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Inside cricket legend Don Bradman’s magnificent Sydney home

<p>Cricketer Sir Don Bradman’s first Sydney home where he lived while batting as a young sportsman has been put up for sale. </p> <p>The neat and “well-kept” five-bedroom house at 172 Frederick Street in Rockdale will be auctioned off on October 1. </p> <p>The property located in Sydney’s south was lived in by the legendary cricketer briefly when he first moved to Sydney between the end of 1929 and the start of 1930.</p> <p>The house then belonged to Frank Cush, cricket administrator and chair of Cricket Australia from 1955 to 1957 - Bradman stayed in Cush’s son’s bedroom. </p> <p>The gorgeous, traditional listing has locals worried however as they're afraid the home could be knocked down by developers. </p> <p>[I] didn't know he [Bradman] lived in Rockdale, that's "massive" history! Would have been great heritage value if council bought it,” a nearby resident wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>“The best case scenario would have been that the house had been heritage listed,” said another. </p> <p>“But the onus is/was on the owners to get this done and they didn't want to. I doubt very much that council would entertain the idea of purchasing an unlisted residential home - those days are over I'm afraid.”</p> <p>Another added: “If someone redeveloped that it would be a horrible shame. It's horrible it's not heritage listed.”</p> <p>“Massive new Duplex coming soon,” a fourth person wrote.</p> <p>The home was built on 700 sqm of land, and was last sold in 2017 for $713,000. </p> <p>The property features a number of traditional, untouched original designs - from the kitchen to the bathroom and the stunning leadlight windows, said Chris Pappas from Ray White Rockdale. </p> <p>“The kitchen is original, the bathroom is original, but all in good order,” he told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.domain.com.au/news/rockdale-house-once-home-to-don-bradman-up-for-auction-879556/" target="_blank">Domain</a>. </em></p> <p>“The home is centrally located and only a short walk to Rockdale Railway Station, Rockdale Plaza, Bexley Village shopping centre and only moments to bus services, schools and parklands,” the listing said. </p> <p>The property, thanks to its location and chunk of land it sits on could run up to $2 million at auction. </p> <p>It can be inspected on various dates between September 14 and October 1. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the cricketer's first Sydney home. </p> <p> </p>

Domestic Travel

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“He is conscious”: Turning point in Michael Schumacher's sad plight

<p>Formula One star Michael Schumacher is said to be “conscious” after undergoing stem-cell treatment in Paris, France, a French newspaper has reported. </p> <p>The <em>Le Parisien </em>revealed earlier this week the seven-time world champion had been admitted to Georges-Pompidou hospital for a complex treatment involving the transfusions of inflammation-reducing stem cells. </p> <p>The cardiac surgeon who carried out the complex operation, Professor Philippe Menasche is also the same doctor who performed the world’s first embryonic cell transplant on a patient with heart failure in just 2014. </p> <p>“He is in my area. And I can assure you that he is conscious,” a source told the French newspaper. </p> <p>The 50-year-old German was left with severe brain damage in 2013 after suffering an accident while skiing. </p> <p>The Formula One legend has since been recovering at his family home in Lausanne and while his family has kept his condition as private as possible, new details have come to light about the trip to Paris. </p> <p>An Italian newspaper <em>La Repubblica </em>quoted biology professor Angelo Vescovi who claimed to have been “contacted by a person who knew Schumacher’s family”. </p> <p>“They asked if something could be done (for Schumacher). At that time, we had made an attempt to inject the same cells we use for multiple sclerosis into the brain of a boy in a coma with quite good results,” he said. </p> <p>“At the moment, we can only make assumptions about what they are doing in Paris.”</p> <p>The <em>Le Parisien</em> reports the Ferrari and Mercedes driver has an estimate of 10 security guards watching over him at the hospital. </p> <p>The family said on the star’s 50th birthday that they were “doing everything humanly possible" and “that he is in the very best of hands”. </p> <p>The manager of Schumacher, Nick Fry, spoke about his accident in his new book<em> Survive. Drive. Win</em>. where he wrote: “Corinna (Schumacher’s wife) and the family have kept a very tight control on information about his condition and his treatment which, I think, is a pity.</p> <p>“There are millions of people out there who have a genuine affection for Michael, and that’s not just his fans in Germany or fans of Mercedes Benz.</p> <p>“He has sustained an injury while skiing, which unfortunately happens to ordinary people every year. Families of those in recovery generally react better if they know other people are in the same boat.</p> <p>“I am sure that techniques and therapies have been developed and tried (with Schumacher) over the last few years that may well help others.</p> <p>“It would be helpful for his family to share how they have dealt with this challenge.”</p> <p> </p>

Body

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A life in pictures: Prince Harry turns 35!

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Loving father, accomplished veteran and doting husband - Prince Harry has it all. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When we first met Prince Harry in 1984, he was a tiny cherub in his mother’s hands who made headlines around the world as they stood on the steps of St Mary’s Hospital, London. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He was the second son to Prince Charles and Princess Di, and a warm, cheeky welcome after the arrival of his big brother Prince William who was born in 1982. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Growing up in the eyes of the public as the son of “the most photographed woman in the world” and the future King of England was not an easy feat - but thankfully he had a close support system in his family to rely on and the world never got to miss out on seeing a cheeky Hazza stick his tongue out at the cameras or adorably smile up at his mother or big brother. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since growing up in the spotlight, Prince Harry has made a name for himself by supporting children with HIV and AIDS through his charity Sentebale. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He has also campaigned alongside the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to promote mental health awareness. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 2018, a 33-year-old Prince Harry married American-born Meghan Markle who became Meghan, Duchess of Sussex in a highly televised wedding which had hearts melting all around the world. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Duke and Duchess of Sussex share one child together, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor, who graced the world in May of 2019. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see Prince Harry’s life in pictures. </span></p>

Art

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Delicious recipe for pad thai

<p><em> </em>A popular Thai dish with a healthy twist! This recipe uses kelp noodles that are crunchy and incredibly low in fat and calories – it's a great dinner option!</p> <p><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fraw-is-more-eccie-newton%2Fprod9780857833235.html">Edited recipe extract from Raw Is More by Eccie and Gini Newton, published by Kyle Books and distributed by Simon &amp; Schuster Australia, RRP $35.</a></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 packet (250g) of kelp noodles </li> <li>A handful of coriander leaves </li> <li>2 tablespoons dried peanuts (dehydrated for 3 hours), roughly ground </li> <li>2 large handfuls of beansprouts </li> <li>1 carrot, spiralized into spaghetti-like curls </li> <li>3 tablespoons small dried shrimp </li> <li>1 teaspoon dried garlic flakes (shop-bought or dehyrated in very thin slices for 3 hours) </li> <li>1 tablespoon dried shallots (shop-bought or dehyrated in very thin slices for 3 hours) </li> <li>1 lime, cut into wedges</li> </ul> <p><strong>For the dressing</strong> </p> <ul> <li>30g raw cane sugar </li> <li>60g dried peanuts (dehydrated for 3 hours), reserving half for garnish </li> <li>1 teaspoon fermented chilli bean paste </li> <li>50ml tamarind water </li> <li>50ml fish sauce</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. First make the dressing. Grind half the dehydrated peanuts with the sugar using a pestle and mortar. Grind in the chilli paste. Gradually add the tamarind water and fish sauce and keep grinding to fully combine the ingredients. Set aside in a large bowl.</p> <p>2. Soak the kelp noodles in cold water for 10 minutes. Pick the coriander leaves off the stalks, then finely chop the stalks. Drain the kelp noodles and toss in the large bowl containing the dressing, then toss in the beansprouts, carrot and coriander stalks. Finally toss in the dried shrimp.</p> <p>3. Divide between two plates and top each portion with the remaining peanuts, dried garlic, dried shallot and coriander leaves and a couple of lime wedges.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <ul> <li>Dehydrating the peanuts gives the dish a stronger flavour.</li> <li>Serves 2</li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pad-thai.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

food & Wine

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“The most amazing human” Serena Williams opens up about Duchess Meghan’s US trip

<p>Serena Williams and Duchess Meghan’s friendship traces back to years ago, and dates back to when the royal first forged her career as an actress. </p> <p>Now, she is the Duchess of Sussex, and mother to a new royal baby Archie - but the pair still seem to remain solid friends. </p> <p>This month, Duchess Meghan travelled to New York to support the tennis dynamite at the US Open final. </p> <p>Williams had a few kind words to say about her 37-year-old pal, describing her as “amazing”. </p> <p>"She literally flew across the seas just to support for a few hours with a newborn baby," she told <em>E! News</em> while attending New York Fashion Week. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2H-_drnwlD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2H-_drnwlD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by My royal Diary 👑🏰 (@my_royal_diaries)</a> on Sep 7, 2019 at 2:16pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"She is the most positive, amazing human that I know. Everyone needs to know how amazing she is.</p> <p>"I don't know if I could have done that with my daughter at that age. But she did it. And that shows the kind of person that she is."</p> <p>At the start of the match, Duchess Meghan could be seen waving and smiling as she took a seat in William’s viewing box. </p> <p>Ultimately she lost the final to Bianca Andreescu, and with a 6-3, 7-5 victory she became the first Canadian to ever win a Grand Slam. </p> <p>Despite the sour turn of events for the mother-of-one, her clear gratitude for her friend travelling across the pond to watch her play is evident. </p> <p>Serena said during her pregnancy to her daughter Alexis Olympia, with internet entrepreneur husband Alexis Ohanion, that Duchess Meghan would constantly check in on her. </p> <p>"I'm like, 'How are you?' and she's like, 'No, how are you? and I'm like, 'You're so sweet, but I'm really asking, how are YOU?'</p> <p>"I'm like, 'Meghan, stop being so nice you're the pregnant one, aren't you supposed to have hormones, why are you so sweet?' But that's always been her."</p>

International Travel

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How to manage your phone's data use

<p>Smartphones give you access to a wealth of information and media, but most networks put a cap on the amount of data you can use each month. A typical phone contract includes a data allowance of between 500MB and 10GB per month; the more data, the higher the monthly cost. Your usage can mount up surprisingly quickly – watching a film on the phone is about 700MB in SD, an hour of streaming TV is around 500MB or 60-140MB for the same of radio, chatting on Skype for an hour is around 40MB. Try these tips to better manage your data usage:</p> <ul> <li>If possible, wait until you can connect to free Wi-Fi before using your phone’s data features.</li> <li>When you are on the road, use your car’s GPS, not your phone, to find your way. The phone has to download map data as you move, but maps are preloaded in a GPS, making this free to use.</li> <li>Be careful of how many “free” games you play on the move. Many of these are funded by ads that pop up on your screen. Every ad has to download through your network, using up your data allowance.</li> <li>If you regularly need to use a lot of data on your phone, consider a data-compressing app, such as Onavo (<a href="http://www.onavo.com/">www.onavo.com</a>). It compresses</li> <li>data before it is fed to your phone, so you use less of your monthly allowance. You may have to subscribe to such compression services, so you’ll need to weigh up whether it’s worth the cost.</li> </ul> <h4>Travel Smart</h4> <p>Using your phone overseas can be costly. Before you go, see if your carrier offers prepaid or flat-rate roaming. At your destination, if your phone is unlocked, you can buy a local prepaid SIM to replace yours, or buy a cheap prepaid phone and use free Wi-Fi for internet.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/How-to-Manage-Your-Phone-Data-Use" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Income

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Can you eat your way out of Alzheimer's disease?

<p>With the rise of fad diets, “superfoods”, and a growing range of dietary supplement choices, it’s sometimes hard to know what to eat.</p> <p>This can be particularly relevant as we grow older, and are trying to make the best choices to minimise the risk of health problems such as high blood pressure, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart (cardiovascular) problems.</p> <p>We now have evidence these health problems <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25142458">also all affect brain function</a>: they increase nerve degeneration in the brain, leading to a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other brain conditions including vascular dementia and Parkinson’s disease.</p> <p>We know a healthy diet can protect against conditions like type 2 diabetes, obesity and heart disease. Fortunately, evidence shows that what’s good for the body is <a href="https://yourbrainmatters.org.au/diet-the-evidence-base">generally also good for the brain</a>.</p> <p><strong>Oxidative stress</strong></p> <p>As we age, our metabolism becomes less efficient, and is less able to get rid of compounds generated from what’s called “oxidative stress”.</p> <p>The body’s normal chemical reactions can sometimes cause chemical damage, or generate side-products known as free radicals – which in turn cause damage to other chemicals in the body.</p> <p>To neutralise these free radicals, our bodies draw on protective mechanisms, in the form of antioxidants or specific proteins. But as we get older, these systems become less efficient. When your body can no longer neutralise the free radical damage, it’s under oxidative stress.</p> <p>The toxic compounds generated by oxidative stress steadily build up, slowly damaging the brain and eventually leading to symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>To reduce your risk, you need to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26682690">reduce oxidative stress</a> and the long-term inflammation it can cause.</p> <p>Increasing physical activity is important. But here we are focusing on diet, which is our major source of antioxidants.</p> <p><strong>Foods to add</strong></p> <p>There are plenty of foods you can include in your diet that will positively influence brain health. These include fresh fruits, seafood, green leafy vegetables, pulses (including beans, lentils and peas), as well as nuts and healthy oils.</p> <p><strong>Fish</strong></p> <p>Fish is a good source of complete protein. Importantly, oily fish in particular is rich in omega-3 fatty acids.</p> <p>Laboratory studies have shown omega-3 fatty acids <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236236/">protect against oxidative stress</a>, and they’ve been found to be lacking in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>They are essential for memory, learning and cognitive processes, and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30205543">improve the gut microbiota and function</a>.</p> <p>Low dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids, meanwhile, is linked to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28466678">faster cognitive decline</a>, and the development of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (changes in the brain that can be seen several years before for onset of symptoms such as memory loss).</p> <p>Omega-3 fatty acids are generally lacking in western diets, and this has been linked to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27825512">reduced brain cell health and function</a>.</p> <p>Fish also provides vitamin D. This is important because a lack of vitamin D <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23042216">has been linked</a> to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and vascular dementia (a common form of dementia caused by reduced blood supply to the brain as a result of a series of small strokes).</p> <p><strong>Berries</strong></p> <p>Berries are especially high in the antioxidants vitamin C (strawberries), anthocyanins (blueberries, raspberries and blackberries) and resveratrol (blueberries).</p> <p>In research conducted on mouse brain cells, anthocyanins have been associated with lower toxic Alzheimer’s disease-related protein changes, and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28931353">reduced signs of oxidative stress and inflammation</a> specifically related to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29401686">brain cell (neuron) damage</a>. Human studies have shown <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28249119">improvements in brain function and blood flow</a>, and signs of reduced brain inflammation.</p> <p><strong>Red and purple sweet potato</strong></p> <p>Longevity has been associated with a small number of traditional diets, and one of these is the diet of the Okinawan people of Japan. The starchy staple of their diet is the purple sweet potato – rich in anthocyanin antioxidants.</p> <p>Studies in mice have shown this potato’s anthocyanins protect against the effects of obesity on blood sugar regulation and cognitive function, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29344660">and can reduce obesity-induced brain inflammation</a>.</p> <p><strong>Green vegetables and herbs</strong></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555333">traditional Mediterranean diet</a> has also been studied for its links to longevity and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>Green vegetables and herbs feature prominently in this diet. They are rich sources of antioxidants including vitamins A and C, folate, polyphenols such as apigenin, and the carotenoid xanthophylls (especially if raw). A carotenoid is an orange or red pigment commonly found in carrots.</p> <p>The antioxidants and anti-inflammatory chemicals in the vegetables are believed to be responsible for <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/full/10.1146/annurev-food-030216-030125">slowing Alzheimer’s pathology development</a>, the build up of specific proteins which are toxic to brain cells.</p> <p>Parsley is rich in apigenin, a powerful antioxidant. It readily crosses the barrier between the blood and the brain (unlike many drugs), <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28237914">where it reduces inflammation and oxidative stress</a>, and helps <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6304859/">brain tissue recovery</a> after injury.</p> <p><strong>Beetroot</strong></p> <p>Beetroot is a rich source of folate and polyphenol antioxidants, as well as copper and manganese. In particular, beetroot is <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/10715762.2011.641157">rich in betalain pigments</a>, which reduce oxidative stress and have anti-inflammatory properties.</p> <p>Due to its nitrate content, beetroot can also boost the body’s nitric oxide levels. Nitric oxide relaxes blood vessels resulting in lowered blood pressure, a benefit which has <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30400267">been associated</a> with drinking beetroot juice.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29077028">recent review of clinical studies</a> in older adults also indicated clear benefits of nitrate-rich beetroot juice on the health of our hearts and blood vessels.</p> <p><strong>Foods to reduce</strong></p> <p>Equally as important as adding good sources of antioxidants to your diet is minimising foods that are unhealthy: some foods contain damaged fats and proteins, which are major sources of oxidative stress and inflammation.</p> <p>A high intake of “junk foods” including sweets, soft drinks, refined carbohydrates, processed meats and deep fried foods <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1038/oby.2001.122">has been linked</a> to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.</p> <p>Where these conditions are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31062323">are all risk factors</a> for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, they should be kept to a minimum to reduce health risks and improve longevity.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Ralph Martins, Chair in Ageing and Alzheimer’s Disease, Edith Cowan University; Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/are-there-certain-foods-you-can-eat-to-reduce-your-risk-of-alzheimers-disease-117096" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Mind

News

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Alan Jones radio show under review due to “appalling” Jacinda Ardern comments

<p>Radio veteran Alan Jones has been put on notice after Macquarie Media announced a pending “full review” of his program.</p> <p>This comes after his controversial comments about NZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern that saw more than 100 companies withdrawing their advertising dollars from the radio station.</p> <p>The scandal initially began when the 78-year-old Jones said that Ardern is a “complete clown”.</p> <p>“She’s a clown, Jacinda Ardern; a complete clown,’’ Mr Jones said.</p> <p>“I just wonder whether Scott Morrison is going to be fully briefed to shove a sock down her throat.’’</p> <p>“She is a joke, this woman; an absolute and utter lightweight,” he said on social media.</p> <p>Macquarie Media chairman Russell Tate publicly warned Jones that he would be sacked if he made similar comments in future.</p> <p>According to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/alan-jones-breakfast-show-to-undergo-full-review-macquarie-chairman-20190910-p52pqs.html" target="_blank"><em>Sydney Morning Herald</em></a>, Macquarie Media have reportedly sent a letter to advertisers pledging a review of <em>Jones’ Breakfast Show</em> on 2GB and 4BC.</p> <p>“This incident has brought into sharp focus the need for all Macquarie Media broadcasters to ensure that the debate they bring to the microphone and the words they use are, at all times, respectful and reflect the standards expected today by our listeners, our clients, and the wider community,” the letter allegedly reads.</p> <p>“Through this incident, we have experienced the ability of offended groups to greatly amplify their complaints and to actively disrupt you, our clients and your staff, who have done no more than seek to engage with the audience which chooses to listen to us,” Mr Tate said in the letter.</p> <p>“Of course, we have seen valued commercial partners withdraw from Alan’s program, but the fact is we got it wrong in the first place and we must now do everything possible to ensure that doesn’t happen again,” he said.</p> <p>“To that end, we have already commenced, with Alan’s encouragement and support, a full review of the 2GB/4BC Breakfast Show’s content, presentation and controls with a specific focus on audience and guest/third party engagement. That review will extend into all 2GB/4BC programs.”</p> <p>As to what the “pending review” will uncover remains to be seen.</p>

News

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Back to work! Duchess Meghan steps out in style after wrapping up maternity leave

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has officially returned to work after maternity leave.</p> <p>On Thursday, four months after giving birth to her and Prince Harry’s first child Archie Harrison, the Duchess attended her first engagement in London as she launched her work wear line.</p> <p>The Smart Set capsule collection was created in collaboration with Smart Works, a charity which provides unemployed women with free clothes and job interview training. The collection features apparels from fashion brands and designers such as John Lewis &amp; Partners, Marks &amp; Spencer, Jigsaw and Misha Nonoo.</p> <p>For every item sold from the collection, one will be donated to the charity.</p> <p>Speaking outside the John Lewis department store, Duchess Meghan said the initiative was the “kind of work I’ve been doing for a very long time”.</p> <p>She said, “A big piece of this is trying to transform the idea of charity to community … You don’t go through your closet and just toss in a box whatever you don’t care about anymore. That’s charity, as we know it today.</p> <p>“Community is going through your closet and saying, this is the blazer that I wore when I nailed my first job interview and got my dream job. And I don’t need that anymore, because I am where I want to be.</p> <p>“But if I’m able to share that blazer and be part of another woman’s success story, then that’s community.”</p> <p>According to a source, the Duchess will be wearing pieces from the capsule collection on her upcoming tour of South Africa later this month. “She’s planning to take a working wardrobe over anything too glamorous so I am sure we’ll be seeing more of Meghan in the Smart Set collection,” the source said.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Duchess Meghan's stunning style. </p>

News

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“I was uncomfortable”: Zara Tindall explains her strange demeanour at Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s wedding

<p>Over tens of millions tuned in around the world to watch the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on May 19, 2019. </p> <p>However, there is one royal who said she felt “uncomfortable” while sitting on the sidelines watching her cousin wed. </p> <p>Photos of Zara Tindall, the Queen’s eldest grandchild and Princess Anne’s daughter,  painted her looking slightly uneasy during the special service at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle last year. </p> <p>Zara explained the obvious discomfort on her face while talking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/family/parenting/zara-tindall-going-back-work-8-weeks-has-made-better-happier/" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Telegraph. </em></a></p> <p>"I was uncomfortable! My bum sort of slid over either side [of the pew] and Lena kicked the hell out of me for an hour," she said of her youngest daughter who was born in June 2018. </p> <p>"It just wasn't comfy at all, and it probably showed on my face."</p> <p>Tindall said she found it particularly difficult to be at ease while during Bishop Michael Curry’s speech, which lasted a little over 13 minutes. </p> <p>"It was just the general amount of time everything was taking," she said.</p> <p>"I think my face was probably caught the point when I thought, 'Right he's going to finish now' and then he went off on another little story and it was like, "Really?'"</p> <p>The royal and her husband welcomed their second daughter a month after the royal wedding, on June 18. </p> <p>Their eldest daughter, Mia, is five and Lena is now 15 months old.</p> <p>The couple sadly suffered two miscarriages before successfully welcoming their second daughter to the world. </p> <p>Zara Phillips is an equestrian and has competed in the Olympics - going on to win silver in 2012. She and former footballer Mike Tindall married in 2011.</p> <p>At birth, Zara was sixth in line to the British throne and is now 18th.</p>

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“I’m seeing someone else”: Dame Edna claims she's dating Thomas Markle

<p>Dame Edna is a classic Australian icon, and it’s safe to say that this title does not come without controversy.</p> <p>As Dame Edna is promoting her new tour, she’s announced to the press that she’s got a new man in her life.</p> <p>“I’ve had many years of widowhood, but I’m seeing someone else,” Dame Edna said, before dropping clues about her new lover.</p> <p>“An older man. He’s not well known. He was in the limelight because of his daughter’s marriage. He lives in America. He sometimes lives in Mexico. His name is Thomas Markle,” she said, as the room erupted in laughter.</p> <p>Although they’re getting “very, very close”, nothing serious has happened yet.</p> <p>“He is the father of little Meghan and he’s such a lovely man,” she continued. “We’re getting very, very close. We haven’t committed acts of immodesty yet.”</p> <p>After doing some quick math, Dame Edna realised that she would be in line to the throne if her and Tommy tied the knot.</p> <p>“Do you realise that if I do tie the knot with Tommy, I will be 17th in line for the throne,” she said.</p> <p>“So he suggested we go down to his local jeweller and have our heads measured for crowns, just in case. Queen Edna and King Thomas, it sounds good, doesn’t it?”</p> <p>This isn’t the first time that Dame Edna has had a brush with the royal family, as she recently posted a video on her Instagram page of her with Prince Charles and Camilla at the Royal Variety Show.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2Nih1dHV_K/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2Nih1dHV_K/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Me with Prince Charles and Camilla at the Royal Variety Show. I absolutely ADORE them! 😘 #royalfamily #royal #royalty #royals #britishroyalfamily #katemiddleton #queenelizabeth #princewilliam #britishroyals #duchessofcambridge #princeharry #meghanmarkle #princegeorge #queen #princesscharlotte #princelouis #royalwedding #monarchy #princess #dukeofcambridge #london #duchessofsussex #princessdiana #love #windsor #houseofwindsor #royalfamilynews #hermajesty #thequeen#dameedna</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/dameednaeverage/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Dame Edna Everage</a> (@dameednaeverage) on Sep 9, 2019 at 6:06pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p> </p>

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Travel

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13 things you should never do at the airport

<p>OK, so you know not to joke about having a bomb in your luggage, but it’s still surprisingly easy to get yourself in a pickle at the airport. Here are 13 tips to help you avoid some of those all-to-frequent airport pitfalls.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t expect it to be easy</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Now that the golden age of aviation has passed, we can no longer count on assigned seating, checking baggage, legroom or free meals. Before you even board, you have to run the gauntlet of an overcrowded, understaffed airport. The glamour of flying is dead, and that can set you up for disappointment: "A tremendous amount of stress happens because we have expectations that are unrealistically high," notes digital news platform Fast Company.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t show up late</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Being on time is crucial when it comes to air travel, according to veteran commercial pilot Tom Davis (not his real name). When you show up late to the airport, you not only risk missing your flight, but you make the experience worse for other passengers and the flight crew. If that doesn’t make you want to change your tardy ways, know that your impatience will attract the attention of airport security. All in all, it’s just one of the airport mistakes you really could do with avoiding.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Go easy on the perfume or aftershave</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Airports and planes are crammed with people. You can make everyone’s experience a bit less unpleasant if you minimise your scent of choice. In fact, antiperspirant will be enough to get you through (and protect your seatmates), says Davis. Going overboard with scents is one of the inconsiderate aeroplane habits passengers need to stop.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t ask a pilot for directions</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>If you see a uniformed pilot or flight attendant in an airport, there’s a really good chance they’re just passing through – which means they could be just as lost as you are. "When you ask a pilot for directions, you’re more than likely wasting both your time and theirs," advises Davis.</p> <p> </p> <p><br /><strong>Don’t take a sedative</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>It’s tempting to want to sleep your way through a long flight, but you don’t want to incapacitate yourself on a plane, warns Davis – you’ll not only need to get up for people sitting in your row, but you may need to respond to emergency instructions. A registered nurse told Business Insider that, "Taking medication to help you sleep while flying increases your risk of blood clots in your legs that can lead to death." Shocking, but true.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t drink too much</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>You need your wits about you while you’re at the airport, which is enough of a reason to go easy on the booze. Flying also dramatically dehydrates you, so drinking alcohol rather than water will make the flight and arrival far more miserable. That jet lag you’re feeling? It’s probably half hangover.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t try to outwit airport security</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Yes, customs queues are annoying, and no one likes taking off their shoes, belts and coats. But there’s no way around security – and if you try, you’re not going to like what happens. On one flight, a woman who refused to take off her coat because it was part of her outfit ended up being pulled aside for an extensive pat-down. In the security line, follow the path of least resistance.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t leave your laptop at security</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Most security checkpoints require that all laptops and tablets be placed in a separate bin – and a shocking number of travellers forget to put their electronic devices back in their bags. "You wouldn’t believe how many people leave these things behind," said one airport security officer.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t sleep at the airport</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>It’s a great way to miss a flight and get pickpocketed or lose your belongings, Davis points out. "Sleeping at airports is a strictly at-your-own-risk activity," writes TripSavvy. "It is something that few people would recommend outside of extenuating circumstances."</p> <p> </p> <p>If you’re at the airport hours before your flight, as we all need to be, a good way to say goodbye to airport boredom is with these global wi-fi passwords – just make sure you don’t get so engrossed on what’s on your device that you miss your plane.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t mess with the baggage conveyor belt</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Yes, you’re anxious to grab your suitcase and get out of there. And it’s incredibly frustrating when it’s sitting on the belt, ready to slide down, and then the belt stops – or your luggage gets stuck. Resist the urge to climb onto the belt to try to fix things: you’re not only risking a fall or getting tangled up in the machinery, but you’re also violating airport security.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t forget to charge your phone</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Your mobile boarding pass is useless if your phone is dead, and that’s really going to hold you up. If you can’t get it up and running quickly – or worse, forgot your charger and have to fork over for one at the newsstand – you could miss your flight.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t take photos of strangers without their permission</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>"Taking someone’s photo without their consent and posting it on the internet is a [bad] thing to do," advises Lifehacker. "It’s invasive, inappropriate, and can even put the other person in danger." It can also put the photographer – and their phone or camera – in danger should the subject catch on and strenuously object.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Don’t forget why you’re there</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Airports can be incredibly distracting, with duty-free shops, restaurants and other novelties. It’s become more and more common for travellers to lose track of time. Safebee – a safety news site – interviewed a guy who once missed his flight entirely: "I was in the [airport] coffee shop, found a newspaper and started poring over it – forgetting I had a flight coming a few gates down the concourse," he admits.</p>

International Travel

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Inside Ellen DeGeneres' luxury $10 million Santa Barbara home

<p>Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi have dropped the price of their gorgeous vintage farm near Santa Barbara, California. </p> <p>The property had over $1 million slashed from its price back in July and is now going for AUD$10 million. </p> <p>The prolific home owners purchased the home for AUD$9.8 million a little over a year ago and turned it into a posh, design-savvy home that is hard to resist! </p> <p>With three bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms with an additional barn house for a lucky guest, the 10.5 acre mountain and ocean-view property has become a haven for any potential buyer looking for seclusion in comfortable luxury. </p> <p>Built in 1917, the main floor has an open layout with wide, beautiful plank oak floors throughout to give a real farmhouse feel. </p> <p>The kitchen has a unique touch with all black granite counter tops, grey cabinetry, stone slabs and sleek, stainless steel appliances. </p> <p>The living and dining area also carry a dark tone with a painted stone fireplace. </p> <p>The master suite offers a size that is unlike any other - with vaulted ceilings, custom lighting and a french doors leading to a verandah it is the type of airy and spacious part of the home a haven. </p> <p>The property also comes with a century-old barn as well as a spa, various terraces pastures that give a view worth looking at. </p> <p>The equestrian estate is located between Montecito and Carpinteria - areas DeGeneres and her wife de Rossi are familiar with. </p> <p>The couple have spent an estimate of $145 million flipping homes.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Ellen's gorgeous home. </p>

International Travel

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Europe’s 10 tourist rules you never realised you had to follow

<p>When travelling to Europe it's easy to let your hair and guard down and accidentally upset the locals. Our guide will help you avoid any embarrassing mistakes.</p> <p>When your entire country can be considered a work of art or priceless history, officials sometimes have to go to extremes to protect their national treasures, leading to some pretty surprising rules that you need to follow when you travel.</p> <p><strong>1.Don’t sit on the steps in Rome</strong></p> <p>New tourist laws in Rome make it illegal to sit on the city’s famed Spanish Steps. The explanation: The newly renovated stairs are a centuries-old historic monument, not actually seating. The same goes for other historic stairways in the city; you can walk up and down, but don’t get comfortable by grabbing a seat or you can be issued a fine. It’s also against the law to bump your wheeled luggage and baby strollers down ancient stairs since it can destroy the stone. Even though these rules can sound pernickety, it’s become a necessity to protect the ancient highlights of the city since Italy is the country everyone wants to travel to this year.</p> <p><strong>2.Don’t wear heels in Athens</strong></p> <p>Rome isn’t the only iconic city worried about preserving vintage stone; in Greece, it’s illegal to wear high heels when you’re touring storied monuments like the Parthenon and the Acropolis in Athens, or any other ancient marble and stone historic site. (They’re notoriously slippery, so we wouldn’t recommend it anyway.)</p> <p><strong>3.Don’t jump in the Canal in Venice</strong></p> <p>It’s never OK to swim, or even dunk your toes, in the famous canals and lagoons in Venice; it’s against the law. Honestly, you shouldn’t even want to, it’s not all that clean. Instead, head to lovely Lido Island for beautiful sandy beaches and clean swimming waters.</p> <p><strong>4.Fountains are not for swimming</strong></p> <p>Forget what you’ve seen in movies, you’ll be in hot water if you try to splash around in Rome’s Trevi Fountain to cool off, or in any other fountain in Italy. Instead, head to the beautiful beaches of Cinque Terre or the Amalfi Coast to cool off during the summer.</p> <p><strong>5.Don’t swim in the Blue Grotto</strong></p> <p>Speaking of water in Italy, if you see a sign that prohibits swimming, take it seriously. Heidi Klum and her newly betrothed Tom Kaulitz were recently fined more than $6,000 for leaping into the fabled waters of the Blue Grotto in Capri after they tied the knot on a nearby yacht.</p> <p><strong>6.Don’t snack on the go</strong></p> <p>Here’s an Italian law that may catch you by surprise: It’s illegal to eat messy food in historic locations in Rome, Florence, and Venice. That doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy your gelato in a park or while you stroll down a quiet street, but you could be fined (or even removed from the city center) if you try to eat a pizza in a historic piazza or drip your ice cream onto the stones of the Coliseum. And in Greece, you can’t bring drinks, food, or gum into any historic sites, either. And please don’t cook your food in a historic site: two German tourists were actually kicked out of Venice for brewing coffee on the famed Rialto Bridge.</p> <p><strong>7.Keep your shirt on</strong></p> <p>Taking a dip in the sea in Barcelona? Don’t plan on walking around in your bathing suit once you leave the beach; wearing just a bikini or swim trunks on the street is a fineable offence here and also on the popular Spanish island of Mallorca. And men, keep your shirt on when you’re in Rome, too; it’s against the law to walk around bare-chested. Taking your phone?</p> <p><strong>8.Don’t feed the pigeons</strong></p> <p>Want to toss a few breadcrumbs to the infamous flying residents of San Marco Square in Venice? Not so fast! It’s actually against the law to feed the pesky pigeons. Same goes for the birds in Vienna, Austria, where feeding the pigeons has been a fineable offence since 2014.</p> <p><strong>9. Keep the noise down</strong></p> <p>If you’re visiting Germany, it’s illegal to make too much noise on a Sunday or holidays. And keep things down when you’re visiting Venice, too; a new law says that making too much noise at night or during siesta time (1 pm to 3 pm), is also forbidden.</p> <p><strong>10. Don’t put your mouth on the tap in Rome</strong></p> <p>According to Lonely Planet, tourists will need to be especially considerate about how they drink water from Rome’s historic public drinking fountains, known as <em>nasoni</em>. It’s unacceptable to let your mouth touch the metal spout; instead, cup your hands under the spout to get a drink, or bring a reusable water bottle, and skip the issue altogether.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/travel-hints-tips/europes-10-tourist-rules-you-never-realised-you-had-to-follow?slide=all"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a> <img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Travel Tips

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Sailing: The only way to see the Greek Islands

<p>Convincing anyone to visit the Greek Islands is an easy task: endless sunshine, crystal clear blue waters, ancient archaeological sites, and the best olives you’ll ever taste. But with so much to see and do, the way you get around makes a huge difference to your trip; and by far the best way to do it is by boat.</p> <p>Board a yacht or catamaran and you’ll find yourself on the most hassle-free, yet exciting trip of your life. Only having to unpack your bag once, you’ll see far more than you would navigating on your own.</p> <p>The living quarters are compact but comfortable – this is no luxury cruise, but you won’t want to be spending too much time on the boat when you’re surrounded by warm water, stunning hiking trails, and vibrant local ports.</p> <p>These trips are suitable for all ages and fitness levels, and companies such as G Adventures and Peregrine offer group tours for people who are social, but want to steer clear of the infamous under-30s party tours.</p> <p>If you’re interested in discovering the more authentic side of the islands, and finding the perfect balance between exploring Greek culture and relaxing in stunning locations, then this trip is for you.</p> <p>Sailing tours offer a fantastic combination of group and independent travelling. Each morning you’ll get up and make breakfast with the rest of the ‘crew’, before setting sail for the day’s destination (you’ll average one night at each island depending on the length of your trip).</p> <p>If anyone is interested, the boat’s skipper will spend this time teaching everyone the basics of sailing – knots, steering, reading charts – or you can spend your time on deck reading or soaking up some sun.</p> <p>Once you arrive at the next island, how you spend the rest of the afternoon is up to you. Some people choose to spend most of their time at the beach, others will explore the cities or hike through the surrounding hillsides. Dinner is usually together, at a local hidden gem suggested by the skipper.</p> <p>Flexibility is a key part of these tours, and you’ll have the option to visit a wide variety of different islands depending on the desires of everyone on board. Some of the islands you won’t want to miss out on include:</p> <p><strong>Naxos</strong></p> <p>Inhabited throughout the entire year, you’ll find Naxos has one of the best examples of more authentic Greek lifestyle and is very family friendly.</p> <p>In addition to sand beaches, you can hire a car or ATV to travel inland to explore ancient temples, olive presses, and ouzo distilleries. The night life in the main port is fantastic – stop at a restaurant called Flamingos to see the head chef light the ground on fire and dance the sirtaki across it.</p> <p><strong>Santorini</strong></p> <p>Famous for its volcanic black beaches, you’ll find some of the most stunning natural scenery on Santorini. Take a day trip from the island to explore nearby volcanoes, hot springs, and end by watching the sunset in postcard perfect Oia.</p> <p>You've probably seen sunsets from Santorini on hundreds of postcards but it's truly breathtaking to see it in person</p> <p><strong>Mykonos</strong></p> <p>One of the more expensive islands, this is the place to treat yourself to some off-boat pampering. Partying and boutique shopping are the two most popular activities here, but you can find some secluded beaches if you travel away from the main port.</p> <p><strong>Paros</strong></p> <p>One of the most beautiful islands in Greece, you’ll be stopping to take a photo every two metres. Octopi hang from doorways and white building walls with bright blue doors surround small docks. The boats even sit matching alongside the beautiful Greek colors. Paros' nightlife is more relaxed and is a fantastic place just to wander about and absorb the sights.</p> <p>If you’re planning a trip, July and August are the peak season – but be aware this means big crowds. For the best combination of summer sun and a little peace and quiet, June is the best time of year to go.</p> <p><em>Written by Casey Ventura. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/sailing-around-the-greek-islands.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Cruising

Health

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"Racism is taught": Heartwarming video of toddlers hugging each other goes viral

<p>A video of two toddlers running down the street to give each other a hug has gone viral, garnering headlines across the globe.</p> <p>The video, posted by Michael Cisneros to social media last week, shows his two-year-old son Maxwell running towards and hugging his best friend Finnegan after unexpectedly spotting him on the New York street.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FMichaelDCisnerosNYC%2Fvideos%2F10217659556234176%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>Cisneros told <em>CBSN New York</em> that the two boys hug every time they see each other.</p> <p>The father said the video has attracted thousands of views and shares online because of the growing racial tensions in the US and around the world.</p> <p>“Honestly, I think it has gotten so big because of the race issue in our country and also around the world,” Cisneros said.</p> <p>“Racism is taught. Hatred is taught. These two boys don’t see anything different within each other. They love each other for who they are and that’s exactly how it should be.</p> <p>“We just want to raise loving, caring boys, and I think the world likes to see a little bit of hope.”</p> <p>Cisneros said Maxwell and Finnegan first became friends when their parents met at a restaurant a year ago.</p> <p>He added that today the toddlers celebrate their birthdays together and are always “super excited to see each other, even if they’ve only been apart for a day or two”.</p>

Caring

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Why are people religious?

<p>The quick and easy answer to why people are religious is that God – in whichever form you believe he/she/they take(s) – is real and people believe because they communicate with it and perceive evidence of its involvement in the world. Only <a href="http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/04/05/christians-remain-worlds-largest-religious-group-but-they-are-declining-in-europe/">16 per cent of people worldwide</a> are not religious, but this still equates to approximately 1.2 billion individuals who find it difficult to reconcile the ideas of religion with what they know about the world.</p> <p>Why people believe is a question that has plagued great thinkers for many centuries. Karl Marx, for example, called religion the “<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2009/jun/26/religion-philosophy">opium of the people</a>”. Sigmund Freud felt that god was an illusion and worshippers were reverting to the childhood needs of security and forgiveness.</p> <p>A more recent psychological explanation is the idea that our evolution has created a “<a href="https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23631561-000-effortless-thinking-the-godshaped-hole-in-your-brain/">god-shaped hole</a>” or has given us a metaphorical “<a href="https://www.csicop.org/si/show/the_god_engine">god engine</a>” which can drive us to believe in a deity. Essentially this hypothesis is that religion is a by-product of a number of cognitive and social adaptations which have been extremely important in human development.</p> <p><strong>Adapted for faith</strong></p> <p>We are social creatures who interact and communicate with each other in a co-operative and supportive way. In doing so we inevitably have stronger attachments to some individuals more than others. British psychologist John Bowlby demonstrated <a href="https://www.learning-theories.com/attachment-theory-bowlby.html">this influence of attachments</a> on children’s emotional and social development, and showed how these can suffer when they are threatened through separation or abuse. We continue to rely on these attachments in later life, when falling in love and making friends, and can even form strong attachments to non-human animals and inanimate objects. It is easy to see that <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10508619.2012.679556">these strong attachments could transfer</a> to religious deities and their messengers.</p> <p>Our relationships depend on being able to predict how others will behave across situations and time. But the things that we form attachments to don’t necessarily need to be in front of us to predict their actions. We can imagine what they would do or say. This ability – known as <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;id=R5c4AAAAIAAJ&amp;oi=fnd&amp;pg=PR9&amp;dq=decoupled+cognition+development&amp;ots=EguvU5WaPt&amp;sig=vFzsPLOgvR-DVKo45otxPToTL-s#v=onepage&amp;q=decoupled%20cognition%20development&amp;f=false">cognitive decoupling</a> – originates in childhood through pretend play. It is a small leap from being able to imagine the mind of someone we know to imagining an <a href="http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/271772">omnipotent, omniscient, human-like mind</a> – especially if we have religious texts which tell of their past actions.</p> <p>Another key adaptation that may help religious belief derives from our ability to to anthropomorphise objects. Have you ever seen the outline of a person only to realise that it is actually a coat hung on the door? This capacity to attribute human forms and behaviours to non-human things shows we also readily endow non-human entities, such as gods, with the same qualities that we possess and, as such, make it easier to connect with them.</p> <p><strong>Behavioural benefits</strong></p> <p>In addition to these psychological aspects, the ritual behaviour seen in collective worship makes us enjoy and want to repeat the experience. Dancing, singing and achieving trance-like states were prominent in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4958132/">many ancestral societies</a> and are still exhibited by some today – including the <a href="https://www.survivalinternational.org/tribes/sentinelese">Sentinelese people</a>, and <a href="https://www.aboriginal-art-australia.com/aboriginal-art-library/aboriginal-ceremonial-dancing/">Australian aborigines</a>. As well as being acts of social unity, even more formal rituals also <a href="https://www.salon.com/2014/01/04/this_is_your_brain_on_religion_uncovering_the_science_of_belief/">alter brain chemistry</a>. They increase levels of serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin in the brain – chemicals that make us feel good, want to do things again and provide a closeness to others.</p> <p>These cognitive adaptations are facilitated by educational and household norms which don’t tend to dispute religious ideas. While we are encouraged to challenge other ideas presented to us early in childhood that may not have a strong evidence base – such as Father Christmas or the Tooth Fairy – this is not the case with religion. These challenges are often discouraged in religious teachings and <a href="https://www.christianpost.com/news/billy-graham-its-sin-in-the-eyes-of-god-to-criticize-your-pastor.html">sometimes regarded as sinful</a>.</p> <p>Regardless of your point of view, the impact of religion and religious thinking on human functioning and evolution is a captivating intellectual debate that shows no sign of ending. Of course, one might argue that god creates everything outlined above but then this leads us onto another, bigger question: what is the evidence for god?<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/108647/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Nick Perham, Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Cardiff Metropolitan University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/why-are-people-religious-a-cognitive-perspective-108647" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Mind

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7 innocent mistakes that put your kidneys in trouble

<p>If your kidneys aren’t working properly, you could raise your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Here are seven things you may be doing that could jeopardise the health of your kidneys.</p> <p><strong>1. You’re a fan of packaged food</strong></p> <p>Most processed food is chock-full of sodium, which isn’t just bad for your heart, it can lead to kidney problems. When you’re showing signs that you eat too much salt, your body needs to flush the sodium out when you wee, and it takes calcium with it. In turn, having too much calcium in your urine increases your risk for kidney stones, says nephrologist Dr James Simon.</p> <p>In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has set an ‘Adequate Intake’ of sodium at 460–920 mg per day (equivalent to about 1.15-2.3 g of salt), however because on average we consume about 10,000 mg of sodium, the suggested dietary target is 1600 mg (equivalent to about 4 g of salt). One teaspoon of salt equals 2300 mg of sodium – 700 mg higher than the dietary target.</p> <p>Check the nutritional label on processed food, you’ll be surprised just how quickly sodium can add up. In fact, processed and fast food is where more than 75 per cent of the sodium we consume comes from. “People look at carbs and fat and kilojoules, but they don’t pay attention to sodium,” says Dr Simon.</p> <p><strong>2. Your blood pressure is out of control</strong></p> <p>High blood pressure is hard on your whole body, including your kidneys. “Kidneys are basically one big set of blood vessels with urine drains,” says Dr Simon. “If you have high blood pressure in your big blood vessels, you have high blood pressure in your smaller blood vessels.” Letting high blood pressure go unchecked could damage the blood vessels leading to your kidneys, plus scar the organs themselves.</p> <p><strong>3. You haven’t kicked your smoking habit</strong></p> <p>If you thought lung cancer was the only reason to put down the cigarettes, think again. A 2012 study found that quitting smoking for 16 or more years cut the risk of renal cell carcinoma (the most common form of kidney cancer in adults) by 40 per cent. Plus, smoking can damage the blood vessels and increase your risk of high blood pressure. “It’s another reason smoking is just bad on the body,” says Dr Simon.</p> <p><strong>4. You never drink when you’re thirsty</strong></p> <p>Contrary to popular belief, you don’t necessarily need to down a full eight glasses of water to keep your kidneys working well. Even with just four to six glasses of water a day, your kidneys are probably fine, says Dr Simon. But sticking with just a cup or two a day could challenge the organ. Not only will you not have enough water flushing out your system to keep your sodium levels in check, but a dehydrated body will have a harder time keeping blood pressure steady. “The kidney is very sensitive to blood flow,” says Dr Simon. “It won’t like it if you are so dehydrated that your blood pressure drops and the blood flow to your kidneys drops.”</p> <p>You probably won’t need to worry about that level of dehydration every day, but make sure you drink enough water if you’re exercising a lot or outside on a hot day, he says.</p> <p><strong>5. You pop painkillers constantly</strong></p> <p>Watch out if you take over-the-counter medication for chronic pain. Anti-inflammatory drugs, which include ibuprofen and aspirin, reduce blood flow to the kidneys, and cause scarring because they’re directly toxic to the organ, says Dr Simon. Nobody’s saying you need to suffer through a throbbing headache, but popping anti-inflammatory pills too often can increase your risk of kidney problems. “The people at risk are taking them on a daily basis for long periods of time,” says Dr Simon. But if you already have kidney damage, he recommends avoiding these drugs altogether.</p> <p><strong>6. You assume supplements are safe</strong></p> <p>Just because a product is marketed as ‘natural’ doesn’t mean it’s good for you. “There are plenty of herbal medicines out there that are harmful,” says Dr Simon. Case in point: a plant-based ingredient called aristolochic acid can be found in ‘traditional medicines’, but it can cause scarring in the kidneys. Consumers are warned to stay away from products listing Aristolochia, Asarum or Bragantia on the label, because they probably contain the harmful ingredient. Unless you’re taking a regular multivitamin, always check with your doctor before starting any kind of supplement, advises Dr Simon.</p> <p><strong>7. Your weight is pushed to the side</strong></p> <p>No surprises here: extra kilos are hard on your body. Being overweight puts you at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which in turn can increase your chances of developing kidney disease. Insulin issues from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause inflammation and scarring in the kidneys, says Dr Simon. “Anybody with diabetes should be getting their kidney function and urine checked on a fairly regular basis,” he says.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Marissa Laliberte</span>. This article first appeared in </em><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/7-innocent-mistakes-that-put-your-kidneys-in-trouble" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Body

Lifestyle

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56 and still got it! Demi Moore strips down for stunning photoshoot

<p>Actress Demi Moore has posed nude for the US October issue of Harper’s Bazaar, only wearing a diamond bracelet and an oversized pink hat.</p> <p>“Baring all for the October issue of @harpersbazaarus,” Moore, 56, captioned the cover photo.</p> <p>In the magazine, Moore opens up to interviewer Lena Dunham about her mother and father’s addiction issues, as well as her own.</p> <p>“The next thing I remember is using my fingers, the small fingers of a child, to dig the pills my mother had tried to swallow out of her mouth while my father held it open and told me what to do,” Moore recalled, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/demi-moore-reveals-she-suffered-a-miscarriage-at-42/news-story/a7130debe338a1ff3ab8b9cbd1f2389d" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“Something very deep inside me shifted then, and it never shifted back. My childhood was over.”</p> <p>Moore also reflected over her time of being a mother-of-three and revealed that she suffered a miscarriage in 2004 whilst being married to Ashton Kutcher.</p> <p>The pair were married in 2005, and the couple had planned to call their baby Chaplin Rose.</p> <p>After the miscarriage, Moore started drinking again and blamed herself.</p> <p>“In retrospect, what I realised is that when I opened the door [again], it was just giving my power away,” she admitted.</p> <p>“I guess I would think of it like this: It was really important to me to have natural childbirth because I didn’t want to miss a moment. And with that I experienced pain. So part of being sober is, I don’t want to miss a moment of life, of that texture, even if that means being in — some pain.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Demi Moore's stunning photoshoot with Harper's Bazaar.</p>

Retirement Life

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Signs you are dating a psychopath

<p>It may sound like a scene straight out of a horror movie, but statistically you are not that unlikely to end up on a date with a psychopath. It is estimated that about <a href="https://www.livescience.com/7859-psychopath-answers-remain-elusive.html">1 in 100 people</a> are psychopaths – similar to the number of people <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/if-the-uk-were-a-village-of-100-people-1754307.html">who are teachers</a>.</p> <p>And while we may associate psychopaths with horrifying criminals such as the American serial killer, rapist and necrophile <a href="https://www.biography.com/people/ted-bundy-9231165">Ted Bundy</a>, the majority of psychopaths aren’t actually criminals, but live fairly ordinary lives in our midst. So how do you know if you happen to be dating a psychopath and what should you expect? Luckily, there’s research on the topic.</p> <p>Despite this type of personality disorder being well established and researched, there is some controversy <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jopy.12115">around exactly how it should be diagnosed</a>. However, researchers do agree that psychopathy involves <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/development-and-psychopathology/article/triarchic-conceptualization-of-psychopathy-developmental-origins-of-disinhibition-boldness-and-meanness/172BC63ED5C4C4C295C47DDCB01E838D">persistent antisocial behaviour</a>, impaired empathy and remorse, boldness, emotional resiliency, meanness, impulsivity and extremely egotistical traits.</p> <p>Psychopaths also have certain positive traits, however, such as paying attention to detail, being good at reading people and engaging in conversation with ease. Their ability to be precise and creative means psychopaths <a href="https://listverse.com/2016/04/22/10-unexpected-benefits-to-being-a-psychopath/">can be successful</a> professionals.</p> <p><strong>Romantic problems</strong></p> <p>The first trait that might become apparent when dating a psychopath is <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-015-7856-1_2">pathological lying</a>. Psychopaths are likely to repeatedly attempt to deceive their partners and will lie about anything under any circumstances in order to conceal their behaviour and achieve their goals – whatever they may be.</p> <p>Unfortunately, it can be difficult to catch a psychopath lying as they often strategically plan deceitful stories. They often also tend to have a superficial charm that may have got their partner addicted in the first place – this could make their other half <a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-an-example-of-psychopathic-charm">doubt their suspicions</a>.</p> <p>Their perception of self worth is typically extremely high. Even if you are a successful, confident professional, you are likely to feel worthless in comparison. And if you don’t, a psychopath partner may set out to crush your self esteem in order to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3560578/">have more control over you</a>. Research shows that psychopaths often use a technique called gas lighting in order to achieve this – gradually eroding a “victim’s” confidence and sense of reality by confusing, misdirecting, deceiving and persuading them – leading to extreme <a href="http://parenting.exposed/dating-and-relationships-after-leaving-a-psychopath/">self doubt</a>.</p> <p>The reason psychopaths are good at manipulating is that they typically study people’s behaviour and skilfully use it to control them. If you are in a relationship with a psychopath and manage to resist their manipulation, they will often throw a <a href="https://www.mentalhelp.net/advice/please-explain-how-it-is-that-psychopaths-can-manipulate-people-if-they-have-no-empathy/">toddler’s tantrum full of frustration</a>, anger, nagging or repetitive conversations – and of course the pity puppy eyes as a final attempt – to make you feel sorry for them and give in to their wishes.</p> <p>The lack of guilt or remorse is particularly hard to deal with. But don’t expect it to change – research suggests the brains of psychopaths are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14789949.2014.943798">wired in this way</a>. A recent brain scanning study of psychopaths in prison showed that the higher levels of psychopathy people had, the more likely they were to cheat – and <a href="https://academic.oup.com/scan/article/13/8/797/5048611">not feel bad about it</a>. This was associated with reduced activity of the <a href="https://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/jnp.23.2.jnp121">anterior cingulate cortex</a>, which is thought to play a role in morality, impulse control and emotion among other things. Other studies have discovered that psychopaths have structural and functional differences in <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2016-55325-001">several brain areas</a>, including the prefrontal cortex, which plays a crucial role in personality development and planning.</p> <p>It is clearly also exhausting to be in a relationship with someone who <a href="https://academic.oup.com/scan/article/5/1/59/1731641">struggles to feel empathy</a>. However, some studies have indicated that psychopaths may actually have the ability to feel empathy – both on an intellectual and emotional level – but <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23431793">can choose to disregard it</a>, as if they have an emotional off switch. Similarly, it seems psychopaths <a href="http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/psychotic-affective-disorders/hidden-suffering-psychopath">are often aware</a> of the wrongfulness in their negative behaviour, but act in that way in any case due to their lack of self control.</p> <p>Romantic partners of psychopaths will therefore soon realise it is hard work to keep up with their partners’ continuous need for stimulation and unrealistic long-term goals. Their lack of self control can also get partners in trouble. For example, a psychopath may be <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160252717300523">rude to their partner’s colleagues</a> or embarrass them at a party.</p> <p>Psychopaths also tend to show traits of sociopathy and narcissism, and both traits <a href="https://www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/personality-types-most-likely-to-cheat-and-why-they-do-it">have been been correlated with infidelity</a>. A <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0265407517734068">recent study</a> that examined how psychopathic traits play out in romantic relationships also found that manipulation to gain sex may be a common approach.</p> <p>While many of these traits are off-putting, men and women seem to struggle with different things when living with a psychopathic partner. Women are more likely to resent their partner’s behaviour and gradually end the relationship, while men are more likely to experience <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2014.08.014">an increased fear of rejection</a> due to their partner’s impulsive behaviour.</p> <p><strong>Dealing with rejection</strong></p> <p>People who find the strength to get unhooked from a romantic relationship with a psychopath may find that their other half actually feels sorry – but that’s most likely to be because they <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/113/50/14438">are no longer able to own</a>, control and use them anymore.</p> <p>And if you dump a psychopath and later try to get them back you are unlikely to be successful. Their lack of empathy means that they will take no responsibility for what went wrong in the relationship and offer to change going forward. Instead, they will most likely <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/1468-5930.00062">blame the outcome on you</a> or anyone else but themselves. This attitude comes from their belief that, if you are feeling hurt, then it is your responsibility and your problem – in other words, <a href="http://philosophycommons.typepad.com/flickers_of_freedom/2015/01/psychopaths-and-moral-responsibility-the-state-of-the-debate.html">you let this happen to you</a>.</p> <p>However, if their next romantic partner is not as challenging, interesting and fruitful as they hoped for, they might come right back to you full of deceitful apologies and new-found meaning in your relationship – along with promises of love. That is because psychopaths tend to live a <a href="http://psychogendered.com/2014/06/bloodsucker-the-parasitic-psychopath/">parasitic lifestyle</a>, feeding off others and taking more than they give. That means they may want to have your friends, resources and even your financial status back as their own.</p> <p>That said, psychopaths do appreciate their relationships in their own way. They do suffer pain, feel loneliness, have desires and feel sadness if they do not receive affection. Clearly dating a psychopath is not for everyone. But some people can see beyond the negative traits and accept a psychopath partner as they are – ultimately having greater chance of seeing the relationship succeed.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/106965/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Calli Tzani-Pepelasi, Lecturer in Investigative Psychology, University of Huddersfield</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/worried-you-are-dating-a-psychopath-signs-to-look-for-according-to-science-106965" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Relationships

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Why seniors get osteoporosis and have falls

<p><em>This article is part of The Conversations series on <a href="https://theconversation.com/au/topics/older-peoples-health-33308">older people’s health</a>. It looks at the changes and processes that occur in our body as we age, the conditions we’re more likely to suffer from and what we can do to prevent them.</em></p> <p>As the world’s population lives longer, the significance of osteoporosis and fractures increases.</p> <p>In Australia, it is estimated that <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">4.74 million Australians aged over 50</a> have osteoporosis, osteopenia (less severe than osteoporosis) or poor bone health. By 2022, <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">it’s estimated this will increase</a> to 6.2 million, with one fracture occurring every 2.9 minutes.</p> <p>In 2012, the <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">total cost of poor bone health</a> in adults aged over 50 was A$2.75 billion, and 64% of this cost was directly associated with treating and managing fractures.</p> <p><strong>What is osteoporosis?</strong><br />Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become fragile and brittle, leading to higher risk of breakage. This occurs when bones lose minerals such as calcium more quickly than the body can replace them.</p> <p>In Australia, osteoporosis affects <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">one in three women and one in five men</a> over the age of 50.</p> <p>Referred to as a “silent” disease, osteoporosis generally has no symptoms and is rarely diagnosed until bones break or fracture. Osteoporosis is the disease and fractures are the outcome we are trying to prevent.</p> <p><strong>Why do we get osteoporosis as we age?<br /></strong>Our bones are living tissue and are in a continual state of renewal. As we age, more bone is broken down (resorbed) than is replaced by new bone. Thus our bones get thinner and more fragile as we age. This is particularly true during menopause for women and in men with lower levels of sex steroid hormones such as testosterone.</p> <p>“Primary osteoporosis” is bone loss that can be attributed to ageing or the known hormonal consequences of ageing, such as the decline in oestrogen and testosterone. These hormones help regulate bone renewal that occurs naturally as we age.</p> <p>As the level of these hormones decline from about the age of 50 in women and around 60 in men, the rate of bone breakdown is faster than the growth of new bone to replace it. Over time this leads to weaker, thinner bones. In women, the risk abruptly increases from the time of menopause, coinciding with a significant drop in circulating levels of oestrogen.</p> <p>“Secondary osteoporosis” occurs as a consequence of another disease (such as coeliac disease with associated calcium malabsorption), or as an adverse consequence of therapy for another disease where medication might bring it on.</p> <p>Thin bones of a poorer quality structure are more likely to break. The vast majority of fractures occur as a result of a fall from standing height. Vertebral or spinal fractures are the exception, frequently occurring without a fall or significant “trigger event”.</p> <p><strong>Why do we fall over when we get older?<br /></strong>There are many reasons older adults are susceptible to falls. These include side effects of some medications, vision impairments and less ability to prevent tripping over as balance, muscle mass and strength decline with age.</p> <p>The risk of fracture due to poor bones increases with age, and this is further enhanced by osteoporosis.</p> <p>Genetics also plays a role in an individual’s risk of fracture. Those of us with parents who had a hip fracture have an increased risk of fracture. The most common sites of fracture in older adults are the hip, vertebrae or spine, wrist or the humerus (upper arm or shoulder).</p> <p>About <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10083688">30% of older adults</a> fall at least once a year. The less often you fall, the less likely you are to break a bone.</p> <p>People aged 70 and over <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">accounted for 70% of the total</a> acute hospital inpatient costs in 2012. Hip fractures <a href="http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/Burden%20of%20Disease%20Analysis%202012-2022.pdf">impose the highest burden</a> both in terms of cost and decline in health-related quality of life.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25792491">Results from a recent study</a> show most fracture patients have not fully recovered their previous level of quality of life by 18 months after the fracture.</p> <p><strong>Preventing osteoporosis and falls<br /></strong>Preventing falls in older people is an important way to prevent fractures. Adults who have good balance and muscle strength are often able to “save themselves” when they trip. Exercises that improve balance (such as Tai Chi) and help maintain muscle mass (weight-bearing and resistance exercises) are beneficial.</p> <p>Preventing osteoporosis involves regular weight-bearing and resistance exercise, adequate calcium in the diet (at least three serves of dairy or equivalent per day) and an adequate level of vitamin D in the bloodstream.</p> <p>Sunlight exposure on the skin is the primary source of vitamin D, but we need to practise safe sun exposure to reduce the risk of skin cancer. The recommendations vary by <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/open/2013/2/1/building-healthy-bones-throughout-life-evidence-informed-strategy-prevent-osteoporosis">skin type, latitude and season</a>. For people with moderately fair skin, six to seven minutes before 11am or after 3pm during summertime is considered sufficient.</p> <p>During wintertime, the daily recommended sun exposure increases to between seven and 40 minutes <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/open/2013/2/1/building-healthy-bones-throughout-life-evidence-informed-strategy-prevent-osteoporosis">depending on where you live in Australia</a>.</p> <p>While lifestyle factors such as nutrition and exercise can make an important difference to bone health over time, if an older adult has several risk factors for fracture their doctor may discuss the benefits of “bone active” medication. These medications slow the rate bone breaks down as we age. In general these medications halve the risk of fracture and are much more effective than lifestyle measures alone</p> <p><em>Written by Kerrie Sanders. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-older-people-get-osteoporosis-and-have-falls-68145">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Retirement Life

Finance

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Drug laws on possession: several countries are revisiting them and these are their options

<p>Many countries are changing the way they approach people who use drugs. The Irish government <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf/Files/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf">has just announced</a> possible alternatives to criminalisation for possession of some drugs. Other countries, including <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/norway-decriminalize-drug-use_n_5a387b70e4b0860bf4aa96c4">Norway</a> and <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/06/malaysia-decriminalise-drug-health-minister-190628060223845.html">Malaysia</a>, are weighing options. But what can countries do if they don’t want to arrest or convict people because they use drugs?</p> <p>To inform the Irish government’s decision, we carried out a <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf/Files/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf">detailed review</a> of approaches in various countries. These countries were Australia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Portugal, the UK and the US. We found three main approaches: depenalisation, diversion and decriminalisation. (We did not review models of legally regulating the production and sale of drugs. Decriminalisation is not the same as legalisation.)</p> <p><strong>Depenalisation</strong> is where the crime remains in law, but the police stop imposing penalties for some people. For example, police in England and Wales can issue written <a href="https://theconversation.com/policing-of-cannabis-possession-is-largely-accidental-and-many-officers-dont-think-it-makes-a-difference-100102">warnings</a> to people found to be in possession of small amounts of cannabis for the first time, instead of arresting them.</p> <p><strong>Diversion</strong> is when people found to be in possession of drugs are sent to education sessions, treatment or social services, instead of being charged and prosecuted. These schemes have been adopted in Australian states, such as <a href="https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/sites/default/files/ndarc/resources/DPMP%20Monograph%2027%20-%202019%20-%20Criminal%20justice%20responses%20relating%20to%20personal%20use%20and%20possession%20of%20illicit%20drugs.pdf">New South Wales</a>, and in some parts of England and the US. Some schemes, including one in Queensland, are written into law. Others, like County Durham’s <a href="https://www.durham.police.uk/Information-and-advice/Pages/Checkpoint.aspx">Checkpoint</a> scheme and the <a href="http://leadkingcounty.org/">LEAD programme</a> in Seattle, are based only on changes in police practice.</p> <p><strong>Decriminalisation</strong> involves legal changes so that it is no longer a criminal offence to possess a small quantity of drugs for personal use. But there are three approaches to this model.</p> <p>Since the 1970s, many US states have replaced criminal sanctions and prison sentences with civil sanctions, such as fines for the possession of less than an ounce of cannabis. Similar schemes operate in the Czech Republic, Jamaica and some Australian states, such as South Australia.</p> <p>Other countries and states, such as <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002204260403400302">Germany</a> and <a href="https://eu.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/politics/government/2018/01/22/vermonts-legal-marijuana-law-what-you-should-know/1045478001/">Vermont</a> have decriminalisation with no sanction at all. Still others, like Portugal, have favoured decriminalisation with diversion to targeted health and social responses.</p> <p>In 2001, Portugal decriminalised the possession of small amounts of all kinds of drugs, combined with the possibility to impose civil sanctions (such as fines or suspension of driving licences) and diverting people into treatment, via a meeting with a “commission for the dissuasion of addiction”. In practice, most cases end with no sanction. Portugal also expanded access to treatment, health and social services with <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/50/6/999/404023">positive results</a>.</p> <p><strong>How the models stack up</strong></p> <p>Each approach has its own advantages and drawbacks. Depenalisation, for example, is easy to implement and lets police use their discretion in deciding who to arrest. But this may lead to discriminatory enforcement, as black people are often <a href="https://www.release.org.uk/publications/ColourOfInjustice">far more likely</a> to be stopped, arrested and punished for drugs.</p> <p>Decriminalisation requires legal changes to be made. Some may argue that it leaves authorities without legal opportunities to intervene in undesired activities, such as public drug use. But these can still be banned by separate rules. Indeed, possession of cannabis has been formally decriminalised in New York State since 1977, but it has still been an offence to have the drug “in public view”, leading to hundreds of thousands of arrests for low-level drug offences, again falling most heavily on <a href="http://www.drugpolicy.org/new-york/marijuana-reform">people of colour</a>.</p> <p>But decriminalisation also brings the potential for health, social and criminal justice benefits, by reducing stigma surrounding drug use - a known barrier to treatment and harm reduction - and <a href="http://www.ndlerf.gov.au/sites/default/files/publication-documents/monographs/monograph-66.pdf">improving employment prospects and housing stability</a>. It can also reduce the burden on police and courts. In Portugal, the extra spending on health services was offset by savings in the criminal justice system and other benefits, meaning the <a href="https://www.sciencediret.com/science/article/pii/S095539591400231X?via%3Dihub">overall social cost of drugs fell</a></p> <p><strong>No models lead to increased drug use</strong></p> <p>Importantly, we did not find evidence that any of these alternative measures consistently increased the use of drugs. A <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395919300210?via%3Dihub">study</a> of over 100,000 teenagers in 38 countries did not show higher rates of drug use in countries with more liberal approaches. Recent decriminalisations in five US states produced big reductions in arrests but <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395918301786?via%3Dihub">no apparent increase</a>in cannabis use among young people.</p> <p>As countries look for ways to implement <a href="https://www.unsceb.org/CEBPublicFiles/CEB-2018-2-SoD.pdf">UN recommendations</a> to avoid criminalising people for using drugs, they will need to consider these different options carefully. They will, <a href="https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/first-time-drug-offenders-to-be-referred-to-hse-in-policy-overhaul-1.3974643">as Ireland has found</a>, need to adapt them to their own legal, social and drug use contexts. They can do so with a fair amount of confidence that removing the harms of punishment is not likely to increase drug use. But, given some models bring greater long-term gains, there is merit in arguing that governments ought to be bold.</p> <p><em>Written by Alex Stevens and Caitlin Hughes. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/drug-laws-on-possession-several-countries-are-revisiting-them-and-these-are-their-options-121221"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Legal

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“Anchor babies”: Peter Dutton’s harsh label for Tamil children facing deportation

<p>Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has made a controversial statement surrounding the children in a Tamil asylum-seeker family that are facing deportation.</p> <p>He’s called the children “anchor babies”.</p> <p>"It's been made very clear to them at every turn that they were not going to stay in Australia and they still had children," Mr Dutton told 2GB radio on Thursday.</p> <p>"We see that overseas in other countries – anchor babies, so-called – and the emotion of trying to leverage a migration outcome based on the children."</p> <p>The Sri Lankan couple who are facing deportation came to Australia by boat separately several years ago before having two children.</p> <p>They currently are in detention on Christmas Island as the Federal Court decides whether the youngest child, age 2, is eligible for protection in Australia.</p> <p>Labor’s home affairs spokeswoman Kristina Keneally first raised the idea of debate around the Biloela family and that it was straying into “anchor baby” territory.</p> <p>"This is an importation, quite frankly, of an American debate about so called 'anchor babies' and the law is very different in the United States where citizenship is accorded to anybody born on American soil," she said during an ABC radio interview.</p> <p>"That is not the law in Australia so it's an importation of that debate."</p> <p>However, Keneally is aware that the issue at hand is that Australians want the family to stay and integrate them into community.</p> <p>"It's not simply the act of having a child," she said.</p> <p>Dutton believes that it’ll take some time to resolve.</p> <p>"I think it will go on now for potentially a couple of months because lawyers will try and delay and that's part of the tactic," he said.</p> <p>"They think that if they delay they can keep the pressure up on the government and we'll change our mind in relation to this case."</p>

Legal

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5 simple things you can do to boost your retirement nest egg

<p>There’s a lot to look forward to about retirement. You will have more time to travel, read and spend time with those you love. You might even take up a new hobby or two. But to truly enjoy this beautiful time in your life, it helps to be financially secure.</p> <p>If you’re nearing retirement age, now is the time to pull out all the financial stops to set yourself up for a stress-free retirement. Here are a few simple steps you can take to boost your retirement nest egg.</p> <p><strong>1. Get out of debt</strong></p> <p>Taking debts into retirement with you is the last thing you want – so pay off any debts as fast as you can. Work overtime if possible, or delay retirement by a year or two if need be. It might feel like a bit of a hard slog for a while, but paying off debts without regular income will be much harder. Sell items you no longer need and cut down on unnecessary spending. That retirement cake is going to taste so much sweeter knowing you’re in the black.</p> <p><strong>2. Make extra pre-tax super contributions</strong></p> <p>Your superannuation is your retirement savings plan and the more you look after it while you’re still working, the better it will look after you when the time comes.</p> <p>Consider putting extra money into your super. You can do this by asking your employer to contribute some of your pre-tax salary on your behalf, or you may be able to make a personal contribution if you complete the appropriate paperwork.  The current cap is $25,000, including the employer contribution and the new “catch-up” legislation will allow you top up if you missed out – seek advice on details. This is an incredibly tax effective strategy that will boost your super while you save on tax.</p> <p><strong>3. Make your investments work harder</strong></p> <p>Do you know how well your superannuation investment strategy is performing? If you haven’t paid much attention to this in the past, now is a great time to start.</p> <p>A lot of people prefer to go conservative with their investments later in life, but if you’re still a few years away from retirement you could consider investing in higher growth assets to build your wealth more quickly.</p> <p>The right mix of conservative and high-growth strategies for you may have changed over the years so it’s important to get the right balance for your circumstances. If you like to DIY, visit ASIC’s <span><a href="https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/tools-and-resources/publications/factsheet-choosing-a-super-strategy">MoneySmart</a></span> website which explains some investment terminology, but note every fund is different so perhaps seeking professional financial advice before making any changes is wiser.</p> <p><strong>4. Downsize and reap the benefits</strong></p> <p>If you’re bouncing around in a big family home and no longer need the space, selling it is a great way to free up some extra cash for retirement.</p> <p>If you’re over 65, you may be eligible to put proceeds from the <span><a href="https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/superannuation-and-retirement/income-sources-in-retirement/selling-the-family-home">sale of your home towards your super</a></span> up to a maximum of $300,000 per person. This is on top of any other voluntary contributions you may have made.</p> <p>Of course, selling an asset like this can be an emotional decision and is not to be taken lightly, but if it works for you, it could be a great earner.</p> <p>There are a few hoops to jump through with this, so if you’re interested in doing it, read up on the rules via the <span><a href="https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/Growing-your-super/Adding-to-your-super/Downsizing-contributions-into-superannuation/">Australian Tax Office website</a></span> and get some independent advice.</p> <p><strong>5. Get professional advice</strong></p> <p>I can’t emphasise enough how important it is to sit down with a qualified financial adviser to ensure you’re setting yourself up for a great retirement.</p> <p>A financial adviser is a bit like a physiotherapist who looks at an athlete’s physical condition, identifies weaknesses and devises a strategy to reach optimum fitness ahead of a big game.</p> <p>A good financial adviser will be able to examine your assets, investments and debts, and develop a plan to put you in a much stronger financial position when you retire.</p> <p>Money certainly can’t buy happiness, but having enough of it allows you to spend less time worrying about your finances and more time focusing on what matters to you.</p> <p>By working hard to grow your nest egg now, you will reap the rewards with a worry-free retirement. The earlier you start, the better.</p> <p><em>Helen Baker is a licenced Australian financial adviser and author of two books: </em>One Your Own Two Feet – Steady Steps to Women’s Financial Independence<em> and </em>On Your Own Two Feet Divorce – Your Survive and Thrive Financial Guide<em>. Helen is among the one per cent of financial planners who holds a master’s degree in the field. Find out more at <a href="http://www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au">www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au</a> Note this is general advice only and you should seek advice specific to your circumstances.</em></p>

Retirement Income

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Here is what William Tyrrell would look like today

<p>A team of experts has released a projection of what William Tyrrell would look like today, five years since the boy disappeared.</p> <p>Newcastle University criminologist Xanthé Mallett and her team generated an age progression image using the latest technology in her forensic services company.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7830711/william-tyrrell-10-xm.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/294b328cf15f407d9a23e26cca570dac" /></p> <p>Tyrrell was last seen at his foster grandmother’s yard in Kendall on the New South Wales mid-north coast on September 12, 2014.</p> <p>He would be eight years old today.</p> <p>“He will have changed quite a lot in the intervening five years so it helps people imagine what he would potentially look like now,” Mallett told <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/crime/a190911dvaio/this-is-what-william-tyrrell-would-look-like-today-20190911" target="_blank"><em>10 News</em></a>.</p> <p>“Most interestingly for a child, the dentition would’ve change. Their adult teeth would’ve come through and that would have changed the lower part of William’s face.”</p> <p>Despite being one of the largest investigations in the state’s history, Tyrrell has not been found.</p> <p>A <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/major-development-in-william-tyrrell-inquiry-as-local-claims-sighting" target="_blank">part-heard inquest into the disappearance</a> will continue next year.</p>

Legal

Entertainment

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5 minutes with author Nicola Marsh

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Nicola Marsh, an award-winning fiction writer. She has published 70 books – ranging from romance and domestic suspense to urban fantasy and supernatural thriller – and sold more than 8 million copies worldwide. Her newest book, <em>Long Way Home</em>, will be released on September 24. </span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with Marsh about J. K. Rowling, the amnesia trope, and what truly makes for a good romance.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>Over60</span></em><span>: What is your best writing tip?</span></strong></p> <p>Nicola Marsh: <span>My best writing tip is to make it a habit. Daily if possible. The more you write, the faster you become. I like to compare it to flexing a muscle; using our writing muscle will hone and strengthen it. Writing is all about voice and the way to find your voice is by actually sitting down and getting the words on paper regularly.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think more people should read?</span></strong></p> <p><em><span>The Kiss Quotient</span></em><span> by Helen Hoang, for the simple reason it showcases what a great romance is. It’s a great opposites attract story that’s both tender and sexy. Stella is a neuro-diverse heroine that hires a half Vietnamese-half Swedish escort to teach her about sex. It’s wonderful.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How have your past job(s) influenced your writing?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Working as a physiotherapist for 13 years before I started writing means I appreciate my dream job even more now. The creative side of my brain has taken over the scientific side and I’m loving it. I get to manipulate characters rather than manipulating backs!</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you laugh or cry?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I can bawl at movies but rarely cry when reading, so a book really has to touch me for that to happen. I read Kelly Rimmer’s <em>Before I Let You Go</em> a few months ago and that definitely made me cry. It’s a beautifully poignant story about sisters, the trials of their upbringing, drug addiction and a baby. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Do you have any writing routine? If so, what does it look like?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Writing is my full-time job, so I treat it as such. Once I get the kids off to school I do a 40-minute gym workout before settling down to write. I try to get 5 hours done before the madness of being a mum starts all over again with school pick-up and the rest. If I’m juggling tight deadlines for several publishers, I’ll try to write a few hours in the evening too.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What do you think makes a good romance fiction?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Creating characters that readers connect with and invest in. I’m an avid reader and nothing keeps me turning pages faster than characters that are real and that I care about. So that’s what I strive for in creating my stories.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Which author, deceased or living, would you most like to have dinner with?</span></strong></p> <p>J. K. Rowling, because her story fascinates me. The number of times she was rejected, being published, having her books become a worldwide phenomenon, the movies, her change in lifestyle… intriguing stuff that would make the perfect dinner conversation.</p> <p><strong><span>What trope grinds your gears? Alternatively, is there a cliché that you can’t help but love?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I’m not a huge fan of the amnesia trope. It’s one I’ve never tackled in my writing once in 70 books because I find it hard to connect with as a reader. </span></p> <p><span>As for tropes I love, there’s nothing better than a good friends to lovers romance.</span></p>

Books

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Apple TV+ finally has a launch date and the price it’s set at will surprise you

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple has finally released the launch date and price of the anticipated streaming service, Apple TV+.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The streaming service will go live in more than 100 countries on November 1</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">st</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, so mark that date on your calendars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s surprisingly affordable at $7.99 a month for Australians and if you’re on the fence about getting the service, there’s a seven-day free trial, which is considerably less than Netflix’s 30 day free trial.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’ve bought a new iPhone, iPad, Apple TV console, iPod touch or Mac, you’ll get a free one-year subscription to Apple TV+ as a sweetener.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s also family sharing enabled, which allows you to share the account with six other people.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The streaming service is launching with nine original programs on its first date, including Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston’s media drama </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Morning Wars</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and a futuristic dystopian show called </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">See</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which features Jason Momoa and Alfre Woodard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll be able to download the original programs for offline viewing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple launched the Apple TV+ app in anticipation of the service and have also signed a deal with Samsung so that those with Android phones don’t miss out on the streaming service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is rare as Apple usually like to keep apps within their own app ecosystem.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple TV+ comes out on November 1</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">st</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and will cost Australians $7.99 a month.</span></em></p>

Technology

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Former Today presenter opens up on “humiliating” axing

<p>Broadcaster Sami Lukis has opened up about the “cut-throat” television and radio industry as she detailed her “humiliating” experience of being sacked from the <em>Today</em> show.</p> <p>Lukis, who worked as weather presenter on the Channel 9 breakfast show from 2002 to 2004, said she received the “shocking” news from her manager at the end of her three-week US holiday.</p> <p>“Talk about a holiday to remember,” Lukis wrote on <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/morning-shows/sami-lukis-my-humiliating-today-show-sacking/news-story/883511de9b9398c97d05d39578406e35" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“This all happened many years ago, but the memory is just as vivid today. And thinking about how it all went down still makes me anxious.”</p> <p>Lukis said Richard Wilkins, her friend and colleague at the network, had been told she was leaving the show before she found out.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1tBtfEAFIl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1tBtfEAFIl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Sami Lukis (@samilukis)</a> on Aug 28, 2019 at 3:00am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>She later discovered that Steve Price, who was her holiday replacement, would be taking over her role. She said while the news was “an added kick in the guts”, she did not bear him any ill will. “I have no hard feelings towards Stevie,” she wrote. “He was clearly the right man for the job. I mean, he’s still there, all these years later.”</p> <p>Lukis said the experience helped her prepare for another sacking a decade later, when she was let go from her breakfast show at Mix FM . After nearly a year of co-hosting the morning program with Yumi Stynes, a friend informed her of reports that Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O would be moving to the network.</p> <p>“’The story in today’s paper that Kyle &amp; Jackie O are taking over the breakfast show at Mix FM. Isn’t that your job?’” Lukis recalled her friend’s message.</p> <p>“Yep. It was my job at the time. My network. My timeslot.</p> <p>“It certainly would have lessened the blow if the bosses had respected me enough to let me know, before it became public knowledge.”</p> <p>In January 2014, Kyle and Jackie O began broadcasting at the station, which was also rebranded as KIIS FM.</p> <p>“In an industry that’s all about ‘communicating’, it’s ironic that communication is often its greatest let down,” Lukis wrote.</p>

TV

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Maddox Jolie-Pitt breaks silence on strained relationship with dad Brad Pitt

<p>Maddox Jolie-Pitt has opened up about his dad Brad Pitt, giving a brief insight into the difficulty of their relationship. </p> <p>It seems their relationship hasn’t improved, he admitted in a rare interview about his famous father. </p> <p>The 18-year-old who is studying biochemistry at Yonsei University in South Korea, said on film obtained by In <em>Touch Weekly</em> that he wasn’t sure if his father would visit him while he is studying abroad. </p> <p>“I don’t know about that [or] what’s happening,” he told a reporter. </p> <p>Maddox also spoke on their relationship being over or improving to which he said “Well, whatever happens, happens”. </p> <p>Reports show Maddox and his 55-year-old Hollywood heavyweight father had a falling out in 2016 after an incident aboard a private plane. </p> <p>Allegedly, Pitt hit his eldest son in a rage - a few days later, his wife Angelina Jolie filed for divorce. </p> <p>Pitt fell under investigation by US authorities after being accused of physically and verbally abusing his children during an angry outburst, <em>TMZ</em> reported in September 2016. </p> <p>Pitt vehemently denied allegations of violence against his children, however he did admit to screaming at his son. </p> <p>The FBI cleared Pitt of any violent wrongdoings and said they would not file charges against him. </p> <p>44-year-old Angelina dropped Maddox off at university in August. </p> <p>Together, Brad and Angelina share six children; Maddox, Pax, 15, Zahara, 14, Shiloh, 13, and twins Vivienne and Knox, 11.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Jolie-Pitt family. </p>

Movies