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Sights unseen: Top 10 must-see European destinations

<p>Bursting with beauty, history and culture are a multitude of intimate and lesser-travelled European destinations that every keen traveller must see in their lifetime.</p> <p>From Greece’s colonnaded Parthenon to a finger-like peninsula whose highest peaks are home to Orthodox Christian monasteries, your next epic and equally dreamy summer holiday escape to Europe is right at your fingertips.</p> <p>Here are 10 magical destinations you must experience for yourself and add to your bucket list.</p> <p><strong>1. Tallin, Estonia</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828630/viking-cruise-do-not-use-10.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/07d804167a394c32a8856beea18163aa" /></strong></p> <p>Estonia may be one of the smallest countries in Europe yet it boasts a culture and history as vibrant and insightful as any other. In Tallin, the charming capital of Estonia located on the coast of the Baltic Sea, you can immerse yourself in a number of experiences – everything from a brush with old civilisation and the meticulously-kept medieval streets of the Old Town to suppers and heavenly homemade cuisines. This includes cinnamon roasted almonds, which are a must-try from an Old Town street store or treat yourself to the special sweet taste of marzipan that holds an immensely fascinating and meaningful history.</p> <p>Once under the rule of Russia, the newly independent country is the perfect place to journey through for a touch of the old and the new. Those who admire fine art must add the Kadriorg Art Museum at the Baroque Kadriorg Palace to their to-do list, which was once a summer home for Catherine I of Russia.</p> <p>The perfect blend of modern culture and ancient history, stop in during an immersive <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/baltic/viking-homelands/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-tallin">15-day Baltic Sea journey</a> which will see you exploring northern  Europe with Viking Cruises.</p> <p><strong>2. Puglia, Italy</strong></p> <p>Roaming around Puglia, better known as the “boot” of Italy, might be the most beautiful view to cast your eyes upon. The white-washed towns of Ostuni and Alberobello are two cities visitors may never want to leave as the tree-lined, sunny streets are just one part of what makes <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/italian-sojourn/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-puglia">Puglia a sight to behold.</a></p> <p>The beloved city, which is responsible for over 60 per cent of Italy’s olive oil production, is home to centuries-old olive trees. The history built from beneath the soil of the pristine city should be more than enough to entice any traveller to feast on the Pugliese cuisine.</p> <p>The Romanesque Basilica of St Nicholas is a must see for all culture-hungry travellers. Built late in the 11<sup>th</sup> century, the stunning church took nearly 100 years to complete. With clean, simple lines and cream coloured stone, this cathedral is well worth exploring for yourself. </p> <p><strong>3. Troy, Turkey</strong></p> <p> <img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828628/viking-cruise-do-not-use-12.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/eb2f7be66ef148b88c7e6accce30cdaf" /></p> <p>An archaeological wonder, the story of Troy is one that has amazed and astounded for generations.  Located in Western Turkey, the ancient ruins of Troy are a marvel that date back to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/ancient-adriatic-treasures/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-troy" target="_blank">approximately </a>3000 BC and have been preserved so remarkably well, visitors will be able to experience a genuine glimpse of what the region’s former glory was once like.</p> <p>The legendary ancient city was made famous by <em>The Iliad – </em>an epic poem written by Greek author Homer, who in this particular body of work detailed specific events of the final weeks of the Trojan War. The incredible prose has become an iconic piece of work and is considered the earliest writings in the whole of the Western literary tradition.</p> <p>Culture-hungry travellers should not pass up the privilege to witness the ancient ruins of Troy for themselves. They offer an immersive insight into a world that once was but no longer exists and are surrounded by legends and myths all pointing to the fascinating and meaningful history readily available.</p> <p>Along with visiting the glorious ruins of Troy, travellers will be able to visit the tranquil memorial site from World War I, the battlefields of Gallipoli.</p> <p>The long-fought campaign was one of the deadliest and extensive battles fought during the war and has a sombre history, which you can retrace with a ferry ride across the Dardanelles straight to Eceabat on the Gallipoli Peninsula.</p> <p>This historically enriching experience is part of an <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/ancient-adriatic-treasures/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-troy">eight-day journey</a> starting from romantic Venice to the intriguing Istanbul with <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/ancient-adriatic-treasures/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-troy">Viking Cruises.</a></p> <p><strong>4. Mostar, Bosnia</strong></p> <p>The scenic city of Mostar is a sight any traveller may not ever want to leave. Best known for their landmark <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/eastern-mediterranean/empires-mediterranean/index.html?itineraryday=4#modal/173899999&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-mostar-oldbridge">‘Old Bridge,’</a> the small town is a true symbol of peace and unity in a region once absolved in conflict. Stari Most is a 16<sup>th</sup> century, ottoman-style bridge and is by far Mostar’s most beloved and iconic architectural landmark. Stretching just 28 metres across Neretva River, Stari Most has become a symbolic reminder of harmony and multiculturalism. </p> <p>Along with the abundance of street art, abandoned buildings and ancient mosques and churches, there is a mystique quite unlike any other destination you will travel to.</p> <p>While Bosnia might not be located on a coastline, you can explore this destination from Croatia during the <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/eastern-mediterranean/empires-mediterranean/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-mostar">Empires of the Mediterranean</a> itinerary with Viking Cruises. The intimate locations are just simple reminders that journeys like these are hard to come by.</p> <p><strong>5. Rethymno, Greece</strong></p> <p>One of the best-preserved medieval cities in Greece, Rethymno is the third biggest city of Crete in the Greek Islands, and is a lively, animated town you won’t want to miss a second of. The dreamy seaside town is the perfect balance between the old and the new – stroll along the 16<sup>th</sup> century cobblestone streets while taking in the arched doorways, stone staircases and ancient remains of what once was.</p> <p>The cosy old town and its tavernas will be a breath of fresh air on your 25-day journey through the cities of antiquity and the holy land where travellers will get the opportunity to explore the <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/eastern-mediterranean/cities-of-antiquity/index.html#itineraryday/5?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-rethymno">wonders of the Mediterranean</a> with Viking Cruises.</p> <p><strong>6. Shetland and Orkney Islands, Scotland</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.18101545253865px;" src="/media/7828639/viking-cruise-do-not-use-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b09769a69b484d10ba187c276381c90c" /></p> <p>Travelling to Shetland, Scotland is sure to be the remarkable experience you wish you’d had sooner while immersing yourself in a <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/baltic/british-isles-explorer/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-shetland">15-day cruise from Bergen, Norway</a> to London, England.</p> <p>Along the way, as you wind your way around the British Isles, travellers will have the opportunity to witness the famous Shetland ponies grazing along the roadside, on the beaches and along the dappled hillsides of the Shetland Islands.</p> <p>During the <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/baltic/british-isles-explorer/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-shetland">British Isles Explorer</a> cruise with Viking Cruises, travellers are given the opportunity to learn about the meaningful history surrounding Orkney Islands – from the 5,000-year-old circle of stones to the remarkably preserved Stone Age settlement of Skara Brae that is estimated to have been built between 3000BCE and 2500BCE, and is one of Scotland’s most fascinating villages.</p> <p>This enriching experience is one you won’t want to pass up.</p> <p><strong>7. Trømso, Norway</strong></p> <p>Deemed the “Gateway to the Arctic,” Tromsø is the second largest city in Norway which offers both natural wonders, vibrant cultural elements and unique structures specific to the famous city.</p> <p>Whether you seek adventure, natural beauty or romance, you will find a mingling of activities to suit your needs – from an exploration through the stunning and “daring” Arctic Cathedral created in 1965, to learning about exciting arctic expeditions and dog sledding.</p> <p>Embark on an epic <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/baltic/into-the-midnight-sun/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-tromso-midnightsun" target="_blank">15-day voyage Into the Midnight Sun </a>through the UK and Scandinavia and visit Trømso, where travellers will have the opportunity to witness 24 hours of daylight, and the magical ‘Midnight Sun’, during the Scandinavian summer.</p> <p>Alternatively, those wanting to explore the pristine natural beauty of the world’s northernmost city during winter in search of the northern lights can choose a 13-day <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/baltic/in-search-of-the-northern-lights/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-tromso-nlights">In Search of the Northern Lights </a>cruise.</p> <p><strong>8. Koper, Slovenia</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828635/viking-cruise-do-not-use-5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ebe524f9aafe4517a9f37fcb22b52c67" /></strong></p> <p>One of Slovenia’s largest coastal towns, Koper is the country’s best kept secret. A city with a bountiful history, it carries the legacy of the Venetian Republic where the large and abundant town became a force to be reckoned with in the 15<sup>th</sup> and 16<sup>th</sup> century.</p> <p>Those with the rare opportunity to wander through the rich architecture will not be left disappointed. In Tito Square, travellers can admire the uniquely built Venetian-Gothic Praetorian Palace. The beautifully ornate building once served as the municipal seat for many generations and has since become one of the city’s most popular landmarks to explore.</p> <p>The glorious town, which is Slovenia’s only port city, is visited during a 10-day voyage to nine magnificent locations throughout the<a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/eastern-mediterranean/empires-mediterranean/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-koper"> Eastern Mediterranean.</a></p> <p><strong>9. Lucca, Italy</strong></p> <p>Located in the Tuscany region of Italy, Lucca is a remarkably preserved city bubbling with a rich way of life that visitors will be entranced by. The charming fortified town is a peaceful rest away from the hustle and bustle of busy Italian life, with an old charm you just can’t beat and a step into a life much different to the world we live in now.</p> <p>A fortified wall encloses the entire town – a distinctive reminder of the city defence that existed many years ago.</p> <p>A place of divine interactions and real experiences with the locals of Tuscany, Lucca is a lovely reprieve filled with its own culture to digest – from unique Lucchese cuisine to a pedestrian promenade that has become one of the city’s most beloved features.</p> <p>During a call to Florence, travellers can choose to explore Lucca during your discovery of the <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/mediterranean-odyssey/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-lucca">Mediterranean’s most historic ports</a>, from the fabled towns of Tuscany to the French Riviera’s seaside treasures in Marseille and Monte Carlo.</p> <p><strong>10. Montpellier (Sète), France</strong></p> <p>The seductive city of Montpellier is a vibrant and culturally diverse gem in the south of France and is the perfect destination to journey to.</p> <p>Cultivated by over 1000 of years of history, the charming, architecturally designed town is filled with a healthy mix of history, art, antiquities and ample amounts of sunshine.</p> <p>The thin strip of land boasts the perfect blend between modern and ancient with its medieval streets, waterfront homes and the buzzing canal linking the Mediterranean Sea to its enclosed saltwater lagoon of Ethang de Thau.</p> <p>Travellers looking to find serenity and belonging in the bustling city will enjoy Cimetière Marin – a monumental cemetery that is the resting place for generations of former inhabitants of Montpellier. Immortalised by local poet Paul Valéry, it offers brilliant views of the sea all the way to Sardinia.</p> <p>Later, voyagers can experience what makes Montpellier’s culinary scene a destination to completely immerse yourself in. See why their seafood delicacies are what they are known for as you watch local fisherman bring in their daily catch on France’s Mediterranean coast.</p> <p><a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/iconic-western-mediterranean/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-montpellier">Montpellier</a> is one stop on your <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/iconic-western-mediterranean/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-montpellier">eight-day voyage</a> while journeying through the Western Mediterranean with <a href="https://www.vikingcruises.com.au/oceans/cruise-destinations/western-mediterranean/iconic-western-mediterranean/index.html?utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_source=oversixty&amp;utm_campaign=sights-unseen-editorial-montpellier">Viking Cruises.</a></p> <p>While there are plenty of destinations to choose from, it’s best you get packing now – for the best holiday is just around the corner in this chilly southern hemisphere weather.</p> <p>The perfect solution to keep the winter chill at bay is by jumping on the next sojourn to explore some of the most intriguing and diverse locations Europe has to offer, many of which are best accessed by water.</p> <p><em>This article is brought to you in conjunction with Viking Cruises. </em> </p>

Cruising

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Mack Horton’s controversial refusal to share podium with "drug cheat" causes furore

<p>Mack Horton has received a flurry of criticism online through his social media platforms from furious Chinese swimming fans.</p> <p>The Australian swimmer sparked a heated debate after refusing to stand on the podium next to his Chinese rival "drug cheat" Sun Yang at the swimming championships on Sunday night.</p> <p>The bold move of refusing to stand next to Yang by Horton made international headlines.</p> <p>Sun underwent a three-month doping suspension in 2014 and is now being investigated again finishing first in the 400m freestyle – beating Horton by 0.73 of a second.</p> <p>The Australian Olympian made his anger apparent by snubbing the medal podium where he would stand next to Yang – a clear protest to show he was unhappy with the Chinese swimmer being allowed to compete in the eight-day championship.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828825/new-project.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9c9a3591c0ac4d3b90f22c561d1ca172" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Silver medalist Mack Horton of Australia, gold medalist Sun Yang of China and bronze medalist Gabriele Detti of Italy.</em></p> <p>The incredible move and bitter rivalry between the two has sparked an intense international debate after Yang accused Horton of disrespecting China.</p> <p>“I was aware that the Australian athlete had dissatisfaction and personal feelings towards me,” Yang said via an interpreter.</p> <p>“But it was unfortunate because disrespecting me is okay but disrespecting China was very unfortunate and I felt sorry about that.</p> <p>“I’m aware of the rumours (about his alleged hammer attack). (But) I think this has been the greatest achievement in history for the Chinese (swimming) team.”</p> <p>10-time world champion Yang is accused of smashing vials of his blood during a clash with drug testers last year, however, he was allowed to compete in the eight-day swimming event while he awaits a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing in September.</p> <p>Horton has not been shy of his feelings on Yang, suggesting <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/aussie-team-stands-by-mack-horton-in-china-swimming-feud" target="_blank">he was a “drug cheat” at the 2016 Rio Olympics.</a></p> <p>The Olympian admitted on Sunday he was unhappy with the results of the race.</p> <p>“Frustration is probably it,” Horton said after the race.</p> <p>“I think you know in what respect.”</p> <p>Andrew Horton, father of the swimmer, told 3AW Radio their family have a “huge respect” for China.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of commentary about China. We have huge respect for China. This is about ensuring that there are systems and processes in the sport that keep the sport clean,” he said.</p>

Caring

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How to host the perfect BBQ

<p>Nothing gets the tastebuds tingling like the smell and sizzle of a great aussie barbecue. The warmer weather makes it almost compulsory and there is no better way to get family and friends together. But how can you make sure your next barbie is trouble free and has some extra-special touches that take it out of the ordinary? To help you out, we have put together a smorgasbord of simple ideas that will make sure you impress without any stress.</p> <p><strong>Get your equipment in good shape</strong></p> <p>It’s difficult to have a great barbecue if the tools of trade are not in good condition. Every 10 sessions or so you should dismantle plates grills and drip trays for a wash with soapy water followed by a light oiling to protect from rust. Every time you cook you also need to ensure that the plate and grill are free from any residue from previous uses. This is critical to avoid meat sticking to the grill. It is well worthwhile investing in a solid barbecue brush with wire bristles and notched scraper, so that you can get right into the difficult to reach places in between the grill grates.</p> <p>Check your burners are giving an even flame and use some wire to clear any blocked outlet holes. If you have lava rocks, then make sure they are not clogged with grease and replace them if they are. Now you’re ready to start cooking.</p> <p>There’s nothing more embarrassing than running out of gas, so use this quick trick to check your bottle isn’t empty. Pour some hot tap water down the side of the bottle, which will heat up the metal. Because the gas is naturally at a lower temperature the metal will cool a lot quicker, so simply run your hand down the bottle and wherever the metal suddenly becomes cooler is where your gas level is.</p> <p><strong>Do some delegation</strong></p> <p>If you are inviting guests they will invariably want to contribute something, so get them involved and delegate some of the menu. There are two general approaches to this. One is to keep the barbecued food under your control and ask guests to bring salads and side dishes. This has the advantage of allowing you to keep control over the barbecuing itself. Just remember to let guests know if there is a particular cuisine theme in your cooking, so that they bring sides that are complimentary.</p> <p>The second approach is to do all the sides inhouse and ask guests to bring their own meat. You lose a bit of control on the cooking front, but it will save on costs for you.</p> <p><strong>Top tips for great grilling</strong></p> <p>Let’s get down to the business end of things. To get the best of that great barbecue char flavouring, it is best to grill on a grate rather than a flat plate. It is essential to have your grill well and truly preheated to a high temperature before you begin cooking – that is key to getting the all-important char effect. If your barbecue has a lid then always use it to avoid heat loss and to maximise the smoky flavour.</p> <p>With those basics in mind, here are some specifics on cooking different types of meats:</p> <p><strong>Steak</strong></p> <ul> <li>For the perfect steak, always season generously about 15 minutes before cooking and have the meat at room temperature – not straight out of the fridge.</li> <li>To get those classic cross-hatch patterns on a steak, use the “10 and 2 method”. Position the steak so it is angled on the grill with the top end pointing to the 10 o’clock position. Leave it for 3 or 4 minutes without moving it and then lift and place it back down pointing to 2 o’clock for a couple more minutes. Turn the steak and repeat the process (with a little less cooking time on the second side).</li> <li>If you prefer your steak well done, move it away from the direct heat for the last few minutes of cooking to avoid it drying out.</li> <li>Always rest meat with a loose foil covering for a few minutes before serving.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Chicken</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use boneless for a quicker and more predictable result.</li> <li>Thigh fillets are a lot more forgiving that breast. Breast can go from perfect doneness to dry in a matter of a minute, whereas thigh will remain juicier even if overcooked a little.</li> <li>Chicken can be a bit bland on its own and will benefit from oil based marinades – particularly for breast meat, which is a lot leaner.</li> <li>Always cook the shinier side of the breast or thigh first. The key to avoiding the chicken sticking and tearing is to LEAVE IT ALONE once it hits the grill. You need to hold your nerve and let it develop caramelised grill marks BEFORE you attempt to turn it. If it’s sticking when your try to turn it, leave a little longer – it will eventually release easily.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Fish</strong></p> <ul> <li>Baste with oil before cooking and don’t be afraid to start with high heat – it’s essential to the caramelisation process.</li> <li>Place the fish on the grill skin side up and LEAVE IT ALONE until it has caramelised enough to release easily from the grill, before turning.</li> <li>Use the 70/30 – 70% of the cooking time is on the first side and just 30% on the second.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Vegetables</strong></p> <ul> <li>Unlike meat, vegetables only need a medium heat</li> <li>Vegetables such as eggplant, zucchini and capsicum are ideal for barbecuing. Cut them lengthwise to achieve maximum surface area. Large mushroom caps are also a perfect BBQ choice.</li> <li>Brush with oil to prevent sticking and to preserve moisture</li> <li>Avoid overcooking which can leave them soggy.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Change it up with BBQ entrée or dessert</strong></p> <p>If you go the BYO meat route, then why not surprise and delight your guests with entrée and dessert done on the barbecue. It can be super quick and easy . . . and sure to make an impact. Try these ideas:</p> <ul> <li>BBQ nachos – a great way to spark the socialising. Simply layer corn chips, grated cheese and salsa in an aluminium tray and throw on the barbecue with lid down for 5 minutes. Dollop on some avocado puree and sour cream and watch the smiles ignite when you serve.</li> <li>Paul Hogan tribute – The famous “shrimp on the barbie” is an ideal entrée. Peel, clean and pack the prawns tightly on kebabs (to maintain succulence) using two skewers (for easier flipping). Brush with olive oil and a generous sprinkle of your favourite seasoning. Use a high heat and cook 2 minutes one side and 1 minute on the other.</li> <li>Brilliant bruschetta – Whisk up a dressing of olive oil, julienne basil leaves, balsamic and salt, then toss through some quartered cherry tomatoes. Brush some olive oil on to sliced baguette and toast on the grill. Rub the toasted bread with a cut garlic clove, spoon on the tomato and top with some crumbled fetta.</li> <li>For a glorious finish, what could be simpler for dessert than a range of grilled fruits, such as melon, pineapple, stone fruit, apple and pear. Just cut into thick slices and grill for a couple of minutes on each side, while you melt down a glaze of melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon in a small saucepan. Brush on the glaze and grill for another couple of minutes and serve with vanilla ice cream.</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to become “world’s best grandparent”!</strong></p> <p>Make the grandkids feel a little special with some easy BBQ mini burgers. Just slice hamburger buns into 3 slices, discard the middle slice and use a 4cm scone cutter to punch out mini buns from the top and bottom slices. Combine grated onion, salt, Worcester sauce and an egg with 250 grams of mince and form into flattened balls to grill on the BBQ plate. Melt some cheese slices on the cooked burgers and using large toothpicks skewer the bun, burger, sliced cherry tomato and lettuce leaves.</p> <p>Treat them for dessert too by slitting along the inside curve of a banana and pressing in some choc bits and mini marshmallows in the banana flesh. Wrap in foil and throw on the barbecue for a few minutes. The rich, gooey result will blow the kids away when served with some ice cream.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/food-and-wine/how-to-host-the-perfect-bbq.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

food & Wine

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Over 60’s styling tips – be confident in what you wear

<p>I’m not naturally rebellious, but as the years go by there are rules I find irritating to say the least; in particular I get annoyed about ‘rules’ on what I should or should not wear.</p> <p>At the age of 63, I figure I am only responsible to myself as to how I dress. Not that I plan hanging out on a nudist beach any time soon, but after years in the corporate world it is a relief to no longer wear a ‘uniform’ – actual or perceived.</p> <p>Coincidentally, as I now have the freedom to wear what I want, I have also taken a much stronger interest in my personal presentation. I understand the importance of self-image and take the time to get dressed and feel my best.</p> <p>I have a personal rule that I won’t go to the shops unless I am tidily dressed and have added a pop of lipstick. It was too easy in my early retirement to hang around all day in gardening clothes, but I quickly found that I felt bad when I did so.</p> <p>So, in figuring out what clothes work for me in my retirement (I prefer to call it re-wirement) I have learned a lot about what works for my body and my lifestyle. I have determined my personal style.</p> <p>I hang out in some online style groups, I share my ‘#everydaystyle’ (thanks to Nikki Parkinson of <a href="http://www.stylingyou.com.au/">Styling You</a> for that inspiration) on Instagram, and I dress to please myself. I know what makes me feel confident and what doesn’t. I know I like a balance of style and comfort. I know I like to be aware of the latest trends and colours, but not be a slave to them. And I know that a lot of the so-called style rules don’t work for me.</p> <p>I don’t own a crisp white button up shirt – I’m tall and a bit overweight with short hair – I look butch in that style.</p> <p>I do wear distressed skinny jeans – skinny jeans suit my shape and flatter my legs (one of my best assets). I like the distressed look as one of my nods to current trends.</p> <p>I do sometimes wear dresses and skirts above my knee, again because my legs are good. I don’t wear super mini skirts like I did in my late teens and 20s but I won’t have anyone tell me I can’t. I don’t because I would spend all day tugging at the skirt. That’s the same reason I haven’t embraced the off-the-shoulder trend; I hate strapless bras and I don’t want to be fussing with a top that pops up (or heaven forbid, down!).</p> <p>I rarely wear high heels because I get a sore back and ankles when I do, but I do like an ankle boot with a low heel and I am a great fan of kicks. I can stay current without breaking my neck and those styles suit my lifestyle.</p> <p>I know that my wardrobe needs to be travel friendly because we travel domestically a lot and internationally when we can. That dictates the fabrics that I select – I love natural fibres but silk isn’t practical for me.</p> <p>Unlike my legs, my arms aren’t in great shape, so I don’t often wear a sleeveless dress or top. But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t – I see plenty of women older than me with great muscle definition rocking sleeveless tops.</p> <p>So, I only have one ‘rule’ to share with you. Know what suits you, what you can afford and what makes you feel your best. Wear that!</p> <p><em>Written by Jan Wild. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/in-praise-of/in-praise-of-personal-style.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Art

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Who wants your parents' stuff?

<p>Helping your parents clean out the family home or, even worse, taking on the task after they’ve died can be heartbreaking – layers of history to be sorted through; decisions to be made about what should be saved and what to do with the rest.</p> <p>While no one wants to look on the exercise as a money-making venture, taking the time to sell items that have some value not only helps cover the costs involved with moving, but also has the benefit of being more environmentally friendly than sending everything to the tip.</p> <p>The first step is to work out how much time you have. If you and your siblings already have full plates, you can call in an expert team to do the clearance, once you’ve removed items – keepsakes, photographs, documents – you want to keep.</p> <p>Rebecca Mezzino operates Adelaide-based company <a href="http://clearspace.net.au/">Clear Space</a>, which offers downsizing and estate clearances. She works with local dealers and auction houses to sell whatever has value, donates usable goods to charities and disposes of any rubbish. She also has some tips for doing the job yourself.</p> <p>“Most of the services you need are quite separate,” says Rebecca. “So, you can get a second-hand dealer to come and take what they want, you can get a skip to put rubbish in, and you can take things to the Salvo’s, but it’s quite difficult to get it all done in one go.”</p> <p>Of course, the average person won’t know whether a piece of furniture will be worth anything to someone else. Auction houses, advises Rebecca, will look at photos of your goods and tell you whether it’s worth selling them. Second-hand dealers, too, will visit and take away what they think they can sell.</p> <p>“Anything that’s mid-century vintage is in demand,” says Rebecca. “Things like Dad’s old tools that are 50 or 60 years old will sell at auction, too. People will say to me, ‘It’s rusty and it’s old,’ but it should be sent to auction. There are often surprises.”</p> <p>Of course, with all sorts of information at your fingertips, you can use Google to get an idea of what people are paying for certain items. For instance, stamps on the bottom of vintage dinner sets or a silver tea set can help you date them, which is helpful when you’re talking to auction houses. Bids on sites like eBay (“not what sellers are listing them as a Buy Now price,” warns Rebecca) are also a good indication.</p> <p>For anything that isn’t considered a collectable – furniture and working white goods, for example – you can use a website such as Gumtree, where you’ll often get a better price than if you sell it at auction.</p> <p>“At auction houses you’ll get a bargain basement price,” says Rebecca, “but you do need to put effort into Gumtree. We always tell people not to throw anything away because you’d be surprised at what can be sold or what people will collect for free. Free stuff on Gumtree goes really quickly.”</p> <p>If your family has specific types of collections, it’s often worth contacting a specialised dealer. Nicole Jenkins from <a href="http://circavintageclothing.com.au/">Circa Vintage Fashion</a> in Melbourne often assesses collections during house clearances.</p> <p>“Many vintage fashion items are valuable not for their age, but for their quality, uniqueness and how favoured they are by the current market,” she explains. “There are a lot of points to consider, so if you think you’re handling a collection that might have exceptional value, it’s best to call in the experts for advice. It should be remembered that age does not necessarily equate to value, especially if it's in poor condition.”</p> <p>Nicole says couture labels, such as Chanel, Dior and Balenciaga, and garments from the 1960s and 70s – Australian labels such as Tullo, Prue Acton and House of Merivale, as well as Biba, Thea Porter, Pucci and Halston – are particularly sought after at the moment: “As a general rule, if it was expensive when originally purchased and it’s been maintained in excellent condition, then it should retain an element of that value – subject to the vagaries of fashion.”</p> <p>Similar experts can be sought out if you find a number of what could be rare vinyl records, antiquarian books or other well-maintained collections.</p> <p>As for sentiment, Rebecca says you should keep what means something to you and can’t be replaced. “I always say to clients, ‘What emotional need is this meeting?’ then ask how much is enough so they have all their emotional needs met.</p> <p>“Another good idea is to take photos of rooms and everything that leaves the house, then to put together a photo album of memories of the house. A lot of people can have their emotional needs met with just that.”</p> <p><em>Written by Carrie Hutchinson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/who-wants-your-parents-stuff.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Caring

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The allure of Cape Town

<p>Sometimes it seems that Cape Town isn’t really part of Africa at all. Rather it’s a hipster chunk of Europe that somehow found itself at the bottom of Africa. The locals spend a lot more time discussing coffee and cuisine than you’d expect to find in the wild Dark Continent.<br /><br />The city is in a sublime location. When discussing the world’s most picturesque harbour cities we always find Sydney, Rio, Vancouver on the list. But for bay cities, Cape Town must reign supreme with Table Mountain looming behind it.<br /><br />Here are some of the highlights.<br /><br /><strong>Table Mountain</strong><br />For early mariners, the first sight of the flat summit of Table Mountain announced they were safely around the Cape of Good Hope and a well provisioned port lay ahead.</p> <p>Today, taking the <a href="http://www.tablemountain.net/">cable car</a> up to walk around the mountain and survey the city and bay beyond is the one essential thing to do. Walk around the corner and you can see most of the way to the Cape and over the upmarket suburb of Camps Bay and Hout Bay beyond.</p> <p>One unexpected delight of this excursion is the furry mammals you’ll find up there. They are called dassies or rock hyrax and look like marmots or large rats, depending how kindly you view them. But their closest living relative is the elephant. You’ll need a big step in imagination to see the family resemblance.<br /><br /><strong>Victoria and Alfred Waterfront</strong><br />The ongoing redevelopment of the waterfront has been a crowning glory to the city. Lots of hipster coffee shops, all the mainstream brand shops and a great African arts and crafts hall.</p> <p>I bought a painting made from used tea bags in a dedicated charity shop. Whoever in the village had the idea, it was inspired. And it is the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront – not the Victoria and Albert Waterfront because it’s named after the queen and her second son, not her long-lamented husband.<br /><br />Cruises leave from here too – a sunset cruise is a great way to see this spectacular city and the mountain from the water and if you’re lucky you may see the “tablecloth” roll in.<br /><br /><strong>Food</strong><br />Cape Town has always been a cosmopolitan city and that’s reflected in the food. Whether seeking Cape Malay or any international cuisine there will be choice – and the local meat, fish and produce are excellent.</p> <p>You’ll find game, from crocodile to kudu, on many menus, too. The best restaurant in town is The Test Kitchen that is listed as one of the world’s best. But book well in advance and even then, good luck getting a table.</p> <p><strong>Company’s Garden</strong><br />Right in the heart of the city are the Company’s Garden, created in 1650 and featuring a large statue to Cecil Rhodes.</p> <p>Whether you appreciate the legacy of Rhodes or see him as an oppressor, wandering through the gardens is a pleasant way to cool down in the city. If you want a more expansive garden, head to the Botanic Gardens in the shadow of Table Mountain.<br /><br /><strong>Winnebagos on the roof</strong><br />Before the rest of the world’s hotels thought of sticking seven Airstream mobile homes on the roof of premises, the <a href="http://granddaddy.co.za/">Grand Daddy Boutique Hotel</a> on Long St did it first – and then put a rooftop cinema in the middle. It may not be five star but it’s certainly unusual.<br /><br /><strong>Robben Island</strong><br />If you wish to visit Robben Island it’s a very good idea to book tickets in advance as they often sell out. <br /><br />Most of us know of Robben Island - the flat 2x3km island about seven km from Cape Town - as the prison that held Nelson Mandela for 18 of his 27 years as a political prisoner during South Africa’s apartheid era. The 3.5 hour tour has two distinct parts.</p> <p>The first is a general tour of the island where you learn that it also served as a leper colony and an animal quarantine staion. The circumnavigation includes a stop where penguins can be seen on the beach.</p> <p>That’s a soft introduction to a tour of the prison on which you’re shown around by a former prison inmate. I asked out guide if he found it hard to be back here and he said that it took him a couple of years to come to terms with it. Of course, you are shown Mandela’s cell and learn how hard conditions in the prison were.<br /><br /><strong>Cape of Good Hope</strong><br />If there is one essential tour out from Cape Town, it’s down to the Cape of Good Hope. This is not the southernmost point of the African continent but it is one of the world’s three Great Capes – the other two are Cape Horn and WA’s Cape Leeuwin.</p> <p>It’s a rugged place and there’s always the chance to see wildlife like antelopes, ostrich, baboons and zebra.</p> <p><strong>Penguin patrol</strong><br />There are quite a lot of penguins to be found in the waters off Cape Town. These are African penguins and they look a lot like the Magellanic penguins of South America. Both are sometimes called jackass penguins for the braying sound they make. They can be seen on a tour of Robben Island.</p> <p>Or if you wish to get close to them you can head to Boulders Beach near Simon’s Town or Stony Point near Betty’s Beach – both have boardwalks and charge an admission fee.<br /><br /><strong>Helicopter overview</strong><br />If you are in Cape Town when the weather is good, it’s worthwhile taking a helicopter flight out over the bay for a spectacular aerial view of the city. We used <a href="http://www.nachelicopterscapetown.com/">NAC Helicopters</a> and the grand panoramas made the short flight great value.</p> <p><strong>Staying</strong><br />Cape Town has a wide range of hotels. Many are at the V&amp;A Waterfront. A personal favourite is the <a href="http://www.westincapetown.com/">Westin Cape Town</a>, particularly the Executive Club with a lounge that offers unsurpassed views across the city to Table Mountain.<br /><br /><a href="http://tintswalo.com/atlantic">Tintswalo Atlantic</a> is a very alternative option. It’s a unique luxury boutique hotel on Hout Bay, located within the National Park.</p> <p>The waves lap the rocks below your balcony so you feel very much in the wild although the city and airport are only minutes away. The wild surrounds and the absolute luxury within create a</p> <p> very special experience.<br /><br /><strong>Cape Province delights</strong><br />Whether your interest is in the whales and sharks of Hermanus, the Cape flowers, the wines of Franschhoek and Stellenbosch, or setting off on the Garden Route, Cape Town is the perfect starting point. Just a few days here will convince you that Africa is a wonderland ripe for exploration.</p> <p><em>Written by David McGonigal. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/the-allure-of-cape-town.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Cruising

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Nigella Lawson: "How my daughter taught me to be happy again"

<p>Nigella Lawson is known by many as being a domestic goddess in the kitchen, but she credits her daughter for helping her transform her life after her ex-husband grabbed her by the throat.</p> <p>Charles Saatchi, advertising millionaire, shocked the world as he grabbed his then wife by the throat in pubic in a busy restaurant. Just seven weeks after the incident back in 2013, their 10-year marriage was over.</p> <p>However, Nigella’s confidence was shaken, and she developed a fear of being photographed or being seen in public.</p> <p>Her daughter, Cosima Diamond, 25, is credited with helping Nigella overcome her fear.</p> <p>“I have been forced to be guarded. I used to be more open and I’d like to think I will be again,” Nigella opened up to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/tv/tv-news/nigella-lawson-says-daughter-transformed-18457049" target="_blank"><em>The Mirror.</em></a></p> <p>"Cosima said to me, ‘Mum, would you rather be a real person like you or someone who has hair and make-up done to go to the supermarket? It is better to be a real person.’ She’s right.”</p> <p>Nigella also shared that her children are the biggest fans of her cooking, but they make fun of her presenting style.</p> <p>“When I am on TV, I cook the food that I cook at home but my children always tease me.</p> <p>“I do a running commentary at home of my life like I do on TV.</p> <p>“I always wanted to do the advanced driving test as when you do it you have to do a commentary like, ‘I am now moving into second gear.’ I do feel I ought to take it.”</p> <p>Nigella says that she gets a “bit nervous or a bit awkward” due to the camera being on her.</p> <p>“The thing about television is that it is both frightening and boring.</p> <p>"It is not an act, but I do think you get a bit nervous or a bit awkward when there is a camera on you,” she explained.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxKJoVMlHCA/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxKJoVMlHCA/" target="_blank">We're delighted to welcome goddess of the kitchen, Nigella Lawson, to the Masterchef kitchen next week! 👩🍳 🥘 🥗 ❤ #MasterChefAU</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/masterchefau/" target="_blank"> MasterChef Australia</a> (@masterchefau) on May 7, 2019 at 3:51am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Nigella went into detail about her success in Australia, following her appearances on the Australian version of <em>MasterChef</em>.</p> <p>“I do like it as I like the people there. The programme has been going for 11 years,” she said.</p> <p>“They are very funny, Australians. I don’t go to America a great deal. I did for book tours, but America is a very greedy monster.</p> <p>“All they ever want to know is, ‘What are you going to do next?’ and ‘How much more are you going to do?’</p> <p>Nigella says that the pressure isn’t something that she wants for her life.</p> <p>“It is not what I want to do. If I wanted to go and work non-stop and do that I would go there.</p> <p>"I like lying about and reading books and drinking tea as well, so I don’t want a life which just becomes about making television programmes.”</p>

Mind

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Glowing in green: Princess Eugenie turns heads in floral for surprise engagement

<p>Princess Eugenie is embracing the warmer season in the most glamorous way she knows how.</p> <p>During a surprise appearance in London for an important cause, the royal opted for a stunning ensemble that turned heads for all the right reasons.</p> <p>With most of the royal family now on summer holidays, Eugenie delighted fans when she arrived at Westminster Abbey to show support for a cause that’s close to her heart – The Anti-Slavery Collective.</p> <p>The charity aims to beat modern day slavery, and Eugenie met with John Cotton Richmond, the US Ambassador-at-Large for Combating Trafficking in Persons.</p> <p>The 29-year-old stunned in a green and gold floral Alice &amp; Olivia dress, which came complete with a matching ribbon tied around her waist.</p> <p>The wrap style silhouette and bunched sleeves made the Princess look right on trend, with the deep green hue complimenting her brunette locks.</p> <p>She finished off the look with a pair of nude heels.</p> <p>Eugenie has previously discussed her work in anti-slavery initiatives, with the most recent interview being from last year when she appeared on podcast <em>Global GoalsCast</em>.</p> <p>The Princess and her long-time friend, Julie de Boinville, who works with the royal on Antislavery Collective, both revealed the time they visited Calcutta in 2013 and met a woman who started the Women’s Interlink Foundation.</p> <p>The Foundation aims to get trafficked females off the streets by teaching them skills such as fabric design and creating clothing.</p> <p>“Jules and I, that was the first time we ever really saw what modern slavery was and human trafficking and what really that is in the modern age,” said Eugenie at the time.</p> <p>The Princess has been kept busy this summer by making a number of appearances at Royal Ascot, as well as attending the Queen’s garden parties at Buckingham Palace.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Eugenie’s flirty summer ensemble.</p>

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Waleed Aly's challenge after Adam Goodes' documentary

<p>Waleed Aly has weighed in on the controversy surrounding Adam Goodes after the controversial documentary addressing the bullying and racism the former Sydney Swans star faced in Australia sparked an outpouring of emotion and support.</p> <p><em>The Final Quarter</em>, which was aired on Thursday night on Channel 10, showed the booing and abuse Goodes dealt with over the last three seasons of his career, leading him into an early retirement.</p> <p>In the special late-night edition of <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/sport/a190717fgbdv/adam-goodes-was-failed-by-the-game-and-fans-he-loved-20190718" target="_blank"><em>The Project</em></a> that followed the documentary, Aly spoke with indigenous representatives and media and sporting figures to discuss the issue.</p> <p>“It was a difficult thing to go through ... what should have been a spectacular finish to an incredible career is just extremely sad,” said Jude Bolton, former Sydney Swans player and teammate.</p> <p>Chip Le Grand, journalist at <em>The Australian,</em> said the doco demonstrated how “a lot of us don’t seem to even know racism when we see it”.</p> <p>He criticised the AFL’s failure to step in and defend Goodes.</p> <p>“They just needed someone to clearly stand up, and it was [Chief Executive Officer] Gillon McLachlan’s time, in that instance, to just say: ‘Look, yes, it is complicated but, clearly, race is a part of this, it’s a big part of this, it’s ugly and it has to stop’,” he said.</p> <p>Aly closed the discussion by making a statement on what the nation should do from this point.</p> <p>“It seems that what began as personal torment for Adam quickly became a national controversy,” Aly said.</p> <p>“The question now really is whether it can become a productive national conversation. And the answer to that question rests with each of us.”</p> <p>The AFL released an apology on the same day of the film premiere.</p> <p>“Adam, who represents so much that is good and unique about our game, was subject to treatment that drove him from football. The game did not do enough to stand with him and call it out,” the statement said.</p> <p>“We apologise unreservedly for our failures during this period.</p> <p>“Failure to call out racism and not standing up for one of our own let down all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander players, past and present.”</p>

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Did Novak Djokovic just reignite his feud with Nick Kyrgios? His subtle swipe

<p>Novak Djokovic has kept a cool head as he’s ignored Nick Kyrgios’ podcast taunts. However, as Wimbledon is now over, it appears all bets are off.</p> <p>The back-to-back Wimbledon champion has shown a hint of his true feelings towards the Australian tennis player.</p> <p>Vocal tennis legend John McEnroe was quoted from a BBC Radio interview, where he declared that Kyrgios would be a top five player on the planet if he was able to keep his efforts consistent and honest.</p> <p>“Is he good for the game? Yes he’s good for the game,” McEnroe told <em>BBC Radio 5</em>.</p> <p>“Does he sell tickets? Yes. I can’t handle the fact that he only tries half the time. We can’t support that anymore. I don’t think he should be out there anymore unless he gives an honest effort — that’s my personal opinion.</p> <p>“The guy would be top five in the world for sure if he was able to do it [give honest effort]. He’s got an incredible – this is my opinion – fear of failure. He doesn’t even allow himself to train hard enough to give himself a chance.</p> <p>“You saw what he is capable of, he was driving Nadal crazy, it was the best second-round match, one of the best matches of the whole tournament. But when he plays guys he’s supposed to beat, he doesn’t even show up.”</p> <p>UK tennis site tennissportwalkin republished his comments on their Instagram and Djokovic liked the post.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0BCHp6glAm/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0BCHp6glAm/" target="_blank">🗣🎾 @johnmcenroeofficial felt @k1ngkyrg1os could make himself a fortune if he changed his mentality. . . . . Photo by Getty | #NickKyrgios #kyrgios #johnmcenroe #atp #atpworldtour #wimbledon #wimbledon2019 #usopen #usopentennis #usopen2019 #Tennis #Sportwalk</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tennissportwalkin/" target="_blank"> Tennis Sportwalk</a> (@tennissportwalkin) on Jul 17, 2019 at 4:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>It’s doubtful that Kyrgios noticed, let alone let the subtle aggression bother him, as he’s made his feelings about Djokovic well known.</p> <p>He told well-known tennis journalist Ben Rothenberg earlier this year that Djokovic “just wants to be liked.”</p> <p>“I just feel like he has a sick obsession with wanting to be liked,” Kyrgios told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://nochallengesremaining.podbean.com/" target="_blank">No Challenges Remaining Podcast</a>.</p> <p>“He just wants to be like Roger. For me personally — I don’t care right now, I’ve come this far — I feel like he just wants to be liked so much that I just can’t stand him.”</p>

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The surprising item the Queen always travels with

<p>When you’re a member of the royal family you can’t just pack light and head out the door.</p> <p>And while others are travelling with crown jewels, beige pumps and plenty of hats, the Queen is forced to take a vial of her own blood, as does Prince Philip and Prince Charles.</p> <p>The blood is for when senior royals fall sick while travelling and is used if a safe supply of blood isn’t available when they require a transfusion.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/" target="_blank"><em>Fabulous Digital</em></a>, royal editor Adam Helliker said: “The Queen always travels with a supply of blood which is placed in the responsibility of whichever doctor is on duty and accompanies her on duties and Royal tours.</p> <p>“This means that in a country where speedy access to a reliable blood supply cannot be guaranteed, such as remote parts of Africa, the sovereign and her consort will be able to receive blood transfusions if they were required for a medical emergency.”</p> <p>The blood is taken care of by a personal page.</p> <p>Along with the blood, the Queen also travels with three personal physicians who, before her trip, will research nearby hospitals in case of an emergency.</p> <p>Her blood supply is also “regularly topped up” so she never has to use someone else’s.</p> <p>“She will have kept the supply topped up with regular deposits on the months before a trip abroad,” said Helliker.</p> <p>“So it’s just like someone making voluntary blood donations – the difference being that she will be the only recipient if it’s ever needed – that ‘blue blood’ will never find its way to an ordinary patient.”</p>

Travel Tips

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“National disgrace”: Aussie taxpayers fork out $40 million to expand irrigation in the Murray-Darling Basin

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian taxpayers have given a large corporation more than $40 million, which has enabled it to expand irrigation in the Murray-Darling Basin under an environmental scheme that has been labelled a national disgrace.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Four Corners revealed that more than $4 billion in Commonwealth Funds have been handed over to irrigators. This has allowed them to expand their operations and use more water under the $5.6 billion water infrastructure scheme.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The scheme is intended to recover water for the rivers by giving farmers money to build water-saving infrastructure in return for some of their water rights.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some beneficiaries of the scheme are foreign-owned corporations according to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-08/taxpayers-helping-fund-murray-darling-basin-expansion/11279468"><span style="font-weight: 400;">the ABC.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Maryanne Slattery, a former director at the Murray-Darling Basin Authority says that it’s horrifying a scheme that’s designed to help the environment has allowed irrigators to use more water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"That program was supposed to reduce the amount of water that was going to irrigation, when it's actually increased the opportunities for irrigation … all subsidised by taxpayers," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I think Australian taxpayers will be really shocked to find out that that money is actually going to foreign investors as well."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">UNSW river ecologist Professor Richard Kingsford has been studying the Murrumbidgee River for more than 30 years. He has said that the new dams are trapping water that would have otherwise flowed downstream into habitats and farming communities in the Murray-Darling Basin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I find that astounding. I mean, why are we building these large dams for private gain at public cost?" he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Essentially it increases the take from the river system and ultimately decreases the amount of water in the river. That to me is where, in fact, we may be seeing more water taken out of the rivers than water savings."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Maryanne Slattery says that the region is unsuitable for dams because of the high rate of evaporation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"You just see dam after dam after dam, these massive on-farm dams, in a place that is as flat as a table, that just should not have dams," said Ms Slattery, who is now a senior water researcher at the Australia Institute.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"And then when you realise they're being paid for by the Commonwealth, under a supposedly environmental program, that's just horrifying."</span></p>

Domestic Travel

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“Probably going to get criticised”: Lisa Wilkinson doesn’t hold back in interview with NZ PM Jacinda Ardern

<p>Despite the recent popularity of NZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, veteran news reporter Lisa Wilkinson wasn’t flustered and didn’t hold back in asking the difficult questions in a new interview on<span> </span><em>The Sunday Project</em>.</p> <p>The question was about Ardern’s thoughts on Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s stance on deportations.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Jacinda Ardern was propelled into the world stage because of an unspeakable atrocity, and the way she reacted to it.<br />A lot’s happened since then, and<a href="https://twitter.com/Lisa_Wilkinson?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Lisa_Wilkinson</a> sat down with the NZ PM to talk life, love, and of course, politics. <a href="https://t.co/3zkgDVV0jm">pic.twitter.com/3zkgDVV0jm</a></p> — The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1152871393006149638?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">21 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“You’ve described Scott Morrison’s stance on deportations as ‘corrosive’,” Wilkinson started.</p> <p>The question immediately flustered Ardern as she went into damage control mode.</p> <p>“Oh look I think we should be fair the, the deportation policy has existed for a while and…” Ardern stated.</p> <p>Wilkinson helped out Ardern and branded Morrison “the architect” of the policy that Ardern has described as “wrong” and “unjust”.</p> <p>“That is, that is correct,” Ms Ardern said. “When you are friends as we are, you can speak frankly with each other you know.”</p> <p>Ms Ardern added, “I think it speaks to the strength of it that we do speak so openly." </p> <p><em>The Sunday Project</em> interview was filmed shortly after a meeting between Ardern and Morrison, where the two leaders discussed the implications NZ citizens living in Australia have faced since the laws have tightened back in 2014.</p> <p>Ardern spoke candidly to NZ media, according to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-19/dutton-dismisses-ardern-demands-to-stop-deporting-new-zealanders/11324382" target="_blank">ABC</a>.</p> <p>“If something’s wrong and if something is not fair and is unjust, you don’t let it go,” the NZ Prime Minister said.</p> <p>“I totally accept that it is within Australia’s rights to deport those who engage in criminal activity in Australia. But there are some examples that will not make any sense to any fair-minded person.”</p> <p>Luckily, Wilkinson switched to a lighter note and asked Ardern about how she’s going with motherhood.</p> <p>Ardern revealed that she’s not “this Wonder Woman” and gets a lot of help from her fiancé Clarke Gayford.</p> <p>“No one needs to see anyone pretending it’s easy because it’s not and so I’m not going to go around pretending I do everything,” she said.</p> <p>“I’m not, it’s hard and women who are both working and raising children deserve to have help and support and so we shouldn’t pretend it can be done alone.”</p>

International Travel

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Cruising to a New Zealand holiday

<p>Back in the 1970s, well before cruising was travel’s growth area, I took a Sitmar voyage from Sydney to Wellington on the Fairsky. Of the 461 cabins, only seven had private bathrooms (I guess The Seekers didn’t have those when they worked their fare to the UK onboard the ship in 1964).</p> <p>That was a world away from modern cruising as epitomised by Royal Caribbean’s Radiance of the Seas that has been a regular feature in Australian waters over the past few summers. Its 2500 passengers appreciate the stunning Centrum area amidships: soaring seven storeys high, the exterior walls are clear glass so from the lounges and bars you are constantly looking at the sea and sky.</p> <p>The walls of the elevators are glass, too, so as you ascend you are either looking down to the central Deck 4 bar or out over an ocean panorama. Radiance OTS (as fans write it) is a big ship, but you can never forget you are at sea.</p> <p>This summer, Radiance will be based in Sydney and will undertake several return voyages to New Zealand. Cruising at 25 knots, it takes just two sea days to cross the Tasman and, starting at the top, you explore the delights of our neighbour from the Bay of Islands, Auckland, Tauranga and the Bay of Plenty, Wellington, Akaroa (for Christchurch) and Dunedin before exploring Dusky and Milford sounds and returning to Sydney.</p> <p>The <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/Great-Deals/13-night-New-Zealand-Cruise">13-night cruise</a> departing on March 28, for example is a great mix of excursion days and sea days. Modern ships provide so much in entertainment and facilities that you feel short changed if there aren’t a few sea days to simply explore and appreciate the ship.</p> <p>The last time I sailed on Radiance was through the Panama Canal before the newly expanded canal was opened. It was a tight fit; indeed sailing into Gatun Locks was rather like putting a cork back in a bottle. The canal locks designed by the US for the 1914 opening are all the same size: 110 feet wide by 1050 feet long. In similar imperial terms, Radiance is 105.6 feet wide and 962 feet long so we fitted, but only just, and we left some paint behind. Radiance of the Seas displaces 90,090 tons and, over its 12 passenger decks, carries 2114 passengers in double cabins or a maximum of 2501 served by more than 850 crew.</p> <p>There’s a wide range of dining options on board from a Brazilian steakhouse to the Italian cuisine of Giovanni’s Table. Besides an English pub, there’s the enjoyable and rather eccentric Schooner Bar and Colony Club that you enter past old canon and gunpowder kegs. It has gyroscopic self-levelling billiard tables, using technology created for North Sea oil platforms.</p> <p>Of course there’s a day spa, casino, gym, nightclub and theatre, but there’s also a giant outdoor movie screen, a climbing wall up the funnel, golf simulator, mini-golf and a basketball/volleyball court. On cold days, the jungle-like African-themed glassed solarium and pool is a delight. If you are making an intergenerational voyage, you’ll be happy to see that kids of all ages are catered for. Royal Babies and Royal Tots (6 to 36 months) have combined with Fisher-Price to create interactive activities.</p> <p>There are two divisions of Adventure Ocean: the youth program (3 to 11 years) offers everything from scavenger hunts to science experiments while the teen program (12 to 17 years) offers a teen space, parties, separate dinners and an elaborate water slide at their pool.</p> <p>It’s no wonder that cruises from Australia to New Zealand are rapidly increasing in popularity. Not only is NZ delightfully close, but it’s packed with a wide range of scenery and activities – from the warm beauty of the Bay of Islands to the wilds of the southern fiords. And there’s no better way to explore the maritime highlights than by ship.</p> <p><em>Written by David McGonigal. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/cruising-to-a-new-zealand-holiday.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Cruising

Health

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Australian tennis legend passes away aged 64

<p>Former Australian Davis Cup tennis star Peter McNamara has died aged 64.</p> <p>“Macca,” who reached a career-high number seven in the world in 1983, left a memorable mark when he beat two all-time greats Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl to win two of his five singles titles.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.39400921658984px;" src="/media/7828812/eacpdumueaiyi11-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8fca7dad11f949949a1e0a3f6767101c" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Peter McNamara, 2014. </em></p> <p>However, what the tennis star was perhaps most highly regarded for was his doubles partnership with Paul McNamee – the duo went on to win Wimbledon twice in 1980 and 1982 as well as the Australian Open in 1979.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hard to believe that after 50 years of friendship Macca is gone... you lived life to the full mate and will be missed by your loved ones and many more...a toast to the great times mate <a href="https://t.co/0RVbCD6ZRd">pic.twitter.com/0RVbCD6ZRd</a></p> — Paul McNamee (@PaulFMcNamee) <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee/status/1153066090760511490?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Melbourne-born McNamara retired in 1987 and enjoyed a successful coaching career.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So saddened to wake up to the news of Peter McNamara’s passing overnight. A great player, great coach that improved every player he worked with, and gun of a person. Big hugs to his family, friends and of course, his great mate <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PaulFMcNamee</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> 😔 <a href="https://t.co/CeFBai2jYI">pic.twitter.com/CeFBai2jYI</a></p> — Darren Cahill (@darren_cahill) <a href="https://twitter.com/darren_cahill/status/1153063153724354560?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>He coached Mark Philippoussis and guided Grigor Dimitrov in his formative years. More recently, he coached Matt Ebden and Wang Qiang.</p> <p>Until February, McNamara worked with Qiang and helped her to reach the world’s top 20 in their four-year partnership.</p> <p>The Aussie legend died peacefully at his home in Germany on Saturday night after a long and brave battle with prostate cancer.</p> <p>David Law, commentator and long-time friend of the tennis star and coach said McNamara went on to compete in exhibition matches and coach throughout his illness without many people ever knowing about his personal health issues.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So sad to wake up &amp; hear the news of Peter McNamara’s passing 😢 he was always one of the coaches I could sit down with on tour &amp; be able to have a great chat with. Mostly about life &amp; our kids. I will never forgot him telling me to live my life &amp; be happy with who I am <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — Casey Dellacqua OLY (@caseydellacqua) <a href="https://twitter.com/caseydellacqua/status/1153042613152337920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>McNamara is survived by his wife Petra, his children and grandchildren.</p> <p>The tennis world took to social media to voice their love and admiration of the late tennis legend.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">When you represent Australia.. you get the chance of meeting so many good people. One of them was Australian tennis legend Peter McNamara. Ripper bloke and will sadly be missed. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/tennis?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#tennis</a> 😪</p> — Dean Jones (@ProfDeano) <a href="https://twitter.com/ProfDeano/status/1153074719203233795?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Peter McNamara was one of the greats, a great person. He gave his all to everything he did, respected life &amp; always had a smile &amp; time for you. He’s someone you wanted to be in the trenches with. He fought in silence and now he can rest peacefully . <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — roger rasheed (@roger_rasheed) <a href="https://twitter.com/roger_rasheed/status/1153038830552772608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">One of the greats 🇦🇺 🙏<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://t.co/iYJvS3qDBq">pic.twitter.com/iYJvS3qDBq</a></p> — TennisAustralia (@TennisAustralia) <a href="https://twitter.com/TennisAustralia/status/1153078863129264128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote>

Caring

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Today star Deborah Knight's gruelling work schedule

<p>Deborah Knight is across television screens seven days a week right now – both morning and night – due to her current hectic schedule.</p> <p>The <em>Today</em> co-host is on TV from 5:30 am weekdays and pumps out three-and-a-half hours of high-pressure live television.</p> <p>On top of that intensive workload, Knight is also the anchors of Nine’s 6 pm evening news bulletin on Saturday and Sunday nights, but also fills in for Peter Overton, the weekday host of Nine's 6 pm news bulletin, when he is on leave.</p> <p>And, Overton has been on leave this week, so Knight has had to step in.</p> <p>Knight will be clocking off tonight for a well-earned break for two whole days. However, that means that this week alone, she will have done more than 22 hours of live broadcast presenting. Those are very high numbers.</p> <p>Others in the industry are raising their eyebrows at Knight’s hectic work schedule, as the mum-of-two is waking up at 3 am each day for <em>Today</em> and then back on TV at night for the 6 pm news.</p> <p>“I’m exhausted just thinking about it,” one on-air personality at a rival network told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/morning-shows/television-star-deborah-knight-is-everywhere-becoming-channel-9s-morning-and-evening-workhorse/news-story/bbca998eb03ce7e0d01f37b593b9573b" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</p> <p>“Not many people come to mind when I try to imagine someone else so willingly putting in those hours. Live TV is gruelling stuff. She’s a gun.”</p> <p>Media consultant Steve Allen believes that Knight’s constant appearance on Channel Nine is part of a larger plan to aid the failing <em>Today</em> brand by luring some of the evening news bulletin audience to the breakfast show.</p> <p>“It’s a very clever strategy and it should, over the midterm, produce some ratings dividends. <em>Today</em> certainly needs it,” Allen said.</p> <p>“It brings Nine back to where many think it should be, as the professional and slightly more up-market home of news. They’re positioning themselves as more trusted and more serious than that mums-and-dads show called <em>Sunrise</em>.”</p> <p><em>TV Tonigh</em>t editor David Knox agrees.</p> <p>“When Deb was given the plum job of anchoring<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>with Georgie Gardner, Nine indicated she would no longer be fronting prime time news bulletins in Sydney,” Knox said.</p> <p>“But clearly, they recognise she is one of their most versatile presenters, whether holding her own in political interviews or never missing a beat when the news autocue goes down.</p> <p>“Knight has survived TV’s revolving door where many others would not. Whether on Nine or Ten, viewers have always rated her, possibly more than some TV execs.”</p> <p>Allen says that her hectic work schedule at the moment is due to her being “more humble” than many in the television industry.</p> <p>“She doesn’t have any side to her, you know. She’s a lot more humble than many in TV and I think the public sees that. That’s why they really relate to her,” he said.</p> <p>“If Nine is doing tracking research, which I imagine they are, she’s bound to be coming out as someone who viewers like.”</p> <p>Nine has kept quiet about their new strategy, but it will be interesting to see whether or not viewers will follow Knight from the nightly news to the breakfast morning show.</p>

Body

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How a simple 10-minute exercise can boost your happiness

<p><span>Stresses and pressures can often be inevitable in our daily lives. There is no shortage of strategies to ease a sour mood and get yourself out of a rut – <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/mind/easy-tricks-to-improve-a-bad-mood/">spending time outdoors</a>, <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/music/this-hospital-uses-piano-music-to-boost-the-mood-and-mental-health-of-patients/">listening to music</a> and <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/mind/the-simple-trick-to-boost-your-mood-in-minutes">performing acts of kindness for others</a> are just some of them.</span></p> <p><span>But if you’re looking for a more reflective and personal exercise, this technique might just help.</span></p> <p><span>Sandi Mann, psychology lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire wrote on her book <em>Ten Minutes to Happiness </em>that writing a daily journal could help us re-orient our memory and shift our mindset to better cope with difficult situations.</span></p> <p><span>In her book, Mann outlined the six questions to use in your daily journal:</span></p> <ol> <li><span> What experiences, however mundane, gave you pleasure?</span></li> <li><span> What praise and feedback did you receive?</span></li> <li><span> What were the moments of pure good fortune?</span></li> <li><span> What were your achievements, however small?</span></li> <li><span> What made you feel grateful?</span></li> <li><span> How did you express kindness?</span></li> </ol> <p><span>One of the prominent themes from these questions is gratitude, which plays an important part in lifting our mood. Writing about things we are grateful for <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10503307.2016.1169332">has been found to improve mental health</a> as it turns our attention away from negative emotions.</span></p> <p><span>Mann said the benefits of this 10-minute review are not just limited to the writing time. Re-reading previous entries can also help us override our selective memories, which tend to be fixated on sources of unhappiness. </span></p> <p>While this method could help those who are having <a href="http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20181016-how-to-boost-your-mood-with-one-10-minute-exercise">low mood or stress without clinical symptoms</a>, Mann said people who may suffer from depression should consult with a GP for further treatment.</p>

Mind

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Aussie cricket legend Ian Chappell reveals cancer battle

<p>Cricket commentator and former Australian captain Ian Chappell has revealed that he has been undergoing treatment for skin cancer.</p> <p>The 75-year-old has reportedly completed five weeks of intensive radiation therapy after having carcinomas removed from his shoulder, neck and underarm.</p> <p>Chappell told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/test-cricket-legend-ian-chappell-reveals-skin-cancer-battle/news-story/1092ad54c11a54cb0f333ce8fdf17249?utm_source=Daily%20Telegraph&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=editorial" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Telegraph</em></a> that the prognosis is positive. </p> <p>“I didn’t tell too many people early on. Mainly because I just wasn’t sure what the radiotherapy would involve and how weary I’d be,” said Chappell.</p> <p>“But as it turned out, it wasn’t so bad. A bit of tiredness at night and a bit of skin irritation, but other than that I’m feeling pretty good.”</p> <p>The Test cricket legend said he has gotten used to having skin cancers over the years. </p> <p>“When you hit 70 you feel (vulnerable) anyhow, but I guess I’ve got so used to bloody skin cancers over the years, and the fact that none of them have been melanomas, probably provides a bit of comfort. It may be naivety on my part,” Chappell told<span> </span><em>The Daily Telegraph</em>.</p> <p>“I’ve had multiple skin cancers cut off, burnt off and every other way you can get rid of them,” he added.</p> <p>Chappell said he decided to deal with the disease after watching his mother “come to grips with death”.</p> <p>“You get to 70 and you start to think, ‘Christ, it’s getting near the end now’,” he said.</p> <p>“But I saw my mother Jeanne near the end and she’d come to grips with death, and that’s probably when I thought, ‘Shit, this is something you need to deal with’.”</p> <p>He also shared out the deaths of close pals Richie Benaud and Tony Greig affected him. </p> <p>“When Richie and Tony (Nine commentary comrades Richie Benaud and Tony Greig) went … again, it was just a reminder that it happens to everybody," Chappell reflected. </p> <p>Chappell has continued to work in the commentary box for the Nine Network during his radiotherapy. He confirmed that he will take part in the network’s Ashes coverage next month. “With the Ashes coming up now, I’ll speak to Nine and just say, ‘Look, I’m ready to go if you need me.’”</p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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Why we desire partners who have had relationship experience

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/why-were-more-likely-to-date-someone-who-has-an-ex-67367">Mate copying</a> (sometimes called mate-choice copying) is where an individual is preferred as a future romantic partner simply because they have relationship experience.</p> <p>Mate copying is a form of non-independent mate selection arising from social learning. Someone gathers mate-relevant information about a potential partner by observing their romantic interactions with someone else. The “copying” part refers to developing a preference for a partner simply because someone of the same gender as yourself has had a preference for them in the past.</p> <p>The basic idea is that people who have already been in a relationship have been “road-tested”. The logic goes they have proven they have at least some romantically desirable attributes because of their experience. This might seem odd, but there is plenty of good <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513810000231">scientific evidence</a> that mate copying exists.</p> <p>Although the phenomenon <a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0009115">applies broadly</a>, we know that it is particularly prevalent <a href="https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/36244/">among young women</a>.</p> <p>So, what is the value in mate copying? While it may not be obvious, the phenomenon does hold some utility. For one, mate-seekers (men or women) can readily identify a “good” (or at least passable) mate. In a sense, the person with experience is a “safer bet”.</p> <p>Another advantage is that this information is cheap. Rather than going through a costly trial-and-error process to identify a suitable romantic partner (expending time and money on dates), the mate copier gets similar information from observing others.</p> <p>A man holding hands with and embracing a woman is presumably considered by her to be at least an adequate relationship partner. The guy in the corner of the room alone staring at his iPhone may or may not be.</p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12110-003-1006-0?LI=true">“The Wedding Ring Effect”</a>, as it is sometimes called by the popular media, is the idea that simply by wearing a wedding ring a man is somehow imbued with a host of desirable characteristics.</p> <p>With an understanding of how and why mate copying works, this may seem like an entirely logical extension. It is, however, an egregious misconception.</p> <p><a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/2462347?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents">Seminal studies</a> and a multitude of <a href="http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.5735/086.048.0202">subsequent empirical work</a> have thoroughly established that mate copying exists among non-humans, and there is a bunch of converging evidence suggesting that the phenomenon occurs among humans. However, having a heightened preference for someone that has been romantically “pre-approved” is very different from chasing someone who is married.</p> <p>Studies have shown that romantically unavailable men are considered to be both more <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1660608/">attractive</a>, and more <a href="http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/77762/">desirable as long-term mates</a>. But there are also solid reasons not to pursue (or even desire) a married man.</p> <p>For one, married men are probably going to be harder to romantically “obtain” than someone who is single. A married man is going to at least be reluctant to violate marital commitments, and prying him from his partner is likely going to be met with strong resistance.</p> <p>Additionally, there are all sorts of social proscriptions against pursuing a married man. Doing so may well result in social derogation and/or exclusion.</p> <p>In one of the most realistic studies of mate copying, <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12110-003-1006-0">Swedish researchers</a> had women engage in real-life interactions with men who were wearing a wedding ring and men who weren’t. After the women had met and talked with each man (separately), each woman was asked a series of questions about the men she had just met. For example, she was asked her first impression of each man, their attractiveness and so on.</p> <p>There were no major differences between the two men in terms of how they were perceived by the women, but the men without wedding rings were on average considered more attractive, both physically and generally.</p> <p>Women suggested that they would rather have dinner with, have sex with, start a relationship with, and invite home the men not wearing a wedding ring. This may not come as much of a surprise, but it does suggest that while being in a relationship may make a man appealing in some sense, being married doesn’t.</p> <p>Following on from this idea, <a href="http://docplayer.net/22088144-The-wedding-ring-effect-revisited-steve-manna.html">research</a> conducted in the US found that female participants evaluating a photo of a man found him to be slightly more romantically attractive and generally likeable if he was romantically available than if he was living with a romantic partner.</p> <p>The much more important variable here was whether or not he had a history of commitment. Men who had previously been in relationships for three years were considered far more romantically attractive and generally likeable than men whose longest relationship had lasted only a few months.</p> <p>Some research I conducted recently found a curious pattern of results. Namely, men with relationship experience were considered more desirable than those without experience if the men were described only (no visual representation). As soon as they were pictured alongside a partner, this effect completely reversed.</p> <p>Taken together, these studies suggest that the idea of a man in a relationship is appealing in theory – but when it becomes a reality the appeal vanishes, or is at least mitigated.</p> <p><em>Written by Ryan Anderson. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-we-desire-partners-who-have-had-relationship-experience-78463">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Relationships

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50 reasons why you should love being over 50

<p>It might not surprise you, but most studies find that we are happiest between the ages of 50 and 70. For the most part you’ve done worrying about what other people think of you, built more than a little resilience and your career and kids are not demanding the attention they once did.  Now it’s finally time for you.</p> <p>We’re building the list of reason to love being over 50 and we’d love you to help us get it to 50! What are your favourites?</p> <p><strong>Reasons to love being over 50</strong></p> <p>1. You’re old enough to really appreciate your parents.</p> <p>2. You’re happy in your own skin.</p> <p>3. Experiences mean more than things.</p> <p>4. You’ve got more me time now that the kids are off your hands.</p> <p>5. A really fantastic cup of coffee.</p> <p>6. You can finally get to work on that bucket list.</p> <p>7. Spending time with great friends.</p> <p>8. Older and bolder, self confidence tends to grow with age.</p> <p>9. Eating chocolate cake for dinner.  With no ‘example to set’, you can eat whatever you want whenever you want! </p> <p>10. Sleeping in!</p> <p>11. Freckles and knobbly knees – the things we used to obsess about when a teenager seem utterly irrelevant now. </p> <p>12. Having the time to actually read a great book.</p> <p>13. Family - spending precious time with crazy cousins, kooky aunts and much loved parents, children and grandchildren. </p> <p>14. And speaking of them – GRANDCHILDREN !</p> <p>15. After a lifetime of delivering 'what is expected'. No more expections!</p> <p>16. Knowledge gained and amazing memories.</p> <p>17. We can participate in life with the energy and enthusiasm of a child but with the wisdom of experience - just magic!</p> <p>18. Setting your own schedule and time-frames because you are finally your own boss!</p> <p>19. Having the time to travel for more than a month a year (and when it isn't school hoildays).</p> <p>20. Spending time with grandchildren who love you back unconditionally. Being able to read to grandchildren for as long as you want to, without worrying about all the jobs that still need doing.</p> <p>21. Having the time to write about experiences brings a whole new perspective to amazing holidays and relationships.</p> <p>22. Being old enough to know better but then doing it anyway.</p> <p>23. Realising you don't need to worry about what others think. You only need to answer to yourself.</p> <p>24. Seeing all the kids and 'young people' wearing the 'latest fashion' that you wore at the same age as they are now.</p> <p>25. Having a great cup of tea with an old friend and having the time to just enjoy spending time together.<br />26. ?</p> <p><strong>Now help us build our list and tell us your favourite reasons …</strong></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/help-us-find-50-reasons-why-you-should-love-being-over-50.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Fairy tale romance: The heartwarming story of how MKR's Manu Feildel met his wife

<p>Maybe it’s his French accent or his talent in the kitchen, but Manu Feildel is no stranger to women fawning over him.</p> <p>But despite the popularity, when the<span> </span><em>My Kitchen Rules</em><span> </span>judge met his now-wife Clarissa Weerasena at Sydney’s Ivy night club in 2011, she reacted differently.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/aww" target="_blank"><em>The Australian Women’s Weekly</em></a><span> </span>in 2016, Clarissa revealed that she had no idea who the iconic chef was.</p> <p>“He comes up to me and says, ‘Your friend says that you can cook better than me,’ and I said, ‘I probably can’,” she recounted. “I thought, who the hell are you?”</p> <p>Speaking about the hilarious first encounter, Manu told<em><span> </span></em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/tvweek" target="_blank"><em>TV WEEK</em></a><span> </span>his version of events. “We met in a lift going to a nightclub in Sydney. She didn’t know who I was.”</p> <p>He then said: “We didn’t see each other for three months after that, then we caught up for a drink. I was nervous. Because three months had passed. We didn’t see each other for another three months, then had some lunch. The rest is history.”</p> <p>But what sealed the deal was Clarissa’s knowledge in the kitchen. The chef is known to love sauce accompanying meals and after tasting one of her creations, he knew he had found the one.</p> <p>“Clarissa ticked all the boxes – and that was the biggest box. I was like, thank God! She loves eating and she loves cooking – she’s perfect!” He told the<span> </span><em>Australian Women’s Weekly</em>.</p> <p>Madly in love, the<span> </span><em>Australia’s Got Talent</em><span> </span>judge asked Clarissa to marry him in 2013, and the couple then welcomed their daughter Charlee in 2015.</p> <p>Before Clarissa, Manu was in a 12-year relationship with Ronnie Moreshead whom he shares a son Jonti with.</p> <p>After being engaged for four long years, the couple tied the knot in 2018 in what Manu describes as a “beautiful intimate ceremony”.</p> <p>He took to Instagram to share the happy news.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BehblRUF_Xc/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BehblRUF_Xc/" target="_blank">I’ve often said don’t believe what you read in the press but now you hear it from the horses mouth, yes it’s true I am married! Last week I married the love of my life Clarissa in a beautiful intimate ceremony. We had a wonderful day surrounded by family and friends and lots of love and laughter. Thanks to @theelandra @blueskyphotographyqld @onedaybridal @linneys_jewellery</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/manufeildelofficial/" target="_blank"> Manu Feildel</a> (@manufeildelofficial) on Jan 28, 2018 at 9:54pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I’ve often said don’t believe what you read in the press but now you hear it from the horses mouth, yes it’s true I am married!” he wrote.</p> <p>“Last week I married the love of my life Clarissa in a beautiful intimate ceremony. We had a wonderful day surrounded by family and friends and lots of love and laughter.”</p> <p>And they’re still going strong, as only recently, Manu shared a photo of the duo celebrating his 46th birthday.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvd1bjtnL_n/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvd1bjtnL_n/" target="_blank">Happy B’day to me!!! 46 year young and going strong. Best wife, best son, best daughter, best life.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/manufeildelofficial/" target="_blank"> Manu Feildel</a> (@manufeildelofficial) on Mar 26, 2019 at 2:16am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Happy B’day to me!!! 46 year young and going strong. Best wife, best son, best daughter, best life,” he gushed.</p>

Relationships

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Is my forgetfulness normal?

<p>We all forget things from time to time. For example, how many of us have walked into a room only to forget why we went there in the first place? Or forgotten the name of a new acquaintance only moments after they’ve introduced themselves? These are common experiences, but if these memory lapses turn persistent or progressive it could be a sign of something else.</p> <p><em>“A person with forgetfulness may lose their car keys, but a person with dementia may lose their car keys and then forget what the car keys are actually used for,”</em> explains Alzheimer’s Australia CEO, Carol Bennett. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and affects 80 per cent of people with dementia. While memory loss is the most common symptom of dementia, other symptoms may include confusion, personality change, apathy and withdrawal or an inability to perform everyday tasks.</p> <p>According to Bennett, dementia will present itself in many different ways and symptoms may vary between individuals. <em>“For some people it won’t be memory loss, rather they may experience visual-spatial differences. For example, someone with dementia may put their glass down under the table or above the table and drop the glass. They may misjudge stairs, because they lose their capacity to judge physical space,”</em> she said.</p> <p><strong>Early signs of alzheimer’s disease</strong><br />Alzheimer’s Australia advise some warning signs include:</p> <p>1. Remembering events, words, names or objects: A person with dementia may progressively forget common words or names and may even forget part or all of an event. In healthy people, there may be the occasional lapse but words are usually on the tip of the tongue and memories are vague, rather than completely forgotten.</p> <p>2. Understanding stories: Dementia causes a decline in the ability to follow story lines in TV shows, films, books or any other storytelling form of entertainment.</p> <p>3. Performing everyday tasks: In someone with dementia, everyday tasks like dressing and cooking can become quite arduous, whereas a healthy person will not have any difficulty unless physically impaired.</p> <p>4. Following directions: Healthy people should be able to follow written and verbal directions without any difficulty. Someone with dementia, on the other hand, is increasingly unable to follow these cues.</p> <p><a href="https://fightdementia.org.au/">Read the full checklist on the Alzheimer’s Australia website.</a></p> <p><strong>Younger onset dementia</strong><br />While dementia is more common in people over 65, sadly there are more than 24,000 Australians in their 30s, 40s, 50s and early 60s affected by the disease.</p> <p><em>“Dementia in the under 65s is often misdiagnosed. There’s a lack of information, even among health professionals,”</em> adds Bennett. One theory is that people with younger onset dementia tend to present with problem solving and behavioural issues, and as a result, these individuals can be mistakenly diagnosed with depression.</p> <p>There are different types of dementia and symptoms are variable. However, if you or a loved one is worried, see a GP or ask for a referral to a neurologist who can complete a series of medical and psychological tests to determine the cause. Your doctor may talk to you about your medical history, perform cognitive, psychiatric and/or neuropsychological testing, or request blood and urine tests to screen for illnesses which could be responsible for dementia-like symptoms.</p> <p>Bennett explains, when it comes to younger onset dementia, early intervention is key.<em> “Early diagnosis makes a huge difference to the outcome. Unfortunately it is a very progressive condition, especially in younger onset where it tends to progressive more quickly. The sooner you can provide support the better. Early intervention keeps people out of hospital and residential aged care,”</em> she adds.</p> <p><strong>Preventing dementia: help at hand</strong><br /><em>“There isn’t a one size fits all, it’s about keeping your mind active,”</em> advises Bennett. In fact, experts say that the changes in the brain that lead to dementia begin up to 15-20 years before symptoms first appear. Lifestyle changes, such as keeping physically active, eating the right foods and challenging the mind, all reduce the risk.</p> <p><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/six-ways-to-keep-your-mind-sharp.aspx">Click here</a> for six fun and simple ways to reduce your risk for dementia and keep your mind sharper for longer. </p> <p>Alzheimer’s Australia has also developed a Brainy App, which can help determine your ‘brain health’ and assist you with completing brainy activities using a score system. Download the free app <a href="http://yourbrainmatters.org.au/a-little-help/brainyapp">here</a>.</p> <p>Ready for something new? Take the Your Brain Matters 21 challenge! Always dreamt of speaking Spanish, learning the violin or finally mastering a soufflé? Keeping your mind active by doing new things is a fun way to establish brain healthy habits visit: <a href="http://yourbrainmatters.org.au/challenge">Your brain matters</a>.</p> <p>You can also call the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500 for support and advice regarding health, financial and counselling services in your area.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/is-my-forgetfulness-normal.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

Finance

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Golf club owner Kerri-Anne Kennerley is suing over husband's fall is a long-time "friend"

<p>On the evening of March 6, 2016, Australian TV personality Kerri-Anne Kennerley’s life changed forever after her husband John fell from a verandah at the Bonville International Golf Resort which caused him to fracture his C3 and C4 vertebrae.</p> <p>He was paralysed from the neck down following the incident and sadly passed away three years later in March 2019 at the age of 73.</p> <p>Now, news has emerged that the golf course is being sued for negligence due to the accident, but the place is owned by a friend of Kerri-Anne’s as well as being a former Australian Olympian.</p> <p>Peter Montgomery, 69, represented Australia in four Olympic campaigns from 1972 to 1984 before serving as chairman of the Australian Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission and vice-president of the AOC from 2001 to 2016, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/olympian-peter-montgomery-owns-golf-course-kerrianne-kennerley-is-suing-over-husbands-fall/news-story/f828ef5503ab6baeaf7fb55fe7e5b2ce" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Telegraph</em>.</a></p> <p>The real estate portfolio owned by Montgomery includes the Bonville International Golf Resort, which is now being sued for unspecified damages, interests and costs filed by John Kennerley five months before his death.</p> <p>Montgomery’s company Ironhill Services has denied that the fall was its fault and that the accident occurred due to John not looking where he was walking.</p> <p>"The defendant says if the plaintiff suffered injury, loss and damage as alleged, such injury, loss and damage was caused or contributed to by the plaintiff's own negligence," read the court document in an NSW Supreme Court filing.</p> <p>Ironhill claim that John “failed to look where he was walking, stepping into a garden bed (and) failing to take care not to step onto an object, prize, on the floor”.</p> <p>However, John’s lawyers are arguing that a “reasonable person” from the golf resort’s perspective would have implemented measures to ensure patrons cannot get hurt at the golf course residence.</p> <p>Kerri-Anne spoke to <a rel="noopener" href="https://celebrity.nine.com.au/latest/golf-course-kerri-anne-kennerley-husband-died-being-sued-friend-former-olympian/9bb4599b-b4c2-460c-b4c9-ecc21bcdf0d5" target="_blank">News Corp</a> earlier this week about the incident.</p> <p>"John and I survived for three years but other people could not and that does actually make me angry,” she said.</p> <p>"Whatever the circumstances are, for an accident for any insurance company to drag something out for almost three-and-a-half years is despicable."</p> <p>The incident is said to have strained things between the former friends, but John Eales, an ambassador of Bonville Golf Resort, has said that Montgomery is “a man of the highest integrity”. </p>

Legal

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Easy ways to save money

<p>There are many benefits to getting a little bit older. Kids flying the nest, working fewer hours (if you’re lucky), feeling a little bit wiser and caring much less about what others think. Today we live longer than our grandparents and enjoy better health. And with any luck, most of us are a little more financially secure, giving us the freedom to enjoy our leisure time. That’s a lot to be thankful for.</p> <p>However, there may be even more rewards there for the taking that you’re not taking advantage of. Discounts and concessions can make a huge difference to your budget, freedom and enjoyment of life. It’s important to be aware of exactly what you’re entitled to at every stage of life, to ensure you’re not missing out on what’s due to you.</p> <p>Perhaps the most important concession is the Australian Seniors Card. This piece of handy plastic can save you money on everything from travel to energy bills. Registration is free, and each state has its own card scheme, with a published list of participating businesses from which you can claim a discount, whether you’re eating in a restaurant or buying a new fridge.</p> <p>You’ll find you can get money off insurance costs, new cars, legal fees, medical and dental treatments, taxi fares, even beauty products. You name it, there’s probably a discount for it. Not all states are equal – for instance, in Queensland you can get a concession for your boat registration, while in the Northern Territory, hot-air balloon across the outback will cost you less if you hold a Seniors Card.</p> <p>Most cards will be accepted interstate, and it’s also worth taking your card with you when you travel overseas – many international businesses accept cards, particularly in New Zealand, Hong Kong, Singapore, USA, Canada and the UK. All you have to do is ask.</p> <p>We’ve listed below all the information you need to get the best out of this handy card in each Australian state.</p> <p><strong>Australian Capital Territory</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be over 60, a permanent resident of the ACT and working no more than 20 paid hours per week. Up to 300 Government and non-Government organisations participate in this discount scheme. For a full directory of participating outlets <a href="http://www.actseniorscard.org.au/Documents/SeniorsDirectory2013_v10.pdf">click here.</a></p> <p>There is no online application process. To apply for an ACT Seniors Card, you have to visit a Government shopfront in person. A list of participating outlets can be found <a href="http://www.actseniorscard.org.au/eligibility.htm">here.</a></p> <p><strong>New South Wales</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be 60 or over and a permanent resident of NSW working no more than 20 hours of paid work per week. You must also be the holder of a valid Medicare card. Thousands of outlets are signed up to the scheme in NSW. For a full directory, <a href="http://www.seniorscard.nsw.gov.au/Memberguide/Discount_Directory.asp">click here.</a></p> <p>Apply for a NSW Seniors card <a href="http://www.service.nsw.gov.au/transaction/apply-nsw-seniors-card">here.</a></p> <p>Hot tip: the Senior Shopper helpline 1300 366 265 can find you the best deals on a wide range of products. Just call them and tell them what you want, and an agent will do all the legwork, then call you back with the best price.</p> <p><strong>Northern Territory</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be over 60 and a permanent resident. More than 200 businesses support the scheme providing discounts on goods and services all over the territory. A directory can be found <a href="http://www.dcm.nt.gov.au/strong_community/seniors/seniors_directory">here.</a></p> <p>There is no online application process. Download the application form <a href="http://www.dcm.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/58502/seniors_card_application_form.pdf">here</a>, and apply by post, or call 1800 441 489.</p> <p><strong>Queensland</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be a permanent resident of Queensland , 65 years or older and working less than 35 paid hours per week or 60-64 and working less than 35 paid hours per week and holder of one of four Commonwealth concession cards. See the website <a href="http://www.qld.gov.au/seniors/legal-finance-concessions/applying-seniors-card/">here</a> for more information.</p> <p>Queensland has thousands of participating businesses and services, which can be found in an online searchable directory <a href="https://secure.communities.qld.gov.au/chiip/SearchDiscounts.aspx">here.</a> </p> <p>Apply for a Queensland Seniors Card <a href="https://secure.communities.qld.gov.au/chiip/SearchDiscounts.aspx">here</a>.</p> <p><strong>Hot tip:</strong> The state also has a free telephone Senior Shopper service (1300 366 265) in which a consultant will shop around for the best deal on your behalf.</p> <p><strong>South Australia</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be aged 60 or over, and a permanent South Australia resident working not more than 20 hours paid employment per week. For the full directory of participating businesses <a href="http://www.sa.gov.au/topics/seniors/seniors-card/seniors-card-discount-directory-your-lifestyle-guide">click here</a>. </p> <p>Apply for your South Australia Seniors Card <a href="https://www.bizgate.sa.gov.au/xml_forms1/site/page.cfm?action=frameset&amp;id=82&amp;action_frame=display">here.</a></p> <p><strong>Tasmania</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be a resident of the state, aged 60 or over and not working more than 20 paid hours per week. More than 730 businesses take part in Tassie. For a directory of services, take a look <a href="http://www.dpac.tas.gov.au/divisions/csrt/programs_and_services/seniors_card/for_cardholders/find_a_discount/directory_search">here.</a> </p> <p>There is no online application process. You can download the application form <a href="http://www.dpac.tas.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/232965/Seniors_Card_Application_Form_Revised_MAY2013_press.pdf">here.</a></p> <p>Then take your completed form to a Government shopfront, along with three original pieces of identification. For the full list of outlets <a href="http://www.dpac.tas.gov.au/divisions/csrt/programs_and_services/seniors_card/for_cardholders/how_to_apply">click here.</a></p> <p><strong>Victoria</strong><br />Eligibility: You must be aged 60 or over, a permanent resident of Australia, residing in Victoria, working less than 35 paid hours per week. Thousands of outlets participate in Victoria. For a full directory <a href="http://www.seniorsonline.vic.gov.au/Home/Seniors-Card/Your-Seniors-Card/Get-Discounts-and-Benefits/Discount-Directory?q=directory">click here.</a></p> <p>To apply for a Victorian Seniors Card <a href="http://www.seniorsonline.vic.gov.au/Home/Seniors-Card/Your-Seniors-Card/Apply-for-a-Card">click here</a>. </p> <p><strong>Western Australia</strong><br />Age eligibility will change soon. Until 30 June 2015 you have to be:<br />60 years and a permanent resident of WA, working 25 paid hours or less per week.</p> <p>Apply before 30 June with application form including statutory declaration to confirm eligibility, signed by an approved witness. From 1 July, the eligible age will increase by a year, every two years to 65 by 2023-24. You’ll still need to be permanent resident working 25 paid hours or less. You’ll also need to provide 100 points of identification to be approved for a WA Seniors Card.</p> <p>For the WA directory of discounts <a href="http://www.communities.wa.gov.au/Documents/Seniors%20Card/SC_DiscountDirectory_2014-16.pdf">click here.</a></p> <p>Apply for your WA Seniors Card <a href="http://www.communities.wa.gov.au/Documents/Seniors%20Card/SeniorsCard_ApplicationForm.pdf">here.</a></p> <p><strong>Did you know</strong> the Australian Government have pledged $1.3 million to supply free access to computers and internet training for 97,000 senior Australians? Read all about it <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/lifestyle/boomer-life/broadband-support-for-seniors-keeping-everyone-in-touch.aspx">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>Other handy resources</strong><br />The Commonwealth Seniors Health Card is available to self-funded retirees only.<br />It provides discounts on prescription medicines and Government-funded medical appointments and treatments. You must be at least 65, but not qualify for the Age Pension. For more information, <a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/commonwealth-seniors-health-card">click here</a>.</p> <p>If you work past retirement age, you may be entitled to a <a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/work-bonus">Work Bonus</a> for remaining in the workforce. The payment is calculated automatically by the Government. You do not need to apply. <a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/subjects/payments-for-older-australians">Visit the Department of Human Services</a> to make sure you are receiving all the benefits to which you are entitled.</p> <p><strong>See also</strong><br /><a href="http://www.moneysmart.gov.au/life-events-and-you/over-55s/your-money">ASIC’s</a> Money Smart - for over 55's.<br /><a href="http://www.nationalseniors.com.au/">National Seniors Australia</a> – membership scheme providing an independent voice for over 50s.</p> <p><em>Written by Ali Wright. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/work/employment/easy-ways-to-save-money.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Legal

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Supermarket wars: How Coles and Woolworths will use customer data to beat ALDI

<p><span>Woolworths and Coles are looking to use customer data to get an edge over competitors like ALDI, according to a Credit Suisse report.</span></p> <p><span>Although the supermarket giants have accumulated details on customers through their loyalty programs – Rewards and flybuys respectively – analysts from the financial services company said it was only the beginning stage for their use of artificial intelligence to boost their marketing and promotional efforts.</span></p> <p><span>Credit Suisse retail analyst Grant Saligari said Coles and Woolies’ use of data and analytics technology would give them <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/coles-and-woolies-secret-weapon-in-war-with-aldi-is-data-20190529-p51sej.html">an advantage against smaller competitors</a> such as ALDI and IGA. “The respective Rewards and Fly Buys programmes of Woolworths and Coles provide an unmatched capability to engage with customers on a unique basis.”</span></p> <p><span>Supermarkets can already use the data to target members with emails informing the item they have bought in the past are on sale. </span></p> <p><span>However, Saligari said the promos will become more sophisticated in the future, with the ability to offer different discounts to different shoppers depending on their sensitivity to price.</span></p> <p><span>“Allocating expenditure to intermittent shoppers that are likely to switch a purchase from a competitor would likely be a better use of promotional expenditure than a similar promotion to a loyal customer,” said Saligari.</span></p> <p><span>Credit Suisse said 20 per cent of the cost of a grocery item in supermarkets goes towards promotions.</span></p> <p><span>Last year, ALDI launched a campaign that poked fun at its competitors for their “<a href="https://mumbrella.com.au/aldi-takes-aim-at-competitors-by-poking-fun-at-loyalty-cards-in-latest-good-different-ad-546367">pointless points</a>” and loyalty cards.</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8dqnqcd-LKU"></iframe></div> <p><span>“ALDI has a different point of view on loyalty,” said Mark Richardson, marketing director at ALDI. </span></p> <p><span>“In the 17 years we’ve been operating in Australia, we’ve created a loyal following of customers by offering consistently low prices and great quality goods. Customers continually tell us that this is what matters most to them.”</span></p> <p><span>Woolworths and Coles are currently the two biggest supermarkets in Australia with a <a href="http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/7936-australian-grocery-market-december-2018-201904050426">joint market share</a> of 61.6 per cent. ALDI follows on the third spot with an 11.4 per cent share.</span></p> <p>A <a href="https://www.choice.com.au/shopping/everyday-shopping/supermarkets/articles/which-is-the-best-supermarket-satisfaction-survey">recent survey by CHOICE</a> found that Woolworths and Coles were the lowest-rated grocers in terms of shopper satisfaction. Some of the most common complaints among Coles customers included slow and difficult checkout system, lack of local produce options, limited product availability and unhelpful staff.</p>

Retirement Income

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Australia's residential aged care facilities are getting bigger and less home-like

<p>Most older people <a href="http://www.who.int/mental_health/publications/dementia_report_2012/en/">want to stay at home</a> as long as they can. When this is no longer possible, they move into residential aged care facilities, which become their home. But Australia’s care facilities for the aged are growing in size and becoming less home-like.</p> <p>In 2010–11, 54 per cent of residential aged care facilities in major Australian cities had <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/aged-care/residential-aged-care-in-australia-2010-11/contents/table-of-contents">more than 60 places</a>, and the <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/aged-care/report/aged-care-overview-booklet.pdf">size of the average facility</a> is growing.</p> <p>Today, more than 200,000 Australians live or stay in residential aged care on any given day. There are <a href="https://www.gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/Topics/Services-and-places-in-aged-care">around 2,672 such facilities</a> in Australia. This equates to an average of around 75 beds per facility.</p> <p>Large institutions for people with disability and mental illness, as well as orphaned children, were once commonplace. But now – influenced by the 1960s <a href="https://psychcentral.com/encyclopedia/deinstitutionalization/">deinstitutionalisation</a> movement – these have been closed down and replaced with smaller community-based services. In the case of aged care, Australia has gone the opposite way.</p> <p><strong>Why is smaller better?</strong></p> <p>Evidence shows that aged care residents have better well-being when given opportunities for self-determination and independence. Internationally, there has been a <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525861016300482">move towards</a> smaller living units where the design encourages this. These facilities feel <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26743545">more like a home</a> than a hospital.</p> <p>The <a href="http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/186463/9789240694811_eng.pdf;jsessionid=731A680E51575BBDBEC07AFC9C449F23?sequence=1">World Health Organisation</a> has indicated that such models of care, where residents are also involved in running the facility, have advantages for older people, families, volunteers and care workers, and improve the quality of care.</p> <p>In the US, the <a href="https://www.thegreenhouseproject.org/resources/research">Green House Project</a> has built more than 185 homes with around 10-12 residents in each. Studies show Green House residents’ enhanced quality of life doesn’t compromise <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26743545">clinical care</a> or <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21158746">running costs</a>.</p> <p>Around 50 per cent of residents living in <a href="https://www.gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/Resources/Factsheets-and-infographics/Care-needs-factsheet.pdf?ext=">aged care facilities</a> have dementia. And <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1471301214532460">research has shown</a> that a higher quality of life for those with dementia is associated with buildings that help them engage with a variety of activities both inside and outside, are familiar, provide a variety of private and community spaces and the amenities and opportunities to take part in domestic activities.</p> <p>In June 2018, an <a href="https://theconversation.com/caring-for-elderly-australians-in-a-home-like-setting-can-reduce-hospital-visits-97451">Australian study</a> found residents with dementia in aged-care facilities that provided a home-like model of care had far better quality of life and fewer hospitalisations than those in more standard facilities. The home-like facilities had up to 15 residents.</p> <p>The study also found the cost of caring for older people in the smaller facilities was no higher, and in some cases lower, than in institutionalised facilities.</p> <p>There are some moves in Australia towards smaller aged care services. For example, aged care provider <a href="https://www.wintringham.org.au/">Wintringham</a> has developed services with smaller facilities for older people who are homeless. Wintringham received the <a href="https://www.wintringham.org.au/built_environment.html">Building and Social Housing Foundation World Habitat Award 1997</a> for Wintringham Port Melbourne Hostel. Its innovative design actively worked against the institutional model.</p> <p><strong>Bigger and less home-like</strong></p> <p>Historically, nursing homes in Australia were small facilities, with <a href="https://www.anu.edu.au/fellows/jbraithwaite/_documents/Articles/The%20Nursing%20Home%20Industry.pdf">around 30 beds</a> each, often run as family businesses or provided by not-for-profit organisations. Between <a href="https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/lcdocs/other/9768/Aged%20care%20industry%20facts.pdf">2002 and 2013</a> the proportion of facilities with more than 60 beds doubled to 48.6 per cent. <a href="http://www.stewartbrown.com.au/images/documents/StewartBrown---ACFPS-Residential-Care-Report-March-2017.pdf">Financial viability</a> rather than quality of care drove the increase in size.</p> <p>Today, around 45 per cent of <a href="https://gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/Resources/Access-data/2018/September/Aged-care-data-snapshot%E2%80%942018">facilities are operated</a> by the private for-profit sector, 40% by religious and charitable organisations, 13 per cent by community-based organisations, 3 per cent by state and territory governments, and less than 1 per cent by local governments.</p> <p>In 2016, the <a href="https://gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/Resources/Access-data/2018/September/Aged-care-data-snapshot%E2%80%942018">Australian Institute of Health and Welfare</a> (AIHW) reported that residential care services run by government organisations were more likely to be in small facilities. One-fifth (22 per cent) of <a href="https://www.gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/www_aihwgen/media/2017-Factsheets/Services-and-Places-Factsheet-2016%E2%80%9317_2.pdf">places in these facilities</a> are in services with 20 or fewer places. Almost half (49 per cent) of privately-run residential places are found in services with more than 100 places.</p> <p>All of this means that more older Australians are living out their last days in an institutional environment.</p> <p>Once larger facilities become the norm, it will be difficult to undo. Capital infrastructure is built to have an <a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/sites/g/files/net1426/f/documents/09_2016/2016_report_on_the_funding_and_financing_of_the_aged_care_industry_2.pdf">average 40-year life</a>, which will lock in the institutional model of aged care.</p> <p>The built environment matters. The royal commission provides an opportunity to fundamentally critique the institutional model.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/103521/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Ralph Hampson, Senior Lecturer, Health and Ageing, University of Melbourne</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/australias-residential-aged-care-facilities-are-getting-bigger-and-less-home-like-103521" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Retirement Income

Entertainment

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New Michael Hutchence documentary reveals the night that changed everything for the star

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michael Hutchence and INXS in their prime made some of the biggest hits of their era and reached number one with Need You Tonight in January 1988.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">20 years on from his suicide, Hutchence is still a pop culture icon. With newspapers, TV documentaries, drama series and reality competitions retelling his story, they were all missing a crucial piece of information.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hutchence had suffered a traumatic brain injury from a one-punch attack in Copenhagen, 1992.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The story, told in a new documentary </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mystify</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, was told by Hutchence’s partner from 1991 to 1995 Helena Christensen. The story was then backed up by a coroner’s report.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Christensen recounts that a taxi driver "yelled at Michael to move, got out of his car and punched him. He fell backwards and hit the curb".</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The aftermath was dark. Hutchence insisted on leaving the hospital and stayed in Christensen’s apartment, vomiting and refusing food for the next month.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"This dark, very angry side came out in him," she says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The documentary </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mystify</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is told by long-time INXS collaborator Richard Lowenstein.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"She didn't even tell her parents for 20 years, so her interview was very revealing. And then the coroner's report was even more revealing — of what he was hiding," Lowenstein tells </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/stop-everything/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">RN's Stop Everything!</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I think it was incredibly emotional finding that out, especially for the band members. They came to a screening and they didn't know the full extent until they saw the film."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lowenstein obtained the unedited coroner’s report of Hutchence through British Journalist sources. He then showed it to neurologists and psychologists.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I don't think anyone had seen that unedited coroner's report before, but that was a revelation," he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"[They] rang up in the middle of the night saying: 'It's very obvious what happened. This is a perfect storm of suicide risk, what's here in the report.'"</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lowenstein said that the revelation was a transformative piece of the “jigsaw puzzle” that was Hutchence.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"After his assault in Copenhagen in 92, he came back and filmed some videos, and all of us at Ghost, everyone who worked with him, saw a very different Michael. And we just [thought]: 'There's something wrong'," he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We didn't know if it was going to be permanent. And then we saw him go off the rails. You'd see him every three months and you'd go: 'Whoa, that's not the Michael we knew three months ago.'"</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lowenstein said he was inspired to tell the true story of Hutchence as he didn’t feel like the real version of him was out in the media.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We just all sat there and thought: 'There's honestly nothing of the guy we remember — that we recognise — out there.' And we just we had all the footage in our archive, in literally my attic. And we thought, we should do something authentic about him," he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"As we put the jigsaw puzzle together, I discovered a much more complicated and insecure [person], someone who had been fighting depression from the start," Lowenstein says.</span></p>

Music

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Princess Mary shares rare family photograph with surprise guest

<p>Rarely do we get treated to candid family photos from any royal families over the world, however the Danish royal family are sharing a rare look into their private life.</p> <p>Princess Mary has shown there is nothing quite like a European summer and in an extremely thoughtful move, the Danish royal family have shared a family photograph with a very special addition.</p> <p>In a gorgeous candid snap, Prince Frederik and his wife Princess Mary are pictured at Gråsten Palace, in southern Denmark, along with their four children - as well as Frederik's mother and Mary's mother-in-law Queen Margarethe.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fdetdanskekongehus%2Fphotos%2Fa.284013581937230%2F956215991383649%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="497" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The family are known to spend many family summers at the grand mansion where they get the opportunity to sit back and put their feet up in their own home.</p> <p>Aussie-born royal Mary had a wide grin on her face as did her four children, Prince Christian, 13, Princess Isabella, 12, and 8-year-old twins Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine.</p> <p>It was the extra addition to the family, 79-year-old Queen Margarethe, who surprised fans. Pictured in simple, casual clothes, the grandmother of eight and mother to two was shown cosying up to some of her grandchildren – a rare sight indeed!</p> <p>Not only were fans treated to a photograph of the whole family outside their gorgeous palace, they also took to Instagram to share another sweet snap, this time showing the Queen just with her grandchildren.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz_NpTMh4d6/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz_NpTMh4d6/" target="_blank">A post shared by DET DANSKE KONGEHUS (@detdanskekongehus)</a> on Jul 16, 2019 at 11:28am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>As Aussies continue to shiver through a chilly winter, it is no wonder we are a little envious of Princess Mary and her family, who are all basking in the glorious European sun.</p>

Art

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This is what your favourite stars will look like when they're 70

<p><span><em>The Project</em> hosts have become household faces over the last 10 years, but on Wednesday, the show’s panel gave their viewers a sneak peek into what they’ll look like in the future by using the FaceApp ageing filter.</span></p> <p>The hilarious segment left audience members in stitches as Waleed Aly, Carrie Bickmore and Peter Helliar all took part in the viral challenge.</p> <p>First up was Carrie, with the 37-year-old looking well beyond her years in the transformed snap.</p> <p>Her flowing blonde locks were replaced with greying hair, and her smooth skin was covered in fine lines and wrinkles.</p> <p>As the camera panned back to Carrie, she looked visibly taken aback by the image.</p> <p>“Why are you coming back to me, to prove how bad I look?” she joked with the cameraman.</p> <p>Peter Helliar was next in the firing line, as a photo of him pretending not to know how to use a mobile phone was aged with the help of the filter.</p> <p>“I don’t know how to use the phone. Bl**dy technology,” joked Peter.</p> <p>Towards the end of the segment, Waleed was the last one to see how he would look in the next 40 years.</p> <p>The academic and TV star was unrecognisable as he held a coffee cup in his hand and had grey hair.</p> <p>Turning the laughter towards himself, Waleed said: “Scary thing about that was that there was no filter on that one.”</p> <p>And they’re not the only ones jumping on board the viral sensation, as celebrities such as Manu Feildel, Grant Denyer and Dave Hughes have all revealed what they’ll look like in 40 years’ time.</p> <p>"Do not let anyone do that older look thing on you," Hughes captioned his old age photo which he posted on Instagram.</p> <p>Grant's photo looked incredibly realistic, as he joked that having "Bali-belly for 4 days is rather dehydrating".</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see what your favourite celebrities will look like in the future. </p>

Technology