Movies

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Get through the scary movie with your grandkids

<p>The cinemas and TV channels are filled with horror movies. But what should you do if you have a young child who wants to watch too?</p> <p>Many of us have a childhood memory of a <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/5sjstb/whats_a_movie_that_traumatized_you_as_a_kid/">movie that gave us nightmares</a> and took us to a new level of fear. Maybe this happened by accident. Or maybe it happened because an adult guardian didn’t choose the right movie for your age.</p> <p>For me it was <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070047/">The Exorcist</a>. It was also the movie that frightened my mum when she was a youngster. She had warned me not to watch it. But I did. I then slept outside my parents’ room for months for fear of demonic possession.</p> <p>Parents often ask about the right age for “scary” movies. A useful resource is <a href="https://childrenandmedia.org.au/movie-reviews/">The Australian Council of Children and the Media</a>, which provides colour-coded age guides for movies rated by child development professionals.</p> <p>Let’s suppose, though, that you have made the decision to view a scary movie with your child. What are some good rules of thumb in managing this milestone in your child’s life?</p> <p><strong>Watch with a parent or a friend</strong></p> <p>Research into indirect experiences can help us understand what happens when a child watches a scary movie. Indirect fear experiences can involve <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18614263">watching someone else look afraid or hurt in a situation</a> or <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2882043/">verbal threats</a> (such as “the bogeyman with sharp teeth will come at midnight for children and eat them”).</p> <p>Children depend very much on indirect experiences for information about danger in the world. Scary movies are the perfect example of these experiences. Fortunately, research also shows that indirectly acquired fears can be reduced by two very powerful sources of information: parents and peers.</p> <p>In one of our recent studies, we showed that when we <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28531872">paired happy adult faces with a scary situation</a>, children showed greater fear reduction than if they experienced that situation on their own. This suggests that by modelling calm and unfazed behaviour, or potentially even expressing enjoyment about being scared during a movie (notice how people burst into laughter after a jump scare at theatres?), parents may help children be less fearful.</p> <p>There is also some evidence that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3189411/">discussions with friends can help reduce fear</a>. That said, it’s important to remember that children tend to become <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27585485">more similar to each other in threat evaluation after discussing a scary or ambiguous event with a close friend</a>. So it might be helpful to discuss a scary movie with a good friend who enjoys such movies and can help the child discuss their worries in a positive manner.</p> <p><strong>Get the facts</strong></p> <p>How a parent discusses the movie with their child is also important. Children do not have enough experience to understand the statistical probability of dangerous events occurring in the world depicted on screen. For example, after watching Jaws, a child might assume that shark attacks are frequent and occur on every beach.</p> <p>Children need help to contextualise the things they see in movies. One way of discussing shark fears after viewing Jaws might be to help your child investigate the <a href="https://www.thewildlifemuseum.org/exhibits/sharks/odds-of-a-shark-attack/">statistics around shark attacks</a> (the risk of being attacked is around 1 in 3.7 million) and to acquire facts about shark behaviours (such as that they generally do not hunt humans).</p> <p>These techniques are the basis of <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/au/blog/in-practice/201301/cognitive-restructuring">cognitive restructuring</a>, which encourages fact-finding rather than catastrophic thoughts to inform our fears. It is also an evidence-based technique for managing excessive anxiety in children and adults.</p> <p><strong>Exposure therapy</strong></p> <p>If your child is distressed by a movie, a natural reaction is to prevent them watching it again. I had this unfortunate experience when my seven-year-old daughter accidentally viewed <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1935859/">Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children</a>, which featured a monster with knives for limbs who ate children’s eyeballs for recreation.</p> <p>My first instinct was to prevent my daughter watching the movie again. However, one of the most effective ways of reducing excessive and unrealistic fear is to confront it again and again until that fear diminishes into boredom. This is called <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-virtual-reality-spiders-are-helping-people-face-their-arachnophobia-73769">exposure therapy</a>.</p> <p>To that end, we subjected her and ourselves to the same movie repeatedly while modelling calm and some hilarity - until she was bored. We muted the sound and did silly voice-overs and fart noises for the monster. We drew pictures of him with a moustache and in a pair of undies. Thankfully, she no longer identifies this movie as one that traumatised her.</p> <p>This strategy is difficult to execute because it requires tolerating your child’s distress. In fact, <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/buy/2016-23260-001">it is a technique that is the least used by mental health professionals</a> because of this.</p> <p>However, when done well and with adequate support (you may need an experienced psychologist if you are not confident), it is one of the most effective techniques for reducing fear following a scary event like an accidental horror movie.</p> <p><strong>Fear is normal</strong></p> <p>Did I ever overcome my fear of The Exorcist? It took my mother checking my bed, laughing with me about the movie, and re-affirming that being scared is okay and normal for me to do so (well done mum!)</p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/you-cant-erase-bad-memories-but-you-can-learn-ways-to-cope-with-them-103161">Fear is a normal and adaptive human response</a>. Some people, including children, love being scared. There is evidence that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30307264">volunteering to be scared can lead to a heightened sense of accomplishment</a> for some of us, because it provides us with a cognitive break from our daily stress and worries.</p> <p>Hopefully, you can help ensure that your child’s first scary movie experience is a memorable, enjoyable one.</p> <p><em>Written by Carol Newall. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-watch-a-scary-movie-with-your-child-105973">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Watch these 5 movies if you LOVE cats

<p> </p> <p>2019’s offerings include <a href="https://theconversation.com/jojo-rabbit-hitler-humour-and-a-childs-eye-view-of-war-make-for-dark-satire-128622">Hitler comedy Jojo Rabbit</a>, Ken Loach’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8359816/">Sorry We Missed You</a> and Cannes Film Festival hit <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8613070/">Portrait of a Lady on Fire</a>.</p> <p>Perhaps the strangest offering is <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5697572/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Cats</a>, the big screen adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical, itself based on T.S. Eliot’s cycle of poems.</p> <p>From the trailer, glimpses of a creepily transformed all-star cast (a sinisterly sibilant Judy Dench, Idris Elba and Taylor Swift to name but a few) and a darkly glamorous cat-fight vibe <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jul/19/cats-movie-trailer-internet-reacts-horror-demented-dream-ballet">raised more than a few hackles</a> – so much so, <a href="https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/m7qq43/the-cats-in-cats-movie-have-changed-after-the-creepy-trailer-everyone-hated">elements have been “subtly” reanimated</a>. Reviews of the film have been overwhelmingly negative.</p> <p>It remains to be seen whether Cats will land as deftly with film goers as it did in the theatre. But if nothing else, its release provides a timely reminder of how the big screen has gifted us many memorable feline performances.</p> <p>Here are five of the very best.</p> <p><strong>Keanu (2016)</strong></p> <p> “That’s the cutest cat I’ve ever seen!”</p> <p>No, it’s not a Disney movie or an internet meme; it’s a line that speaks for every adult male who crosses paths with the adorable tortoiseshell tabby kitten <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4139124/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Keanu</a>.</p> <p>We first meet this eponymous feline amid the corpse-strewn detritus of a meth lab that has been shot up by two hefty gangster assassins.</p> <p>Keanu’s escape to suburbia and subsequent kidnapping from his newly adopted human, the nerdy Rell (Jordan Peele) provides the catalyst for this delightfully idiotic <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9zy27apgI8">buddy/action movie spoof</a>.</p> <p>Director Peter Alencio and writers Peele and Alex Rubens milk full comedic value from vicious killers turned into cooing, kitten kissing softies – and bumbling middle-class cowards Rell and Clarence (Keegan-Michael Key) into badass, kitten rescuing heroes.</p> <p>Viewers familiar with Peele’s <a href="https://theconversation.com/jordan-peeles-us-black-horror-movies-and-the-american-nightmare-114334">directorial work</a> will know he is no respecter of cuteness. Rest assured, a walk on the wild side only sees Keanu’s adorable qualities further enhanced by rocking a wicked black bandanna.</p> <p>In a dream sequence, his voice is provided by some actor called Reeves.</p> <p><strong>Alien (1979); Aliens (1986)</strong></p> <p>Those with an attentive eye for cats on screen and/or for what makes feminist icon Ellen Ripley (Sigourney Weaver) tick won’t be surprised to see the trouble-making ginger Jonesy from the first two films in the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078748/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Alien</a> franchise on this list.</p> <p>This (space) ship cat is no mere piece of fluff: he serves a significant plot function, raises tensions at key moments and importantly provides the first film’s only love interest.</p> <p>Rescuing the moggy complicates Ripley’s escape and reveals a tender, protective side to her steely nature. This is even more powerfully highlighted in the sequel Aliens, even if Jonesy himself only makes a brief early appearance: “and you, you little shithead, you’re staying here”.</p> <p><strong>Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1962)</strong></p> <p>This iconic adaptation of Truman Capote’s novel <a href="https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/10-great-films-featuring-cats">frequently tops</a> cat movie lists, but while I am more than happy to include Holly Golightly’s flatmate Cat, “poor slob without a name”, near the top of my list I must confess I’m no great fan of the film overall – a ham-fisted, sanitised Hollywood do-over.</p> <p>Capote, as is well known, <a href="http://www.today.com/id/27841277/ns/today-today_entertainment/t/capote-never-liked-hepburn-iconic-role/">was not keen</a> on the casting of Audrey Hepburn as drifter-turned-grifter Holly Golightly, apparently preferring Marilyn Monroe.</p> <p>Little is known of his view of the casting of Orangey – <a href="https://www.womansworld.com/posts/breakfast-at-tiffanys-cat-169893">an award-winning performer</a> – as Cat, but for mine this handsome fellow is a far better actor than George Peppard, the film’s wooden, (Hollywood confected) male lead.</p> <p>You don’t have to be a cat lover to know who Holly’s true soul mate is.</p> <p><strong>A Street Cat Named Bob (2016)</strong></p> <p>This adaptation of <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12394068-a-street-cat-named-bob">a best-selling book</a> tells the true story of a homeless, heroin addict, James Bowen, (Luke Treadaway) who finds love and redemption when he meets Bob, a doughy but lovable ginger who chooses him as his human.</p> <p>While James is busking or selling The Big Issue, Bob is perched on his shoulder and proves a magnet for punters. When Bob is injured in a fight, James takes on new responsibilities as provider and carer.</p> <p>After a young friend dies from an overdose, James decides to get clean and is helped by the presence of the watchful, patient Bob.</p> <p>Sure, it’s no <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117951/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Trainspotting</a>, but there’s enough grit, vomit and despair to avoid the overly sentimental and Bob – played by none other than the real Bob himself – is a delight, exuding an aura of streetwise empathy to a kindred spirit, and adding a dash of mischief, too.</p> <p><strong>Kedi (2016)</strong></p> <p>Turkish director Ceyda Torun’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4420704/">sublimely shot documentary</a> focuses on Istanbul’s many thousands of street cats and the humans whose turf they share, who tend them and take solace in their company without seeking to constrain their freedom.</p> <p>Torun skilfully intertwines the stories of several cats into the fabric of the places in which they (and, in some instances, their young) survive.</p> <p>She captures them wandering through street markets, cafés, artists’ studios, workshops and patches of wasteland. We watch them hunting, scavenging and charming their way around fishing boats, riverbanks, tips, kitchens and jetties. They nip in and out of the windows of cramped, ageing flats, through backyards, shops and crowded alleys.</p> <p>Kedi’s central message is that the centuries-long interdependence of human and feline – marked by easy tolerance, respect and not a little folklore and superstition – is a distinctive marker of Istanbul’s culture, one potentially under threat by the inexorable creep of high rise, urban redevelopment.</p> <p>It should be cherished and preserved as a civilised and civilising point of pride.</p> <p><em>Written by Deborah Hunn. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-5-best-films-for-cat-lovers-that-arent-the-movie-cats-128128">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p> </p>

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Disney movie princess? Duchess Meghan’s latest passion project

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has signed a new voiceover deal with Disney to benefit the wildlife conservation charity<span> </span><em>Elephants Without Borders.</em></p> <p>The new role, first reported by the<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://go.redirectingat.com/?id=74968X1525087&amp;xs=1&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thetimes.co.uk%2Farticle%2Fvoiceover-deal-with-disney-hints-at-future-career-path-5sr0jmjvd&amp;sref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.townandcountrymag.com%2Fsociety%2Ftradition%2Fa30486892%2Fmeghan-markle-disney-voiceover-deal%2F%3Fpre%3Dsociety%252Ftradition%252F%26prefix%3Da%26id%3D30486892%26del%3D%26variantId%3D%26post%3D%252Fmeghan-markle-disney-voiceover-deal" target="_blank">Times</a></em>, follows after Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan announced their intentions to “carve out a progressive new role withing the institution of the royal family.”</p> <p>Not much information is known what the voiceover is for, but the Duchess, 38, reportedly recorded it before she left for her six-week holiday break in Canada with her husband, the Duke of Sussex and their 8-month-old son, Archie.</p> <p>It is believed Karey Burke, the president of ABC Entertainment hinted of the news last week during the Television Critics Association press tour.</p> <p>"We have an office waiting for them in the animation studios building should they be looking to produce television," she said. ABC is a division of The Walt Disney Company.</p> <p>It isn’t the first time the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have had a run in with the childhood favourite conglomerate.</p> <p>Last year, Prince Harry and the Duchess attended European premiere of <em>The Lion King<span> </span></em>and even brushed shoulders with A-listers.</p> <p>Harry and Meg shared that at the time, Disney made a donation to their charity work in the environment and conservation space.</p> <p>It was also the premiere where the Sussexes had the opportunity to meet Jay Z and Beyoncé for the first time.</p> <p>"The baby, so beautiful," Beyoncé said, about Harry and Meghan's newborn Archie. "We love you guys."</p> <p>Jay Z even offered up some helpful parenting advice: "The best advice I can give you, always find time for yourself," he said.<span> </span></p>

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Frozen 2 becomes the highest-grossing animated film of all time

<p><em>Frozen 2 </em>has officially been crowned as the highest-grossing animated film in history, topping its predecessor <em>Frozen</em>.</p> <p>The sequel has amassed US$1.325 billion at the global box office in the first full week of January 2020, less than two months after its release. Nearly $450 million of that sum came from the US, while the biggest bounties made <span><a href="https://variety.com/2020/film/box-office/frozen-2-biggest-animated-movie-ever-disney-box-office-1203456758/">overseas</a></span> came from China ($118 million), Japan ($103.8 million), South Korea ($96.2 million) and the UK ($65 million). The earnings surpassed the records set by the original <em>Frozen </em>($1.28 billion) in 2013 and <em>The Incredibles 2 </em>($1.243 billion) in 2018. All three films are from Disney Animation/Pixar.</p> <p>In 2019, Disney became the first studio in the world to gross more than $10 billion at the global box office, thanks to high-performing titles such as <em>Avengers: Endgame</em> ($2.798 billion), <em>The Lion King</em> ($1.656 billion), <em>Captain Marvel</em> ($1.13 billion), <em>Toy Story 4</em> ($1.074 billion) and <em>Aladdin</em> ($1.051 billion). With <em>Frozen 2 </em>crossing the billion dollar mark, the studio is likely to see seven of its movies – including <em>Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker </em>– gross <span><a href="https://deadline.com/2019/12/disney-crosses-10-billion-worldwide-box-office-new-all-time-record-1202803824/">over $1 billion in a single calendar year</a></span>.</p>

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Jojo Rabbit: Hitler humour and a child's eye view of war make for dark satire

<p>Jojo Rabbit is not Disney Studios’ first foray into Hitler parody. In 1943, it produced <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L90smU0SOcQ">der Fuehrer’s Face</a> – an anti-Nazi film inside Donald Duck’s nightmares.</p> <p>Now, Disney is the Australian distributor of Jojo Rabbit, a story of a young boy whose imaginary friend (and buffoonish life coach) is Adolf Hitler.</p> <p>In this dark satire, from the Polynesian-Jewish-New Zealand director Taika Waititi who brought us <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4698684/">Hunt for the Wilderpeople</a>, Nazi Germany is in its waning days. The Germans have all but lost the second world war but 10-year-old Johannes “Jojo” Betzel (Roman Griffin Davis) believes he, and he alone, will be the Aryan hero to turn the tide.</p> <p>The boy’s imaginary friend, a hilariously incompetent Hitler (played by Waititi in blue contact lenses and the trademark moustache), cheers him on. When asked to kill a rabbit to get into the Hitler Youth, Jojo baulks, though he does almost manage to kill himself in a grenade stunt.</p> <p>“You’re still the bestest, most loyal little Nazi I’ve ever met,” the fantasy Fuhrer enthuses.</p> <p><strong>Through children’s eyes</strong></p> <p>Themes and images of children have often been central in films exploring WWII. Steven Spielberg famously used <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUJ187mkMq8">“the girl in red coat”</a> to create a powerfully moving symbol of innocence in <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/movies/article/2017/03/31/schindlers-list-one-most-visually-powerful-war-films-ever-made">Schindler’s List</a> (1993).</p> <p>Immediately after the war, a stream of films, including Roberto Rosselini’s <a href="https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/1358-germany-year-zero-the-humanity-of-the-defeated%22%22">Germany Year Zero</a> (1948), Gerhard Lamprecht’s <a href="https://ecommerce.umass.edu/defa/film/6025">Somewhere in Berlin</a> (1946), and Fred Zinnemann’s <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iu8h7OyX8-Y">The Search</a> (1948) looked at wartime trauma through injuries acquired by children.</p> <p>Like Jojo’s grenade mishap, their wounds were permanent.</p> <p>In war films, children’s perspectives don’t diminish the ghastliness of war. Quite the contrary. When war and its pervasive horror spills over from the battlefield and intrudes on their youth, viewers are appalled at its spread.</p> <p>Containing that disease of war, curing it even, is where Waititi’s takedown of fascist group-think truly begins.</p> <p>How will Jojo escape the brainwash army of Reichswehr propaganda parrots like Rebel Wilson’s Fräulein?</p> <p>There are several steps. The first one for Jojo is finding out his mother has been hiding a Jewish girl in the attic.</p> <p>Scarlett Johansson gives an enchanting performance as a single mum who tries to keep the embers of humanity and love in Jojo’s heart alive as he gets lost in Nazi doctrines of vile anti-Semitism.</p> <p>Jojo starts falling for Elsa Korr (Thomasin McKenzie), the hideaway in his attic, as her humanity – and his pre-pubescent hormones – triumph over fascist indoctrination. Through Jojo’s eyes, we see Elsa turn from monster into human as he comes back from the brink of fanatic hatred.</p> <p>Waititi hides that innocent, simple love story under slapstick and a ton of special effects. The latter don’t always work. And some of the jokes fall flat.</p> <p>But what works is the message that Jojo is both manipulated and self-manipulating. His Nazi hate is a cage of his own making, and Elsa is the key to unlocking it. She teaches him that empathy for those who we think are different from us is powerful.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VTqd4yNFuSw?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><strong>Irreverent or irresponsible?</strong></p> <p>Hitler comedies have a long history. In 1940, Charlie Chaplin released <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVLQ8lNd1Pk">The Great Dictator</a>. Mel Brooks created <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brkp2VhzdDI">The Producers</a> in 1968.</p> <p>German filmmakers Dani Levy (<a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0780568/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">My Führer – The Really Truest Truth about Adolf Hitler</a>, 2007) and David Wnendt (<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylstybS6rqw&amp;list=PL-2fuUy0f-jOu3bV_Bj1Uh-SbTO8OCK1A&amp;index=2&amp;t=0s">Look Who’s Back</a>, 2015) strived to find the right balance between comedy and drama.</p> <p>Like Waititi, those filmmakers experienced how mining sombre Holocaust themes and hateful iconography for the ridiculous splits public reactions along extreme lines. The critics bemoaned that Levy committed only halfheartedly to a funny Hitler, making the film the worst thing a comedy can be: too harmless.</p> <p>Wnendt faced another issue. He intercut his film with hidden camera footage of Germans reacting to the lead actor dressed as Hitler. People thought this was too much realism.</p> <p>Waititi <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-09/jojo-rabbit-review-and-taika-waititi-on-making-comic-hitler/11721074">says</a> he didn’t look at these forerunners and didn’t do any research on Hitler. He looked to literature instead.</p> <p>Jojo Rabbit uses the masterful dramatic novel <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25641300-caging-skies?from_search=true&amp;qid=ev2DKS7scE&amp;rank=1">Caging Skies</a> by New Zealand-Belgian author Christine Leuens as source material. The book doesn’t have the same generous scoops of comedy and tragedy found in Ladislav Fuks’ <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/725311.Mr_Theodore_Mundstock">Mr. Theodore Mundstock</a>, or in <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18582851-the-nazi-and-the-barber">The Nazi and the Barber</a> by Edgar Hilsenrath.</p> <p>It’s all the more reason to recognise what Waititi has tried to accomplish. He had to negotiate between a book adaptation, Holocaust memory, and Hollywood.</p> <p>Commenting on <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJSwD_17qjY">his motivation</a> for making the film, Watiti, whose mother is Jewish, said: “I just want people to be more tolerant and spread more love and less hate”.<em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/benjamin-nickl-594248">Benjamin Nickl</a>, Lecturer in International Comparative Literature and Translation Studies, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/jojo-rabbit-hitler-humour-and-a-childs-eye-view-of-war-make-for-dark-satire-128622">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Fans rejoice as Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta bring back their iconic Grease characters

<p>Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta have reunited in a blaze of glory for the Meet N Grease Movie Singalong in West Palm Beach, Florida.</p> <p>The pair reprised the iconic roles of Sandy and Danny and it’s the first time that the pair have been in costume since the movie was made more than 40 years ago.</p> <p>Newton-John announced the reveal on her Instagram.</p> <p>"First time in costume since we made the movie! So excited," she wrote.</p> <p>The singalong event featured a screening of the film where the audience was encouraged to dress up and sing along to the songs they know and love as well as an intimate Q&amp;A with Travolta and Newton-John.</p> <p>The pair donned their leather jackets while answering questions from the crowd. One fan asked how they had managed to stay in touch over the years, given the success of the film was more than 40 years ago.</p> <p>“Once you love someone, you don’t unlove them. You love them forever,” Travolta sweetly explained, according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinraven/2019/12/16/thousands-of-fans-travel-to-see-john-travolta-and-olivia-newton-john-together-at-grease-events/#567ce89d312b" target="_blank">Forbes</a></em>.</p> <p>Fans also asked how many kids that Danny and Sandy would’ve had in the film. Travolta said that the pair would have had six kids, since he was from an era where people had a lot of children.</p> <p>However, Newton-John quickly put a stop to six children by saying “That’ll do. That’s enough.”</p> <p>During the evening, Travolta spoiled the crowd by singing a portion of “Sandy” while Newton John, not to be outdone, sung “Hopelessly Devoted To You” a cappella to the crowd.</p> <p>Later, Travolta was backed by leather jacket clad greasers to a performance of “Greased Lightning”.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the iconic duo in their costumes for the first time in 40 years.</p>

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Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe, Margot Robbie and Toni Collette in Oscars contention after SAG awards nod

<p>The Hollywood award season continues on and this year will once again acknowledge Australia’s A-listers, with Nicole Kidman, Margot Robbie, Russell Crowe and Toni Collette nominated for Screen Actors Guild Awards.</p> <p>The SAG Awards are one part of ceremonies that occur before the Oscars, and nominations provide a significant boost to actors' campaigns.</p> <p>Voters snubbed Kidman in the lead actress in a TV drama series category for her TV show<span> </span><em>Big Little Lies.</em></p> <p>It came as one of the biggest surprises on Wednesday during the SAG nomination ceremony.</p> <p>However, she received a supporting actress nod for her role in<span> </span><em>Bombshell</em>,<span> </span>a movie that centered on sexual harassment at US news channel<span> </span><em>Fox News.</em></p> <p>Kidman will go head to head with her <em>Bombshell</em> co-star Margot Robbie in the SAG category.</p> <p>The Australian actress is in the running for SAG’s top award along with Robbie and the rest of the<span> </span><em>Bombshell</em> cast, including Malcolm McDowell.</p> <p>McDowell played Rupert Murdoch in the film.</p> <p>Kidman also received a nomination with her <em>Big Little Lies</em> cast in the TV drama series ensemble category.</p> <p>New Zealand-born actor, Russell Crowe, has received a nod in the outstanding actor in a TV movie/limited series category for <em>The Loudest Voice</em>, which follows closely behind his Golden Globe nomination.</p> <p>The actor, who recently opened up about the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/heartbroken-russell-crowe-shows-bushfire-damage-to-multimillion-dollar-property" target="_blank">damage done to his multimillion-dollar property due to the NSW and QLD bushfires</a>, plays <em>Fox News</em> boss Roger Ailes.</p> <p>Toni Collette received a nomination in the outstanding actress TV movie/limited series category for her role in<span> </span><em>Unbelievable</em>.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Kidman was snubbed for a supporting actor nod for<span> </span><em>Bombshell </em>at the Golden Globe nominations but did receive a nod for<span> </span><em>Big Little Lies.</em></p> <p>Robbie, Crowe and Collette all received the same Globe nominations  as they did with SAG in the same categories.</p> <p>The SAG Award winners will be announced on January 19 in Los Angeles.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the Australian A-listers. </p>

Movies

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How Frozen II helps children weather risk and accept change

<p>Disney’s <em>Frozen</em> has been a staple in my house since before it won an <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/frozen-oscars_n_4887295">Academy Award for best animated feature in 2014</a>. Before my girls could even talk, they were humming along to the famous “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-zXT5bIBM0">Do You Want to Build a Snowman</a>?” song.</p> <p><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2294629/plotsummary"><em>Frozen</em></a> is about a fearless princess named Anna who journeys to find her sister, Elsa, whose icy powers have trapped their kingdom in eternal winter. Anna’s quest to save the kingdom comes to an abrupt halt when she is frozen in a heroic act to save Elsa from being killed by Hans, who wants to take over the kingdom.</p> <p>Now, <em>Frozen II</em> has broken box office records <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/frozen-2-box-office-all-records-broken-1257703">for an animated film global opening</a> — and I’m not surprised. As a mom, I love that Anna and Elsa’s love for one another teaches my daughters to love each other and to take care of one another. And as an early childhood professional, I appreciate how the film <a href="https://www.tor.com/2016/06/23/fairy-tale-subversion-hans-christian-andersens-the-snow-queen/">reinterprets</a> and <a href="https://www.bustle.com/articles/38101-how-is-frozen-different-from-the-snow-queen-by-hans-christian-andersen-theyre-an-icy-world">retells</a> <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.act2080.0047.311">fairy tales</a> and myths to share powerful lessons about coping with change and taking risks.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eIw-dKqTtY0?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">‘Frozen II’ trailer.</span></p> <h2>Lesson 1: Life is full of change</h2> <p><em>Frozen II</em> begins with Elsa and Anna’s quest to discover the truth about their kingdom’s past, and Elsa’s gradual discovery that her charged and sometimes dangerous magical powers have deep origins. Anna, meanwhile, seeks to hold onto the sisters’ powerful bond while finding her own identity.</p> <p>Olaf the snowman returns in this movie after being brought to life by Elsa in <em>Frozen</em>. No longer trapped in a perpetual ice world, the characters celebrate autumn. Olaf tells Anna about the difficulties he’s having. He observes changes in the season and anticipates change in the family with Anna and Kristoff’s engagement. He worries that “nothing is permanent.”</p> <p>Life is full of change. Children are constantly learning and growing, and are therefore experiencing large amounts of <a href="https://www.early-education.org.uk/sites/default/files/Helping%20children%20cope%20with%20change.pdf">change and transition each day</a>.</p> <p>Change can include simple things like a change in season, or an unfamiliar food served at lunch. But changes like moving schools, parents divorcing or a death in the family can have <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/jftr.12243">profound effects on children</a>. Some children <a href="https://books.google.ca/books?id=30dIGIyRGf0C&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=how+children+adjust+to+change&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwi0npXpj4bmAhUCnOAKHYz3AzIQ6AEIMDAB#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">can adjust</a> easily to changes, but for many children, change is scary.</p> <p>Children who have a <a href="https://www.easternflorida.edu/community-resources/child-development-centers/parent-resource-library/documents/parenting-the-slow-to-warm-temperament.pdf">slow-to-warm-up temperament</a> may struggle with change more than easygoing children. Children who have difficulty with trust may experience change as traumatic. For children <a href="https://raisingchildren.net.au/autism/behaviour/understanding-behaviour/changing-routines-asd">on the autism spectrum</a>, change, especially if it alters their predetermined structure, can be especially difficult.</p> <h2>How to assure children</h2> <p>Through Olaf’s discussion with Anna, he comes to understand that “growing up means adapting, puzzling at your world and your place.”</p> <p>In the face of Olaf’s sadness and unease about the unknown, Anna assures Olaf that it’s important to rely on the certainties: “Yes, the wind blows a little bit colder, and we’re all getting older,” but “some things stay the same.”</p> <p>She reassures him that as things change, there will always be people in your life who will support you.</p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-1-4614-3661-4">Resilience is important for learning</a>, relationships and being able to handle difficult situations. Coping with change is a part of <a href="https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED386327">building resilience</a> and an essential skill for future success.</p> <p>You can help children adapt to change by talking about it. Have discussions about what’s changing and why. If the change is unexpected, share with them only what you know about the change. It’s OK to tell children: “I don’t know.”</p> <p>Have <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2012.657040">routines</a> and consider transitions. When children know what comes first, then next and can predict some of what will happen, they are learning to think through situations and solve problems. Both these skills are important when managing the emotions that come with change.</p> <p>Accept <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2012.718037">children’s grief</a> through change, especially during significant situations like the death of a loved one or a divorce. It’s important to listen to their feelings and respond to their questions and worries.</p> <p>Give them choices and let them be a part of the change — this allows them to feel like they have control. With control comes acceptance. For example, if you’re moving to a new home, let your child help pick out the paint colours.</p> <h2>Lesson 2: Taking risks</h2> <p>Elsa and Anna’s comfort zone was their kingdom, Arendelle. As they embark on their journey into the enchanted forest to discover their family’s history, Olaf reminds us <a href="https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/203434/the-uses-of-enchantment-by-bruno-bettelheim/">that the enchanted forest</a> — where we step outside of our comfort zones while looking to trusted guides or companions — is a place of transformation.</p> <p>It’s important to take risks throughout life, but the uncertainty of taking risks can be scary. There is a feeling of unease associated with not knowing the outcome, as well as fear of potential failure.</p> <p>Elsa depicts this fear in her musical response to the enchanted forests’ calling for her. She sings:</p> <blockquote> <p>“I can hear you, but I won’t … There’s a thousand reasons I should go about my day and ignore your whispers, which I wish would go away.”</p> </blockquote> <p>Elsa takes a leap of faith, plunges into the unknown and finally embarks on an adventure to discover hidden truths. She finds a place where she can be herself, without fear of harming anything with her powers.</p> <p>Anna, meanwhile, becomes queen of Arendelle, a place where she no longer lives in her sister’s shadow — where she can shine.</p> <h2>How to support children’s risk taking</h2> <p>It’s important to allow children to participate in <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/12/6/6423/htm">risky play</a>. Risky play teaches children to regulate <a href="https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ985542">fear and anger</a>. They learn to manage and overcome obstacles.</p> <p>Sometimes the outcome of risk-taking in both childhood and adulthood is failure. <a href="https://thriveglobal.com/stories/why-it-s-important-to-let-your-kid-fail/">Failure</a>, as difficult as it is, is an important part of life and necessary for children to learn for future success. We should help our children to see failure as a stepping stone to discovering who they are.</p> <p>The forest howls and it’s scary. But with love and friendship, and having the courage to step into the unknown, in time princesses become queens, dangerous powers can become gifts — and snowmen can cope with autumn.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Elena Merenda, Assistant Program Head of Early Childhood Studies, University of Guelph-Humber</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/frozen-ii-helps-children-weather-risk-and-accept-change-127845" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Movies

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What is Scarlett Johansson’s best movie performance?

<p>As one of the biggest names in Hollywood today, Scarlett Johansson isn’t one to be missed. She is the world’s top-paid actress with <span><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/22/the-worlds-highest-paid-actors-and-actresses.html">US$40.5 million in earnings</a></span>, and – despite the controversy surrounding <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/mar/24/scarlett-johansson-ghost-in-the-shell-director-whitewashing">her casting in <em>Ghost in the Shell</em></a></span> and her support for <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/sep/04/scarlett-johansson-defends-woody-allen">accused sexual abuser Woody Allen</a></span> – she is set to get her first Oscar nomination next year for her work in <em>Marriage Story </em>and <em>Jojo Rabbit</em>.</p> <p>In recognition of Johansson’s successful year, <em>Vulture </em>has listed some of the 35-year-old’s best performances.</p> <p>The number one spot went to the 2013 science fiction flick <em>Under the Skin</em>, where Johansson played an extraterrestrial disguised as a human woman. While the movie did not perform well in the box office, it received critical acclaim and was named as one of the BBC’s 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7S1yhSp5jaI"></iframe></div> <p>“Earlier in her career, she was magnetic or sarcastic or the simple object of a man’s affection,” wrote Tim Grierson and Will Leitch. “In <em>Under the Skin</em>, she sheds all need to connect to an audience, giving us a menacing figure who’s brutally efficient but emotionally vacant.”</p> <p>Other movies making the top five include Sofia Coppola’s <em>Lost in Translation </em>(2003), Spike Jonze’s <em>Her </em>(2013) and Terry Zwigoff’s <em>Ghost World </em>(2001).</p> <p>“What’s abundantly clear is that, at the age of 35, Johansson already boasts a sizable treasure trove of standout performances,” wrote Grierson and Leitch.</p> <p>See the full list <a href="https://www.vulture.com/article/best-scarlett-johansson-movies-ranked.html">here</a>.</p>

Movies

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What is there to love about black and white films? Everything!

<p>Any photography app worth its hashtags features a black and white mode. It’s as much a part of the tech shebang as filters. In this hypersaturated mega mega-pixeled era, it seems we just can’t get away from the eternal beauty that is black, white and the grayscale between. It is simultaneously austere and flattering. Totes arty as the millennials might say.</p> <p>Many of us, of course, can remember when black and white wasn’t a choice. Like national service, short back and sides and the poetry of John Laws, it was pretty much mandatory. Especially if you wanted to catch the latest goings on at <em>Number 96</em>.</p> <p>But where the format really shone was film. Every few years, some hip director who is inordinately fond of the word “zeitgeist” rediscovers the sheer monochromatic magnificence of the medium. And we get titles such as <em>The Artist</em> and <em>Nebraska</em> as a result.</p> <p>But you know what? The rest of them can keep their CGI and digital cameras that can pick up every pore on Angelina Jolie’s nose.</p> <p>Black and white gave generations of screen goddesses the ethereal allure necessary for the title. It flattered and cajoled like a teenage boy working up to ask the prettiest girl in school to the prom.</p> <p>Twelve-feet tall and in a flickering beam, Ava, Marilyn, Joan and Bette didn’t look like people you saw on the streets of Adelaide or Melbourne. And that was precisely the point. Call me a misty-eyed nostalgic but I prefer my Katharine as a Hepburn not a Heigl and Bacall over Beyonce.</p> <p>Lest you write this reminiscence off as a priapic stroll down mammary lane, let’s get to the likes of Cary and Cagney. Black and white was ideal for portraying men who saw the world in precisely these terms. Enigmas in dinner jackets with flinty faces, and hearts that would never be broken again. Even if it meant a lifetime of last drinks and loneliness.</p> <p>If this all sounds rather romantic, no apologies are made. That was the point. Because when you stepped out into the Technicolour sunshine of Australian daylight, you blinked to not only accustomise your eyes to the light but the fact that you were no longer beside Charles Foster Kane’s bed as he breathed his enigmatic last.</p> <p>Of course, the technology exists to colourise pretty much any film you care to mention but this Pantone migration has not taken place. Want to know why? No one wants to see the hues of Rick’s Café Americain, let alone its proprietor. It’s better than fine as is.</p> <p>From a craft perspective, the filmmakers simply did not have the luxury of a rainbow to create a sense of foreboding or fantasy. What they had at their disposal was light and shadow, perspective and dimension. Not to mention the European expressionist grounding that gave rise to an American artform as idiosyncratic as jazz: film noir.</p> <p>Aesthetics aside, black and white films also throw down a visual challenge to the viewer; they make you recalibrate the image and subliminally add the colour yourself.</p> <p>Or not. You have the option.</p> <p>It is as much a cinema of inference as exposition. Take the shower scene in <em>Psycho</em> as an example. Do you think the infamous shot of Janet Leigh’s blood gurgling into the shower drain would be any more chilling if it was red instead of grey? We say no.</p> <p>What director Alfred Hitchcock asks viewers to bring to party is the finishing touches, the custom viridian spoutings of their nightmares. The original plasma screen if you will.</p> <p>So roll on black and white, roll on. Down in front and pass the Jaffas.</p> <p><em>Written by David Smiedt. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/in-praise-of/in-praise-of-black-and-white-films.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to stream all the latest tv and movies at home

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An entertainment revolution is quietly taking place in living rooms all across Australia. Where once we were limited to four TV channels, and forced to trudge to the DVD shop to rent a movie, now we can watch what we want, when we want, wherever we want to watch it. It’s called “streaming” and it’s really easy to do, even if you’re a technological novice.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Streaming is different from Pay TV such as Foxtel or Fetch TV in that it doesn’t require a special set-top box, and won’t tie you into an expensive long-term contract. Streaming can be done on a laptop, iPad, phone, or even a gaming console. All you have to do is log on to the streaming service’s website (see below) and sign up for a subscription.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you prefer to watch on a large screen, you can link your laptop, phone or tablet to your television using a cable adaptor, or even splash out on one of the new Smart TVs, which come with built-in streaming compatibility. There are so many choices available, there really is something to suit everyone.</span></p> <p><strong>What you’ll need</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll ideally want broadband speeds of at least 2 megabits per second. You’ll also need to make sure that you have a generous, or preferably unlimited, download allowance. Check with your internet provider to see what your limit is, and shop around to see if you can find a better deal – try comparison website www.youcompare.com.au which lists the different packages and prices. Some telcos, including Telstra and Optus, offer movie streaming as options in their monthly packages.</span></p> <p><strong>Choosing your hardware</strong></p> <p><strong>Laptop</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re using a laptop, you can either watch movies on the computer screen, or use an HDMI cable to connect the computer to your TV. You can buy HDMI cables at places like Harvey Norman, Officeworks or JB Hi-Fi for around $20. Once you’ve plugged it in, you need to change the display settings on your computer. On PCs, go to Control Panel, then Display, then select Change Display Settings. On a Mac, go to System Preferences, then Display, then Arrangement. When you have followed these steps, you can drag the browser window across using the mouse. Thankfully it isn’t as complicated as it sounds. YouTube has a number of helpful videos to guide you through these steps. Click here to view.</span></p> <p><strong>Phone or tablet</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Streaming on a tablet or phone allows you to watch your favourite shows anywhere – even on the bus. Most streaming providers have an app that can be downloaded from their websites to make viewing even easier. Phones and tablets can also be linked to a TV screen for viewing at home: for iPhones and iPads, you need a Composite AV Cable, available from Apple stores for $59. For Android phones and tablets, you’ll need an HDMI cable with the appropriate port for your phone (the same as your charger). You can get these from most electrical retailers. Again, if you’re using a phone, don’t forget to make sure you have a high data limit, so you don’t get slapped with hefty charges.</span></p> <p><strong>Games console</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you have an Xbox or Playstation, it should already be able to connect to the internet, and you can use it in the same way to access online streaming.</span></p> <p><strong>Apple tv</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mac owners might want to consider buying this little box, which gives you access to Apple’s library of movies, TV shows, live sports and news (RRP $109).</span></p> <p><strong>Google chromecast</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This little “dongle” has a USB port that plugs directly into the HDMI port on your TV and allows you to connect your computer or Android phone to the screen wirelessly (RRP $49).</span></p> <p><strong>Smart tv</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new generation of televisions by Sony, Samsung, LG and others, come with internet browsing built in – although not all makes and models will be compatible with all streaming services available in Australia. If you are considering buying one, check the information on the streaming service’s website to make sure you choose a TV that’s compatible.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So now you’ve got the kit, the next step is to decide which streaming service you want to sign up for – we’ve listed them below. They all offer free trials (of up to 30 days) and there are no contracts to tie you in. Plus, they’re much cheaper than a Foxtel subscription, so why stop at one?</span></p> <p><strong>Quickflix</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Launched in 2003 as a postal DVD-rental service, Quickflix began streaming movies in 2011. It has a vast selection of new releases and classic television series available to stream.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Quickflix Subscription: from $9.99 per month. </span></p> <p><strong>Netflix</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The behemoth of the streaming world, this American service finally landed in to Australia in March 2015. Its TV shows include many popular “Netflix Original” series such as House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, and its latest offering, Bloodline starring Aussie actor Ben Mendelsohn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Netflix subscription: from $8.99 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>Presto</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Foxtel is behind this venture, in partnership with Seven West Media. Both companies provide the content, so expect home-grown Australian series like Packed to the Rafters and films from Foxtel’s movie library. There are a few HBO shows, including Entourage and The Sopranos, but no Game of Thrones. This one is more expensive than its rivals.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Presto subscription: Movies only $9.99 per month; TV and movies $14.99 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>Stan</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jointly owned by Nine Entertainment and Fairfax, Stan was launched on Australia Day 2015. It has an extensive catalogue of shows, and is also commissioning original Australian drama for exclusive viewing on its service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stan subscription: $10 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>ABC iView</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A chance to catch up on free-to-air TV. Programs are usually available to view for 30 days after broadcast. There’s no subscription and you don’t need to sign up. All you need is an internet browser to log on to the ABC’s website, click on iVew and start watching.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC iView: Free service.</span></p> <p><strong>SBS on demand</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like the ABC, this service has a library of recently broadcast programs and complete series available to view for a limited time, without subscription. It also has 600 movies, with an emphasis on international, art house and cult classics. Watch via an internet browser.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">SBS on demand: Free service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are so many benefits to streaming that once you start you’ll wonder what took you so long. Forget fighting over the remote. Now everyone can watch their favourite shows, whenever suits them. What’s more, you can wave goodbye to annoying ad breaks and, even better, you won’t have to wait a week to watch the next episode of a show and find out what happens.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Ali Wright. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/how-to-stream-all-the-best-tv-and-movies-at-home.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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What drives the appeal of 'Passion of the Christ' and other films on the life of Jesus

<p>Church isn’t the only place people go to learn about Jesus.</p> <p>At the beginning of Lent, 15 years ago, devout evangelical Christians did not go to church to have ashes marked on their foreheads. Rather, they thronged to theaters to <a href="https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2004/march/100.100.html">watch</a> a decidedly Catholic film to begin the Lenten season.</p> <p>That film was Mel Gibson’s “The Passion of the Christ,” which would go on to gross over US$600 million globally. It brought to screen a vivid portrayal of the last few hours of the life of Jesus and even today many can readily recall the brutality of those depictions. The film also stirred up a number of <a href="https://www.firstthings.com/article/2004/06/the-passions-passionate-despisers">cultural clashes</a> and raised questions about Christian anti-Semitism and what seemed to be a <a href="https://www.chron.com/g00/entertainment/movies/article/Will-a-recut-Passion-still-stir-debate-1568750.php?i10c.ua=1&amp;i10c.encReferrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8%3d&amp;i10c.dv=22">glorification</a> of violence.</p> <p>This wasn’t the only film to bring Jesus to cinema in such a powerful way. There have, in fact, been hundreds of films about Jesus produced around the world for over 100 years.</p> <p>These films have prompted devotion and missionary outreach, just as they have challenged viewers’ assumptions of who the figure of Jesus really was.</p> <h2>From still images to moving images</h2> <p>For the last two decades, I have researched the <a href="https://cup.columbia.edu/book/religion-and-film/9780231176750">portrayal of religious figures on screen</a>. I have also looked at the ways in which <a href="http://theconversation.com/when-do-moviegoers-become-pilgrims-81016">audiences</a> make their own spiritual meanings through the images of film.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520286955/the-forge-of-vision">Images of Jesus</a>, or the Virgin Mary, have long been part of the <a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/Image_as_Insight.html?id=lrpLAwAAQBAJ">Christian tradition</a>. From amulets to icons, paintings to sculptures, Christianity incorporates a rich visual history, so perhaps it is not surprising that cinema has become a vital medium to display the life of Jesus.</p> <p>Inventors of cinematic technologies, such as <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0151913/">Thomas Edison</a> and the <a href="http://www.acinemahistory.com/2016/04/la-passion-1898-passion.html">Lumière brothers</a>, were among the first to bring Jesus’s life to the big screen at the end of the 19th century. Hollywood continued to cash in on Christian audiences all through the 20th century.</p> <p>In 1912, Sidney Olcott’s <a href="http://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2b6aaafe24">“From the Manger to the Cross”</a> became the first feature length film to offer a full account of the life of Christ.</p> <p>Fifteen years later, crowds flocked to see Cecil B. DeMille’s <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Catalog/moviedetails/10078">“The King of Kings”</a>, demonstrating the power of a big budget and a well-known director. Writing about DeMille’s film some years later, film historian Charles Musser <a href="https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/900-the-king-of-kings">commented</a> how the film evoked “Christ’s charisma” through “a mesmerizing repertoire of special effects, lighting and editing.”</p> <p>In Hollywood’s portrayal, Jesus was a white, European man. In Nicholas Ray’s 1961 film, <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Film/20301-KING-OF-KINGS?sid=b96a394a-6a48-4f41-b7a4-6d05b5042fc3&amp;sr=3.1776974&amp;cp=1&amp;pos=0">“King of Kings”</a> Jeffrey Hunter made a deep impression on his audience in the role of Jesus with his piercing blue eyes. Four years later, George Stevens’s <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Catalog/moviedetails/22336">“The Greatest Story Ever Told”</a>, cast the white Swedish actor Max von Sydow in the lead role.</p> <p>In all these films, evidence of Jesus’s <a href="https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1853&amp;context=jrf">Jewish identity</a> was toned down. Social or political messages found in the gospels – such as the political charge of a “kingdom of God” – were smoothed over. Jesus was portrayed as a spiritual savior figure while avoiding many of the socio-political controversies.</p> <p>This was, as Biblical studies scholar Adele Reinhartz <a href="http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195146967.001.0001/acprof-9780195146967">put it</a>, not Jesus of Nazareth, but the creation of a “Jesus of Hollywood.”</p> <h2>Global moral instruction</h2> <p>Many of these films were useful for Christian <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/33/4/article-p310_2.xml">missionary work</a>.</p> <p>An <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=k-KOCMRN1yYC&amp;pg=PA116&amp;lpg=PA116&amp;dq=%22destined+to+be+more+far-reaching+than+the+Bible+in+telling+the+story+of+the+Saviour%22&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=qfNYKdafRF&amp;sig=ACfU3U1thBDr3oVzabJSRUbpLHjMhCtMZA&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiZ">advertisement for Olcott’s film</a>, for example, stated how it was “destined to be more far-reaching than the Bible in telling the story of the Savior.” Indeed, as media scholars <a href="https://www.vwu.edu/academics/majors/communication/meet-the-faculty.php?person=tlindvall">Terry Lindvall</a> and <a href="https://www.regent.edu/faculty/m-a-andrew-c-quicke/">Andrew Quicke</a> have <a href="https://nyupress.org/books/9780814753248/">noted</a>, many Christian leaders throughout the 20th century utilized the power of film for moral instruction and conversion.</p> <p>A 1979 film, known as <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/cros.12121">“The Jesus Film”</a>, went on to become the most <a href="https://religionnews.com/2017/12/20/jesus-film-project-premieres-1500th-translation-of-jesus/">watched</a> film in history. The film was a relatively straightforward depiction of the life of Jesus, taken mainly from the gospel of Luke.</p> <p>The film was translated into 1,500 languages and shown in cities and remote villages around the world.</p> <h2>The global Jesus</h2> <p>But, as <a href="https://www.firstthings.com/article/2006/12/believing-in-the-global-south">majority Christian population shifted</a> from Europe and North America to Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, and South Asia, so did portrayals of Jesus: they came to reflect local cultures and ethnicities.</p> <p>In the 2006 South African film <a href="https://www.sheffieldphoenix.com/showbook.asp?bkid=232">“Son of Man”</a>, for example, Jesus, his mother and disciples are all black, and the setting is a contemporary, though fictionalized, South Africa. The film employed traditional art forms of dance and music that retold the Jesus story in ways that would appeal to a South African audience.</p> <p>It was the same with a Telugu film, <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/36/1/article-p41_3.xml">“Karunamayudu” (Ocean of Mercy)</a>, released in 1978. The style resembles a long tradition of Hindu devotional and mythological films and Jesus could easily be seen as part of the pantheon of Hindu deities.</p> <p>For the past four decades in southern India and beyond, villagers have gathered in front of makeshift outdoor theaters to watch this film. With over 100 million viewers, it has become a <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/41/2/article-p120_3.xml">tool for Christian evangelism</a>.</p> <p>Other films have responded to and reflected local conditions in Latin America. The Cuban film “<a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/1212065?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents">The Last Supper</a>,” from 1976, offered a vision of a Jesus that is on the side of the enslaved and oppressed, mirroring Latin American movements in <a href="https://library.brown.edu/create/modernlatinamerica/chapters/chapter-15-culture-and-society/essays-on-culture-and-society/liberation-theology-in-latin-america/">Liberation Theology</a>. Growing out of the Cold War, and led by radical Latin American priests, Liberation Theology worked in local communities to promote socio-economic justice.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the appeal of some of these films can also be gauged from how they continue to be watched year after year. The 1986 Mexican film, “La vida de nuestro señor Jesucristo,” for example, is broadcast on the Spanish-language television station Univision during Easter week every year.</p> <h2>The power of film</h2> <p>Throughout history, Jesus has taken on the appearance and behavior of one cultural group after another, some claiming him as their own, others rejecting certain versions of him.</p> <p>As the scholar of religion <a href="https://dornsife.usc.edu/cf/faculty-and-staff/faculty.cfm?pid=1003260">Richard Wightman Fox</a> puts it in his <a href="https://www.harpercollins.com/9780060628741/jesus-in-america/">book “Jesus in America: Personal Savior, Cultural Hero, National Obsession:”</a> “His incarnation guaranteed that each later culture would grasp him anew for each would have a different view of what it means to be human.”</p> <p>Cinema allows people in new places and times to grasp Jesus “anew,” and create what I have <a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/Representing_Religion_in_World_Cinema.html?id=tQGc8oHH5fkC">called</a> a “georeligious aesthetic.” Films, especially those about Jesus, in their movement across the globe, can alter the religious practices and beliefs of people they come into contact with.</p> <p>While the church and the Bible provide particular versions of Jesus, films provide even more – new images that can prompt controversy, but also devotion.</p> <p><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><em>Written by <span>S. Brent Rodriguez-Plate, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Cinema and Media Studies, by special appointment, Hamilton College</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/what-drives-the-appeal-of-passion-of-the-christ-and-other-films-on-the-life-of-jesus-110691" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/110691/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p>

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5 facts about Elizbeth Taylor

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are five facts about hollywood heavyweight Elizabeth Taylor. </span></p> <p><strong>1. A beautiful soul, with an illustrious career</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This Hollywood legend was married 8 times (twice to Richard Burton), starred in 50 movies and won 2 Oscars. With the fifth anniversary of her death coming up on 23rd March, here are 18 reasons we still love Liz. In her last interview in Harper’s Bazaar Taylor said, “I never planned to acquire a lot of jewels or a lot of husbands. I have been supremely lucky in my life in that I have known great love, and of course, I am the temporary custodian of some incredible and beautiful things.”</span></p> <p><strong>2. Royal favour</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With dual citizen status to America and England, Taylor was named a Dame Commander of the British Empire (DBE) during a visit to the UK in 2000. She joined a short, but illustrious, list of entertainers to be given damehoods, including Julie Andrews, Judi Dench, Maggie Smith and Vanessa Redgrave.</span></p> <p><strong>3. A child star</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Discovered by talents scouts at the tender age of 10, Elizabeth Taylor first wowed audiences in the 1942 film, There’s One Born Every Minute. Her performance was so captivating that directors scrambled to secure her in their latest projects. In 1943 she played Priscilla in Lassie, Come Home, and the following year she completed two films, Jane Eyre and National Velvet. Life With Father (1947), A Date with Judy (1948) and Little Women (1949) were the final three big-screen performances Elizabeth would make as a ‘child’.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Movies and men</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Appearing in 50 films, Taylor enjoyed working with co-stars of the highest calibre. Her leading mean included Rock Hudson and James Dean (Giant, 1956), Montgomery Clift (A Place in the Sun, 1951, Raintree Country, 1957 and Suddenly, Last Summer, 1959), Paul Newman (Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, 1958) and on-again-off-again husband Richard Burton she met on the set of Cleopatra in 1963. She and Burton shared the screen in 14 feature-length films.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Tabloid film </strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taylor once told the gossip columnist Liz Smith, "My fame has been ridiculous. I often wondered why it persisted. But once I became involved with AIDS, I blessed every lousy photograph, all the fat jokes, every untrue rumour, every true rumour. Les scandales! My crazy fame allowed me to do this work. It all finally made sense."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/elizabeth-taylor-19-classic-must-see-images/page/18"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

Movies

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The Golden age of Hollywood

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Golden Age of Hollywood was the boom in movie productions from Hollywood after silent films. The actresses that graced our screens with their timeless glamour and style is something that we still aspire to today. Here we take a moment to salute these ladies who are forever immortalised on our screens.</span></p> <p><strong>Marilyn Monroe </strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B452SF0nGIy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B452SF0nGIy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Marilyn Monroe (@somelikeitmonroe)</a> on Nov 15, 2019 at 3:05pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Marilyn Monroe was a classic Hollywood sex symbol of the 1950s. Monroe was usually typecast to play the "dumb blonde" roles but she was incredibly smart, strong and sophisticated, growing up from a tough, dysfunctional childhood. Her sex symbol status is forever immortalised by the scene in the 'The Seven Year Itch' (1955) where she stands over a subway grate that blows up her white dress. It is one of the most iconic scenes of classic Hollywood.</span></p> <p><strong>Judy Garland</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-3cAHFaVA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-3cAHFaVA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Movies (@archie_movies_and_more_1)</a> on Nov 17, 2019 at 1:51pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judy Garland's breakthrough role was Dorothy in 'The Wizard of Oz' (1939) and she continued to light up screens with her amazing voice, starring in a number of musical films such as 'Me in St Louis' (1944) and 'A Star is Born' (1954). Her life was marked by tragedy but we will forever remember her voice and presence on screen.</span></p> <p><strong>Grace Kelly</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4xNYy2Dj5U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4xNYy2Dj5U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by life (@life)</a> on Nov 12, 2019 at 6:34am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grace Kelly shot to Hollywood fame through her role in Alfred Hitchcock’s 'Rear Window' (1954) as Lisa Fremont. Kelly wedded the Prince of Monaco, Rainier III and famously wore her engagement ring in her last film, 'High Society' (1956). Her wedding too was dubbed by the press as “the wedding of the century” due to her high profile within Hollywood at the time.</span></p> <p><strong>Vivien Leigh</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45ozMllTI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45ozMllTI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Period Fashion (@periodfashion)</a> on Nov 15, 2019 at 1:07pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vivien Leigh, was British born actress that shot to stardom in Hollywood by winning two Academy Awards for her “southern belle” performance of Scarlett O’Hara in 'Gone with the Wind' (1939). Leigh also had a love for theatre where she met and fell in love with Laurence Olivier and had a very public love affair.</span></p> <p><strong>Elizabeth Taylor</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-TYhyn0Ki/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-TYhyn0Ki/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Elizabeth Taylor Archives (@elizabethtaylorarchives)</a> on Nov 17, 2019 at 8:36am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Elizabeth Taylor is one of the world’s most famous film stars and one of the last to debut from the classic Hollywood studio system. You may remember her from films such as 'A Place in the Sun' (1951), 'Cat on a Hot TIn Roof' (1958) and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' (1966). She was not only recognised for her acting, but she was always featured for her glamorous lifestyle, beauty and her alluring blue/violet eyes.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/the-gold-age-of-hollywood-the-female-starlets/page/1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

Movies

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How Scorsese cinema boycott will shape the future of movies

<p>Cinema has always been a medium in crisis. After the so-called golden age of Hollywood came television: why go to the movies when you can sit in the comfort of your home, watching recycled movies in letterbox format? Yet cinemas adapted and survived.</p> <p>This week, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/nov/07/why-martin-scorseses-the-irishman-wont-be-coming-to-a-cinema-near-you">major cinema chains</a> said they would not run Martin Scorsese’s upcoming film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1302006/">The Irishman</a> because Netflix - who partially funded production and own distribution rights - were restricting its theatre run to four weeks before it hit small screens.</p> <p>The news signals a looming threat to cinema as we know it.</p> <h2>Big screen blues</h2> <p>Television made movies a commodity audiences could consume on their own terms. Yet cinema survived. In fact, it became a global mass cultural medium in the late 1970s and in the <a href="https://blog.scienceandmediamuseum.org.uk/very-short-history-of-cinema/">multiplexes</a> of the 1980s.</p> <p>Even the turbulent digital turn that brought cinema to a second crisis point in the early 2000s was navigated by the major Hollywood studios with the rebirth of the blockbuster in pristine form: <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0499549/?ref_=nv_sr_2?ref_=nv_sr_2">Avatar</a> (2009) in stereoscopic 3-D, the high-tech Marvel <a href="https://hbr.org/2019/07/marvels-blockbuster-machine">cinematic universe</a>.</p> <p>This is all to say that cinema, for the time being, is alive and well.</p> <p>But shrinking diversity in cinema offerings - Scorsese is <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/nov/05/martin-scorsese-superhero-marvel-movies-debate-sadness">no Marvel fan</a> - has forced even big name directors to seek funding from alternative sources. This is especially necessary when their movie <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/21/business/media/netflix-scorsese-the-irishman.html">costs US$159 million</a> (A$230 million) to make. Enter television streaming giant Netflix.</p> <h2>Are you talking to me?</h2> <p>The Irishman, Scorsese’s eagerly anticipated gangster epic, opened this week in a number of independent <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-irishman-australian-cinemas-2019-11">Australian cinemas</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WHXxVmeGQUc?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">The Irishman tells the story of war veteran Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro) who worked as a hitman alongside Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino).</span></p> <p>Scorsese is perhaps America’s greatest living auteur, the director of films including <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075314/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1">Taxi Driver</a> (1976), <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081398/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Raging Bull</a> (1980), <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099685/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Goodfellas</a> (1990), and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112641/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Casino</a> (1995).</p> <p>But what makes The Irishman unlike any other Scorsese film is that it is being distributed by Netflix. After its short theatre run it will be distributed to our homes, where it will do its major business.</p> <p>In February, the tension between Netflix and theatrical distributors escalated with the nomination of Alfonso Cuarón’s Netflix-distributed <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6155172/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2">Roma</a> for a Best Picture Oscar. Director Steven Spielberg subsequently <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/03/steven-spielbergs-netflix-fears/556550/">declared</a> a Netflix film might “deserve an Emmy, but not an Oscar”.</p> <p>A Netflix production – whether David Fincher’s monumental longform series, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5290382/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Mindhunter</a>, or Scorsese’s The Irishman – was television and therefore not cinema.</p> <h2>Goodfellas or bad guys?</h2> <p>Netflix represents a very real threat to theatrically screened cinema and its distribution apparatus, which is why several large cinema chains in the US (and, indeed, Australia) are boycotting The Irishman.</p> <p>While Netflix has consistently produced high quality content either through internal production or by acquiring and distributing titles, its assimilation of an auteur picture – a Scorsese gangster epic, no less - signals an aggressive move into the once sacrosanct domain of cinema entertainment.</p> <p>One wonders: if Scorsese capitulates to the economic strictures of the contemporary studio system, what will independent filmmakers do? How will low budget features be funded in an era in which Netflix colonises the large and small-scale productions alike?</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SshqfhmmtSE?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <span class="caption">Scorsese has directed many of the greatest characters of modern cinema.</span></p> <p>Netflix is not cinema, but neither is it television. Directors such as Spielberg struggle to understand that the new media entertainment regime is far removed from the projection (theatre) or broadcast (television) media environment of a predigital era.</p> <p>Instead of declaring a Netflix production unworthy of an Oscar, we could invert this measure: perhaps it is the Oscar that is increasingly outmoded as an artistic and cultural mark of value.</p> <h2>‘The End’, roll credits</h2> <p>The digital economic currents that carry Netflix intuitively seek expansion into proximate markets, and cinema is a natural fit. Netflix’s move into cinema distribution – with Scorsese at the helm – is therefore a smart negotiation. Even if Scorsese is an unwilling participant, it sets a clear precedent.</p> <p>It seems unlikely that cinema will end in any formal sense, at least within the next few decades.</p> <p>But a Netflix-distributed Scorsese film gives us cause to lament the ailing cinema experience. Christopher Nolan’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5013056/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1">Dunkirk</a> (2017) exemplified cinema’s ability to assault us with big screen images and jolt our bodies with a powerful soundscape. Only a grand technological scale can provide this kind of visceral experience.</p> <p>And yet, like Scorsese, I’m tired of Marvel. I’m tired of the rigidity of formulaic narrative and image structures intrinsic to the contemporary studio system. I’m disappointed at Hollywood’s capitulation to an instrumental economic model. Could a studio have produced The Irishman? They had a chance, and they <a href="https://variety.com/2019/film/news/theater-chief-blasts-netflix-over-handling-of-martin-scorseses-irishman-its-a-disgrace-1203390726/">turned it down</a>.</p> <p>Hollywood - and media entertainment structures more generally - will need to find a way for the big and small screen distributors to get along in order to keep the dynasty alive.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/126598/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Bruce Isaacs, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, University of Sydney</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/pass-the-popcorn-scorsese-cinema-boycott-will-shape-the-future-of-movies-126598" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Gene Kelly’s wife reveals another side to the Hollywood icon

<p><span>When she first met him in 1985, she had no idea who he was – but Patricia Ward Kelly was soon to develop a special insight into Hollywood legend Gene Kelly both as an artist and a person.</span></p> <p><span>Patricia, then 26, was working on a documentary about the Smithsonian museum when she was introduced to the then-73-year-old Gene, who was tapped as the television special’s host. After she was made aware of his fame, Patricia took out videos from the store and carried out a marathon viewing. What she watched – from <em>Singin’ in the Rain </em>to <em>Brigadoon </em>– left her mouth “agape”.</span></p> <p><span>The two soon became closer and bonded over the poetry of William Butler Yeats. Before long, Gene invited her to California to become his biographer, and their working relationship turned into a romance.</span></p> <p><span>Gene and Patricia tied the knot in 1990. Throughout the decade they spent together, Patricia documented her partner’s words – be it in writing or tape recording – nearly every day, and in the process, grew a greater appreciation of the seemingly “two-dimensional” man that the audience knew and loved.</span></p> <p><span>“People have no idea of the magnitude of him,” she told <em>Over60</em>. “He looks great up on-screen dancing, [but] many people don’t realise he created what you’re seeing, that he directed and choreographed it, and that’s really what he wanted to be known for … for being behind the camera, and for changing the look of dance on film.”</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/x7CIgWZTdgw"></iframe></div> <p><span>Gene, she said, had some personal favourites from his impressive filmography. The first and most widely known was the 1949 musical <em>On the Town</em>, which Gene took part in co-directing and choreographing. </span></p> <p><span>“He would often say that because it broke new ground by shooting the opening number on location,” she said. “That just had not been done in that way, and that really influenced the French New Wave filmmakers like François Truffaut.”</span></p> <p><span>However, Gene also had a lesser-known pick – a work that grew out of his childhood interests. According to Patricia, Gene revealed in private that he really enjoyed <em>The Three Musketeers</em> because swordplay and acrobatics were some of “what he loved as a little boy growing up”.</span></p> <p><span>Gene died in 1996 at the age of 83 following a series of strokes – but Patricia has been determined to keep his legacy and memory alive. In 2012, Patricia launched <em>Gene Kelly: The Legacy</em> and has since toured with it around the world. </span></p> <p><span>Patricia said a “show” is not quite the right word to describe the program. “I often refer to it as a kind of an experience. It begins the minute the door is open,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>In the “one-woman presentation”, set to tour Australia next year, Patricia is set to share some stories, film clips, previously unreleased recordings, personal memorabilia, and insights culled from hours of interviews and conversations with her husband.</span></p> <p>“It’s like we’re sitting in the living room having a chat, and I’m bringing these things out,” she said. “Even though it’s a very large venue, people [will] just feel like we’re in this very intimate setting.”</p> <p><em>Gene Kelly: The Legacy is coming to Australia in February 2020.</em></p>

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Kyle and Jackie O’s disastrous interview with Russell Crowe

<p>Kyle and Jackie O have opened up about their disastrous radio interview with Russell Crowe.</p> <p>Revealing the details on air yesterday, the KIIS FM hosts took a trip back in time and reminisced about what happened when they met Crowe face-to-face for the first time when they were hosting the<span> </span><em>Hot30<span> </span></em>in the early 2000s.</p> <p>“We went to his hotel to interview him,” said Jackie O. “We were pretty young and impressionable. We thought, ‘What can we do to get Russell on side and have a great interview with him?’”</p> <p>Crowe had just won an Oscar for his role in<span> </span><em>Gladiator</em><span> </span>and was known to be stand-offish during interviews, so Kyle came up with a plan to get on his good side.</p> <p>“You said, ‘We’ll take him a carton of beer and a carton of cigarettes and give it to him as a gift’,” said Jackie O.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B4wYEN4DP2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B4wYEN4DP2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#KJShow</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kyleandjackieo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Kyle and Jackie O</a> (@kyleandjackieo) on Nov 11, 2019 at 10:50pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>But unfortunately, the gift didn’t go down too well.</p> <p>“It was a disaster,” Kyle recalled.</p> <p>“He was offended! He said, ‘Is this what you think I’m like, is it? Is this all there is to me?’” said Jackie O.</p> <p>The radio hosts were left bewildered as things only started to get worse from there.</p> <p>“We started the interview … and he goes, ‘Have we started yet?’” said Jackie O. “And we’re like, ‘Yeah’, and we kept going on and again he said, ‘Sorry, have we started? This is the interview, is it?’”</p> <p>“It was so bad,” Kyle exclaimed.</p> <p>But despite the interview starting off disastrous, it gradually took a positive turn as the actor loosened up, and even invited Kyle and Jackie O to stick around afterwards.</p> <p>“By the end of the interview, he goes, ‘Let’s crack open the beers and all hang out together’,” said Jackie.</p> <p>“We stayed there so late, chain-smoking and skolling beer, and I don’t even drink,” Kyle said. “I was legless. Then we had to get a cab back to the radio show and we went on air live blind drunk. I was rat-a**ed.”</p> <p>The radio hosts now consider Crowe a good friend, with Kyle saying, “He’s the greatest bloke.”</p>

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James Dean to star in new movie 64 years after his death

<p><span>James Dean is set to star in an upcoming Vietnam War film, 64 years after his death.</span></p> <p><span>Last week, Magic City Films announced that they will be casting the late Hollywood icon for their upcoming movie <em>Finding Jack </em>through computer-generated imagery (CGI).</span></p> <p><span>Directors Anton Ernst and Tati Golykh told <em><a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/afm-james-dean-reborn-cgi-vietnam-war-action-drama-1252703">The Hollywood Reporter</a></em> they obtained the rights to use Dean’s image from the actor’s family. Dean will play a secondary lead character named Rogan.</span></p> <p><span>The announcement sparked backlash from fans and industry figures.</span></p> <p><span>Actor Chris Evans called the decision “awful”, saying, “Maybe we can get a computer to paint us a new Picasso. Or write a couple new John Lennon tunes. The complete lack of understanding here is shameful.”</span></p> <p><span>Actress Zelda Williams, whose late Robin Williams restricted exploitation of his image for 25 years following his death, expressed her concern on Twitter. “I have talked to friends about this for YEARS and no one ever believed me that the industry would stoop this low once tech got better,” she wrote.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I have talked to friends about this for YEARS and no one ever believed me that the industry would stoop this low once tech got better. Publicity stunt or not, this is puppeteering the dead for their ‘clout’ alone and it sets such an awful precedent for the future of performance. <a href="https://t.co/elS1BrbDGv">https://t.co/elS1BrbDGv</a></p> — Zelda Williams (@zeldawilliams) <a href="https://twitter.com/zeldawilliams/status/1192141551171854338?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 6, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>“Publicity stunt or not, this is puppeteering the dead for their ‘clout’ alone and it sets such an awful precedent for the future of performance.”</span></p> <p><span>Ernst said Dean’s estate has been “supportive” of the film. “I think they would have wanted their family member’s legacy to live on,” Ernst told <em><a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/director-new-james-dean-movie-speaks-backlash-stars-casting-1253232">The Hollywood Reporter</a></em>. “That’s what we’ve done here as well. We’ve brought a whole new generation of filmgoers to be aware of James Dean.”</span></p> <p><span>Ernst said he was “saddened” and “confused” by the negative reaction to the news. “We never intended for this to be a marketing gimmick.”</span></p> <p><span>Visual effects companies Imagine Engine and MOI Worldwide will be working on a full-body CGI of Dean based on archival footage and photographs, while another actor will voice Dean’s character.</span></p> <p><span>The movie is expected to be released in November 2020.</span></p>

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