is-too-much-screen-time-for-your-kids/10869736" target="_blank"><em>7.30</em></a>. </p> <p>“No-one admits to going to McDonald's, but obviously people are going. So, I think there is a bit of a stigma in it.”</p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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Lisa Wilkinson's best travel tips

<p><a href="http://www.lisawilkinson.com.au/">Lisa Wilkinson</a> shares her favourite travel memories from the Northern Territory and more.</p> <p>After a distinguished career in magazine editing, at just 21 she was the youngest ever magazine editor of a national magazine teen magazine Dolly and four years later she became the editor or Cleo, <a href="http://www.thefordhamcompany.com.au/lisa-wilkinson-awarded-am-for-media-charity-mentoring-work/?utm_source=rss&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=lisa-wilkinson-awarded-am-for-media-charity-mentoring-work">Lisa Wilkinson AM</a> had been the co-host of Channel 9’s <em>Today</em> since 2007 before transitioning to <em>The Project.</em></p> <p><strong>Have your travel interests changed over the years?</strong> <br />Sure, more than anything I now love diversity in the places I travel to and what I can do when I’m there.  And I just love a place that inspires me photographically.  </p> <p><strong>Has your way of travel changed over the years?</strong> <br />No, planes have always seemed pretty good to me.  Although I do love a fast train these days, particularly when I’m in somewhere like Europe.  Much less fussing at train stations rather than airports when you’re crossing borders.  And back home I’m really keen to do the Ghan all the way from Adelaide up to Darwin.  Everyone I know who has done it has absolutely raved.  </p> <p><strong>Best travel experience when you were young? </strong> <br />A holiday house mum and dad rented for a week down at Huskisson on the NSW south coast when I was about 5.  Such a beautiful spot and I still remember watching my brother jump off the bridge into the river and hoping one day that I would be big enough to do that. The shop did the best fish and chips wrapped in newspaper. And don’t even get me started on the pineapple fritters!  </p> <p><strong>Best recent travel experience?</strong> <br />Santorini in <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/greece">Greece</a>. I hadn’t been for 27 years and now I’m wondering why I stayed away so long.  </p> <p><strong>Favourite place in Australia? Why?</strong> <br />The <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/Destinations/Northern%20Territory">Northern Territory</a>, for it’s stunning and diverse landscapes, huge range of activities, beautiful waterfalls, night skies, great bars and restaurants, and the best sunsets anywhere. And if you go, you have to visit the Devil’s Marbles outside of Tennant Creek.  It’s a landscape that is unlike anything I’ve seen anywhere on the planet.  The word “stunning” goes nowhere near describing just how extraordinary and other-worldly this place is. Take your camera!  </p> <p><strong>Favourite place in the world?</strong>   <br />Apart from my own home, it would have to be a toss-up between <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/paris">Paris</a> and <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/new%20york">New York</a>.  Both cities just have most incredible energy, mixed with beautiful parks, great streetlife, restaurants. I walk everywhere, which is a great way to get to know a city.  </p> <p><strong>What are you looking forward to?</strong> <br />Making that trip on the <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/Specials/The%20Ghan">Ghan</a>.  </p> <p><strong>Pet peeve when travelling?</strong><br />Long queues. My husband and I once stood in a queue for four hours at the incredible Gaudi church Sagrada Familia in <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/barcelona">Barcelona</a>, only to get to the ticket office and discover that we hadn’t registered on the “app”.  Sooo not happy.  </p> <p><strong>Never leave home without?</strong> <br />My Canon camera.  </p> <p><strong>I’ll never …</strong> <br />Say never.  I’m open to anything when I travel. The proof is probably in the time I bungee-jumped off a perfectly good bridge above the Zambezi river in Africa, three weeks after another Aussie had done the same, only to have the elastic ropes snap when she was at the bottom of the fall. Crazy I know, but I’m so glad I did it. And it scored me huge brownie points with my kids!  </p> <p><strong>My travel dream is …</strong> <br />The <a href="http://www.salzburg.info/en/sights/guided_tours/tours_from_salzburg/sound_of_music">Sound Of Music tour</a> in Austria.</p> <p><em>Written by Lisa Wilkinson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/insider-travel-tips-lisa-wilkinson.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

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What is your love style?

<p>Love is a complex and powerful force, one that plays out in a number of emotional, cognitive and social ways.</p> <p>When we love a person, we feel emotional arousal in their presence. We will also have a set of thoughts (or cognitions) about that person, and our previous experiences can shape our ideas about what we expect in our relationships. For example, if you believe in love at first sight, then you are <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00998862">more likely to experience it</a>.</p> <p>But we use love in many different contexts. You might say that you love your partner, or your family, or your best friend, your job or even your car. Clearly, you’re using the term in different ways that highlight the various dimensions of love.</p> <p>The ancient Greeks described <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_words_for_love">several different types of love</a>. Following the Greeks, the sociologist and activist John Alan Lee suggested that there are <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Colours_of_love.html?id=5g4RAQAAIAAJ">six broad styles of love</a>.</p> <p>It is good to keep in mind that although these love styles can be thought of as “types”, we are not necessarily <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/014616727700300204">locked into only one</a>. We might have a predominant love style, but we will also have some elements of the other styles.</p> <p>Similarly, our love style might change over time based on our experiences and interactions with our partners.</p> <p><strong>Eros</strong></p> <p>This style is typically experienced as a romantic, fairytale-type love. Physical beauty is important to this love style. Attraction is intense and immediate (“head over heels”), and the Eros lover feels an <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0265407510389126">urgent drive</a> to deepen the relationship emotionally and physically.</p> <p>Because these individuals love the feeling of being in love, they tend to be serial monogamists, staying in a relationship as long as it feels fresh and compelling, then moving on so they can experience those same feelings again with someone new.</p> <p><strong>Storge</strong></p> <p>Storgic types tend to be stable and committed in their relationships. They <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01463370601036515">value</a> companionship, psychological closeness and trust. For these individuals, love relationships can sometimes grow out of friendships, so that love sneaks up on the pair. This love style is enduring, and these individuals are in it for the long haul.</p> <p><strong>Ludus</strong></p> <p>People with a ludic style view love as a game that they are playing to win. Often this can be a multiplayer game! Ludic individuals are comfortable with deception and manipulation in their relationships. They tend to be low on commitment and are often emotionally distant.</p> <p>Because ludic individuals are more focused on the short term, they tend to place greater importance on the physical characteristics of their mate than do the other love styles. They are also <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00224490009552023">more likely</a> to engage in sexual hookups.</p> <p><strong>Pragma</strong></p> <p>Practicality rules for this type. Logic is used to determine compatibility and future prospects. This doesn’t mean that these individuals use an emotionless, Spock-like approach to their relationships, rather they a place a <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01463370601036515">high importance on whether a potential mate</a> will be suited to meeting their needs.</p> <p>These needs might be social or financial. Pragmatists might wonder if their prospective partner would be accepted by family and friends, or whether they’re good with money. The might also evaluate their emotional assets; for example, does a would-be partner have the skills to be calm in times of stress?</p> <p><strong>Mania</strong></p> <p>This refers to an obsessive love style. These individuals tend to be emotionally dependent and to need fairly constant reassurance in a relationship. Someone with this love style is likely to experience peaks of joy and troughs of sorrow, depending on the extent to which their partner can accommodate their needs.</p> <p>Because of the possessiveness associated with this style, <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032714007277">jealousy can be an issue</a> for these individuals.</p> <p><strong>Agape</strong></p> <p>Agapic individuals are giving and caring, and are centred on their partner’s needs. This is largely a selfless and unconditional love. An agapic partner will love you just as you are. But they will also be particularly appreciative of acts of care and kindness <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01463370601036515">that they receive back</a> from their partner.</p> <p>Perhaps because these individuals are so accepting, they tend to have <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pere.12112/pdf">very high levels</a> of relationship satisfaction.</p> <p><strong>The truth about love</strong></p> <p>The kind of love that we feel towards our significant other is <a href="http://www.elainehatfield.com/uploads/3/2/2/5/3225640/34._hatfield_1985.pdf">likely to change over time</a>. At the start of a relationship we feel anticipation about seeing our partner and we are excited every time we see them.</p> <p>These are the heady feelings we associate with being in love, and are very characteristic of romantic love. But in almost all relationships, these intense emotions are not sustainable, and will fade over months to a couple of years.</p> <p>Those passionate feelings will then be replaced by deeper connection as the people in the partnership grow to truly know each other. This stage is “companionate love” and can last a lifetime (or beyond).</p> <p>Unfortunately, many people do not realise that the evolution from romantic love to companionate love is a normal – and indeed healthy – transition. Because the ardent feelings of adoration subside, sometimes people will think that they have fallen out of love, when in fact the intimacy and closeness of companionate love can be extremely powerful, if only given the chance.</p> <p>This is a shame, as these individuals might never experience the <a href="http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sbp/sbp/2004/00000032/00000002/art00007">life satisfaction that is associated with companionate love</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/72664/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Rachel Grieve, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, University of Tasmania</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/there-are-six-styles-of-love-which-one-best-describes-you-72664" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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How Prince Edward and the Countess of Wessex are celebrating their 20th wedding anniversary

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>On June 19, 1999, Prince Edward – who is the youngest child of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip – married Sophie Rhys-Jones.</p> <p>The Earl and Countess of Wessex married in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, in a particularly unique service where guests were informed not to wear hats.</p> <p>The televised ceremony attracted an estimated 200 million viewers around the world.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Earl and Countess of Wessex at <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RoyalAscot?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RoyalAscot</a> - the day before their 20th wedding anniversary 📷 Chris Jackson &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/AdamDavyPA?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AdamDavyPA</a> <a href="https://t.co/mxwp4ZoCX0">pic.twitter.com/mxwp4ZoCX0</a></p> — PA Royal Reporters (@PARoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/PARoyal/status/1141031255888355328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 18, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The unlikely pair met at a tennis event in the early 1990s, where Sophie was a public relations professional.</p> <p>It has been two decades since the royal couple tied the knot, and since the royal couple have welcomed two children – 14-year-old Lady Louise Windsor and James, viscount Severn who is 10.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the last two decades the Earl and Countess of Wessex have spent together.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Why does it feel good to see someone fail?

<p>In the Pixar animated film <em><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2096673/">Inside Out</a></em>, most of the plot plays out inside protagonist Riley’s head, where five emotions – Joy, Sadness, Fear, Disgust and Anger – direct her behavior.</p> <p>The film was released to glowing reviews. But director Pete Docter later <a href="http://nerdist.com/check-out-the-inside-out-emotions-that-didnt-end-up-in-the-movie/">admitted</a> that he always regretted that one emotion didn’t make the cut: Schadenfreude.</p> <p>Schadenfreude, which literally means “<a href="https://www.etymonline.com/word/schadenfreude">harm joy</a>” in German, is the peculiar pleasure people derive from others’ misfortune.</p> <p>You might feel it when the career of a <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/kim-kardashian-age-schadenfreude-936783">high-profile celebrity</a> craters, when a particularly noxious criminal is <a href="http://theconversation.com/no-shortage-of-media-schadenfreude-as-fake-sheikh-is-sent-to-prison-67200">locked up</a> or when <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2018/06/germany-europe-world-cup/564014/">a rival sporting team</a> gets vanquished.</p> <p>Psychologists have long struggled with how to best understand, explain and study the emotion: It arises in such a wide range of situations that it can seem almost impossible to come up with some sort of unifying framework. Yet that’s exactly what my colleagues and I have attempted to do.</p> <p><strong>Schadenfreude’s many faces</strong></p> <p>One challenge continues to plague those who research schadenfreude: There’s no agreed-upon definition.</p> <p>Some think it’s best to study the emotion in the context of social comparison, so they’ll tend to focus on the way <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167296222005">envy</a> or <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/014616720202800708">resentment</a> interacts with schadenfreude.</p> <p>Others view the emotion through the lens of justice and fairness, and whether <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-15718-002">the sufferer deserved his or her misfortune</a>.</p> <p>Finally, the last group thinks that schadenfreude emerges out of <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2F0022-3514.84.5.932">intergroup dynamics</a> – members of a group deriving joy out of the suffering of those outside of the group.</p> <p>In our view, the different definitions point to multiple sides of schadenfreude, each of which might have distinct developmental origins.</p> <p><strong>The blossoming of schadenfreude</strong></p> <p>Perhaps the writers of <em>Inside Out</em>, when deciding to jettison “Schadenfreude,” thought that it would prove too difficult for children to grasp.</p> <p>There’s evidence, however, that children begin to experience schadenfreude early in life.</p> <p>For example, at four years old, children found someone else’s misfortune – like tripping and falling into a muddy puddle – funnier if that person <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjdp.12013">had previously done something to hurt other children</a>, such as breaking their toys.</p> <p>Researchers have also found that two-year-old kids primed to be jealous of a peer <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0100233">experience glee when that peer suffers a mishap</a>. By the age of seven, children feel more pleased after winning a game <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002209651200224X?via%3Dihub">if a rival lost than when both won the game</a>.</p> <p>Finally, in a 2013 study, researchers had nine-month-old infants observe puppets interacting with one another. Some puppets “enjoyed” the same types of food that the infants enjoyed, while others had a different set of tastes. When some puppets “harmed” the other puppets, <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0956797612457785?journalCode=pssa">the researchers discovered</a> that the infants would rather see the puppets who didn’t share their tastes be hurt over the ones who did share their tastes.</p> <p><strong>Bringing it all together</strong></p> <p>Together, these studies show that schadenfreude is a complex emotion that seems to be deeply ingrained in the human condition.</p> <p>Psychologists <a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=McDqyssAAAAJ&amp;hl=en">Scott Lilienfeld</a>, <a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=GfAXgJcAAAAJ&amp;hl=en">Philippe Rochat</a> and <a href="http://www.psychology.emory.edu/cognition/rochat/lab/Wang.html">I</a> wondered if there could be a way to unite the multiple facets of schadenfreude under the same umbrella.</p> <p>Eventually, we settled on seeing schadenfreude as a form of <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-psych-010213-115045">dehumanization</a> – the act of depicting and viewing another person as less than human.</p> <p>When most people hear the term “dehumanization,” they probably go to the worst-case scenario: a complete denial of someone’s humanity, a phenomenon relegated to torture chambers, battlefields and racist propaganda.</p> <p>But this is a misconception. Psychologists have shown that people often view their own group in more human terms, and – <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1207/s15327957pspr1003_4">in subtle ways</a> – can deny the full humanity of those outside of their group.</p> <p>In our <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0732118X18301430">review</a>, we hypothesized that <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fa0037679">the more empathy</a> someone feels toward another person, the less likely they are to experience schadenfreude when that person suffers.</p> <p>So in order for someone to feel schadenfreude toward another person – whether it’s a rival, someone in an outgroup or someone who’s committed a crime – they’ll need to subtly dehumanize them. Only then does the sufferer’s misfortune become rewarding.</p> <p>This theory hasn’t been tested yet, so at the end of our review, we suggest ways schadenfreude’s early origins and individual differences can be placed under scientific scrutiny to study this novel hypothesis.</p> <p>Linking schadenfreude with dehumanization might sound dark, especially because schadenfreude is such a universal emotion. But dehumanization occurs more often than most would like to think – and we believe it’s behind the pang of pleasure you feel when you see someone fail.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/107349/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Shensheng Wang, Ph.D. Candidate in Psychology, Emory University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/why-does-it-feel-good-to-see-someone-fail-107349"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Where drivers don’t mean to speed, it’s no good just fining them

<p>Blaming motorists for their speeding may at times be undeserved. We have recently shown that, rather than intentional wrong-doing by drivers, cognitive factors <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2014-22380-001/">can explain speeding behaviour</a>.</p> <p>Policies and enforcement measures to tackle speeding rely on the idea that driving too fast is always intended by drivers as a result of their attitudes (lack of consideration of the possible consequences) and their willingness to act inappropriately. But speeding is not always a deliberate action.</p> <p><strong>School zone risks require lower speed limits</strong></p> <p>It is standard across Australia to find variable speed limits within school precincts. At times when children are travelling to and from school, a substantially lower limit applies, usually reducing a general urban speed limit to 25-40 km/h in the school zone.</p> <p>It is important for drivers to comply with lower speed limits within <a href="http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/School-road-safety/Safe-school-travel-safest/Speed-limits-in-school-zones.aspx">school zones</a> given the increased activity by pedestrians (especially children) in these areas. This creates increased risks and greater consequences of a collision involving pedestrians.</p> <p>Despite this, speeding in school zones <a href="http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/reckless-drivers-put-children-at-risk-speeding-through-school-crossings/story-fni0cx12-1226929329950">remains common</a>. In response to the <a href="http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/national_road_safety_strategy/">“significant risks associated with low-range speeding”</a>, police and policymakers have relied on enforcement, harsher penalties and education to reduce speeding behaviour. However, in school zones this <a href="http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/more-drivers-than-ever-before-caught-speeding-in-school-zones/story-fnihsrf2-1226821956049">often does not work</a>.</p> <p><strong>Why might drivers speed in school zones?</strong></p> <p>We argue that drivers may recognise that they are in a school zone and slow down at the entry point when they see the speed limit signage and signals, but they forget to drive slowly as they transit the entire school precinct.</p> <p>So how do drivers forget they’re in a school zone? We tend to think of memory as the recollection of past events, but memory also plays a part in planning and deciding on future behaviour. This is prospective memory – the memory for future intentions – and it is very important for our everyday lives.</p> <p>But prospective memory is not foolproof. Errors can occur where individuals forget to perform an intended task. Typically this happens when the “normal” flow or sequence of behaviour is interrupted.</p> <p>A failure to remember to complete an intended behaviour can have serious, unsafe consequences. For example, in commercial aviation interruptions to pre-flight procedures and subsequent <a href="http://hsi.arc.nasa.gov/flightcognition/Publications/Dismukes_07.pdf">prospective memory errors</a> have been shown to contribute to planes crashing. <a href="http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/14143_Chapter9.pdf">Mid-procedure disruptions</a> have resulted in physicians leaving instruments or sponges in patients following surgery.</p> <p>We propose that if drivers are speeding within a school zone, their behaviour may be the result of a failure of prospective memory caused by some interruption. A major interruption in some school zones occurs when drivers are required to stop at traffic light intersections. Traffic light “interruptions” may lead to prospective memory error in the following ways:</p> <p>1. Because of the relative abruptness of the traffic light change from green to amber to red, drivers may have little opportunity to encode the future intention to resume travelling at the reduced school zone speed limit. This memory error can be further promoted if additional distractions attract attention – for example, pedestrian movements or the presence of other vehicles, as well as in-car events such as a radio broadcast or conversation with a passenger. Prospective memory suffers when attention is divided.</p> <p>2. Cues in the environment that are associated with the resumption of driving – for example, the change from red to a green traffic light, a clear path ahead to continue their journey – may lead an individual to accelerate to the speed at which they would typically drive when school zone hours do not apply. The driver has simply failed to recall the need to resume the interrupted and deferred task of driving at the lower speed limit.</p> <p>3. On driving resumption, there are scant cues in the environment to prompt memory retrieval for the deferred task of travelling at a reduced speed. If the route is regularly travelled, the available cues probably suggest habitual driving at the usual (non-school zone) speed.</p> <p><strong>What did our study find?</strong></p> <p>We found that when a driver was able to choose the speed at which they travelled – that is, where the road was clear and there were no vehicles ahead to slow them down – then if they had been interrupted by stopping at a red traffic light, they resumed driving at higher speeds. These speeds related to the normal speed limit, rather than the temporary lower limit.</p> <p>When there was no traffic light interruption, drivers progressed through the school zone at slower speeds, which were closer to the school zone limit.</p> <p>When we placed a reminder cue after the traffic light – simply signage featuring twin amber flashing lights and a sign “Check Speed” – then drivers were able to correct (or fully avoid) a prospective memory error. The driving speeds on resumption were fully compliant with the school speed limit.</p> <p><strong>What this research means</strong></p> <p>We are not arguing that it is invalid to treat speeding behaviour as an intentional act. A number of <a href="http://casr.adelaide.edu.au/rsr/RSR2007/FleiterJ.pdf">researchers</a> have found that drivers do deliberately and consciously intend to speed.</p> <p>What we are arguing is that, in some circumstances, the way the road infrastructure is designed may encourage and prompt motorists to engage in otherwise avoidable illegal speeding behaviour. We have shown that such a phenomenon can occur when traffic lights interrupt drivers in school zones.</p> <p>Drivers appear not to notice their behaviour. But if reminded to think about their speed, they adopt a correct, safe speed.</p> <p>The same cognitive process may also apply in circumstances where drivers fail to slow at speed cameras sites, at roadworks sites or in the transition from rural to urban speed zones.</p> <p>A serious attempt to create a <a href="http://c-marc.curtin.edu.au/local/docs/CMARC%20Fact%20Sheet%201%20Towards%20Zero.pdf">“Safe System”</a> of road use must take this evidence into account. For example, we have shown that placing reminder cues downstream from a known point of interruption can be an effective low-cost solution that eliminates most speeding in high-risk locations.</p> <p><em>Written by Julia Irwin, Bree Gregory and Ian J. Faulks. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/where-drivers-dont-mean-to-speed-its-no-good-just-fining-them-32747">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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Folau slap-down: Kochie hit with blunt comeback on Sunrise

<p>A prominent voice who is in support of Israel Folau has gone head to head with Sunrise host David Koch on Monday morning.</p> <p>Australian Christian Lobby boss Martyn Iles is a vocal supporter of Israel Folau and backed the crowd-funding effort to raise $10 million before it was later taken down by GoFundMe.</p> <p>“I suppose a big issue is why does he need to raise money from other people? He is pretty well off himself. The core case could earn him $10 million. To use other people’s money to earn $10 million,” Koch said.</p> <p>“It could earn $10 million but it could also cost $3 million,” Mr Iles countered.</p> <p>“Firstly, what is the point of the fundraising campaign? Is it for money? It is actually about creating a grassroots support network. It’s more about PR for the case, it’s more about raising the profile of the case.</p> <p>“People have been asking me for days before this happened how we could be a part of it. He has offered that. But also, I will offer this — how much should it cost him? I mean, it’s cost him his job, it’s cost him his career. He’s banned for life.”</p> <p>Koch countered by saying, “Yeah, it could earn him $10 million.”</p> <p>Mr Iles confirmed while the lawsuit could earn him a hefty figure, that the money would go to other causes.</p> <p>“He’s not going to keep the $3 million that people are giving him. That’s going straight into trust, and it can only be distributed for legal expenses, so it’s pretty secure.”</p> <p>After further discussion, the pair discussed free speech, with Mr Iles stating he did not believe it was Folau’s intention to be purposefully inflammatory.</p> <p>“Didn’t he bring it on himself? Why did he need to be so inflammatory? Everyone believes in free speech, there’s no doubt about that, but what’s the line you draw between free speech and hate speech?” Koch asked Iles.</p> <p>Mr Illes replied: “Well look, he doesn’t believe himself that he was being inflammatory.</p> <p>“I mean if you look at his social media record, he’s got a lot of posts on there which are scripture, he’s got a lot of posts on there which talk about themes like repentance and judgment and all that stuff.</p> <p>“He’s just expressing his religious beliefs. He believes he has to share the Bible with his fellow man, and that is something that all Christians believe.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Australian Christian Lobby says Israel Folau's fundraising campaign is about "creating a grassroots support network, raising the profile of the case and giving people a voice to buy into the whole thing". <a href="https://t.co/WSNxNjbkPL">pic.twitter.com/WSNxNjbkPL</a></p> — Sunrise (@sunriseon7) <a href="https://twitter.com/sunriseon7/status/1142914164387540992?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 23, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>However, the conversation took a tense turn after Kochie said the Bible is a “bit weird in parts” and further said it condones slavery.</p> <p>“Well it doesn’t,” Mr Iles replied.</p> <p>“Well it does. There are parts of it that do condone slavery,” Koch continued.</p> <p>“There are other parts that say men should value their goats and their cows more than their wives. Divorce is adultery.</p> <p>“So, you should basically, an extension of that, anyone who divorces should go to hell. So, there are some weird things in there that just are not relevant to today’s society, and make Christians look bad," Kochie added. </p> <p>Iles shot back by saying, “Well, I won’t turn to you for theological advice.”</p> <p>“No, no, no, I’ll give you the list if you like. I’ll come up with a list of all the weird...” Koch countered back.</p> <p>“There’s a messy amalgamation of things there, but let’s put that to one side,” Mr Iles tersely replied.</p> <p>“These conversations should be able to be had. We should criticise, we should debate, but what it’s cost him is unreasonable. Which is that he has posted scripture, which is part of the mainstream beliefs of millions of Australians, and the politically correct baseball bat has been wielded against him," Mr Iles exclaimed. </p> <p>“He’s lost his job, he’s lost his livelihood, he’s actually been dragged through the mud in the media quite badly.”</p> <p>The fundraising campaign claims to be about “creating grassroots support network, raising the profile of the case and giving people a voice to buy into the whole thing,” according to the Australian Christian Lobby.</p> <p>Mr Iles appeared on <em>The Sunday Project</em> on Sunday evening where <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/awkward-interrogation-lisa-wilkinsons-brutal-israel-folau-question-on-the-project" target="_blank">he was asked by host Lisa Wilkinson if he agreed gay people would go to hell.</a></p> <p>He said the “mainstream Christian belief on this is that all of us are born going to hell”.</p> <p>“We’re all sinners and I don’t think it’s helpful to say that Israel Folau’s post targeted homosexuals. It didn’t,” he said.</p> <p>“I was on the list. I think each of us were on the list. We’re all sinners. We will be judged by God and we will be found wanting.</p> <p>“And yeah, we’ll be judged on our sexual behaviours. Me, as a straight man, will be judged on my sexual behaviours and found wanting.</p> <p>“And that’s what Israel was saying, when he was talking about salvation in Jesus Christ available to all, and millions of Australians believe that.”</p>

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Who was in the wrong? Cyclist slams driver for causing car crash

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A driver has been slammed by cyclists for “brake checking” and causing a group of bike riders to collide into each other. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video, from Victoria shows a Toyota Landcruiser ute driving behind six cyclists travelling down a two-lane road. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After overtaking the riders, the motorist appears to stop suddenly and turn into a driveway, causing two cyclists to crash and fall from their bikes. </span></p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" width="698" height="573" scrolling="no" id="molvideoplayer" title="MailOnline Embed Player" src="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/embed/video/1933750.html"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While one cyclist shouted to warn the others, it didn’t make a difference as they still collided with one another and crashed to the ground. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The riders were riding in pairs. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some Facebook users took to the comments to shame the driver, one writing: “Dangerous driving by the d*** in the ute.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Driver was being malicious! That's what the actions suggest,” another added.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One user wrote the 4WD driver could have been less impatient and “waited five seconds to turn behind the riders instead of overtaking braking and then turning.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, while there was a flurry of support for the cyclists, others took aim at the riders. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Funny how the first two folks on bikes don't come undone but the second pair do? Yes, the driver was impatient, but no-one contacted the vehicle,” one user wrote. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another added: “Perhaps single file cycling could have been a way of avoiding the impatient car driver. You cyclists bring this type of driving on yourselves.”</span></p>

Legal

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Check your fridge: Second milk recall announced at Coles, Woolies and IGA

<p>A second milk recall has been announced this month over fears of possible E.coli contamination.</p> <p>Dairy company Lactalis Australia announced a recall for milk sold at Coles, Woolworths, IGA and other stores in Victoria and parts of NSW.</p> <p>The company said the contamination cannot be detected by taste, smell and sight, and might make people sick if consumed.</p> <p>The company has identified the source of contamination “and has taken the necessary steps to address it and prevent any recurrence of this problem in the future”, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-14/milk-recall-coles-pauls-rev-physical-vic-nsw-supermarkets/11208432" target="_blank">it said</a>.</p> <p>Last week, the same company recalled one-litre milk under the brand Coles, Pauls, REV and PhysiCAL due to fears that a cleaning solution had made its way Into the batch.</p> <p>Lactalis said the affected milk may have “<a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/food/has-my-milk-been-recalled-full-list-of-contaminated-coles-and-woolworths-milk-c-176486" target="_blank">yellowish colouring</a> and/or metallic chemical taste”.</p> <p>Shoppers who have bought the milk brands are advised not to consume the products and return them for a refund.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FFood.Standards%2Fphotos%2Fa.281651821862481%2F2728926730468299%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="687" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Below is the full list of the recalled milk brands:</p> <ul> <li>Coles Full Cream Milk 1L Bottle (use by date: 25 and 26 June 2019)</li> <li>Coles Low Fat Milk 1L Bottle (use by date: 25 and 26 June 2019)</li> <li>Coles Skim Milk 1L Bottle (use by date: 25 June 2019)</li> <li>Coles Fresh Full Cream Milk 2L Bottle (sold only at Coles Express with a use by date of 2 July)</li> <li>Pauls Full Cream Milk 1L Bottle (use by date: 26 and 27 June 2019)</li> <li>Pauls Smarter White Milk 1L Bottle (use by date: 25, 26 and 27 June 2019)</li> <li>REV 1L Bottle (use by date: 28 June 2019)</li> <li>PhysiCAL Low Fat 1L Bottle (use by date: 26 June 2019)</li> <li>PhysiCAL Skim 1L Bottle (use by date: 27 June 2019)</li> <li>7-Eleven Lite Milk 2L Bottle (use by date: July 2)</li> <li>Gippy Full Cream Milk 2L Bottle (use by date July 2)</li> <li>Gippy Lite Milk 2L Bottle (use by date July 2)</li> <li>Maxi Foods Lite Milk 2L Bottle (use by date July 2)</li> <li>Pauls Professional Cafe Crema Milk 2L Bottle (use by date July 2)</li> <li>Pauls Smarter White 2% Fat Milk 2L Bottle (use by date July 2)</li> <li>Rev Low Fat Milk 2L Bottle (use by July 2)</li> <li>Rev Low Fat Milk 1L Carton (use by July 2)</li> </ul>

Legal

Entertainment

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“He looks just like him": Fans blown away by Elvis Presley's lookalike grandson

<p>Lisa Marie Presley has shared a rare and sweet photo of herself and her four children on Twitter and Instagram.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/By8tI88F-Eo/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/By8tI88F-Eo/" target="_blank">Mama Lion with cubs ❤️🖤💚💙🦁🥰</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lisampresley/" target="_blank"> Lisa Marie Presley</a> (@lisampresley) on Jun 20, 2019 at 3:34pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In the photo are her 10-year-old twins Harper and Finley, her son Benjamin, 26, and her daughter Riley, 30.</p> <p>The family photo appears to be from a get-together at the end of May in celebration of Riley’s 30th birthday, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/music/lisa-marie-presley-shares-photo-all-kids/" target="_blank"><em>People</em></a>.</p> <p>The photo has sent fans into a spin as they believe that her son Benjamin looks just like his grandfather – and Lisa Marie's father – Elvis Presley.</p> <p>An Instagram follower was stunned by the likeness, saying:</p> <p>“Is that your son? Wow, he looks just like your dad.”</p> <p>Another agreed, providing side by side proof on Twitter.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">You have your opinion and I have mine! I would say they look alike! <a href="https://t.co/pHxxXJavt5">pic.twitter.com/pHxxXJavt5</a></p> — Lisa Reimund (@ya_reimund) <a href="https://twitter.com/ya_reimund/status/1142413146193321985?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">22 June 2019</a></blockquote> <p>51-year-old Lisa Marie often posts photos of her children on social media, and last shared a photo of herself with Benjamin a year ago with the caption:</p> <p>“Flashback!!!! With Ben at Sun Studios filming @goodmorningamerica at Sun Studios on 5/12/2012 during the release of ”Storm &amp; Grace”.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkRMEX1BF5C/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkRMEX1BF5C/" target="_blank">Flashback!!!! With Ben at Sun Studios filming @goodmorningamerica at Sun Studios on 5/12/2012 during the release of ”Storm &amp; Grace”.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lisampresley/" target="_blank"> Lisa Marie Presley</a> (@lisampresley) on Jun 20, 2018 at 6:38pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

Art

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4 ways music can impact your emotions

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">People experience a range of emotions while listening to music, whether it be smiling, laughing or crying.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As music is common in our everyday lives, the way music makes the listeners feel is a vital factor as to whether or not they enjoy what they’re listening to.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are four psychological principles that explain listeners’ emotional reactions to music, according to </span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/science-choice/201906/6-ways-music-affects-your-emotions"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Psychology Today</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>1. The startle effects</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The startle effects mean that our brainstem reflexes are hardwired for quick and automatic responses to loud noises. Sometimes, those responses can be associated with surprise, laughter or fear.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">People who suffer from anxiety disorders are jumpier, which means that you may jump in surprise by a loud noise during a concert.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Emotional contagion</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This means that as human beings, we have a tendency to “catch” the emotions of others when perceiving their emotional responses. If you’ve ever come away from an anxious person feeling more anxious yourself after the conversation, this is emotional contagion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Therefore, when you attend concerts, your emotions are influenced by the people present. The singers and performers also express non-verbal emotion contagion effects as this suggests that the musician cannot move unless the crowd moves with them.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Emotional events</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your response to music is conditioned by the context that you give to the song. Conditioning is a powerful source of emotion in music. For example, people may love a particular song as it reminds them of a wedding or a graduation. As you’ve associated an emotion to a particular song, you’re not likely to forget these emotional events.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When the memory is evoked by listening to the song again, so are the associated emotions with that song. That’s why many people listen to music to remind themselves of past events.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Positive feeling</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For the most part, music makes us feel good. Positive feelings that are brought through music tend to broaden our mindset in ways that are beneficial to health and creative thinking.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Music works even more rapidly and intensely upon the mind than any art simply because it requires so little conscious reflection.</span></p>

Music

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Romance author Judith Krantz passes away aged 91

<p>Best-selling romance author Judith Krantz has passed away from natural causes at the age of 91. She died in her Bel Air home in California and was surrounded by family, friends and her four dogs at the time of her passing.</p> <p>Krantz was a successful journalist, writing in the industry for 27 years and interviewed a number of prominent women as well as writing numerous articles about sex. Her most popular article was “The myth of the multiple orgasm”.</p> <p>She sold more than 100 million copies of her romance novels in dozens of languages and became an author later in life, at age 50, after conquering her fear of flying, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-23/judith-krantz-novelist-who-mixed-sex-with-shopping-dies-at-91" target="_blank"><em>Bloomberg</em></a>.</p> <p>Each of her novels usually involved a young heroine who satisfies her taste for glamorous clothing and powerful men while navigating her way through the world of fashion, advertising and the Hollywood movie industry.</p> <p>Krantz drew on personal experience to help write her romance novels.</p> <p>“I strongly suspect that the difficulties I lived through are the elements in my life that finally made me a storyteller,” she wrote in her autobiography<span> </span><em>Sex and Shopping: The Confessions of a Nice Jewish Girl</em> (2000). </p> <p>“Looked at as a stream in which one thing led to another, the events of my life, and how I coped with them, tell me who I am. And a woman should have a clear idea of who she is.”</p> <p>Krantz also spoke about how she travelled her own “inner-directed path” in her autobiography.</p> <p>"While I seemed like another 'nice Jewish girl,' underneath that convenient cover I'd travelled my own, inner-directed path and had many a spicy and secret adventure," she wrote.</p> <p>"I grew up in a complicated tangle of privilege, family problems, and tormented teenaged sexuality."</p> <p><em>Scruples</em>, which was her first novel and told the story of the over-the-top lifestyle of the people who work in a Beverly Hills boutique, was a massive success and remained on The New York Times Best Sellers list for more than a year.</p> <p>Some of her novels were also developed into television miniseries.</p> <p>Krantz is survived by her son, Tony, daughter-in-law Kristin Dornig Krantz and grandson Nicholas.</p>

Books

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10 facts you didn’t know about Meryl Streep

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Today marks the 70</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> birthday of Hollywood heavyweight Meryl Streep who has proven time and time again she is a force to be reckoned with. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Born 22</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">nd</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> June 1949 in Summit, New Jersey USA, Meryl first came on the scene in the late ‘60s when she performed in several Broadway productions. Eventually in the ‘70s, Streep transitioned to films and thus began her iconic entryway to become one of the most beloved and talented actresses of the 20</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and 21</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">st</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> century. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Streep won Oscars for </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kramer vs. Kramer, Sophie’s Choice </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">and</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> The Iron Lady </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">among a league of numerous nominations. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Hollywood star went on to have four children with sculptor Don Gummer, whom she married in 1978. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are 10 facts you might not know about Meryl Streep. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">1. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The world-famous actress has had such a wildly successful career which has led to Oscar nominations. Due to this, she has broken her </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">own </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">record of being the single actress to be nominated.</span></p> <p>2. She supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 US Presidential elections and joined the campaign.</p> <p>3. Streep was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in November 2014.</p> <p>4. The veteran actor has a master’s degree in Fine Arts received from Yale University.</p> <p>5. Streep studied acting in NYC with Michael Howard.</p> <p><span>6. Meryl donated a wardrobe of hers from her 2011 film </span><span>The Devil Wears Prada, </span><span>to a charity auction.</span></p> <p><span>7. She also donated her entire salary received from 2011’s </span><span>The Iron Lady </span><span>to the Women’s History Museum.</span></p> <p>8. Streep is worth an estimated whopping US$90 million.</p> <p><span>9. When the beloved actress was just a teenager, she quit opera lessons and took up smoking and cheerleading instead, according to an interview she had with </span><a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/janelevere/2016/08/22/meryl-streep-discusses-musical-training-accessorizing-for-florence-foster-jenkins/?utm_medium=google#506f50555014"><span>Forbes</span></a><span>.</span></p> <p>10. When Meryl was 23, she thought of becoming an environmental lawyer. Unfortunately, she slept through an exam and took that as a clear sign that the career path was not the right one for her.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see the life of Meryl Streep through pictures. </span></p> <p> </p>

Art