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Queen Elizabeth's colourful wardrobe: Which look is your favourite?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Of all the things Queen Elizabeth is good at, the most flamboyant one of them all is her daring outfits that match every colour of the rainbow. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While Duchess Kate and Meghan may make headlines for their figure-hugging, fashion-forward looks - Her Majesty has become renowned for her bright power suits and colour-coded outfits. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Sali Hughes, author of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our Rainbow Queen</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, there is a distinct reason as to why she chooses the outfits she does. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[Queen Elizabeth] wears bright colours because she believes it’s her duty to be seen by the people who’ve waited, wet and cold, behind barriers for hours at a time,” Hughes writes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She adds that Queen Elizabeth’s colour-blocked outfits are “born from practicality'' continuing, “She understands her job is to be seen and, standing at just 5’3…[she] needs all the help she can get."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It’s not until you see her many thousands of outfits laid out side by side, as I did when editing the pictures for the book, that you see how bold she’s often been in her choices. And she balances those choices with an innate sense of duty - the bright colour blocking is purely so that members of the public, who’ve waited patiently to see her, know exactly who and where she is, however far back in the crowd. The three quarter length sleeves are for easy handshaking. The matronly Annello and Davide block heels (which she calls her ‘work shoes’) are designed to be comfy enough for lengthy walkabouts, meeting as many people as possible," Hughes told us.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see our Rainbow Queen’s most daring outfits. </span></p>

News

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Osher Günsberg’s pens emotional letter to wife and new baby boy

<p>Osher Günsberg and his wife Audrey Griffen have welcomed their first child together, baby “Wolfie” Wolfgang. </p> <p>The<span> </span><em>Bachelor Australia<span> </span></em>host shared a sweet post in honour of his newest addition to the family - with a heartfelt message to both Audrey and baby Wolfgang. </p> <p>"I am in complete awe of my wife," he wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1ldaeEgcwd/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1ldaeEgcwd/" target="_blank">A post shared by Osher Günsberg (@osher_gunsberg)</a> on Aug 25, 2019 at 4:29am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"What I witnessed her do, the power I saw her summon from within her to bring this boy into the world was utterly astonishing. ⁠⁠As he came closer and closer, her body began to unleash an incredible energy that was absolutely not going to be held back. ⁠⁠</p> <p>"Yet Audrey was able to harness it, guide it, and use it to transcend the extraordinary pain she was feeling and channel it all towards an energy that brought this boy alive and well into the world.⁠"</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/ByNG3DqDKYE/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/ByNG3DqDKYE/" target="_blank">A post shared by Osher Günsberg (@osher_gunsberg)</a> on Jun 2, 2019 at 3:56am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Günsberg and Griffin first met on the set of<span> </span><em>The Bachelor<span> </span></em>back in 2014. </p> <p>"That I've known Audrey for over five years, and yet had no idea that within her this whole time was an almighty divine force capable of bringing life into the world like this blows my mind and was astonishing to witness," he continued.</p> <p>"⁠⁠I can't think of any single thing a man does in his life that physically equates to what I saw Audrey do. ⁠⁠</p> <p>"For me – any marathon or endurance event I've ever raced is essentially a wander to the kitchen compared to what I saw Audrey do on Friday."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BfN95JWBb8b/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BfN95JWBb8b/" target="_blank">A post shared by Osher Günsberg (@osher_gunsberg)</a> on Feb 15, 2018 at 5:00am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Gunsberg also mentioned his step-daughter, 14-year-old Georgia, who in the past he has called the “light of his life.” </p> <p>“Less than an hour after he was born, Wolfie met G for real - and she’s the best big sister he could have ever hoped for,” the Studio 10 TV presenter added. </p> <p>While she wasn’t able to be in the room to witness her mother give birth, she managed to give her own gift to welcome the arrival of her new brother. </p> <p>Georgia prepared a playlist for the occasion - with the likes of Kendrick Lamar, Beyonce and Khalid serenading the room. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BfVVKO9hq0f/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BfVVKO9hq0f/" target="_blank">A post shared by Osher Günsberg (@osher_gunsberg)</a> on Feb 18, 2018 at 1:38am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Osher announced he and Audrey were expecting back in February.</p> <p> "Our lives are already so full of love and adventures and I’m blessed to have such an amazing daughter in Georgia. Looking forward to meeting this little one and expanding my heart even more," Audrey wrote at the time.</p>

Relationships

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The secret “kit” cruise ship employees bring to every job

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise ship employees have revealed their own “life saving” kits to deal with the pressures and demands of staff life. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One former worker, Joshua Kinder opened up about life onboard a cruise after more than five years of employment. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Working as a drummer, Kinder revealed there is a “kit” to brighten their day or make it just a bit better. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With us we would bring the lifesaving first-aid kit that every forlorn crew member aboard a ship of darkness needs,” he wrote in his book </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chronicles of a Cruise Ship Worker. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A red satchel filled with positive attitudes and optimistic outlooks, a sturdy hand powered bilge pump, a couple of gas masks hooked up to oxygen tanks, diving gear in case we found ourselves with unexpected reef in our crew quarters, a lifetime supply of coconut and pineapple scented air fresheners to mask the smell of our cabin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"A warm wool blanket for when the ship thermostat gets stuck on the setting labelled ‘ice cream freezer’.”’</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The former employee also added: “A thin sheet for when said air conditioning breaks down, horse tranquilisers to be used when the ship is placed in Red Alert, the obligatory bottle of haberno hot sauce to mask the otherwise unpalatable foods served in the crew mess.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Joshua then humorously wrote every employee would need a life raft in case they need to jump ship. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite there being a few “essentials” you could probably skip out on, there are some that are absolutely crucial to get through ship life. </span></p>

Cruising

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Frasier cast: Then and now - Can you recognise them?

<p>Over 15 years ago,<span><em> Frasier</em> </span>aired its final episode after 11 straight seasons of downright good television. </p> <p>Starting in 1993, the<span> </span><em>Cheers<span> </span></em>spin-off captured viewers around the world as psychiatrist-turned radio host Dr. Frasier Crane had us in stitches from laughing for over a decade. </p> <p>The story follows the life of psychiatrist Frasier Crane, who lives with his father Martin and his dad’s British carer and part-time psychic, Daphne. </p> <p>Intertwined in the program spanning over 11 seasons, is Frasier's pompous and snooty brother, Nile, his funny radio producer, Roz and work colleagues Bob “Bulldog” Birscor and station boss Kenny Daly. </p> <p><em>Frasier</em> proved to be one of the most successful spin-off television series in history and remains the most critically acclaimed comedy series of all time. The series amassed 37 Emmy’s during its run. </p> <p><strong>Kelsey Grammer (Dr. Frasier Crane)</strong></p> <p>Since starring in<span> </span><em>Frasier,<span> </span></em>Grammar has barely took any time for himself. </p> <p>He briefly played a news anchor opposite Patricia Heaton in<em><span> </span>Back to You,</em><span> </span>before popping up on<span> </span><em>30 Rock </em>as himself. </p> <p>Later, he went on to win a Golden Globe for his short-lived role on the<span> </span><em>Starz<span> </span></em>show,<span> </span><em>Boss<span> </span></em>and appeared in movies like<span> </span><em>The Expendables 3<span> </span></em>and<em><span> </span>Transformers: Age of Extinction. </em></p> <p><strong>David Hyde Pierce (Niles Crane)</strong></p> <p>David was 34-years-old when he graced our screens on Frasier. Pierce has also starred in<span> </span><em>Sleepless in Seattle</em>,<span> </span><em>Wet Hot American Summer</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>The Good Wife</em>.</p> <p>He is married to writer and producer Brian Hargrove.</p> <p><strong>John Mahoney (Martin Crane)</strong></p> <p>John Mahoney was Martin 'Marty' Crane in<span> </span><em>Frasier<span> </span></em>— father to Niles and Frasier.</p> <p>Mahoney has since starred in TV shows including<span> </span><em>In Treatment</em>,<span> </span><em>Burn Notice</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>Hot in Cleveland</em>.</p> <p>The star tragically passed away in February, 2018, after complimcations from throat cancer at age 77. </p> <p>His last TV role was an episode of<span> </span><em>Foyle's War</em><span> </span>in 2015.</p> <p><strong>Jane Leeves (Daphne Moon/Daphne Crane)</strong></p> <p>Jane was 32 when she first hit TV screens and went on to star in<span> </span><em>Hot in Cleveland<span> </span></em>when the series ended. </p> <p>The English-born actress has a daughter, Isabella, and son, Finn with her TV executive husband, Marshall Coben. </p> <p>Sweetly enough, David Hyde Pierce and John Mahoney are godfathers to Finn. </p> <p><strong>Peri Gilpin (Roz Doyle)</strong></p> <p>Gilpin went on to star in many noteworthy TV programs including<span> </span><em>The Lionhearts</em>,<span> </span><em>Make It or Break It</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>Scorpion</em>.</p> <p>In 1999, Gilpin married her boyfriend, Christian Vincent. They share twin daughters born through surrogacy in 2004 and Jane Leeves is reportedly their godmother.</p> <p><strong>Dan Butler (Bob “Bulldog” Briscoe)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dan Butler was a recurring guest member who played as Bob, however, he became a main cast member in 1996. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While his character was written out of the show in 1996, he did return to guest star in five episodes for the series’ last three seasons. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His character is a sports-loving jock who used to bully Fraiser. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Butler is openly gay and is married to Richard Waterhouse. </span></p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Frasier cast - then and now.</p>

TV

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Seconds before heartache: Heroic neighbour rescues boy from danger

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A family has been left counting their blessings after security footage revealed the seconds disaster struck for a 6-year-old boy playing with two other children. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video shows three children playing at the bottom of a driveway in Texas, US, when one of the boys bent down to greet a dog that wandered over. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, when the young child leaned over, the dog launched and knocked him over before climbing on top of him. </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">PITBULL ATTACK: A teenager in Conroe, Texas, helped save his 6-year-old neighbor from a pitbull attack, drawing the animal away and allowing the boy to run for safety; both suffered bite wounds and the dog was reportedly taken by animal control. <a href="https://t.co/OFdgEGuLb9">https://t.co/OFdgEGuLb9</a> <a href="https://t.co/uc7sHT4poE">pic.twitter.com/uc7sHT4poE</a></p> — World News Tonight (@ABCWorldNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/ABCWorldNews/status/1154783435585654784?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 26, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The two other children ran towards their homes as the six-year-old struggled to overpower the dog – until thankfully, a neighbour intervened. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Springing into action, the dog lost interest in the boy and instead chases the man who successfully distracted hm. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Local news station </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">KHOU11 </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">identified the neighbour as Grant Brown, who suffered cuts to his hand in the ordeal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The dog ran away and the young victim was recorded running to safety in his home. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The canine was reportedly handed over to the city’s County Animal Control. </span></p>

Caring

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Eating chocolate won't cure depression

<p>A study published in the journal <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/da.22950"><em>Depression and Anxiety</em></a> has attracted <a href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/dark-chocolate-could-boost-mood-study-c-378548">widespread media attention</a>. Media reports <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=chocolate+depression&amp;client=firefox-b-d&amp;source=lnms&amp;tbm=nws&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjYuqGh14PkAhXX73MBHRnOAysQ_AUIEygD&amp;biw=1522&amp;bih=687">said</a> eating chocolate, in particular, dark chocolate, was linked to reduced symptoms of depression.</p> <p>Unfortunately, we cannot use this type of evidence to promote eating chocolate as a safeguard against depression, a serious, common and sometimes debilitating mental health condition.</p> <p>This is because this study looked at an <em>association</em> between diet and depression in the general population. It did not gauge causation. In other words, it was not designed to say whether eating dark chocolate <em>caused</em> a reduction in depressive symptoms.</p> <p><strong>What did the researchers do?</strong></p> <p>The authors explored data from the United States <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm">National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey</a>. This shows how common health, nutrition and other factors are among a representative sample of the population.</p> <p>People in the study reported what they had eaten in the previous 24 hours in two ways. First, they recalled in person, to a trained dietary interviewer using a standard questionnaire. The second time they recalled what they had eaten over the phone, several days after the first recall.</p> <p>The researchers then calculated how much chocolate participants had eaten using the average of these two recalls.</p> <p>Dark chocolate needed to contain at least 45 per cent cocoa solids for it to count as “dark”.</p> <p>The researchers excluded from their analysis people who ate an implausibly large amount of chocolate, people who were underweight and/or had diabetes.</p> <p>The remaining data (from 13,626 people) was then divided in two ways. One was by categories of chocolate consumption (no chocolate, chocolate but no dark chocolate, and any dark chocolate). The other way was by the amount of chocolate (no chocolate, and then in groups, from the lowest to highest chocolate consumption).</p> <p>The researchers assessed people’s depressive symptoms by having participants complete a short questionnaire asking about the frequency of these symptoms over the past two weeks.</p> <p>The researchers controlled for other factors that might influence any relationship between chocolate and depression, such as weight, gender, socioeconomic factors, smoking, sugar intake and exercise.</p> <p><strong>What did the researchers find?</strong></p> <p>Of the entire sample, 1,332 (11 per cent) of people said they had eaten chocolate in their two 24 hour dietary recalls, with only 148 (1.1 per cent) reporting eating dark chocolate.</p> <p>A total of 1,009 (7.4 per cent) people reported depressive symptoms. But after adjusting for other factors, the researchers found no association between any chocolate consumption and depressive symptoms.</p> <p>However, people who ate dark chocolate had a 70 per cent lower chance of reporting clinically relevant depressive symptoms than those who did not report eating chocolate.</p> <p>When investigating the amount of chocolate consumed, people who ate the most chocolate were more likely to have fewer depressive symptoms.</p> <p><strong>What are the study’s limitations?</strong></p> <p>While the size of the dataset is impressive, there are major limitations to the investigation and its conclusions.</p> <p>First, assessing chocolate intake is challenging. People may eat different amounts (and types) depending on the day. And asking what people ate over the past 24 hours (twice) is not the most accurate way of telling what people usually eat.</p> <p>Then there’s whether people report what they actually eat. For instance, if you ate a whole block of chocolate yesterday, would you tell an interviewer? What about if you were also depressed?</p> <p>This could be why so few people reported eating chocolate in this study, compared with what <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2015/07/22/the-worlds-biggest-chocolate-consumers-infographic/#718514644847">retail figures</a> tell us people eat.</p> <p>Finally, the authors’ results are mathematically accurate, but misleading.</p> <p>Only 1.1 per cent of people in the analysis ate dark chocolate. And when they did, the amount was very small (about 12g a day). And only two people reported clinical symptoms of depression and ate any dark chocolate.</p> <p>The authors conclude the small numbers and low consumption “attests to the strength of this finding”. I would suggest the opposite.</p> <p>Finally, people who ate the most chocolate (104-454g a day) had an almost 60 per cent lower chance of having depressive symptoms. But those who ate 100g a day had about a 30 per cent chance. Who’d have thought four or so more grams of chocolate could be so important?</p> <p>This study and the media coverage that followed are perfect examples of the pitfalls of translating population-based nutrition research to public recommendations for health.</p> <p>My general advice is, if you enjoy chocolate, go for darker varieties, with fruit or nuts added, and eat it <a href="https://theconversation.com/we-dont-yet-fully-understand-what-mindfulness-is-but-this-is-what-its-not-110698">mindfully</a>. — <strong>Ben Desbrow</strong></p> <p><strong>Blind peer review</strong></p> <p>Chocolate manufacturers have been a good source of <a href="https://forbetterscience.com/2016/05/19/chocolate-is-good-for-your-funding/">funding</a> for much of the <a href="https://www.foodpolitics.com/2015/10/heres-why-food-companies-sponsor-research-mars-inc-s-cocoavia/">research</a> into chocolate products.</p> <p>While the authors of this new study declare no conflict of interest, any whisper of good news about chocolate attracts publicity. I agree with the author’s scepticism of the study.</p> <p>Just 1.1 per cent of people in the study ate dark chocolate (at least 45 per cent cocoa solids) at an average 11.7g a day. There was a wide variation in reported clinically relevant depressive symptoms in this group. So, it is not valid to draw any real conclusion from the data collected.</p> <p>For total chocolate consumption, the authors accurately report no statistically significant association with clinically relevant depressive symptoms.</p> <p>However, they then claim eating more chocolate is of benefit, based on fewer symptoms among those who ate the most.</p> <p>In fact, depressive symptoms were most common in the third-highest quartile (who ate 100g chocolate a day), followed by the first (4-35g a day), then the second (37-95g a day) and finally the lowest level (104-454g a day). Risks in sub-sets of data such as quartiles are only valid if they lie on the same slope.</p> <p>The basic problems come from measurements and the many confounding factors. This study can’t validly be used to justify eating more chocolate of any kind. — <strong>Rosemary Stanton</strong><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><em>Written by Ben Desbrow, Associate Professor, Nutrition and Dietetics, Griffith University. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/no-eating-chocolate-wont-cure-depression-121504" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></span></p>

Mind

News

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Prince Andrew finally breaks silence on friendship with Jeffrey Epstein

<p><span>Prince Andrew has addressed his friendship with Jeffrey Epstein, denying that he had any knowledge of the disgraced financier’s criminal behaviour after weeks of speculation surrounding their relationship.</span></p> <p><span>In a statement released on Saturday by Buckingham Palace, the prince said he did not “see, witness or suspect any behaviour of the sort that subsequently led to his arrest and conviction”.</span></p> <p><span>Epstein was found dead on August 10 in his jail cell in Manhattan, where the disgraced financier was being held on sex trafficking charges.</span></p> <p><span>“I met Mr Epstein in 1999. During the time I knew him, I saw him infrequently and probably no more than only once or twice a year,” the prince wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“At no stage during the limited time I spent with him did I see, witness or suspect any behaviour of the sort that subsequently led to his arrest and conviction.”</span></p> <p><span>The Duke of York said it was “a mistake and an error” to see Epstein in 2010 after he was released from prison, where he served nearly 13 months in custody for soliciting an underage girl for prostitution.</span></p> <p><span>“I have previously said it was a mistake and an error to see him after his release in 2010 and I can only reiterate that I was mistaken to think that what I thought I knew of him was evidently not the real person, give what we know now,” he wrote.</span></p> <p><span>The prince said he had “tremendous sympathy” for the people affected by Epstein’s actions. “I deplore the exploitation of any human being and would not condone, participate in, or encourage any such behaviour,” he wrote.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/0lLY2wYK8l">pic.twitter.com/0lLY2wYK8l</a></p> — Roya Nikkhah (@RoyaNikkhah) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyaNikkhah/status/1165248979032059904?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 24, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>This is the third statement released by the royal family this month on Prince Andrew’s relationship with Epstein. Earlier this month, the palace issued a statement saying the prince is “<a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/abhorrent-prince-andrew-speaks-out-over-epstein-scandal">appalled</a>” by Epstein’s alleged crimes. The announcement came after a 2010 video footage of the prince waving to a woman from the money manager’s home emerged. </span></p> <p><span>The Palace also responded to reports of crime allegations against the prince, saying “any suggestion of impropriety with underage minors is categorically untrue”.</span></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/prince-andrew-flew-on-jeffrey-epsteins-lolita-express-with-jailed-miss-russia-hfwjf8hjn">Newly disclosed flight logs</a> revealed that the prince took a flight on Epstein’s private jet from St Thomas to Palm Beach in Florida. Epstein reportedly had properties on both sites.</span></p>

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Foreign spying in Australia reaches “unprecedented scale”

<p>Australia is facing an “unprecedented” wave of foreign espionage, the nation’s domestic intelligence agency has warned.</p> <p>According to the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-26/intelligence-agencies-warn-about-unprecedented-levels-of-spying/11441876?pfmredir=sm" target="_blank"><em>ABC</em></a>, senior intelligence figures said countries such as China, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria, North Korea and Malaysia were known to monitor their nationals living in Australia while also seeking to silence those speaking out against their former governments.</p> <p>Intelligence experts said most people do not have a full understanding of the extent of the threat, including how easily migrants and refugees can be recruited as spies, often against their will.</p> <p>An Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) spokesperson said foreign espionage was occurring at an “unprecedented scale”.</p> <p>“The security threat comes from the actions and intent of the small number of individuals who seek to do Australia harm,” the spokesperson told the<span> </span><em>ABC</em>.</p> <p>However, the spokesperson said the “actions of few” should not be taken as representative of the whole refugee community.</p> <p>“It is critical that we avoid commentary that will instil fear and taint communities which make such a positive contribution to Australian life, economy and culture,” the spokesperson said.</p> <p>Another intelligence expert said there are hundreds of spy recruits or agents operating in Australia today, with many of them having been blackmailed, threatened or coerced into gaining political information, recruiting other informants and conducting other illegal acts.</p> <p>John Blaxland, professor in International Security and Intelligence Studies at the Australian National University said numerous countries have tried to use their diaspora living in Australia to influence decisions made by government bodies, corporations and education institutions in their favour. He said threats are often made against the expats’ jobs and family members.</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>ABC</em><span> </span>report came after ASIO’s director general Duncan Lewis said the level of foreign interference and espionage is “higher than it has ever been”.</p> <p>“It is an unprecedented level of activity … it’s not visible to most people,” Lewis told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/defence/espionage-threats-unprecedented-says-spy-boss-duncan-lewis/news-story/e90c51bb103ffd1d536ae7b691671891" target="_blank"><em>The Weekend Australian</em></a>.</p> <p>“It’s constant. Every day there is a discovery. Some of them are more alarming than others.”</p> <p>Lewis said Australia’s case is not unique, as technological developments and “mass movement of people, goods and ideas” have intensified security challenges.</p> <p>Lewis warned that the espionage threat shows no sign of slowing down, with widespread cyber-attacks and traditional spy craft as well as growing interference within Australia’s political system.</p> <p>“The oversight mechanisms we have are substantial, [but] I think they need to be constantly under review,” he said. “They are not something you can set and forget.”</p>

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“Best innings I’ve ever seen”: World reacts to Ben Stokes historic Ashes performance

<p>No one, not even Ben Stokes himself, could believe what the all-rounder pulled off in Leeds on Monday morning.</p> <p>The star of the England cricket team managed to pull off one of the greatest innings international cricket has ever seen as he single-handedly sent England to its highest successful run chase in Test history, beating Australia by one wicket in a surprising turn of events.</p> <p>They were faced with a chase of 359 runs in the third Ashes Test, but the host country seemed to be losing a grip on obtaining a win, as they came crashing at 9/286. But then, in came Stokes, who dominated the scene with a 76-run 10th wicket partnership with Jack Leach to lead the team to victory.</p> <p>And the world reacted in a stunning way, as they watched the madness unfold.</p> <p>Not only were Stokes’ teammates stunned, but past players were also in a state of disbelief.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I’ve seen some remarkable cricket moments in my life but that is the best I’ve seen in over 50 years. <a href="https://twitter.com/benstokes38?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@benstokes38</a> saved the Ashes and gave a magical inspirational innings. Even better than his World Cup performance.<br />Well done <a href="https://twitter.com/ECB_cricket?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ECB_cricket</a></p> — Geoffrey Boycott (@GeoffreyBoycott) <a href="https://twitter.com/GeoffreyBoycott/status/1165649549035212812?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 August 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Greatest knock of all time .... Must be .... <a href="https://twitter.com/benstokes38?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@benstokes38</a> .... I LOVE YOU ....<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Ashes?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Ashes</a></p> — Michael Vaughan (@MichaelVaughan) <a href="https://twitter.com/MichaelVaughan/status/1165644392432095233?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 August 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Ben Stokes is one hell of a cricketer !!</p> — Nasser Hussain (@nassercricket) <a href="https://twitter.com/nassercricket/status/1165633136585256967?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 August 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I have no sister but if I did I’d want her to marry Ben Stokes.</p> — Graeme Swann (@Swannyg66) <a href="https://twitter.com/Swannyg66/status/1165646306758602752?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 August 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">That was pretty special! <a href="https://twitter.com/benstokes38?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@benstokes38</a> , that was ridiculous! Well done. Ashes alive and well.</p> — AB de Villiers (@ABdeVilliers17) <a href="https://twitter.com/ABdeVilliers17/status/1165645558968705030?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 August 2019</a></blockquote> <p>On Twitter, Mark Waugh commended the player saying, “When Geoffrey Boycott says it’s the greatest Test innings he has seen in 60 years watching the game you know it’s the GREATEST.”</p>

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Travel

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Surprising holiday photos that can land you in trouble

<p>On holidays people tend to take photos of everything that they see, from old rustic buildings and narrow streets, to food at a restaurant and the view of city lights. But there are some photos in particular that can get you in trouble with the law.</p> <p>A British tourist in Egypt was arrested over mobile phone footage of the airport which happened to capture a military helicopter in the background.</p> <p>Muhammed Fathi Abulkasem, 19, from Manchester was arrested and charged with collecting intelligence on the Egyptian military, reported the Associated Press.</p> <p>The teenager innocently filmed the landing of his flight, which showed a helicopter in the background. Taking unauthorised photos or videos of military facilities, equipment or personnel is illegal in Egypt.</p> <p>“We all have one of those landing videos on our phones,” his cousin Shareen Nawaz from the UK told AP.</p> <p>“They shouldn’t have military helicopters in public spaces if this is what will happen.”</p> <p>Many countries have outlawed the photographing or filming of military related materials, equipment and personnel. The strictness of these laws are related to the country’s level of secrecy.</p> <p>More seemingly innocent photographs can also land tourists in hot water from places of worship, airports, museums and galleries, bridges, tunnels and railway stations – and even shopping centres and buildings.</p> <p>These all seem like normal things a tourist would capture on camera – but taking snaps of these places could be illegal without you even knowing it.</p> <p>The most surprising things people can’t take pictures of include some of the most famous photographs in the world, such as the Eiffel Tower in Paris at night.</p> <p>The reason being, under European copyright law, works are protected for the lifetime of the artist, plus an additional 70 years. The tower’s designer, Gustave Eiffel, died in 1923 and the building entered the public domain 10 years later.</p> <p>Although the lights weren’t installed until 1985 by Pierre Bideau and are an artwork, they are still protected under European copyright law.</p> <p>Therefore, taking photos of the Eiffel Tower with the lights off isn’t breaking the law, although at night when the lights are flashing and dazzling over the city, it could get you in trouble with the law.</p> <p>Tokyo’s most famous night bar location in Golden Gai in the centre of the Shinjuku district is an iconic spot jam-packed with around 200 miniature bars with a labyrinth of really narrow alleys winding through the block.</p> <p>Signs throughout the district warn tourists of the banning of photographs.</p> <p>The Sistine Chapel in Rome also forbids photographs, although not for the reasons you may assume. The Sistine Chapel contains the famous artworks of Michelangelo and Cosimo Rosselli.</p> <p>People assume the reason is that the flash could damage the artwork, and although it is a concern for the longevity of the priceless art, that’s not the primary reason.</p> <p>A Japanese TV company owns the exclusive rights to these famous artworks. It attained these rights when they helped fund a major restoration project. The TV corporation offered US$4.2 million to spend on restoration in exchange for the exclusive rights to photograph and film the restored art. The company produced many documentaries and art books from the deal.</p> <p>The photo ban extends from buildings, artwork and iconic landmarks to animals. In particular, Chinese pandas. This ban comes after tourists have attempted to get dangerously close to the endangered creatures.</p> <p>In an attempt to maintain safety for tourists and the pandas, animal groups encouraged the ban.</p> <p>The tightly controlled and regulated country of North Korea consists of many photography bans, which extend to almost everything.</p> <p>Getty Images photographer Carl Court spent a week in the country documenting people’s daily life. Court explained the things he was an wasn’t allowed to photograph.</p> <p>The biggest rule for his photos included having to capture only full-frame images of Kim II-sung and Kim Jong-il statues and iconography.</p> <p>“You can’t crop the feet off the statues. You can’t cut a bit of the corner off,” Court said.</p> <p>Tourists are only allowed to enter the country if they are with a state-approved travel group that closely monitors where they go and what they see.</p> <p>Electronics and mobile phones may be searched by Korean authorities at any time.</p>

Travel Trouble

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A Current Affair dodges questions about who paid for Pauline Hanson’s Uluru trip

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Current Affair</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has dodged questions as to whether or not it paid for controversial One Nation leader Pauline Hanson to climb Uluru.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After a trailer was dropped for Monday night’s episode of the current affairs show, many had questions as to how the show was granted access to Hanson’s trip.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">It's still legal. But is it right?<br />MONDAY. 7.00PM. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9ACA?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9ACA</a>. <a href="https://t.co/YywKw3Rk2r">pic.twitter.com/YywKw3Rk2r</a></p> — A Current Affair (@ACurrentAffair9) <a href="https://twitter.com/ACurrentAffair9/status/1164831623231111169?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">23 August 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nine would not confirm to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/entertainment/2019/08/25/nine-uluru-pauline-hanson/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> as to whether or not they had paid for the trip.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Pauline Hanson has recently expressed a desire to attempt to climb Uluru after the announcement that local landowners would be enforcing their desire to prohibit people climbing the magnificent natural landmark,” a Nine spokesman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ms Hanson invited </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Current Affair</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, along with local land owners, on that journey.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Current Affair</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> have defended their decision to film her journey, saying that it would help Australians gain an insight into the debate.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">ACA</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> team followed due diligence to ensure all permits were granted and the climb was approved, and engaged local elders who agreed to meet with Ms Hanson,” the spokesperson told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hanson also shared a post to Instagram, saying that she was heading back to Alice Springs with the “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Current Affair </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">crew”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Heading back to Alice Springs with the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Current Affairs</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> crew,” she wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I managed to get front seat for a change. Don’t forget to watch the show Monday night.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1kHhvIAzIP/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1kHhvIAzIP/" target="_blank">Heading back to Alice Springs with the A Current Affairs crew. I managed to get front seat for a change. Don’t forget to watch the show Monday night. #aca #PaulineHanson #traceygrimshaw #OneNation #Uluru #ayersrock</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/senatorpaulinehanson/" target="_blank"> Pauline Hanson</a> (@senatorpaulinehanson) on Aug 24, 2019 at 3:58pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Last Thursday, Hanson told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/radio/alicesprings/programs/breakfast/pauline-for-online/11438506"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that she now understands why climbing Uluru would be banned.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s quite scary. I was surprised. I’d never been out there before,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I respect the decision that there is not enough safety with regards to the rock.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I respect the decision that their people, their kids, are not getting jobs. They’re bringing in Aboriginals from outside to fill the positions that should belong to their own people.”</span></p>

Domestic Travel

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“It’s a federal crime”: Tourists slammed after luring crocodile with fish

<p>Two tourists who have been documenting their adventures through the Northern Territory have been slammed after posting a video of a crocodile sneaking onto a ramp to capture a fish that’s on the end of a fisherman’s line.</p> <p>The massive croc was caught on camera at Cahills Crossing in the Northern Territory’s Kakadu National Park.</p> <p>The couple are claiming that the video has been shared as a reminder of what crocodiles are capable of.</p> <p>“Croc sure wanted that Barra! Remember to be croc wise in croc country peeps,” their post read.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1hnHeRj5kw/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1hnHeRj5kw/" target="_blank">Croc sure wanted that Barra! Remember to be croc wise in croc country peeps! 🐊 • • • • • #crocodile #onlyinthent #cahillscrossing #ntaustralia #cuinthent #seekakadu #kakadunationalpark</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/adventure.aus/" target="_blank"> Adventure Australia</a> (@adventure.aus) on Aug 23, 2019 at 4:37pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The footage has been shared on social media, but not everyone is convinced that it’s a near miss like depicted.</p> <p>The NT Crocodile Conservation and Protection Society are sceptical that the fish was “stolen” by the animal and have argued that it was set up by tourists.</p> <p>“[They] definitely did not try to stop the croc taking it. [They] literally got the croc on the ramp and left the fish sitting there for him! Oh and now the croc has a lure in his stomach.”</p> <p>“It is a federal crime to interfere with, or feed crocs. What’s worse is ... [they] are teaching the croc if he comes up on the ramp as a fish is caught the fishermen will let him have it!.”</p> <p>Others were concerned about the crocodile ingesting the metal hook in the fish.</p> <p>“Cahill Crossing is a known spot for big crocs... fishing for adrenaline junkies only! A fisherman was decapitated by a croc while fishing here,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“The hook is still in the fish, poor croc,” another said.</p> <p>“How ridiculous fishing so close to the crocs territory they can move a lot quicker than us,” a third person wrote.</p>

Domestic Travel

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"My husband is planning an accident": Princess Diana’s explosive letter claims

<p><span>Princess Diana’s death may have been at the hands of her former husband Prince Charles, a new podcast has claimed.</span></p> <p><span>The creators of controversial podcast <em><a href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/royals/british-royal-family/diana-case-solved-car-crash-letter-57801">Diana: Case Solved</a> </em>claimed that they have new evidence – including diary entries, letters, recordings and eyewitness testimony – suggesting that the Prince of Wales may have been responsible for the death of his former wife in Paris on August 31, 1997.</span></p> <p><span>In a letter reportedly written by Diana to her butler Paul Burrell, the princess said she felt her safety was at risk.</span></p> <p><span>“This particular phase in my life is the most dangerous. My husband is planning ‘an accident’ in my car, brake failure or some serious head injury in order to make the path clear for him to marry Tiggy [William and Harry's nanny].”</span></p> <p><span>In the letter, she also said Camilla Parker, now Duchess of Cornwall, “is nothing more than a decoy so we are being used by the man in every sense of the word”.</span></p> <p><span>The news came after a body language expert claimed that the late princess spent her final days looking “hunted” and “desperate to hide”.</span></p> <p><span>Judi James told <em><a href="https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/princess-diana-looked-hunted-in-18985368">Daily Star Online</a> </em>that photographs of the princess in the days before the car crash at Alma tunnel showed her increased use of “’hide’ gestures”.</span></p> <p><span>“Her cut-off gesture now involves a shielding hand that is placed across her forehead with either the heel of her hand or her fingers used to shade and hide her face,” James said.</span></p> <p><span>“The expression we can see underneath it looks unhappy rather than the part-smile she often used when facing a barrage of cameras as a royal.</span></p> <p><span>“She does look more hunted and less in control here and her intense shielding gestures and unhappy facial expression could suggest some new levels of fear.”</span></p>

Travel Trouble

Health

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“Not OK”: Ben Fordham criticised for posing inappropriate question to NSW Premier

<p>Federal Minister for Women Marise Payne has slammed a Sydney radio host after he asked a question to New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian or whether she would have an abortion.</p> <p>Sitting down with 2GB host, Ben Fordham, Berejiklian was grilled about the bill to decriminalise abortion that is before the state’s parliament.</p> <p>The Premier has been heavily criticised as accusations have been made against her saying she tried to rush the bill through Parliament, with members of her own government furious as to how she handled the situation.</p> <p>During the interview, Fordham asked Berejiklian whether she would ever consider having an abortion.</p> <p>“I can’t speak for what circumstances I’d be faced with,” she said.</p> <p>“I don’t want to make people feel guilty who have had to go down that path.</p> <p>“I’m not someone who’d be comfortable going through that process, but that’s just me, I can’t speak for other women.”</p> <p>Senator Payne was angered by the interview, saying it was inappropriate to ask such an invasive question.</p> <p>“I don’t think it’s appropriate to ask anyone publicly, male or female, about sensitive health questions like that and it’s not OK,” she told the ABC’s<span> </span><em>Insider</em><span> </span>program on Sunday.</p> <p>The exchange between Fordham and Berejiklian went as follows:</p> <p><strong>Fordham:</strong><span> </span>Under no circumstances?</p> <p><strong>Berejiklian:<span> </span></strong>I can't speak for, I can't speak…</p> <p><strong>Fordham:<span> </span></strong>But within, Gladys, Gladys from Willoughby or wherever you live…</p> <p><strong>Berejiklian:</strong><span> </span>But I can't, but heaven forbid, I've not been in a situation where I've had to contemplate that, and nor would I. But I can't make a vote according to me and my beliefs, I cast my vote because I know other people don't have the life experiences I've had, don't have my beliefs.</p> <p><strong>Fordham:</strong><span> </span>You didn't want your faith or your personal beliefs to flow over into everyone else's views.</p> <p><strong>Berejiklian:</strong><span> </span>That's right.</p> <p><strong>Fordham:</strong><span> </span>But for the record, your own personal view. Not your parliamentary view, or your Premier view.</p> <p><strong>Berejiklian:</strong><span> </span>My personal view is I'm a very conservative person who would not feel comfortable in having that process, but that is just me, and it's not fair for me … and Ben, you've been naughty in pushing me to say that, because I don't want anyone to feel guilty about decisions they've made, because I'm not in their shoes.</p> <p>Senator Payne, who is currently the most senior woman in the federal Liberal Party due to also being Foreign Minister, said that the bill should be left up to New South Wales politicians to decide.</p> <p>“But I do think it’s appropriate for that matter to be decriminalised in New South Wales, yes.”</p>

Body

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Pete Evans slams vegan parents after tragic case of malnourished baby girl: “This is so sad”

<p>Celebrity chef Pete Evans has criticised those who force their children to follow a strict vegan diet, after a couple from Sydney were convicted over the malnourishment of their baby girl.</p> <p>The parents were sentenced to 18 months prison yesterday, but still managed to escape time behind bars. Although, after police discovered their 20-month-old girl severely malnourished and suffering from rickets, their remaining children were taken away.</p> <p>Her diet consisted of just oats, bread and a few mouthfuls of vegetables a day for months after the mother became “increasingly fixated” on veganism.</p> <p>The young girl looked like a three-month old, weighing only 4.89kg. She was unable to crawl or sit up with help, had zero bone development and suffered from swollen legs due to fluid build-up.</p> <p>But after switching up her diet in April 2018 and provided extra support, she began to grow and her teeth emerged.</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>My Kitchen Rules</em><span> </span>judge had a few things to say about the incident, saying it was wrong for depriving a young child of meat.</p> <p>“This is so, so sad,” said the paleo chef in a Facebook post.</p> <p>“I will repeat it again and again. Humans are omnivores and we are designed to eat meat in our diet. Children should not be on a vegan plant-only diet.”</p> <p>The 46-year-old pleaded with parents to “please use common sense”, especially when it came to their kids’ diets.</p> <p>“If you choose to eat a plant-based diet as an adult then that is your choice and go for it … but please, please be wise with choices of what you feed your children.”</p> <p>But not everyone was happy with the chef’s choice of words, saying it had nothing to do with veganism, and was simply due to neglect.</p> <p>“The fact the diet was ‘vegan’ really has nothing to do with it. It was simply inadequate,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“There are vegan diets of crap pizza, pasta and chips … and vegan diets of wholesome organic vegetables and produce. There is a HUGE difference,” said another.</p>

Body

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The advice people wish they received at every age

<p><span>Growing old can be daunting, no matter what age you are approaching. While you may not be able to tell your younger self what you know now, you can gain the benefit of hindsight from those who have experienced more years. </span></p> <p><span>A website named <a href="https://heyfromthefuture.com/">Hey, From the Future</a> has made it possible for you to read and give advice for people of every age. </span></p> <p><span>The website’s creator, Ryder Damen said he created the website on his birthday after sitting on the idea for about a year. “Hey From The Future is an advice sharing website that allowed users to submit anonymous advice they wish they had at a particular age,” Damen said.</span></p> <p><span>“I wanted a platform that allowed people to share advice they wish they had at younger ages … turning another year older gave me the kick in the butt to sit down for a few days, code up an MVP, deploy it, and launch.”</span></p> <p><strong><span>Here are some of our favourite advice for over-60s</span></strong></p> <p><span>“Hey 60 year old, save for your future retirement even if at first it isn’t very much. When you are young retirement doesn’t seem important but before you know it you are 60!”</span></p> <p><span>“Hey 66 year old, it’s not too late to make new friends. Volunteer, take a class, walk a dog … you’ll meet new people. Be friendly, and be a friend whenever you have a chance. You’ll soon find you have new ones.”</span></p> <p><span>“Hey 71 year old, If you’ve not already, review your ‘self-satisfaction’ quotient. At this point in life, you should be ready to accept all kinds of attitudes and characteristics about yourself that may have irritated or mystified you for years. Be at peace.”</span></p> <p><span>What piece of wisdom would you add on to the list?</span></p>

Mind

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Being left-handed doesn’t mean you are right-brained — so what does it mean?

<p>There have been plenty of claims about what being left-handed means, and whether it changes the type of person someone is – but the truth is something of an enigma. Myths about handedness appear year after year, but researchers have yet to uncover all of what it means to be left-handed.</p> <p>So why are people left-handed? The truth is we don’t fully know that either. What we do know is that only <a href="https://www.livescience.com/19968-study-reveals-lefties-rare.html">around 10% of people</a> across the world are left-handed – but this isn’t split equally between the sexes. About 12% of men are left-handed but <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2008-11487-004?doi=1">only about 8% of women</a>. Some people get very excited about the 90:10 split and wonder why we aren’t all right-handed.</p> <p>But the interesting question is, why isn’t our handedness based on chance? Why isn’t it a 50:50 split? It is not due to handwriting direction, as left-handedness would be dominant in countries where their languages are written right to left, which it is not the case. Even the genetics are odd – only about <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-childrens-brains-develop-to-make-them-right-or-left-handed-55272">25% of children</a> who have <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1993-98645-005">two left-handed parents</a> will also be left-handed.</p> <p>Being left-handed has been linked with all sorts of bad things. Poor health and early death are often associated, for example – but neither are exactly true. The latter is explained by many people in older generations being <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/002839329390156T">forced to switch</a> and use their right hands. This makes it look like there are less left-handers at older ages. The former, despite being an appealing headline, <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2398212818820513">is just wrong</a>.</p> <p>Positive myths are also abound. People say that left-handers are more creative, as most of them use their “right brain”. This is perhaps one of the more persistent myths about handedness and the brain. But no matter how appealing (and perhaps to the disappointment of those lefties still waiting to wake up one day with the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278262604000612">talents of Leonardo da Vinci</a>), the general idea that any of us use a “dominant brain side” that defines our personality and decision making <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071275">is also wrong</a>.</p> <p><strong>Brain lateralisation and handedness</strong></p> <p>It is true, however, that the brain’s <a href="https://courses.lumenlearning.com/waymaker-psychology/chapter/the-brain-and-spinal-cord/">right hemisphere controls the left side of the body</a>, and the left hemisphere the right side – and that the hemispheres do actually have specialities. For example, language is usually processed a little bit more within the left hemisphere, and recognition of faces a little bit more within the right hemisphere. This idea that each hemisphere is specialised for some skills is known as brain lateralisation. However, the halves do not work in isolation, as a thick band of nerve fibres – called the corpus callosum – connects the two sides.</p> <p>Interestingly, there are some known differences in these specialities between right-handers and left-handers. For example, it is often cited that around 95% of right-handers are “left hemisphere dominant”. This is not the same as the “left brain” claim above, it actually refers to <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09647049609525672">the early finding</a> that most right-handers depend more on the left hemisphere for speech and language. It was assumed that the opposite would be true for lefties. But this is not the case. In fact, <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01128/full">70% of left-handers</a> also process language more in the left hemisphere. Why this number is lower, rather than reversed, is as yet unknown.</p> <p>Researchers have found many other brain specialities, or “asymmetries” in addition to language. Many of these are specialised in the right hemisphere – in most right-handers at least – and include things such as face processing, spatial skills and perception of emotions. But these are understudied, perhaps because scientists have incorrectly assumed that they all depend on being in the hemisphere that isn’t dominant for language in each person.</p> <p>In fact, this assumption, plus the recognition that a small number of left-handers have unusual right hemisphere brain dominance for language, means left-handers are either ignored – or worse, actively avoided – <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nrn3679">in many studies of the brain</a>, because researchers assume that, as with language, all other asymmetries will be reduced.</p> <p>How some of these functions are lateralised (specialised) in the brain can actually influence how we perceive things and so can be studied using simple perception tests. For example, in my research group’s <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/1357650X.2019.1652308">recent study</a>, we presented pictures of faces that were constructed so that one half of the face shows one emotion, while the other half shows a different emotion, to a large number of right-handers and left-handers.</p> <p>Usually, people see the emotion shown on the left side of the face, and this is believed to reflect specialisation in the right hemisphere. This is linked to the fact that visual fields are processed in such a way there is a bias to the left side of space. This is thought to represent right hemisphere processing while a bias to the right side of space is thought to represent left hemisphere processing. We also presented different types of pictures and sounds, to examine several other specialisations.</p> <p>Our findings suggest that some types of specialisations, including processing of faces, do seem to follow the interesting pattern seen for language (that is, more of the left-handers seemed to have a preference for the emotion shown on the right side of the face). But in another task that looked at biases in what we pay attention to, we found no differences in the brain-processing patterns for right-handers and left-handers. This result suggests that while there are relationships between handedness and some of the brain’s specialisations, there aren’t for others.</p> <p>Left-handers are absolutely central to new experiments like this, but not just because they can help us understand what makes this minority different. Learning what makes left-handers different could also help us finally solve many of the long-standing neuropsychological mysteries of the brain.</p> <p><em>Written by Emma Karlsson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/being-left-handed-doesnt-mean-you-are-right-brained-so-what-does-it-mean-121711"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Body

Lifestyle

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Why everyone should know their attachment style

<p>If you’ve suffered from anxiety, depression or relationship problems, a psychological theory called “<a href="https://www.psychologistworld.com/developmental/attachment-theory">attachment theory</a>” can help you get to the root cause of your difficulties and give you a greater understanding of what’s going on.</p> <p>Attachment theory was developed by British psychiatrist <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bowlby">John Bowlby</a> in the 1960s. The theory explains how our brains are programmed to help us survive and thrive in the environment we are born into.</p> <p>Our self-esteem, ability to control our emotions and the quality of our relationships are all affected by our attachment style. We’ve known for over 50 years that attachment styles can <a href="https://www.abebe.org.br/files/John-Bowlby-Attachment-Second-Edition-Attachment-and-Loss-Series-Vol-1-1983.pdf">predict and explain</a> children’s behaviour. More <a href="https://www.guilford.com/books/Attachment-in-Adulthood/Mikulincer-Shaver/9781462533817/reviews">recent research</a> has shown that attachment styles also continue to affect our behaviour in adulthood.</p> <p><strong>Four attachment styles</strong></p> <p>Infants develop one of <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Why-Dont-I-Feel-Good-Enough-Using-Attachment-Theory-to-Find-a-Solution/Dent/p/book/9781138943513">four main attachment styles</a> in response to the care they receive from their parents or other carers during infancy. Carers who are sensitive to children’s needs foster a “secure attachment style”. Carers who become distressed and retreat when their children are upset create an “avoidant attachment style”. Carers who respond sensitively but are often distracted from their caregiving create an “anxious attachment style”. And carers who harm their children through neglect or abuse, create a “disorganised attachment style”.</p> <p>As children, we develop an attachment style that keeps us safe by programming us to behave in certain ways towards our carer when we are anxious or afraid. These behaviours elicit a response from our carer that, ideally, should be protective.</p> <p>Our brains are programmed through the relationship with our main carer. During this process, we learn to recognise and control our emotions and we create a “template” that guides our social interactions and informs us whether and how we are valued by other people.</p> <p><strong>Faulty template</strong></p> <p>Someone with a secure attachment style feels valued by others, can rely on them to be helpful and is able to control their emotions. At the other end of the spectrum, someone with a disorganised style does not feel valued by others, easily loses control of their emotions and resorts to manipulative behaviour to coerce others into providing help.</p> <p>When we feel anxious or fearful, the template created during infancy tells us how to respond. The world we live in now is often different from the one we were born into when our attachment style was forming, so our response to life’s events may be unsuitable. For example, someone with an anxious attachment style who constantly talks about their latest problem may lose friends who become frustrated by their inability to help.</p> <p>Research shows that attachment style affects our performance in many areas of life, including <a href="https://bit.ly/2zjIVZE">physical and mental health</a>, finding a compatible romantic partner, and our behaviour in family, social and work contexts. Attachment style even affects the type of <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13674676.2014.906394?scroll=top&amp;needAccess=true&amp;journalCode=cmhr20&amp;">religious belief we hold</a>, our <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0092656611000584">relationships with pets</a> and whether our <a href="https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/19819/">home feels like a haven</a>.</p> <p>Once you know your own attachment style – which you can easily discover by completing an <a href="http://www.web-research-design.net/cgi-bin/crq/crq.pl">online survey</a> – you will be able to predict what your response is likely to be in different circumstances. For example, if you have an avoidant attachment style, you fear rejection and may decide not to go for a promotion at work.</p> <p>When you realise that your fear of rejection is caused by your carer’s own difficulties when you were little, it may help you change your own mindset. Taking such positive steps can help you <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23398032">develop a more secure attachment style</a>. So take steps to <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Why-Dont-I-Feel-Good-Enough-Using-Attachment-Theory-to-Find-a-Solution/Dent/p/book/9781138943513">find out what your attachment style is</a> – it can only be of benefit.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/105321/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Helen Dent, Emeritus Professor of Clinical and Forensic Psychology, Staffordshire University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/why-everyone-should-know-their-attachment-style-105321" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships

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Inspiring interview with family crippled by drought moves viewers

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Aussies all over Australia have banded together to support a hard-working NSW family struggling from the worst drought they have ever seen. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On Sunday evening, a story sharing the Jerry family’s struggle warmed the hearts of viewers who came together to help the farmers who spiralled into debt. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Jerry’s run a sheep and cattling property near Coonabarabran in central NSW and have been dealing with unrelenting drought conditions. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Members who know the family told</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> The Sunday Project</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the Jerry’s  were at breaking point, and a GoFundMe fundraiser page had been made to support them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These people are not rich - they are the salt of the earth hard working Aussies who will do anything to keep their animals from suffering, and it's costing them everything they have, and more,” a family friend said on the fundraising page.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The farmers fell into a crippling debt as they were forking out $15,000 a month to keep their stock alive and healthy. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s been the hardest year we’ve had - financially and everything else,” said 80-year-old Coral Jetty in an interview. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coral explained she had lived on the farm for over 50 years, and was only entitled to $3.60 per fortnight from the pension because the farm she owns is deemed asset rich. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After Australians all over the country heard the heartbreaking story, they donated to the fundraising page - and raised a whopping $130,000 in just 15 minutes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It took less than an hour for the campaign to reach more than $200,000. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By Monday morning, the amount had jumped up to more than $275,600.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On Friday, the page has received over $377,000 in support. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The organisers of the page took to social media to share their gratitude. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I'd like to pass on our sincerest thanks to all of you who have supported us this evening. This response is overwhelming and such a huge relief,” a statement read.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Thanks doesn't convey the depth of our appreciation. As well as your amazing donations, we'll never forget the messages of support below - you've made us realise that we are not as alone, even in barest of paddocks. Thankyou.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Visit the </span><a href="https://www.gofundme.com/hungry-cobber"><span style="font-weight: 400;">GoFundMe page </span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">to support the family.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Why some couples split early after marrying

<p><span>Long before Meghan Markle tied the knot with Prince Harry and became the Duchess of Sussex, she was married to film director Trevor Engelson. Their marriage lasted less than two years, with the couple divorcing in August 2013. </span></p> <p><span>The couple is just one of the many who split early after marrying – Nicolas Cage and Lisa Marie Presley, Kid Rock and Pamela Anderson, Cher and Greg Allman all ended their marriages within months or even days. </span></p> <p><span>Many may be wondering why unions crumble so quickly after taking vows, but a popular wisdom may explain the phenomenon – “the first year of marriage is the hardest”.</span></p> <p><span>According to the 2012 <a href="http://www.australianunity.com.au/health-insurance/sitecore/content/about-us/home/news-and-views/news-folder/first-year-of-marriage-unhappiest">Australian Unity Wellbeing Index</a>, people who had been married for less than a year reported lower levels of wellbeing than people in any other year of marriage. While married people were doing better in terms of well being than those who were single, divorced, separated or widowed, the first year of marriage was found to be the unhappiest. </span></p> <p><span>“One might be tempted to think newly-married couples are blissfully happy and over the years that feeling will gradually abate as they settle into a long life together, but this turns out not to be the case,” said the report’s lead author Dr Melissa Weinberg of Deakin University’s Australian Centre on Quality of Life.</span></p> <p><span>“Big changes occur in the first year of married life, and not all of them are comfortable for newlyweds … it boils down to what I call a wedding hangover, couples building up to the wedding day as the best day of their life, and then finding reality biting as they tote up their wedding bills and get back to work after the honeymoon.”</span></p> <p><span>Relationship therapist Aimee Hartstein said apart from dealing with an “anti-climax post wedding”, newly married couples also need to cope with the pressure of the commitment. “It’s simply different from cohabitation,” Hartstein told <a href="https://www.brides.com/story/the-first-year-of-marriage-is-tough"><em>Brides</em></a>. </span></p> <p><span>“Even though they look like the same thing, with cohabitation there’s always a relatively easy out. With marriage, you have signed a binding contract. You are in a permanent union and the stakes just feel higher. Every fight or disappointment within the marriage may feel more significant and more loaded because this is it.”</span></p> <p><span>Psychologist and relationship expert Sabina Read said couples need to investigate what’s behind their decision to get hitched. “I think some people do have a fantasy that marriage will shift the challenges, and something will change magically because we have made a formal commitment to each other,” Read told the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/it-is-confusing-when-a-couple-splits-very-early-after-marrying-20190813-p52gol.html"><em>Sydney Morning Herald</em></a>. </span></p> <p><span>“The fantasy of marriage is still quite strong. But things don’t change because we exchange vows.”</span></p> <p><span>However, Weinberg said couples who manage to survive their first year of marriage are more likely to have higher life satisfaction. “The message for newly married couples is to persevere through that first frantic year, and reap the rewards later.”</span></p>

Relationships

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Royal heartache: Why the Queen felt “great sadness” over grandson Prince William

<p>There is no doubt the Queen and her grandson - as well as heir to the throne - Prince William would share a particularly special bond. </p> <p>The British monarch has been training the royal for his position to one day take the crown since he was just a teenager. </p> <p>However, the two were not always so close. </p> <p>Royal Biographer Ingrid Seward wrote about their complex relationship in her book<span> </span><em>My Husband and I: The Inside Story of 70 Years of the Royal Marriage.</em></p> <p>The 37-year-old is next in line to the throne after his father, Prince Charles and has been aware of his impending responsibilities since he was just 13-years-old. </p> <p>It was around this time when the breakdown of Prince Charles’ and Princess Diana’s marriage began. </p> <p>The couple would divorce in 1996 and not long after that, Princess Di’s explosive interview with BBC’s<span> </span><em>Panorama<span> </span></em>program which shared the inner details of the Royal family would air. </p> <p>In this documentary, the mother-to-two would admit she struggled to fit into the famous family. </p> <p>She was also asked if she thought Prince Charles would ever be kind to which she said:"I don't think any of us know the answer to that.</p> <p>"And obviously it's a question that's in everybody's head. But who knows, who knows what fate will produce, who knows what circumstances will provoke?"</p> <p>The royal went on to add: "There was always conflict on that subject with him when we discussed it, and I understood that conflict, because it's a very demanding role, being Prince of Wales, but it's an equally more demanding role being King.</p> <p>"And being Prince of Wales produces more freedom now, and being King would be a little bit more suffocating.</p> <p>"And because I know the character I would think that the top job, as I call it, would bring enormous limitations to him, and I don't know whether he could adapt to that."</p> <p>Princess Diana was later asked if the title of King should go directly to their eldest son, Prince William. </p> <p>"Well, then you have to see that William's very young at the moment, so do you want a burden like that to be put on his shoulders at such an age?” she said. </p> <p>“...I can't answer that question."</p> <p>Seward said the interview created fairs within the royal household that perhaps Princess Di was not giving her son the proper guidance and leadership to one day be King. </p> <p>"The one person who could help, who had to help, was the Queen," she wrote in the book. "She knew only too well what pressures William was facing. She told her advisers she feared he might crack up like his mother had."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YO2QMHXVv/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YO2QMHXVv/" target="_blank">A post shared by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (@hermajestyqueenelizabethii_fan)</a> on Aug 20, 2019 at 1:11am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The Royal autobiographer said this is when the Queen began to have lunches with her grandson. </p> <p>"They talked in a way they never could have done before. One of her great sadnesses was that, until the separation, she had hardly seen him.”</p> <p>“Now, at last, she was able to do so on a regular basis and form a proper relationship.”</p> <p>"In this quiet intimacy, the Queen was able to impress upon William that the institution of the monarchy was something to be upheld and respected, and worth preserving."</p> <p>Queen Elizabeth has also made sure Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge has had training for eventual role as Queen Consort. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YF-zhIyGO/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YF-zhIyGO/" target="_blank">A post shared by William&amp;Catherine (@familyofwilliamandcatherine)</a> on Aug 19, 2019 at 11:54pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Her Majesty did not have the proper training when she ascended the British throne. </p> <p>During her grandfather’s throne, a younger Princess Elizabeth was third in line behind her Uncle Edward, and her father. </p> <p>Due to this, she was not expected to be the Queen. </p> <p>However, once her grandfather passed away in 1936, her uncle succeeded to the throne but later abdicated so he could propose his divorced girlfriend, Wallis Simpson. </p> <p>Princess Elizabeth eventually became the Queen when her father passed away, at the tender age of 25. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Queen Elizabeth and Prince William throughout the years. </p>

Relationships

Finance

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Aussies less worried about debt, but still anxious about money

<p>Money – and making enough of it – continues to be a pressure point for many Australians. In fact, one in four households struggle to get by on their current income.</p> <p>Even more people are worried about losing their income altogether. Almost half (44%) are concerned that they or their partner could be out of a job.</p> <p>The proportion of the population worried about debt is also high, at 42%. Yet this is the lowest it’s been in more than four years of our nationwide CHOICE Consumer Pulse surveys.</p> <p>Private health insurance has topped the list of cost concerns for the third time running. But the number of consumers baffled  by the various policy options – which spiked in our <a href="https://choice.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=270103a13e38b9f6643b82a8e&amp;id=2c3ef6d60c&amp;e=7f9260877c">previous quarterly survey</a> – has fallen.</p> <p>The previous survey ran in March, when there was a buzz around <a href="https://choice.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=270103a13e38b9f6643b82a8e&amp;id=a1f9233753&amp;e=7f9260877c">new tiers of health insurance</a> being launched by the Department of Health in April.</p> <p><strong>Health insurance still the biggest financial concern</strong></p> <p>The cost of private health cover is the biggest worry for most people (82%), followed closely by fuel (80%) and electricity (79%).</p> <p>In March, we recorded a high of 62% of people who said that finding a health insurance policy to suit their needs was too complicated. The June survey brought this proportion back in line with previous results, at 53%. </p> <p>The result comes as <a href="https://choice.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=270103a13e38b9f6643b82a8e&amp;id=eccd56a971&amp;e=7f9260877c">the latest statistics</a> from APRA show more than 28,500 people have ditched their hospital cover in the three months to 30 June. Young people aged between 20 and 24 made up the largest proportion of those turning away from hospital cover. </p> <p>Over the same period, almost 18,500 people have dropped their extras health insurance covering services such as dental and optical. </p> <p>The total number of people with health insurance cover dropped 0.3 percentage points compared to the previous quarter. </p> <p>Meanwhile, health insurance premiums have risen 2.8% in the past year.</p> <p>Our survey reveals that health insurance has kept its status as the trickiest financial choice people make. It ranks above the 12 other major product categories we researched, including superannuation and mortgages. </p> <p><strong>Most households ‘uncomfortable’ on their incomes </strong></p> <p>Concerns over which products and service providers to choose are mixed in with other financial stresses. Two-thirds of households are either just getting by or struggling to get by on their current incomes.</p> <p>WA has the highest number of people really feeling the pinch. There, 33% of households find it hard to live on their incomes – up from 30% this time last year.</p> <p>NSW and Queensland come in second. In both states, 26% of the population lives with financial stress.</p> <p>Half of people living in NSW have the added worry of losing their jobs – the highest proportion of all states and territories with this concern.</p> <p>The percentage of people in NSW finding it hard to get by on their earnings has risen from 19% this time last year. By contrast, Victoria has experienced almost an exact reversal in fortunes. A fifth of Victorian households now struggle – down from a quarter a year ago.</p> <p>Victoria also has the lowest rate of people struggling on their incomes, along with the ACT, South Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory.</p> <p><strong>Debt worry slowly easing </strong></p> <p>A large proportion of people – two in five – are worried about their level of debt, but our research shows this worry is easing.</p> <p>In surveys before 2017, people worried about their debt were always the majority. But from 2018 onwards, this group has shrunk to a large minority, averaging 45%.</p> <p><em>Written by Saimi Jeong. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.choice.com.au/money/budget/consumer-pulse/articles/debt-worry-declining-but-many-australians-still-anxious-about-money" target="_blank"><em>CHOICE</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Retirement Income

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Airport security worker’s horrendous note to passenger goes viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An airport security worker from New York, US, has been fired from her job after handing a passenger a cruel handwritten note that insulted his appearance. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The incident, which occurred in June, has since gone viral after passenger Neal Strassner obtained security footage from the bizarre moment a female security worker from Greater Rochester International Airport gave Mr Strassner a note after he passed through a metal detector. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Strassner didn’t think much of the situation and he headed toward the gate. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That’s when he said the woman yelled out, “You gonna open the note?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once he did, the woman burst out laughing. </span></p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/npIWjuk1KVA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The note had a cruel message about the man’s appearance, which read “You Ugly!!!!” on a ripped piece of cardboard. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After complaining to her supervisors, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) revealed the woman worked for a contractor. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The woman has since been let go from her position. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video shared to Youtube has since had over 499k views. </span></p>

Legal

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How to save money without pinching pennies

<p><span>Saving is necessary – yet the idea of limiting your spending can feel restrictive and stifling. Here are a few tricks you can try to make saving easier and more fun.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Look for a great deal</span></strong></p> <p><span>Whether you’re buying a new item or signing up for ongoing services – phone, internet, insurance, credit cards and more – it’s a good idea to browse through comparison sites to find the best rates. This could help you save hundreds or even thousands in the long run. Looking through discount sites or online reviews can also help you make your financial decisions. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Review your subscriptions</span></strong></p> <p><span>It’s easier than ever to subscribe to streaming services, online newspapers and mobile apps, but that also means there may be some spending that you leave unaccounted. Take a look at your accounts to see any active subscriptions and cancel the ones you no longer use.</span></p> <p><span>You can also take advantage of the family deals that these subscriptions often offer – if the people in your household all use the same services, consider getting a joint account to make the monthly bill a little lighter.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Go for pre-loved items</span></strong></p> <p><span>From clothing to appliances, shopping second hand or refurbished can be a great option. You can also use the same platform to sell your old belongings.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Consider home brands</span></strong></p> <p><span>Some staples such as toothpaste, tissue rolls, and soap will almost always be needed in a household. If you don’t feel tied to any particular brand, it’s time to make the economical switch and go for supermarket home brands. They generally have similar active ingredients and/or quality as the name brand products, but come at a fraction of the price. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Get app’d</span></strong></p> <p><span>Some mobile apps can help you put some money aside by taking spare change from everyday purchases into a savings or investment account. This type of apps usually charge fees, so read the fine print before you begin.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Visualise the goal</span></strong></p> <p><span>Once you set your savings goal, create a visual representation to see how far along you are in the journey. This will make your goal seem more tangible and help motivate you to stay on the course and accomplish the task. If you’re aiming to save $10,000 by the end of the year, you can draw a thermometer or graph to track your progress. Looking towards a specific objective, like saving up for a Hawaii holiday? Print out pictures of the places you want to visit and place them in your wallet or other spots you frequent as a reminder. This also helps shift your focus from the restrictions (“I can’t buy this because I have to be mindful!”) to the opportunities (“This will help me purchase a new car sooner!”).</span></p>

Retirement Income

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“Genuine doubt”: Why one judges’ argument could save George Pell

<p>After George Pell’s application to Victoria’s Court of Appeal was dismissed on Wednesday with two judges ruling that they thought the jury’s verdict was unreasonable, Pell’s legal team has their sights set on the High Court of Australia.</p> <p>It’s all due to one judge who disagreed and put his views forward in a<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.supremecourt.vic.gov.au/case-summaries/court-of-appeal-proceedings/george-pell-v-the-queen" target="_blank">203-page dissenting opinion.</a></p> <p>Justice Weinburg is a former Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecution who joined the Federal Court in 1998 before moving to the Victorian Court of Appeal in 2008. He retired in 2018 but has served as an acting judge since then.</p> <p>There are five reasons as to why he disagreed with his fellow judges.</p> <p><strong>1. Genuine doubt</strong></p> <p>Weinburg says that he has a “genuine doubt as to the applicant’s guilt.” The jury was required in the case to find Pell guilty “beyond reasonable doubt”, but after reviewing the evidence himself, Weinburg thinks that there was a “significant possibility” that Pell did not commit the offences.</p> <p>“My doubt is a doubt which the jury ought also to have had,” he wrote.</p> <p><strong>2. He didn’t find the complainant convincing</strong></p> <p>Weinburg has suggested that there was a lot of evidence that casts doubt upon the complainant’s story.</p> <p>He said that there were “inconsistencies, and discrepancies, and a number of his answers simply made no sense”.</p> <p>One example Weinburg used was that the fact that the complainant did not remember there were rehearsals for the choir after mass on the two days that the abuse likely occurred.</p> <p>The complainant was also unsure if Pell had said mass that day or was leading Mass.</p> <p><strong>3. Weinburg trusts the other witnesses</strong></p> <p>He gave more weight to other witness testimonies than his fellow judges who concluded their evidence was inconsistent.</p> <p>Weinburg has disagreed and said that their evidence is critical and “if accepted, would lead inevitably to acquittal”.</p> <p>The other evidence provided by Pell’s master of ceremonies Charles Portelli established a routine within the church and helped rule out certain dates.</p> <p>The other judges found that the evidence provided by Portelli and sacristan Max Potter was inconsistent, but Weinburg said that it proves there were “modes of conduct that were subject to particularly rigorous and strong norms”.</p> <p><strong>4. Large number of improbable possibilities</strong></p> <p>Weinburg paid attention to one of the arguments put forward by Pell’s legal team which suggested that for the first incident to have happened, a large number of improbable things would have to had occurred within a short time frame.</p> <p>The boys would have had to break away from the procession, go through two normally locked doors and return to choir rehearsal without anyone noticing they were gone.</p> <p>Weinburg accepts this argument.</p> <p>“The chances of ‘all the planets aligning’, in that way, would, at the very least, be doubtful.”</p> <p><strong>5. Unusual aspects of the case </strong></p> <p>Weinburg noted that the prosecution relied entirely on the evidence of the complainant and that there was no supporting evidence.</p> <p>“These convictions were based upon the jury’s assessment of the complainant as a witness, and nothing more,” he said.</p> <p>He noted that juries were told they cannot convict an accused unless they were satisfied beyond reasonable doubt, as well as being told that they should not convict if there was a “reasonable possibility” that there was substance to the defence provided.</p> <p>“It is not now, and never has been, a question of whether (Pell’s) complainant was to be preferred as a witness to, for example, Portelli, Potter, McGlone, Finnigan, or any other particular witness who gave exculpatory evidence,” Justice Weinburg wrote.</p>

Legal

Entertainment

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The musicians making music via coding

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Allison Walker is shaking up the music scene by “live-coding”. This is an experimental style of music where artists write and update computer code in real time to make funky music.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The audience gets to see all the guts and the wires spilling out everywhere, and it all just seems very incomprehensible," she said to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-21/live-coding-australia-music-computer-code/11301114"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Walker is a video game sound designer, so she has the background needed for this style of music.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"People don't usually see all the hard work that goes on in the background (during electronic music performance), but if they see this wall of code they're immediately like, 'Woah, that's cool!'</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It's more engaging for an audience to get into."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can see what live coding looks like in the video below.</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ix2b_qFYfAA"></iframe></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although it might seem very complex to some, the live-coding community is open to everyone. Western Australian software developer Ethan Crawford explains the concept behind “live-coding”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Live-coding is similar to a text editor — which lots of people use every day; people use Microsoft Word to write things. In this case, Sonic Pi is just a text editor with some fancy features built on top," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"So many of the interactions that you have with people and your environment are mediated through software, but it's all hidden," Ben Swift, Canberra academic said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Live-coding forces somebody, even if only for a second, to engage with computer code — that's something most people probably never do, or maybe only one or two times in their life."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The fact that the audience can see and engage with what's happening as this process that involves both the code and the sound is very important," said Dr Aaron Sorensen, who has been in the live-coding movement in Australia since 2015.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It's about this idea that code can be beautiful."</span></p>

Music

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“Dear tech”: IBM pens open letter to the tech industry

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">IBM is urging the tech sector to use technology for the good of humanity instead of its downfall in an open letter to the industry called “Dear Tech”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the firm, the world needs tech companies that can apply “smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise — not just for some of us, but for all of us”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the global tech giant held its annual Think summit in Sydney, it showcased the mindboggling ways that artificial intelligence is being used to tackle the world’s biggest problems, according to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/05/22/ibm-think-summit-2019/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily.</span></a></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9">  <iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gNF8ObJR6K8"></iframe></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stefan Harrer says that healthcare is ideal for the use of artificial intelligence (AI).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ultimately we want to be able to use and develop technology to improve peoples’ lives,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We want to build tech that can help improve the lives of people that suffer from a variety of diseases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That requires that we do cutting-edge research and develop the tech and think hard about how to translate it into trustworthy and impactful solutions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, as AI becomes more commonplace, it’s more important than ever that there are strict ethics in place around it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s as important to pay enough attention to getting the ethical framework right around AI as it is the technology,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This revolution will not look like the information revolution, it’s not move fast and break things.”</span></p>

Technology

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Why are we seeing so many music documentaries lately?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Music documentaries about famous singers and musicians are quickly becoming the norm. This is due to movie directors and actors bringing life and providing nostalgia to those who watched the musicians grow up. It also brings music to a new audience who is interested but might not have been born when the musicians were in their prime.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It appears that fans can no longer resist a peek into the backroom world that their favourite musicians inhabited.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Gennaro Castaldo, of the record label trade association the British Phonographic Industry, isn’t surprised.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A compelling synergy exists between movies and music,” he told </span><em><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jul/21/why-music-documentaries-are-all-over-our-screens-beyonce-bob-dylan"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Guardian</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With a slew of highly anticipated music documentaries either out, or due for release soon, fans can get close to the icons they love, from Led Zeppelin and Leonard Cohen to Beyoncé and PJ Harvey, so we can expect another surge in sales and streams.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He credits the success of Bohemian Rhapsody and Rocketman to the surge in sales and streams, despite claims that these films are fictionalised and not a realistic account of what the rock stars went through.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The phenomenal success of recent biopics celebrating the work of Queen, Elton John and Abba underline just how fantastic a medium film is for music – culturally but also commercially in terms of the huge global reach it can provide at the cinema and then in the home,” said the BPI’s Castaldo. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Movies provide the perfect emotional context for a piece of music that help to enhance its power and to profoundly resonate with the audience.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In the process, this can reawaken the public’s love of classic repertoire, or of a particular artist, and encourage the next generation of fans to discover music that is new to them.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, film critic Nick James says that a documentary that is strong on sentiment doesn’t always work.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I prefer a documentary to a rock biopic anyday, but I’m wary of nostalgia,” James said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Marianne &amp; Leonard</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is heartfelt and honest, but it’s still to a degree in thrall to the ‘sexual revolution’ whose utter destructiveness it chronicles. [Leonard] Cohen comes out of it badly, but we probably need to see those feet of clay.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fans are responding with their wallets, and it’s looking like that’s the way that companies are going to go: fictionalised accounts of their favourite musicians instead of authentic and gritty stories about their imperfect heroes.</span></p>

Music

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5 minutes with author Kate Forsyth

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in the series is Kate Forsyth, a novelist and children’s book author. After writing her first novel at the age of seven, Forsyth went on to publish more than a dozen titles. Her retelling of Rapunzel, <em>Bitter Greens</em>, won the 2015 American Library Association Award for Best Historical Fiction. Her latest book, <em>The Blue Rose</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with Forsyth about the Brontë sisters, a romance trope she can’t get enough of, and the importance of setting small, achievable targets.</span></p> <p><strong><em>Over60: </em></strong><strong>What is your best writing advice?</strong></p> <p><span>Kate Forsyth: Write what you like to read, get in the habit of writing every day, and set yourself small achievable targets such as writing one chapter a month – then slowly increase the difficulty of the target. </span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now? </span></strong></p> <p><span>I'm reading <em>Circe</em> by Madeline Miller.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>When Breath Becomes Air </span></em><span>by Paul Kalanithi – it choked me up.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think is underrated? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>The Tenant of Wildfell Hall</span></em><span> by Anne Brontë.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Any story of star-crossed lovers who need to overcome enormous obstacles before they can be together.  </span></p> <p><strong><span>Is there any book by other writers that you wish you had written? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>Daughter of the Forest </span></em><span>by Juliet Marillier. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Do you have any writing routine? If so, what does it look like? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Every morning I have a cup of tea in bed and write in my journal – I’ve done so since I was 11 and so I have a great many volumes! Then I have breakfast, tidy the house and then walk with my dog somewhere beautiful for an hour, and think about what I plan to write that day. I settle down to work around 10am, work through till lunchtime, have a little break to eat and chat to my husband, and then work through until it's time to start cooking dinner. In the evening, I usually read - either for pleasure or for research. </span></p> <p><span>I try and have Sundays away from my computer, though I still write in my journal and read. The only time this routine varies is when I’m on the road, talking about my books, teaching and telling stories and/or travelling for research.    </span></p> <p><strong><span>Which author(s) – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with? </span></strong></p> <p><span>The Brontë sisters.</span></p>

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