Domestic Travel

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Heatwave set to scorch 5 capital cities across Australia

<p>Despite the gloomy weather across the country, Australia is set to be hit with an intense heatwave across a number of major cities.</p> <p>The last few days have been relatively blissful but don’t get too comfortable, as the summer heat is set to arrive – right as the Australian Open commences in Melbourne on January 19.</p> <p>The next few days will see Adelaide’s temperature soar into the 40s, with Melbourne following suit. A few towns across the two states can expect a week of 40C weather as a “very hot start to the week” approaches.</p> <p>The weather has been through highs and lows this summer, with some days reaching 40C only to go back down to much cooler temperatures.</p> <p>But Queensland can expect a wet week ahead, as the tropical low – formerly known as Penny – will drench the Sunshine State as it travels towards Darwin. Some areas were hit with over 400mm of rain in 24 hours.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/heatwave-forecast-for-southern-states-just-as-australian-open-kicks-off/news-story/cd82c6ea2872d8d9988db2409fcb5975" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, senior meteorologist from the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), Tom Delamotte, said that the heat was well and truly on its way as rising temperatures are expected for much of central and southern Australia. The cities that will be affected include Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart and Canberra from Tuesday onwards.</p> <p>Victoria and Tasmania should prepare for a “severe” heatwave early next week.</p> <p>“North-westerly winds are developing across the state ahead of a trough moving from South Australia, which will start to drag very warm air sitting over inland Australia into Victoria,” said Mr Delamotte.</p> <p>“There will be no wind across the state to flush out the hot air so it will just continue to build. It does look like a very hot start to next week.”</p> <p>Adelaide can expect the weather to reach 30C on Thursday before soaring to 39C on Friday. The weekend will remain in the mid-30s but then shoot back up to 39C on Monday, 41C on Tuesday and 43C on Wednesday.</p> <p>Melbourne will deal with grey skies on Thursday as it reaches tops of 22C but then the heat will slowly start to pick up from Friday as experts predict a 33C day. The highest temperature is expected for Monday as the forecast is currently 37C.</p>

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5 days of rain set to smash this city – what's in store for your town?

<p>Although some of us might be recovering from the heatwave on the weekend, it’s a good idea to get out your umbrellas. It’s forecasted that this week is going to be bucketing down as it’s expected that most of Australia should be prepared for the oncoming rain.</p> <p>The Bureau of Meteorology’s Diana Eadie told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6563859/Five-days-rain-smash-Sydney-summer-scorcher-set-hit-weekend.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail Australia</a>:</p> <p>“Queensland is at most significant risk and we're expecting bursts of very heavy rainfall.”</p> <p>This is due to Cyclone Penny moving into Queensland on Wednesday evening. It’s expected that Cyclone Penny will hit Mackay before moving onto Townsville and then Cairns.</p> <p>The cyclone will then move West to the top of Western Australia towards the end of the week.</p> <p>Northern Territory is set for a week of stormy downpour whilst temperatures still remain at a high 34 degrees.</p> <p>Don’t think that Sydney’s missed out either, with NSW heading for five days straight of torrential rain as thunderstorms are expected.</p> <p>Ms Eadie explained: “Tomorrow and Wednesday we're seeing an unstable air mass around the Sydney area.</p> <p>“It's a combination of an upper level trough, instability in the atmosphere and a southerly change coming through.”</p> <p>Temperatures within the Sydney area are expected to hit 29 degrees but will be accompanied by strong winds and more than a 60 per cent chance of rain until Friday.</p> <p>Down the bottom of Australia, Tasmania can still expect showers at a much lower rate of 30 per cent over the next five days. Clouds are expected to linger and keep temperatures within the low 20s.</p> <p>If you’ve managed to withstand the rain come Friday, the weather is looking to reward the south of the country with higher than average temperatures.</p> <p>“We're expecting another burst of warm temperatures, well above average as we head to the end of the week,” Ms Eadie said.</p> <p>“The highest temperatures are expected to be concentrated over South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria.”</p> <p>If you’re on the western side of the nation, don’t think you’ve dodged these high temperatures either. Perth and Melbourne will hit a top of 33 degrees on Saturday whereas Adelaide’s peak temperature is looking to be a scorching 39 degrees on Friday.</p> <p>Tasmania doesn’t miss out either, with warmer than average temperatures expected for Friday, especially in the far north east.</p> <p>Looks like you’ll need an umbrella and shorts if you’ve got any trips planned this weekend!</p> <p>What are your plans for this crazy weather? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Extreme temperatures soar over 40C: Brace yourself for a heatwave today

<p>Extreme heatwaves are set to make way across Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and some parts of New South Wales today.</p> <p>Broken Hill is forecast to get up to 45 degrees today yet that’s not the most extreme brunt of heat Australians may be facing today.</p> <p>Melbourne is set to reach 42 degrees and the Mercury is forecast could hit 47 degrees near the Victorian border.</p> <p>Sydney’s west and Hobart, Tasmania will both be reaching for the air con as well with heat projected to hit at 39 degrees.</p> <p>A sticky day is expected for the Northwest in South Australia today, with temps to reach 49.</p> <p>Fires have been totally banned for the whole state of Victoria. Click below to see what these restrictions could mean for you.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Friday 4 January 2019 has been declared a day of TOTAL FIRE BAN for the whole State of Victoria. Plan ahead and understand what this means for you. Know what you can and can't do on a day of Total Fire Ban: <a href="https://t.co/Io6AlZ7Evh">https://t.co/Io6AlZ7Evh</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/vicfires?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#vicfires</a> <a href="https://t.co/utTkH0rfwT">pic.twitter.com/utTkH0rfwT</a></p> — VicEmergency (@vicemergency) <a href="https://twitter.com/vicemergency/status/1080334467779092480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 2, 2019</a></blockquote> <p> </p> <p>Fortunately, the air con might not have to be on for the whole day though as temps are expected to cool down by the late afternoon.</p> <p>However, these cool wind changes could mean issues for firefighters trying to control blazes that may break out from the intense heat, a spokesperson for the CFA said.</p> <p>“The cool changes could make things very problematic,” they said.</p> <p>These winds could be up to 100km/h with the potential to widen fires attempting to be controlled.</p> <p>Forecasters are advising people who are especially susceptible to heatstroke to stay hydrated and remain indoors</p>

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The radical plan to merge South Australia and the Northern Territory

<p>While it may sound like a crazy concept, the idea of merging South Australia with the Northern Territory has been raised in parliament and it’s a notion that has been slowly gaining traction.</p> <p>Creating a new state named Centralia, former Territory and federal MPs have backed the concept including former deputy prime minister and Nationals leader Tim Fischer.</p> <p>The concept comes after former Northern Territory Attorney-General John Elferink wrote a lengthy letter to the editor of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ntnews.com.au/?nk=7a45508c6ea557cfa52e5e55d83842c6-1546474769" target="_blank"><em>NT News</em></a>, where he introduced the idea of forming the two states “with resources to rival WA” that would “put Australia firmly in Asia”.</p> <p>He received mixed responses as many were either for the idea or completely against it.</p> <p>“The opportunities for a new state that represents a third of the continent’s land mass with direct access to Asia are very real and merit serious consideration, particularly in the Asian century,” wrote Mr Elferink.</p> <p>But despite his best efforts, the notion is unlikely to proceed given the Territory’s economic crisis.</p> <p>And while those in South Australia are not attracted to the idea, Australian Conservatives Senate candidate Rikki Lambert has said the idea is interesting and not one without merit.</p> <p>According to Lambert, South Australia’s Premier Steven Marshall should consider the proposal on his own terms.</p> <p>He says that currently, the conditions are not in South Australia’s favour.</p> <p>“You have a jurisdiction that is effectively broke wanting to join a South Australian jurisdiction that is only just coming off of the dependence on state spending that we saw under Labor,” he said.</p> <p>Mr Fisher believes the merger would benefit Australia’s trade with Asia and will present further opportunities to capitalise on.</p> <p>He’s even thought of a name for the proposed state: “I think a name like Coonawarra, an indigenous name which relates to honey, would be … appropriate for the combined state … it has a ring about it,” he told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-02/elferink-idea-for-centralia-formation-tim-fischer-nt-sa-merger/10679176" target="_blank"><em>ABC Darwin</em></a>.</p> <p>Do you think South Australia should merge with the Northern Territory? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Get set for another 40-degree scorcher this week

<p>Temperatures are set to soar on Friday as Victoria is expected to hit over 40 degrees.</p> <p>With much of the state starting 2019 off with grey skies, Melbourne is expected to see the mercury rise on Thursday to 28 degrees before jumping to 42 degrees on Friday.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/a-balmy-start-but-get-set-for-a-scorcher-later-this-week-20190101-p50p1c.html" target="_blank"><em>The Age</em></a>, senior forecaster Rod Dickson said the cause for the extreme weather is the north-westerly winds which was dragging heat from inland.</p> <p>“The maximum temperature depends on the time of the cool southerly change,” said Mr Dickson.</p> <p>And it isn’t only Melbourne that will be affected, as Geelong is expected to reach 43 degrees and northern areas are set to face 46 degrees.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">A summer scorcher expected on Friday! Temperatures 44 to 46 deg in the north, 40 -42 in the south. A gusty southwest change late Friday leading to a cooler weekend. Check the forecast here: <a href="https://t.co/UFa3a5T6My">https://t.co/UFa3a5T6My</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MelbWeather?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#MelbWeather</a> <a href="https://t.co/5sZ2bAqr3i">pic.twitter.com/5sZ2bAqr3i</a></p> — Bureau of Meteorology, Victoria (@BOM_Vic) <a href="https://twitter.com/BOM_Vic/status/1079983551989329921?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">1 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>But the intense heat won’t last too long as the weather is expected to cool down by late afternoon on Friday.</p> <p>A spokesperson for the CFA said the cool wind change can cause issues for firefighters if they are trying to contain a blaze.</p> <p>“The cool changes could make things very problematic,” said the spokesperson.</p> <p>“Severe fire conditions mean a total fire ban is likely – so unfortunately no bonfires at your family barbecue or friendly get-together.”</p> <p>It is advised for people to remain indoors and stay hydrated as temperatures are set to rise throughout the day.</p> <p>Victoria is expected to face a hotter than average summer this year throughout January and February due to the El Nino weather pattern.</p> <p>But despite the heat, those living in Victoria can still get a good a night’s sleep on Thursday and Friday as overnight temperatures are forecasted to be 23 and 17 degrees.</p>

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Hilarious Aussie sign shaming litterbugs goes viral

<p>Granville Harbour Community Coast Care in Tasmania has taken the internet by storm after sharing its hilarious new sign that was put up within the area, in an effort to reduce the number of people dumping their rubbish on the ground.</p> <p>The sign poses the question “Why are you littering?” and provides hilarious multiple-choice options that allude to the characteristics of someone who leaves their rubbish behind.</p> <p>The tongue-in-cheek options suggest the person dumping their rubbish is a “jerk”, highlights their disrespect for “natural areas” and suggests their “mummy still cleans up” for them – as well as an “all of the above option”.</p> <p><img style="width: 374.585px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7822475/1-anti-litter-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/327e950e9773473ab17b8081f84eeb3d" /></p> <p>The sign has started hilarious discussions on social media form Reddit with various viewers providing their input into the growing rubbish-dumping epidemic.</p> <p>“We need to change cultural attitudes regarding littering, Japan doesn't have a littering problem,” one commenter suggested. “We also need to stop the crap being produced in the first place or make biodegradable packaging mandatory.”</p> <p>Many social media users shared their own personal experiences and disgust with coming across litter within a natural public space.</p> <p>A user shared, “I was sitting at a popular chair yesterday in front of a water view. I picked up 216 cigarette butts. Went back today to find another 8 new ones. A sign like this is needed.”</p> <p>Many people praised the sign and the eye-catching, funny way it has been presented to encourage people to take a second to think about their environmentally harmful actions.</p> <p>“Awesome sign,” one person wrote.</p> <p>While another exclaimed, “WOW these signs should be rolled out across the country.”</p> <p>What are your thoughts on this Tasmanian anti-litter sign? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Extreme weather just in time for Christmas: "Triple threat" of wild storms coming

<p>Since summer began, Australia has been experiencing unusual weather conditions.</p> <p>On the weekend, tens of thousands of homes in New South Wales experienced blackouts after a series of powerful storms ripped through costal urban areas in the state.</p> <p>Now, forecasters are saying that the wild weather isn’t over yet, with the possibility of showers and storms from midweek onwards.</p> <p>The storms are expected to hit north east NSW and south east Queensland, including Coffs Harbour, Byron Bay and the Gold Coast.</p> <p>“There’s enough instability and windshear that we could see severe storms; it’s the triple threat again of damaging winds, hail and flash flooding,” <a href="https://www.skynews.com.au/page/weather-forecast">Sky News Weather channel </a>meteorologist Mr Saunders said.</p> <p>“Tuesday should be a quieter day in terms of storms. That starts to change on Wednesday onwards with another trough moving in from the west that will act as a trigger for further showers and thunderstorms.”</p> <p>On Wednesday afternoon, central and northern NSW are expected to be hit with showers, as well as parts of Victoria and Tasmania.</p> <p>“On Thursday we’ll have storms again through eastern NSW and towards the end of the week that threats moves back up towards south east Queensland,” he said.</p> <p>Despite the downpour, the rainfall totals in the south east are likely to be less than in recent weeks as the storms are isolated.</p> <p>“There will be average falls of about 20mm on the east coast but if you get a couple of goods storms it could easily reach 50mm,” Mr Saunders said.</p> <p>Today, Sydney will reach a high of 26C, with the rain getting heavier towards the end of the week. On Christmas Day, Sydney will be mostly sunny with a high of 28C.</p> <p>Canberra will experience showers toward the end of the week but today, it will be mostly sunny with a high of 30C. On Christmas Day, Canberra will be mostly sunny with a high of 32C.</p> <p>Perth and Darwin will face the heat this week with temperatures averaging in the 30s. On Christmas Day, Perth will receive plenty of sun with a high of 33C and Darwin will be hit with some rain and a thunderstorm with a high of 32C.</p> <p>Melbourne will be mild today and then rain could develop from Wednesday. On Christmas Day, Melbourne will be mostly sunny with a high of 28C.</p> <p>Today, Adelaide will be dry and warm with high of 30C, but will see temperatures dip into the 20s as the week goes on. On Christmas Day, Adelaide will receive plenty of sun with a high of 31C.</p> <p>Hobart can expect to experience the possibility of downpour every day. On Christmas Day, Hobart will be partly cloudy with a high of 22C.</p> <p>Brisbane could possibly see showers this morning, with temperatures rising in the afternoon to a maximum of 29C. On Christmas Day, Brisbane will have partial sunshine with a high of 28C.</p> <p>Currently, there is no imminent threat of flooding in Townsville as ex-tropical Cyclone Owen is sitting off the coast.</p> <p>“Owen has stalled, this is the tropical cyclone that will not leave Australia alone and it’s forecast to drift back north again, and as a result the heaviest falls will migrate back to northern parts of Queensland,” said Mr Saunders.</p>

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Get set for another washout: “Intense” rain and storm on the way

<p>Australia could face up to a week of intense wet weather as a possible tropical cyclone which arose from the dead in Queensland is bringing in a “big storm event”.</p> <p>“It’s going to be pretty intense with major thunderstorms expected, many severe,” said<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.skynews.com.au/page/weather-forecast" target="_blank">Sky News</a><span> </span></em>meteorologist Rob Sharpe.</p> <p>The cities which are predicted to be affected are Melbourne, Canberra, Hobart and Brisbane along with places in northern Queensland.</p> <p>It is said that the cities could all be facing up to 50mm or more of rain.</p> <p>As cyclone Owen passed Port Douglas and Cairns, the two cities saw a downpour of rain with Cairns being hit with 170mm and Port Douglas with 300mm.</p> <p>And while many assume the ex-tropical cyclone had died down, it may come back to life once more.</p> <p>Termed a “zombie cyclone”, the system gained strength once more as it made its way towards the Gulf of Carpentaria.</p> <p>“The system is not giving up anytime soon. It could intensify, and it could easily become a tropical cyclone as it swings back into Queensland with more rain to come,” said Mr Sharpe.</p> <p>Showers are expected to hit Sydney throughout the week, with temperatures reaching tops of 24C on Tuesday and 28C on Wednesday.</p> <p>But towards the southern areas of New South Wales, things start to become a lot more intense.</p> <p>“From Wednesday an upper level cold pool will sweep up across south east Australia and with that low-pressure system forming there will be heavy rain, thunderstorms and gusty winds,” said Mr Sharpe.</p> <p>“There will be a big rain and storm even in the south east.”</p> <p>A storm is expected to hit Canberra on Thursday, with up to 55m of rain predicted to hit the capital city.</p> <p>Melbourne is set to have a warm day with Wednesday reaching a maximum of 34C. But the beach weather ends there, as starting from Thursday, showers are expected for the next four days.</p> <p>Hobart will see the hottest day of the week on Wednesday with tops of 28C but will be hit with rain towards the middle of the week.</p> <p>Adelaide will remain fairly dry, but experts advise to still keep an umbrella handy as leading up to the weekend, the city may be hit with a few showers.</p> <p>But despite most of the country seeing downpours of rain, Perth remains extremely dry, with Friday reaching a maximum of 36C.</p> <p>Darwin is expected to see storms starting from midweek onwards. </p>

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New plane ban begins: Drastic change to flights starts across Australia

<p>Australian airlines have united together to stop passengers from getting away with sneaking oversized baggage on aircraft cabins.</p> <p>From tomorrow, all domestic passengers will have their cabin bag weighed before boarding.</p> <p>The strict ban will see passengers who have a bag weighing more than 7kg be forced to pay for it to be stowed in the cargo hold with other checked luggage.</p> <p>Virgin Australian is the latest airline to join the strict weight enforcement, with Qantas announcing the baggage crackdown last week.</p> <p>Budget airlines Tigerair Australia and Jetstar already use scales to make sure passengers don’t bring oversized luggage as carry-on.</p> <p>To make sure the carry-on baggage rule is in full effect, both Virgin and Qantas will increase their resources at airport terminals from next Monday.</p> <p>Virgin Australia said it was joining the ban as oversized carry-on luggage was causing injuries to passengers and cabin crew and holding up flights as passengers struggled to find enough space in the cramped overhead compartments.</p> <p>“As an industry, we’re seeing many passengers trying to bring everything but the kitchen sink on domestic flights, which is causing flight delays as well as safety issues for cabin crew, ground crew and passengers,” Virgin Australia general manager of ground operations Paul Woosnam told <strong><u><a href="https://www.news.com.au/">news.com.au.</a></u></strong></p> <p>“We’re seeing injuries to our cabin crew caused by closing overhead lockers full of heavy baggage, shifting bags in overhead lockers to assist guests finding space and assisting passengers with lifting their bags into the overhead compartments.</p> <p>“Some of these injuries can be quite significant and may result in the crew member being unable to work for a period of time.</p> <p>“This is preventable if all passengers adhered to the baggage limits and guidelines, and from the customers we’ve spoken to, we know they’re in favour of our renewed focus on cabin baggage.”</p> <p>Mr Woosnam said “more and more” flights were being delayed due to the preventable problem.</p> <p>“Christmas is an incredibly busy time of year for us so we do encourage anyone travelling over the holiday period and beyond to familiarise themselves with the carry-on allowances to help get them to their destination safely and on time,” he said.</p> <p>Virgin Australia offers domestic passengers 7kg of carry-on baggage.</p> <p>Passengers can also bring a laptop bag, handbag or suit bag in addition to the 7kg.</p> <p>Qantas passengers can board with a maximum of two carry-on baggage pieces that must be under 7kg. <br />A Qantas spokesman told news.com.au: “Qantas offers the most generous amount of cabin baggage of any Australian airline and we know customers like the convenience of not having to check in luggage. But we’re getting feedback from regular flyers who say all customers need to be reminded about how much luggage they can take on-board.</p> <p>“So, we’re renewing our focus to keep cabin baggage within the allowances and to ensure everyone has their fair share of space on-board.</p> <p>“Ensuring that allowances are being followed will also help reduce delays during the boarding process and ensure an on-time departure.</p> <p>“Cabin bins that are too full or bags that are too heavy can cause a safety risk for both customers and crew.”</p> <p>Jetstar and Tigerair passengers can “top up” their carry-on baggage by paying an extra allowance.</p> <p>The strict crackdown has been supported by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.</p> <p>Are you happy about this cabin baggage crackdown? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Get ready to melt: Once in a decade summer scorcher set to hit

<p>With the average temperature of Adelaide during December being 27C, yesterday's scorching heat broke all records as the CBD reached tops of 40.1C.</p> <p>And now, the heat is travelling towards Melbourne with experts warning of a “summer scorcher” over the next few days.</p> <p>According to the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) this occurs once every five to 10 years, where temperatures soar to extreme levels at the start of summer.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">🌡️☀️ Just reached 30 degrees in Adelaide (West Tce) at 8:21 am. Mostly sunny with a forecast maximum of 39 today. Very hot throughout South Australia. Latest observations at <a href="https://t.co/KgGlltZQei">https://t.co/KgGlltZQei</a></p> — Bureau of Meteorology, South Australia (@BOM_SA) <a href="https://twitter.com/BOM_SA/status/1070435491986722817?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">5 December 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Extreme heat has been forecast in areas across Victoria today. The Chief Health Officer has issued Heat Heath Alerts. <br />Plan ahead, drink water, keep cool, check in on others and never leave kids, adults or pets in a car. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SurviveTheHeat?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#SurviveTheHeat</a>, visit: Visit <a href="https://t.co/CMo0QAI0Vr">https://t.co/CMo0QAI0Vr</a> <a href="https://t.co/5b6LaqgItT">pic.twitter.com/5b6LaqgItT</a></p> — VicGovDHHS (@VicGovDHHS) <a href="https://twitter.com/VicGovDHHS/status/1070425126053785606?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">5 December 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In contrast, the forecast for Queensland is wet weather ahead, with a cyclone prediction for the Sunshine state. Cyclone Owen could possibly cause flash flooding of up to 200mm.</p> <p>“Already across South Australia it was a hot day on Wednesday. For the next 24 hours that will spread right across the south east of the country,” said Tom Saunders, meteorologist for <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.skynews.com.au/page/weather-forecast" target="_blank">Sky News Weather</a>.</em></p> <p>“We are expecting the hottest weather since last summer with temperatures about 15C above average for some parts, a heatwave across the Murray basin with heat lingering and severe fire dangers.</p> <p>“It’s only the first week of summer but a summer scorcher is developing.”</p> <p>Adelaide may reach 37C today with Port Augusta predicted to go up to 42C. Melbourne will see tops of 38C while those living in Mildura are preparing for a heatwave, with temperatures remaining above 40C up till Sunday.</p> <p>The Victorian Government has advised people stay hydrated as they have labelled the warm weather as “extreme heat".</p> <p>According to Mr Saunders, the heat was a direct result of a high-pressure system in the Tasman Sea: “High pressure systems blow anticlockwise around highs; that means a northerly air stream that brings hot air from the northern interior right down towards the south-east.”</p> <p>Victoria is on high alert, as strong winds on Friday may result in severe fires throughout the north-west. The fire danger for those in Melbourne is very high rather than severe.</p> <p>How do you prepare for the hot weather and stay cool? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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Why the Kimberley region is an icon of the outback

<p><em>Travel writer David McGonigal shares his insider tips for exploring the stunning WA Kimberley region.</em></p> <p>Few Australian towns have developed more in recent decades than Broome. However, just 10 minutes outside town little has changed in 50,000 years.</p> <p>The colours of the Kimberley are a constant. They are a brilliant pallet of red soil and blue sky, golden beaches and aquamarine sea. So are the strong characters that inhabit this harsh and largely empty landscape. I wrote after my first visit 30 years ago: “It’s a truly beautiful part of the country that in many ways epitomises the image of Australia that Australians like to present to the world.”</p> <p>That hasn’t changed and is more important than ever as the rest of Australia becomes more urbanised. The Kimberley’s main travel season is April to September, when the days are warm and the skies are clear.</p> <p><strong>Kimberley towns</strong><br />Kununurra began in the 1960s as the centre of the Ord River Irrigation Scheme. There’s a <u><a href="http://www.visitkununurra.com/">wide range</a></u> of accommodation options and many charter flights over the Bungle Bungles and Argyle Diamond Mine. These days it is a modern town with full facilities.</p> <p><u><a href="http://www.experiencewyndham.com.au/">Wyndham</a></u> was born as the port for the Halls Creek gold rush in 1886. It is a sleepy town of 800 people on Cambridge Gulf and the view from Five Rivers Lookout is spectacular. </p> <p><u><a href="http://www.hallscreektourism.com.au/">Halls Creek</a></u> is the northern end of the Canning Stock Route and the Tanami Track and an entry point for Wolfe Creek Crater and the Bungle Bungle Range. The nearby ruins of Old Halls Creek date back to the first discovery of gold in WA in 1885 when 15,000 optimists were living here. </p> <p>As its name suggests, Fitzroy Crossing came about from people waiting for the flooded Fitzroy River to drop so it was safe to travel across the causeway. Of course, the inevitable delay required a drink and that gave rise to the 1897 Crossing Inn. Geikie Gorge is close by, but this is also a good base to explore Mimbi Caves as well as Tunnel Creek and Windjana Gorge.</p> <p><u><a href="http://www.derbytourism.com.au/">Derby</a></u>, established in 1883, is the Kimberley’s oldest town and remains an important administrative centre with a population of 4,500. The famed hollow boab prison tree stands about 7km from town. Derby has the Kimberley’s main Royal Flying Doctor Service base.</p> <p><u><a href="http://www.visitbroome.com.au/">Broome</a></u> is one of Australia’s most important tourist towns. Originally a pearling community it now has a wide range of hotels and resorts and tourist operators. Expect to see expensive jewellery such as pearls and Argyle diamonds on display in the shops. You can still ride a camel along Cable Beach and Sun Pictures outdoor picture gardens is always packed on Saturday nights.</p> <p><strong>Travel by road</strong><br />Trans-Kimberley options are either the Great Northern Highway or the Gibb River Road, or ideally both. The highway comes into Broome from the south along Eighty Mile Beach then passes through Derby, Fitzroy Crossing, Halls Creek, Wyndham and Kununurra before becoming the Victoria Highway to Katherine and Darwin. It’s just over 1000km from Broome to Kununurra. The renowned 700km back-country journey along the Gibb River Road begins outside Derby to the south west and ends near Wyndham. The main side trip is up to Kalumburu and/or Mitchell Falls.</p> <p>The dirt road up the Dampier Peninsula from Broome passes by the Aboriginal communities of Beagle Bay (don’t miss seeing the pearl-shell altar in the church), Middle Lagoon and Lombadina before arriving at Cape Leveque and One Arm Point. Sunset at Cape Leveque turns the blood-red ridge behind the white sandy beach to crimson. The Aboriginal-owned resort of <a href="http://www.kooljaman.com.au/">Kooljaman</a> offers five levels of accommodation and a camp ground.</p> <p>Purnululu National Park is the site of the wonderful orange-and-black banded beehive domes of the Bungle Bungle Range. It is only open between April and December and the rough 53km access road can be negotiated only by 4WD vehicles and single-axles off-road trailers. There are no shops in the park but there are scenic flight options.</p> <p>The Gibb River Road heads north from Derby past <a href="http://www.mowanjumarts.com/">Mowanjum Art and Cultural Centre</a> and the old Derby Leprosarium on the way to the turnoff to Windjana Gorge and Tunnel Creek. Like Geikie Gorge these cut through the ancient coral reef of the Napier Range.</p> <p>The whole Gibb River Road is a grand outback experience and the swimming holes, stations (some offer accommodation) and camping sites along the way provide an unforgettable experience. The road has improved a lot in recent years and opens in April or May when the rivers have dropped and Main Roads has graded it to repair the ravages of the Wet.</p> <p>Around midway along the road there’s the turnoff to Kalumburu and the Mitchell Plateau. The 270km road to Kalumburu is only slightly worse than the Gibb River Road – the track out to Mitchell Falls is <em>considerably</em> worse.</p> <p>For National Parks information go to the <u><a href="https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/">official website</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>Aboriginal tourism</strong><br />Since the late, renowned Sam Lowell OAM began taking tours in 1981 the Kimberley has been a great place to discover the unique perspective of the original Australians. That can be done in many ways including staying at the multi-award-winning <a href="http://www.kooljaman.com.au/">Kooljaman</a>.</p> <p>At Geikie Gorge, the <a href="http://www.darngku.com.au/">Darngku Heritage Cruises</a> provides a special insight into Aboriginal heritage and visits places not accessible to the regular visitor. To explore the opportunities <u><a href="http://www.kimberleydreamtimeadventures.com.au/">Kimberley Dreamtime Adventure Tours</a></u> offers several tours out of Broome.</p> <p>Of course, there are also opportunities to buy Aboriginal art in the area where it was created. There are many galleries throughout the Kimberley. Just ask the local tourist offices.</p> <p><strong>Exploration by air</strong><br />The distances in the Kimberley are vast and the population sparse so air travel is a logical option. Two sights are best seen from an aerial perspective: Wolfe Creek Meteorite Crater and Bungle Bungle.</p> <p>The WA government set up the <u><a href="http://www.westernaustralia.com/en/Attraction/Kimberley_Aerial_Highway/56b2690cd5f1565045dac438">Kimberley Aerial Highway</a></u> linking charter flights to ground operator tours.</p> <p>Several cattle stations across the Kimberley welcome fly-in visitors. For remote coastal luxury there’s <u><a href="http://www.farawaybay.com.au/">Faraway Bay</a></u> where you have to fly in because any other access is impractical. The resort takes pride in its cuisine and the setting is superb.</p> <p>The Kimberley overall offers grand settings and a sense of space that is unique. No matter how you travel, time in this special part of Australia reveals much of what makes Australia special.</p> <p>For general information visit <u><a href="http://www.westernaustralia.com/">www.westernaustralia.com</a></u></p> <p>Have you visited the Kimberley region? Join the conversation below.</p> <p><em>Written by David McGonigal. Republished with permission of <span><strong><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/why-the-kimberley-region-is-an-icon-of-the-outback.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></strong></span> </em></p>

Domestic Travel

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See Australia: Visiting the Yorke Peninsula

<p>An abandoned mining town might seem like an unlikely place for a back-to-nature holiday, but a combination of an unbeatable location in the middle of a national park that harbours some of South Australia’s best coastal scenery, along with fantastic heritage accommodation, makes Inneston an ideal base to explore the beautiful Yorke Peninsula in South Australia’s deep south.</p> <p>A remarkably intact gypsum mining village that was once home to 200 people but abandoned in the 1970s, Inneston has seven historic buildings, including the former manager’s lodge, post office and gatehouse, that are now self-contained accommodation. There’s a heritage walk around the village that attracts a few day-trippers, but late in the afternoon or early in the morning, chances are the only signs of life you’ll see are the resident emus prowling the deserted streets.</p> <p>Spend your days exploring the surrounding national park, which has a number of good coastal walking trails, including the two-hour return walk to Royston Head – highlights include panoramic coastal views of offshore reefs and islands and Dolphin Beach, where you can swim in water so clear it’s almost invisible.</p> <p>There are more than 40 shipwrecks in the coastal waters – the most famous is The Ethel, which ran aground in 1904 during a storm, and you can still see traces of the half-buried three-masted iron barque at Ethel Beach – but there are also a number of much more modern relics lying forgotten on various bays and beaches. Where there are wrecks, there are lighthouses – there are three in the park – and the one at West Cape is stunning. Built of stainless steel, it gleams by day but is at its most impressive just before dusk when the setting sun paints it gold.</p> <p>On a map the Yorke Peninsula looks a bit like a boot, with Innes National Park on the toe, and the</p> <p>fishing village of Edithburgh at the heel. In between is a coast-hugging drive east to Troubridge Point along the sole of the foot that makes for a fabulous daytrip, past beautiful deserted beaches, gleaming salt flats, cliff-top lookouts and the towering Troubridge Hill lighthouse made from red clay bricks. Dangle a fishing line from the jetty at Edithburgh – once one of the busiest ports in the country when windjammers and ketches loaded up with cargo bound for England jostled for space at the wharf – or cool off with a swim in the sea-water swimming pool.</p> <p><strong>WHERE IS IT?</strong></p> <p>Innes National Park is on the southern tip of the Yorke Peninsula, approximately 300km west of Adelaide.</p> <p><strong>WHY GO?</strong></p> <p>Scenery.</p> <p><strong>WHEN TO GO?</strong></p> <p>Temperatures are moderate most of the year. Summer is usually much drier than the winter months, although winter is a great time for salmon fishing.</p> <p><strong>HOW LONG?</strong></p> <p>2–5 days (minimum 2-night stay in lodges).</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from </em>Australia’s Best Nature Escapes<em> by Lee Atkinson published by Hardie Grant Books [39.99] and is available in stores nationally.</em></p> <p><em>Photographer: © Lee Atkinson </em></p> <p><img style="width: 250px !important; height: 300px !important;" src="/media/7822217/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d253436738eb4bf18dd1036c78be3910" /></p>

Domestic Travel

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It's not over yet: Seven more days of intense weather

<p>With Queensland currently on high alert due to bushfires and sweltering heat, NSW, Victoria and SA are looking at a brighter week ahead as experts predict warm, beachy weather to hit the three states.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/national/queensland/news/10000-people-evacuated-132-fires-burning-as-queensland-swelters/news-story/fdd418c0e8a54796af9e4e38289ef01c" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>, Sky News Weather Meteorologist Tristan Meyers has said that much of the south eastern Australia region can expect tops of 30C.</p> <p>But while it may seem like good news, especially after the wild storms and extreme weather, northern Victoria and most of South Australia will be issued severe fire warnings.</p> <p>And with those living in Queensland currently facing terrifying bushfires, the news of a heatwave is not considered a good thing.</p> <p>The Bureau of Meteorology tweeted: “Severe to extreme heatwave conditions” are expected throughout the next week in north east Queensland and is predicted to move into the central and north western areas on Friday.</p> <p>“Max &amp; min temperatures are expected to be well above average, exacerbating fire weather conditions,” the tweet continued.</p> <p>Firefighters have evacuated thousands of residents as bushfires threatened to destroy their homes. The state is facing a crisis with close to 140 wildfires trying to be contained.</p> <p>Katarina Carroll, the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Commissioner, said that the conditions the rescue team are currently facing are “unimaginable”.</p> <p>“(But) due to all proactive work conducted over the last several days, we have lost a minimal amount of houses, thankfully,” she told reporters.</p> <p>The number of houses destroyed stands at two, with 15 sheds and two cabins also burnt to the ground. The bushfire, which started on Saturday, has also damaged 14 homes.</p> <p>“This number could have easily been greater,” she said.</p>

Domestic Travel

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The trip of a lifetime: Saying farewell to The Ghan

<p><em>As The Ghan nears Adelaide, Justine Tyerman finds herself reluctant to disembark and rejoin the real world. Here is the final of a four-part series about her 2979km four-day, three-night expedition on the famous transcontinental train Darwin to Adelaide.</em></p> <p>I was awake before dawn to witness sunrise over the magnificent Flinders Ranges that stretch 430km. Edward John Eyre, who explored the ranges in the 1830s was convinced he would discover land suitable for farming there or even an inland sea but finding mainly barren land, he named many sites to reflect his disappointment: Mt Deception and Mt Hopeless.</p> <p>On the other side of the train, the blue waters of the beautiful Spencer Gulf sparkled in the sun, and as we neared Adelaide, there were golden wheat fields, green pastures, tall haystacks and rolling hills, such a contrast to the landscape we had traversed over the preceding days.</p> <p>The massive turbines of the Snowdon Wind Farm on the ridges of the Barunga and Hummocks Ranges are a dramatic sight. With blades up to 53m in length weighing 10 tonnes each, they are expected to generate enough energy to power 230,000 homes, about 40 percent of South Australia’s annual electricity needs.</p> <p>Before breakfast my hospitality attendant Aaron, who had looked after me so well, took me on a tour of The Ghan, beyond the carriages, lounge and restaurant that were our part of the train.</p> <p>With 285 passengers spread over 38 carriages, it’s a busy schedule for the 49 staff on board. Their care and attention to detail is impeccable.</p> <p>I met our chefs Russel and Terry busy preparing breakfast in their long narrow kitchen and complimented them on the splendid cuisine they consistently produced.</p> <p>Aaron walked me through the noisy power van to the three Platinum Class carriages, the equivalent of first class. The cabins are more spacious than Gold Class with double beds, larger bathrooms and separate showers. Guests have access to two lounges, a dining room and alcoves with coffee machines. The décor is contemporary rather than traditional and ‘trainly’ like our Queen Adelaide Restaurant. The facilities are certainly luxurious offering more privacy and dining options but I preferred our more relaxed Gold Service part of the train.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822154/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/692b6cdd303d4bfc949305d1fbc9478d" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Platinum Service cabin with the bed made up.</em></p> <p>Our last meal was a leisurely brunch before arriving in Adelaide late morning. The blackcurrant and apple juice was lovely and refreshing along with the wild berry, mint and natural yoghurt sprinkled with toasted almonds and hazelnut crumble.</p> <p>The delectable gammon steak, eggs, slow roasted tomatoes and rosti was over-ambitious but I just had to try it.</p> <p>On the way back to my cabin, there was a kerfuffle in the passageway – too many people coming and going at one time so the train manager Bruce Smith asked if he could use my cabin as a passing bay.</p> <p>“No problem,” I said. “I’ve been hoping to meet you anyway. I just want to say the service, care and attention I’ve experienced on The Ghan has been outstanding, impeccable, faultless.”</p> <p>He beamed and asked if he could detect a touch of Kiwi – and then it was all on for the next 15 minutes – politics, sport, the economy, jokes at the expense of Kiwis, jokes at the expense of Aussies.</p> <p>Aged 66, he’s been associated with trains for 50 years, originally as an electrician on the maintenance of The Ghan and for 24 years, working on the trains themselves.</p> <p>Bruce then launched into story telling mode:</p> <p>First of all, he talked about all the Aussie strawberries being dumped because of needles being found inside a few of them.</p> <p>Then he went on to tell me about how all the Aussie farmers were banding together to send hay to their drought-stricken colleagues in South Australia.</p> <p>“But they had to send it all back,” he said with a tragic look on his face.</p> <p>“They found a needle in a hay-stack,” he said.</p> <p>I dissolved in fits of laughter. I just love the Aussie wit.</p> <p>As we trundled towards Adelaide, I spent some quiet time in my cabin, reading about the history of this magnificent train which is due to celebrate its 90<sup>th</sup> birthday in 2019.</p> <p>Originally known as the ‘Afghan Express’, The Ghan was named for the pioneering cameleers who blazed a permanent trail into the Red Centre of Australia more than 150 years ago. Many cameleers were migrants from an area now known as Pakistan. However, according to outback lore in the 1800s, these men were believed to come from the mysterious outpost of Afghanistan and were considered Afghans - 'Ghans'.</p> <p>The original Ghan line followed the route of explorer John MacDouall Stuart. Construction began on the Port Augusta to Alice Springs line in 1877 but it was not until Sunday 4 August, 1929, that an excited crowd gathered at the Adelaide Railway Station to farewell the first Ghan train. This train carried supplies and over 100 passengers bound for the remote town of Stuart, now known as Alice Springs. The train arrived two days later, on 6 August.</p> <p>Back then, the train was steam hauled and had to contend with extreme conditions including flash flooding and intense heat. The old Ghan ran on a light, narrow-gauge track well to the east of the track it travels today. As well as termite damage, the track was subject to fire and flood. Flash flooding, when the normally dry river beds overflowed onto the low-lying desert, frequently washed away the track completely. Legend has it the Old Ghan was once stranded for two weeks in the Outback and the engine driver shot wild goats to feed the passengers.</p> <p>Diesel locomotives were introduced in 1954 to replace the traditional steam engines, cutting about five hours off the trip between Alice Springs and Adelaide.</p> <p>There are many colourful stories and legends about The Ghan but this one about true Aussie ingenuity really appealed to me. In October 1954, The Ghan broke down in Finke south of Alice Springs with electrical trouble and a blown gasket. The postmaster produced the tongue of an old shoe to repair the gasket and The Ghan went on its way.</p> <p>In 1980, the old Ghan rail track was abandoned in favour of a new standard-gauge rail line built with termite-proof concrete sleepers. The track was laid further to the west to avoid the flooding problems encountered along the old route.</p> <p>In 2001, the first sod was turned on the 1420km extension of the railway line from Alice Springs to Darwin. At its peak, 1500 people worked on the project and the new line was completed in just over 30 months, five months ahead of schedule.</p> <p>The Ghan embarked on its inaugural transcontinental journey on 1 February, 2004. Since then, more than half a million passengers have travelled on The Ghan.</p> <p>Today, the journey covers 2979 kilometres and encounters spectacular and diverse landscapes from the green and gold pastures of the South Australian plains, the rusty reds of the MacDonnell Ranges and the tropical landscape of Darwin.</p> <p>I also read a fascinating book about the cameleers who first arrived in South Australia in 1839. The camels were imported to carry goods for explorers and surveyors venturing inland. Being able to carry up to half a tonne in weight and survive without water for long periods of time, they were ideally suited to the harsh conditions of Australia’s interior. Their broad leathery foot pads protected them from the hot earth and prevented them from sinking into the sand.</p> <p>When they were no longer needed, rather than see their camels shot as ordered under the Camel Destruction Act, 1925, some cameleers released them into the wild where they flourished. Australia’s wild camel population is now estimated to be around one million.</p> <p>The Outback Lounges on The Ghan are named after heroic pioneers who explored the Australian interior.</p> <p>Our lounge was named after Edward John Eyre who lived from 1815 to 1901. Eyre survived a murderous mutiny to complete an expedition from Adelaide across the vast Nullarbor Plain to Albany in Western Australia. He also undertook an unsuccessful attempt to reach the centre of Australia.</p> <p>Another lounge was named after Scotsman John McDouall Stuart who lived from 1815 to 1866 and embarked on several death-defying attempts to cross Australia south to north, finally succeeding in 1862.</p> <p>I could have spent many more hours reading about the fascinating history of The Ghan but it was time to pack up my belongings and get ready to disembark.</p> <p>I also wanted to say goodbye to my delightful Ghan friends and thank the staff who had looked after me so well on the trip - Nick, Aaron, Howard, Sonya, Bidya, Mel and Ceidleigh. Such genuine, warm, talented lovely people who go the extra mile for their passengers.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822155/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/80364cdeda234390a4e59e6235a053c9" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /><em>Justine (far right) and her new friends on The Ghan, solo travellers from all parts of the globe.</em></p> <p style="text-align: left;">They don’t look for easy ways on the Ghan. The ethos is to surprise and delight guests, to go beyond the expected to the unexpected, the exceptional. Morning teas including champagne appeared in the most remote, distant and hard-to-access locations not because they were needed but because the staff wanted to add an extra treat to an already memorable experience.<br />The chefs set up lunches, drinks and dinners in the most challenging off-train places – at the historic Overland Telegraph Station, in an underground opal mine, on a mountain top and beside a huge log fire in the desert against the backdrop of The Ghan.</p> <p>Having experienced the Indian Pacific trip from Perth to Sydney a few months earlier, the two journeys are quite different. There’s a lot of on-train time on the Indian Pacific so it’s extremely relaxing with many hours to read, day-dream, drift, doze, and watch the landscape. There’s on-board entertainment and a wealth of opportunities for socialising on the Indian Pacific because the excursions are shorter and less elaborate, especially on the Perth to Sydney trip. I found the three-night, four-day journey a deeply relaxing interlude in a busy life, an opportunity to recharge my physical and mental batteries.</p> <p>On The Ghan, passengers are off the train on excursions for most of the daylight and some evening hours so the bulk of the long stretches of travel are during the night. The only daytime travelling is the first day from Darwin to Katherine and the last day from around Port Augusta to Adelaide.</p> <p>The excursions I chose were energetic with a good amount of hiking and sight-seeing but there were other coach trips for less active or less mobile passengers including wheelchair access. Just down the hall from me was a spacious cabin especially equipped for disabled passengers.</p> <p>Another difference was the greater spread of ages on The Ghan, from children to teens to elderly and disabled.</p> <p>As we pulled into Adelaide, I had a real sense of loss and didn’t really want to rejoin the real world. The Ghan has a true romance, mystique, elegance, and presence. It got under my skin. I decided the only cure was to start planning another train journey. My Rail Plus adviser recommended the Belmond Grand Hibernian, a trip through the ever-changing panoramas of Ireland's celebrated scenic landscapes.</p> <p><strong><em>FACTBOX:</em></strong></p> <p><em>* The Ghan Expedition is a 2979km four-day, three-night train journey through the ‘Red Centre’ of Australia from Darwin to Adelaide.</em></p> <p><em>Justine travelled courtesy of international rail specialists Rail Plus and Great Southern Rail.</em></p> <p><em>* Visit <span><a href="https://www.railplus.com.au/australia-by-rail/australias-great-train-journeys/the-ghan-expedition/ghan-expedition-prices-book.htm">Rail Plus</a></span> for more information on The Ghan and <span><a href="https://www.railplus.com.au/great-train-journeys/">https://www.railplus.com.au/great-train-journeys/</a></span> for other epic train adventures around the world.</em></p> <p><em>*A veteran of many rail journeys organised through Rail Plus, I’ve also travelled on the Indian Pacific (see my series of four stories <span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/domestic-travel/what-it-s-like-travelling-across-australia-on-board-the-indian-pacific">here</a></span>); and the <span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/international-travel/a-day-on-the-tranzalpine">TranzAlpine</a></span>.</em></p> <p><em>Rail Plus has a dedicated team of experts to advise you on Great Train Journeys all around the world including the <span><a href="https://www.railplus.com.au/great-train-journeys/belmond-grand-hibernian/prices-book.htm">Belmond Grand Hibernian</a></span> in Ireland.</em></p> <p><em>The train traverses the sprawling countryside, dramatic coasts and fascinating cities that define this captivating land. With its lush green landscapes, mystical tales of old, fabulous food and a wealth of literary and musical talent, Ireland truly has something for everyone to enjoy. </em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Flash flood warning: The Aussie state set to get hit with one month’s rain in just 24 hours

<p>Although summer has nearly arrived, much of eastern NSW will encounter wet and windy weather on Wednesday, with the potential for flash flooding.</p> <p>On Wednesday, Sydney and Illawarra are expected to receive 100 millimetres of rain, with some localised areas forecast to receive more than 20mm.</p> <p>Bureau forecaster Olenka Duma said: “At this stage it looks like [the biggest totals will be] mostly through the Illawarra and potentially southern parts of Sydney.”</p> <p>"Certainly there will be heavy falls and local flash flooding, no doubt within that vicinity".</p> <p>The rain will be caused by a transient low-pressure system that will move across NSW on Tuesday and off shore on Wednesday.</p> <p>It is expected to shift north and then move away by Thursday.</p> <p>As well as receiving a month’s worth of rain in a day, NSW will also face lashing winds and dangerous surf conditions.</p> <p>Ms Duma told the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>Sydney Morning Herald</em></strong></span></a> that precipitation totals will increase as the system drags warm tropical air from Queensland into NSW ahead of the rain.</p> <p>Those in Queensland can expect record-breaking November heat.</p> <p>In NSW, winds could reach potentially damaging levels on Wednesday evening as the rain recedes.</p> <p>The system is also expected to cause coastal damage along some parts of NSW.</p> <p>The showers and wind will make NSW see cooler than average days on Wednesday and Thursday, however, temperatures will pick up again by the weekend.</p> <p>Temperatures in Sydney for November have been roughly 1.5 degrees above the average for both day and night.</p> <p>Will you be hit by the burst of wild weather? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Domestic Travel

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Why you haven’t really seen Australia until you’ve visited Arnhem Land

<p>We all know that Australia is vast, but what we don’t realise is how much there is to discover in this beautiful country of ours. One of those places is Arnhem Land. Home to culture rich in history that dates back thousands of years, Arnhem Land is spiritual and diverse, and the only way to experience the beauty of the rugged coastlines and savanna woodlands is to see it for yourself.</p> <p>Having occupied the region for over 60,000 years, Arnhem Land belongs to the Yolngu people and is the birth place of the famous Aboriginal instrument – the didgeridoo. But despite the small population, the isolated reserve is now home to safari tours, fishing lodges and so much more.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822119/_d4z1919_lores.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/add0aa5e557c49fcaaa5883426870ebe" /></p> <p>The Indigenous region is one of Australia’s last true wilderness areas and covers 97,000 square kilometres of the Northern Territory. The magic of Arnhem Land is felt as soon as you arrive, where a ‘Welcome to Country’ ceremony is a moving introduction to the Gove Peninsula. This powerful exhibit of Aboriginal tradition is steeped in cultural heritage and reflects the deep connection that Indigenous people have to the land.</p> <p style="text-align: center;" class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/177218181" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Arnhem Land was declared an Aboriginal Reserve in 1931 and is so remote that most maps don’t show directions on how to get there. Which is why it’s important to travel with an experienced and knowledgeable tour operator, as the only way to uncover Arnhem Land is to journey through its heart. <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit</a></span> is Australia’s leading small group tour company and the only operator that has been granted permission from Traditional Owners to conduct tours through the region.</p> <p>Here are four unique and culturally enriching Arnhem Land experiences you need to add to your bucket list:</p> <p><strong>1. Arafura Swamp (Gurruwiling)</strong></p> <p>Nestled in north-central Arnhem Land, the Arafura Swamp, also known as Gurruwiling by Indigenous Land Owners, is a tropical wetland of flourishing habitats, prolific birdlife and great spiritual significance. An untamed wilderness, it is classified as a Key Biodiversity Area that supports many water bird species, turtles and crocodiles. </p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822120/_dsc9756_lores.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/efbca8211c27447f88f489f4ed8c475b" /></p> <p>Covering 700 square kilometres in the dry season and up to 1300 in the wet, it is the largest wooded swamp in Australia, and the location where the award-winning film <em>Ten Canoes</em> was set. The Yolngu people have a deep connection with Gurruwiling, its wildlife and habitat. Whilst exploring the area with Indigenous guides, you’ll stay in Outback Spirit’s exclusive safari camp at Murwangi, perfectly positioned overlooking the stunning Arafura Swamp wetlands.</p> <p><strong>2. Seven Spirit Bay</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7822131/ost-ssb-resort-aerial-2018-05.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b8bff0dd90ff49e59aa644b5f8730807" /></strong></p> <p>Located in one of the most beautiful marine parks in the world, Seven Spirit Bay in West Arnhem is a wilderness lodge that sits on the pristine shores of Coral Bay on the Cobourg Peninsula. Visiting Seven Spirit Bay is a must when exploring the breathtaking world of Arnhem Land, as the luxury lodge is home to amenities one can only dream of, when taking a trip to the outback.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822123/ost_sevenspiritbay_int-043_lores.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9b3efb5549ff4126a5aa95a01002d5c6" /></p> <p>Whether you’re after a bar, palm-fringed swimming pool or comfortable lounge to relax in while taking in views of stunning Coral Bay, Seven Spirit Bay has it all. The lodge is the perfect place to unwind after a day of marine adventures or a 4WD wildlife safari. Whatever activity you choose to partake in, knowing your luxury villa is waiting at the end of the day is a feeling of paradise.</p> <p><strong>3. Mount Borradaile</strong></p> <p>It’s true that every inch of Arnhem Land is covered in rich history and culture, but a location that will truly take you back to the past is Davidson's Arnhemland Safaris at Mount Borradaile. A registered Aboriginal sacred site, Mount Borradaile’s natural beauty has been preserved for thousands of years. Whether you choose to spend time amongst the wildlife, or discover the serene lagoons, the Indigenous site is for those who are looking for an authentic outback experience.</p> <p>But perhaps the most famous sites to behold at Mount Borradaile are the caves and ancient rock art galleries which date back to over 50,000 years ago. The spiritual place awakens your senses as every corner tells a story of the past, such as an intricate rock painting of the Rainbow Serpent that is considered to be the largest artwork to be discovered in Northern Australia. The only way to believe the beauty of Mount Borradaile is to experience it for yourself.</p> <p><strong>4. Port Essington</strong></p> <p>Another historical location that sits in the west of Arnhem Land, Port Essington tells the dark tale of Victoria Settlement, which was established in 1838 and disbanded in 1849. The British government had a plan in place, which was to set up a military settlement and build a trade partnership with Asia. But due to poor living conditions and the rapid spread of disease, the British reign in the region did not last long.</p> <p>Victoria Settlement is now home to old buildings and ruins, and when you tour with <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit</a></span>, you are able to walk through the eerie isolated gravestones that sit in the forest. But you won’t only be sightseeing, you will be learning about forgotten history from informative guides and find yourself truly immersed in the challenges and tragedies of these early settlers.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822124/ost-mv-arafura-2018-12.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/838f5c2155234b428a118a8eb2f40230" /></p> <p>These are just four of the many things to see and do in Arnhem Land, which is a spiritual oasis that very few people have had the opportunity of visiting. Which is why you must grab your bucket list and make this largely untouched, sacred Aboriginal land your number one spot to see – and there’s no better way to discover its culture and beauty than with <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/tours/arnhem-land-wilderness-adventure/">Outback Spirit</a></span>.</p> <p>Offering an exclusive 13-day wilderness adventure, <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit</a></span> will take you to all of the above locations and more, while staying in their network of safari camps and lodges that offer a level of luxury seldom found in such remote areas.</p> <p>For more information regarding Arnhem Land, request a brochure <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/request-a-brochure/">here</a></span>.</p> <p><em>This is sponsored content brought to you in conjunction with <span><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit</a></span>. </em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Why you need to visit the Yarra Valley

<p>Melbourne’s Yarra Valley is a gourmet delight. It has everything that you love – wine, chocolate, cheese, beer and strawberries. Whether you go for a week, or a weekend, you will indulge. </p> <p>If you’re wondering where to start, Yarra Valley tourism has put together some great trail maps on its website based around loose themes such as wine, art and family-friendly excursions. </p> <p>Here’s our pick of the top 8 places you should see in the Yarra. But be careful, you may never want to leave. </p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://coombeyarravalley.com.au/">1. Coombe – The Melba Estate</a></u></strong></p> <p>Coombe was once the home of opera singer Dame Nellie Melba and, as you would expect, it’s a home of grandeur and elegance. Coombe is set on seven acres of stunning gardens. The restored motor house and clock tower now house a gourmet restaurant which serves up seasonal estate-grown produce for breakfast, morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea from Tuesday through to Sunday. Coombe also produces award-winning wines, which you can taste at the cellar door. Make sure you visit the gallery and the cottage garden ‘avenue’ where you will find the oldest swimming pool in Victoria.<br /><strong>Open</strong>: Tuesday-Thursday and Sunday, 9:30am-5pm, Friday and Saturday 9:30am-3:30pm, open public holidays<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 673-675 Maroondah Highway, Coldstream</p> <p><strong>2. </strong><strong><u><a href="http://www.gatewayestate.com.au/">Yarra Valley Gateway Estate</a></u></strong></p> <p>Who doesn’t love a fresh, hand-picked strawberry? At Yarra Valley gateway estate visitors can grab a basket and head into the indoor strawberry patch. Entry is free and you may pick as little or as much as you like. The strawberries are charged by weight. A normal 250-gram punnet costs around $4. Strawberries can be picked all year round, however, in winter there are times when the patch is closed to allow the plants to recover. Check with the estate ahead of time to ensure it’s open. Yarra Valley Gateway Estate also sells picnic hampers, local produce and fine wine.<br /><strong>Open</strong>: Monday - Friday, 9am-5.30pm, Saturday and Sunday, 9am - 5pm<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 667 Maroondah Highway, Coldstream</p> <p><strong>3. </strong><strong><u><a href="http://coldstreambrewery.com.au/">ColdStream Brewery</a></u></strong></p> <p>Fancy a cold brew? Coldstream Brewery is housed in a former wool store on Maroondah Highway. You’ll know you’ve found it when you see the large shivering man on the roof. According to the owners, the shivering man represents taking the plunge and doing something for yourself. Coldstream microbrewery creates handcrafted beer and cider. The best way to experience it is to taste your way through a paddle at the bar. Afterwards grab a pizza to share and maybe a pint of your favourite beer to linger over.<br /><strong>Open</strong>: Sunday - Thursday, 11am-9pm, Friday and Saturday, 11am - 11pm<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 694 Maroondah Highway, Coldstream</p> <p><strong>4. </strong><strong><u><a href="https://yvd.com.au/">Yarra Valley Dairy </a></u></strong></p> <p>Who doesn’t love cheese? Yarra Valley Dairy is renowned for producing award-winning fresh, soft cheeses made in distinctly Italian and French styles. The dairy farm produces both cow and goat cheeses. The one you must try is the Persian fetta. Of course, it’s only right to have a glass of wine with your cheese. The dairy has cheese and wine tasting, cheese plates, regional produce and coffee and tea. Head to the website and you will find some great recipes for using all the cheese you have bought.</p> <p><strong>Open</strong>: Daily 10.30am-5pm<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 70-80 McMeikans Road, Yering</p> <p><strong>5. </strong><strong><u><a href="https://www.yeringfarmwines.com/a/Yarra_Valley_Vineyard_Cellar_Door_Winery_Accommodation_Wine_Sales">Yering Farm Wines</a></u></strong></p> <p>Fancy sipping a glass of silky aged red in front of an open fire in a rustic woolshed? This is the place for you. Yering Farm wines specialise in limited release, handcrafted, boutique wines. The harvest typically commences with Pinot Noir in the first or second week of March and finishes with Cabernet Sauvignon in early May. This is a working farm. You can often wave to the owners as you come up the driveway and you can expect to see ducks waddling around. The rustic tasting room can be found in a shed. Pull up a stool or lean on the worn wooden bar and sample some of the best wines this region has to offer.</p> <p><strong>Open</strong>: Daily 10am-5pm<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 19-21 St Huberts Road, Yering</p> <p><strong>6. </strong><strong><a href="https://visityarravalley.com.au/tarraWarra-museum-of-art">TarraWarra Museum of Art </a></strong></p> <p>This gallery is the cultural jewel of the Yarra Valley, an award-winning architectural building that sprawls over rolling green hills with commanding regional views. But what is inside is just as wonderful. TarraWarra has seasonally changing exhibitions of modern art. More than 70 temporary themed exhibitions have been presented to date, including the collections of the gallery’s founders, philanthropists Eva Besen AO and Marc Besen AO. <u><a href="http://twma.com.au/exhibitions.%C2%A0">Click here to find out about current exhibitions</a></u>. <br /><strong>Open</strong>: Tuesday to Sunday, 11am-5pm, open 7 days a week from Boxing Day to Australia Day<br /><strong>Where</strong>: <span>313 Healesville-Yarra Glen Road, Tarrawarra</span></p> <p><strong><u><a href="https://visitdandenongranges.com.au/activity/william-ricketts-sanctuary">7. William Ricketts Sanctuary</a></u></strong><br />William Ricketts spent much of his life living with aboriginal communities in central Australia. Ricketts believed that Australians could learn from the Indigenous people and should adopt some of their practices, particularly in regard to the environment. He created this sanctuary as a place for quiet reflection and replenishing the spirit. More than 90 scultpures are distributed through the property, carved into rocks and tree trunks or dotted along paths. You just have to see it to believe it. </p> <p><strong>Open:</strong> Daily 10am-4:30pm</p> <p><strong>Where:</strong> 1402 Mount Dandenong Tourist Road, Mount Dandenong</p> <p><strong> 8. </strong><strong><u><a href="https://www.yvci.com.au/">Yarra Valley Chocolaterie and Ice Creamery</a></u></strong></p> <p>We promised you chocolate and here it is. Yarra Valley Chocolaterie and Ice Creamery has free entry and free chocolate tastings. It would be impossible to work your way through the thousands of different kinds on offer. Watch as European chocolatiers handcraft the creations on site. If you can drag yourself away from the chocolate, head to the cafe. Grab a seat and admire the view over the expansive lawns, wetlands and sculpture gardens.<br /><strong>Open</strong>: Daily 9am-5pm<br /><strong>Where</strong>: 35 Old Healesville Road, Yarra Glen</p> <p>Have you visited the Yarra Valley before? If so, tell us about your trip in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/what-to-do-in-the-yarra-valley-food-wine-chocolate/">My Discoveries.</a> </strong></span></em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Princess Beatrice sneaks into Australia – at the same time as her dad Prince Andrew

<p>A month after Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan made the long trip to Australia, two other members of the British Royal Family have jetted Down Under.</p> <p>Prince Andrew and his daughter, Princess Beatrice, are currently in Australia for separate engagements.</p> <p>It was revealed that Beatrice was in the country after her mum, Sarah Ferguson, posted a photo celebrating her eldest for representing Afiniti for a ‘women in business’ event.</p> <p>The 30-year-old Princess is the vice president of partnerships and strategy at the tech company.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqanFGQlO8i/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqanFGQlO8i/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">So proud of Beatrice who is in Australia representing Afiniti for women in business and @princesseugenie who was moderating a panel for her @the_anti_slavery_collective. So proud of my girls #nationalchildrensday</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Nov 20, 2018 at 12:36pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"So proud of Beatrice who is in Australia representing Afiniti for women in business," the Duchess of York captioned the first half of the post.</p> <p>Beatrice, who recently started dating millionaire property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, wore a blazer and polka dot dress to the event.</p> <p>Fergie also gushed over her youngest, Princess Eugenie, who last week appeared on a moderating panel for her initiative, the Anti-Slavery Collective.</p> <p>“And @princesseugenie who was moderating a panel for her @the_anti_slavery_collective. So proud of my girls #nationalchildrensday"</p> <p>Prince Andrew has also updated royal fans about some of his adventures in Australia, including his appearance at the Sydney Opera House for the Pitch@Palace event.</p> <p>Pitch@Palace provides a platform for entrepreneurs to showcase their work and network with others.</p> <p>The Duke of York also met with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his wife, sharing a snap of them together.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqYAcTAgjaC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqYAcTAgjaC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Yesterday The Duke of York met with Hon. Scott Morrison, MP, Prime Minister of Australia</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/hrhthedukeofyork/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> The Duke of York</a> (@hrhthedukeofyork) on Nov 19, 2018 at 12:20pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Fergie also congratulated her ex-husband for hosting the successful event.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqajdQXFYsA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqajdQXFYsA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Congratulations to @hrhthedukeofyork for #pitchatpalace Sydney @sydneyoperahouse and Melbourne. Well done to all the entrepreneurs #australia</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Nov 20, 2018 at 12:04pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Congratulations to @hrhthedukeofyork for #pitchatpalace Sydney @sydneyoperahouse and Melbourne. Well done to all the entrepreneurs," Fergie wrote. </p>

Domestic Travel

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Wild weather: Thick dust storm could make breathing difficult

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The notorious Sydney dust storm of 2009 may make a reappearance this afternoon as Australia’s southeast prepares itself for the upcoming “red dawn”.</p> <p>The wild weather will remain for up to 48 hours as an icy breeze from Antarctica travels north from the Southern Ocean.</p> <p>Those who suffer from asthma or other breathing difficulties are advised to remain indoors and brace themselves for the dust storm that is predicted to hit Sydney and Canberra this afternoon.</p> <p>Areas of NSW that are suffering from the drought have had a burst of rain, with residents taking to social media to share photos of the flash flooding.</p> <p>“The combination of the deep low and the pool of cold air will generate a mix of volatile weather in parts of South Australia, Tasmania, NSW, Victoria and the ACT,” said Weatherzone.</p> <p>It’s predicted that dust storms will cover eastern NSW and the ACT, with Sydney and Canberra on the front line, as strong westerly winds bring about dry top soil from the Murray Darling Basin.</p> <p>According to Jane Golding, the weather services manager from the Bureau of Meteorology, the chances of a dust storm are “pretty high”.</p> <p>She said that current conditions are very similar to the infamous “red dawn” of 2009, which saw a red haze cover the city causing chaos throughout the capital city.</p> <p>“The wind strength would only need to be a little bit less for that not to happen. But it’s certainly something we’re watching,” Ms Golding said to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-21/dust-storm-looms-amid-wild-weather-dry-conditions/10515292" target="_blank"><em>ABC</em></a>.</p> <p><span>BOM forecaster Anita Payne spoke to </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/2018/11/21/12/23/australian-weather-dust-storms-forecast-to-hit-nsw?app=applenews" target="_blank">Nine News</a></em><span> saying: “If it does happen it could have a big impact. Dust storms can effect transport and even stop planes from landing.</span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Domestic Travel