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Huge gold nugget found in mystery Aussie location

<p>A gold prospector has unearthed a gold nugget worth over $4,000 less than a metre underground.</p> <p>The prospector, identified as Bill M, took to the Facebook group Detecting Downunder to share a glimpse of the 50.8g piece.</p> <p>The nugget was found on a private property in the Victorian gold rush city Ballarat last week, the prospector said.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836626/gold2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3307221641fc4ae8adb4db8e0869f7db" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: Facebook / <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/DetectingDownunder/posts/1152731228432238?__cft__[0]=AZX2c9RoTLh-2nI_V8X3RRhcsJZHGoburAdwAAbNk7JnoffHBW4UjQVqIdzFWZTvbKLWJDSkYqVh4c46cC_rmU9NmjXgPOCXUcAejayKHlbQbVM32dX4JaxYNNT0J89XS-CxahnsDJKqe6B4hd44VIhkknXIa-OiyFoz0Fn9ls_B9Q&amp;__tn__=%2CO%2CP-R" target="_blank">Detecting Downunder</a></em></p> <p>“This is straight from a main gold reef,” a related post read.</p> <p>“It was found about 2 feet (60 centimetres) down.”</p> <p>Based on the current gold price of about $81.5 per gram, the nugget is estimated to be worth around $4,140.</p> <p>The finding came a year after a Victorian retiree found <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-27/gold-nugget-found-in-ballarat-by-retiree/11353044">a two-kilogram gold nugget worth about $130,000</a> on the outskirts of Ballarat. In the same year, a family also spotted <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/victoria-news-gold-nugget-found-bendigo/bf34fb4a-0124-4694-a1aa-aebe095d5c8d">a 634g nugget worth more than $35,000</a> while walking their dog on Mother’s Day in Bendigo.</p> <p>It is believed more than 2.26 million tonnes of gold remains underground in regional Victoria, the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-07-27/gold-nugget-found-in-ballarat-by-retiree/11353044">ABC</a> </em>reported.</p>

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Reopening starts across Australia

<p>Australians are now able to enjoy sit-down meals, drink draught beers and visit beauty salons across the country as states and territories began rolling back their coronavirus restrictions.</p> <p>Numbers in dining establishments, museums, libraries, places of worship and beauty businesses have been increased to 20 in most areas.</p> <p>Border restrictions were also lifted in Victoria, NSW and the ACT, with residents and visitors being allowed to enter from other states without having to self-isolate upon arrival.</p> <p>Queensland and WA remain shut to interstate travellers except for those who have been granted an exemption. Recreational travel is allowed within the states, with camping and holiday accommodation being allowed to open. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jun/01/coronavirus-australia-lockdown-covid-19-restrictions-how-far-can-travel-social-distancing-rules-nsw-victoria-queensland-qld-wa-sa-act-how-people-over-house">Exceptions</a> apply for the Kimberley region, biosecurity zones in parts of the Shire of East Pilbara and the Shire of Ngaanyatarraku, and remote Aboriginal communities.</p> <p>South Australia, Tasmania and the NT require arriving visitors and residents to self-isolate for 14 days.</p> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the coronavirus pandemic measures will be in place for at least six months.</p> <p>“There’s no quick fix to this,” he told <em><a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/coronavirus-prime-minister-scott-morrison-says-restrictions-to-last-for-at-least-six-months/100bba96-8ae1-43aa-a4c4-936fc424f9dc">A Current Affair</a></em>.</p>

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Coronavirus restrictions easing: What you can do starting June 1

<p>More coronavirus restrictions are being rolled back from Monday, June 1 in many Australian states.</p> <p>Restaurants and cafes will be able to seat more patrons, and the limits to social gatherings will be expanded.</p> <p>Here is a breakdown of what you can do in each state as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/coronavirus-everything-you-can-do-from-june-1-in-australia-as-states-continue-to-release-restrictions/news-story/9e8299c806ad1513d006350309ad3ac2" target="_blank">the rules are being eased</a> in the coming month.</p> <p><strong>Victoria</strong></p> <p>Starting June 1:</p> <ul> <li>Up to 20 people will be allowed to gather in one place. If it is in a house, the number must include the members of the household. Children and babies count towards the 20-people limit.</li> <li>An enclosed café or restaurant will be able to sit up to 20 people. Customers will be asked to provide their first name and number in case contact tracing is needed. Alcohol must be served with food. The limit will be pushed up to 50 people on June 22.</li> <li>As many as 20 people can play recreational sport together outdoors, including in public playgrounds, outdoor gyms and skate parks.</li> <li>Galleries, museums and other cultural sites as well as outdoor amusement parks, zoos and arcades can open their doors to 20 visitors. The same goes with libraries, youth centres and community clubs.</li> <li>Tourist accommodation such as caravan parks and camping grounds are allowed to open, but communal facilities such as kitchens and bathrooms are off-limits.</li> <li>Travel within the state is allowed.</li> </ul> <p><strong>New South Wales</strong></p> <p>Starting June 1:</p> <ul> <li>Beauty salons can welcome a maximum of 10 clients.</li> <li>Restaurants, pubs and cafes can sit up to 50 people. The four-square-metre rule continues to apply. Customers will be asked to provide their first name and number in case contact tracing is needed.</li> <li>Travel within the state will be allowed.</li> <li>Galleries, museums and libraries will be allowed to reopen.</li> </ul> <p><strong>South Australia</strong></p> <p>Starting June 1:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-25/sa-coronavirus-stage-two-restrictions-relaxation-starting-june-1/12282246">Up to 80 people</a> will be allowed into pubs, bars, restaurants, cafes, cinemas, theatres, galleries, museums, beauty salons, gyms and indoor fitness centre. Alcohol must be served with food. The four-square-metre rule continues to apply.</li> <li>Up to 50 mourners can attend funerals.</li> <li>Non-contact sport will be allowed to resume.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Queensland</strong></p> <p>Starting June 12:</p> <ul> <li>Up to 20 people will be allowed to gather in homes, restaurants, cafes, pubs, clubs, hotels, casinos, indoor cinemas, beauty salons, tattoo parlours, gyms, sports clubs, museums, art galleries, zoos, arcades, theatres, outdoor amusement parks, concert venues, arenas, stadiums, open homes and auctions, and places of worship.</li> <li>Up to 20 people can attend weddings.</li> <li>Up to 50 people will be able to attend funerals.</li> <li>Travel within 250km of one’s region will be allowed.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Northern Territory</strong></p> <p>Starting June 5 noon:</p> <ul> <li>The two-hour limit on indoor activities will be lifted.</li> <li>Alcohol can be served at bars and clubs without food.</li> <li>Entertainment venues and cinemas will be allowed to reopen in approved configuration, along with amusement parks, recreation centres and stadiums.</li> <li>Travel restrictions will be lifted, allowing residents to move between communities.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Tasmania</strong></p> <p>Starting June 15:</p> <ul> <li>The limit will be increased to 20 people for indoor and outdoor gatherings, including restaurants, cinemas, museums, galleries, religious gatherings, weddings and community sport.</li> <li>Up to 20 visitors will be allowed to enter open homes and auctions, beauty salons, and playgrounds.</li> <li>Up to 50 people can attend funerals.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Australian Capital Territory</strong></p> <p>Starting June 1, residents will be allowed to travel to NSW for holidays.</p> <p><strong>Western Australia</strong></p> <p>Starting Thursday, May 28 at 11.59pm, travel within the state will be allowed <a href="https://www.watoday.com.au/national/western-australia/premier-mark-mcgowan-lifts-intrastate-travel-restrictions-in-time-for-public-holiday-20200525-p54w7g.html">with the exception of the Kimberley and bio-security zones in the east Pilbara and part of the Goldfields</a>.</p> <p>Premier Mark McGowan said he expected Broome to become available to visitors by June 5.</p>

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NSW to allow regional holidays starting from next month

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>New South Wales residents are excitedly planning their next regional trip after NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian confirmed that residents are able to travel regionally for holidays.</p> <p>She also confirmed that pubs, clubs, restaurants and cafes are going to be set up to host up to 20 people.</p> <p>“Absolutely,” the Premier said when asked if the number would double within a month.</p> <p>“That’s definitely on the cards. We’re looking forward to continuing to have those conversations with industry and the health experts but we’re also really pleased, can I say, the way in which the community has respected the restrictions.”</p> <p>However, she’s urging residents to take caution.</p> <p>“But please know it won’t be a holiday like before,” Ms Berejiklian said.</p> <p>“We still have to exercise social distancing. We have to book ahead. Please make sure you plan ahead.</p> <p>“Book as many things as possible online and call ahead to the place you’re visiting to see what’s available and what options you have.</p> <p>“Even though restrictions are being eased, the message is that the virus isn’t any less deadly or contagious, it just means we have to live with it.”</p> <p>Not every state is on board with the move, including Tasmania.</p> <p>Tasmania Premier Peter Gutwein has said it’s too early to set a date for when their borders will come down.</p> <p>“If we can continue to follow those rules … I expect that in July we will be able to set a date for when our borders will come down. To set a date now … would not be common sense,” Mr Gutwein said on Tuesday.</p> <p>Federal Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham, despite Tasmania’s concerns, is urging state and territory governments to reopen their borders to domestic holiday takers when it’s safe.</p> <p>“Those states who’ve got border controls in place, assuming we’ve continued to see very low rates of transmission of COVID-19, ought to be looking at opening up their borders,” he told <em>Nine</em> on Tuesday.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Victoria’s biggest rise in virus cases in two weeks

<p>Victorians are facing an important week ahead that will decide if the state follows others in easing restrictions after next weekend.</p> <p>With Victoria’s state of alarm set to end on May 11, the state has been under increasing pressure to relax its measures, especially regarding the return of students to schools.</p> <p>Victoria recorded 22 new cases yesterday – the biggest in the last two weeks.</p> <p>Authorities believe the spike is because of the meat works cluster and the outbreak in a Victorian school.</p> <p>Premier Daniel Andrew’s cabinet has firmly held its position on keeping Victoria partially locked down.</p> <p>Whether this changes will heavily depend on how the fight against the pandemic moves forward this week.</p> <p>The state’s testing blitz that aims to complete 100,000 tests before May 11 will help in making that decision.</p> <p>According to Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton, the more people were tested, the more the health department could know about the virus and how it spreads in the community.</p> <p>Anyone displaying even mild symptoms of coronavirus has been urged to get tested.</p> <p>The increase in cases brings Victoria’s total to 1393.</p> <p>Six of those cases are linked to an outbreak at a meat processing plant that was not named.</p> <p>Opposition leader Michael O’Brien said this meat processing plant should be treated the same way schools and hospitals are.</p> <p>One of the positive cases was a Victorian teacher at Meadow Glen primary school in Epping.</p> <p>The Melbourne north school will be closed from Monday to Wednesday.</p> <p>“The school will be closed for three days so health teams can carry out full contact tracing and we can give the entire place a thorough clean,” Premier Andrews said.</p> <p>“To all the teachers and school staff out there, my heartfelt thanks. Please know that in Victoria, you will always be valued. You will always be listened to.”</p>

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ALDI shoppers furious after retailer cancels its annual snow gear sale

<p>It’s an event that shoppers look forward to each year, as they rush to their nearest ALDI for the annual Snow Gear Special Buys sale.</p> <p>The highly anticipated sale has people “working in teams” as they attempt to score a bargain.</p> <p>But unfortunately, the German retailer has had to cancel the snow sale for 2020, forcing shoppers to put that excitement on hold till 2021.</p> <p>Once a year, the supermarket releases items such as jackets, goggles, boots and thermal wear, helping Aussies stay warm as they hit the slopes.</p> <p>But with the coronavirus pandemic stopping people from travelling, the retailer found that it was inappropriate to continue with the sale.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook, ALDI revealed they are shifting their priorities to the grocery sector, forcing them to make the difficult decision of withdrawing its 2020 Snow Gear Special Buys event.</p> <p>“We’ll be back with our best-ever collection next year,” the post read.</p> <p>“We’re looking forward to sharing our best-ever collection with you in 2021. Apologies for any inconvenience caused.”</p> <p>The post garnered over 1000 comments and shares, but people were torn over the decision.</p> <p>Majority of comments came from those who live in colder areas, saying they rely on the sale to stock up on winter clothing.</p> <p>“Pity about the people who live in the colder areas. I was waiting for this to stock up on clothes to work in the paddocks etc. Typical that they only think people who will go on holidays buy this stuff,” one person commented.</p> <p>“Considering not everyone travels to snowy regions; there are thousands of people who actually live in these areas,” added another.</p> <p>“Winter is still coming – would be great if they still brought out the thermals, boots, gloves, &amp; beanies.”</p> <p>In normal circumstances, the sale occurs each year in May and attracts thousands of shoppers around the country as they hope to snap up a cool saving on snow gear.</p>

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Expert slams Americans by comparing photographs of Australia: “Only Australia crushed COVID-19”

<p>Australian life is slowly returning to normal as Bondi beach reopens and restrictions continue to loosen amid the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>The way the country has handled the severity of COVID-19 and its citizens has become a rarity throughout the world, as Australians look toward a less bleak future.</p> <p>Unfortunately, developed nations including the United States are not able to tell the same story as death told soared past 50,000 within the last week.</p> <p>The death toll from the virus in Australia sits at 84 and new infections have completely slowed down as NSW reported five new cases in one day on Monday.</p> <p>Harvard Professor David Sinclair took to Twitter to blast the state of California and all its citizens by sharing a side-by-side comparison that show both Australia and the U.S at completely odd ends.</p> <p>In the caption above two images of an empty Bondi Beach and an overcrowded Newport Beach in California, he wrote: “California &amp; Australia have similar populations but only Australia crushed #COVID-19. New cases = 1000 vs 9 per day. While the pundits argue about the cause, see if you notice a difference between Newport &amp; Bondi. It’s a clue.”</p> <p>“I miss the days when we were the role model for how to get things done,” he wrote on Twitter.</p> <p>Professor Sinclair also went on to show a timeline of how Australia has combated the virus, closed borders along with the country’s testing measures and strict social distancing rules.</p> <p>California Governor Gavin Newsom criticised locals for flocking to the beach as soon as the warm weather hit over the weekend.</p> <p>He warned their behaviour could mean reverse progress.</p> <p>“We can’t see images like we saw, particularly on Saturday, in Newport Beach and elsewhere,” Mr Newsom said.</p> <p>“The virus doesn’t take the weekend off because it’s a beautiful sunny day around our coasts,” he added.</p> <p>Australian states NSW and Queensland could begin slowly easing back open as soon as next week.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">California &amp; Australia have similar populations but only Australia crushed <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/COVID19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#COVID19</a>. New cases = 1000 vs 9 per day. While the pundits argue about the cause, see if you notice a difference between Newport &amp; Bondi. It's a clue. <a href="https://t.co/TNHbFpiqJu">pic.twitter.com/TNHbFpiqJu</a></p> — David Sinclair, PhD (@davidasinclair) <a href="https://twitter.com/davidasinclair/status/1254834144204521472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 27, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>However, QLD Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk warned “If we do see mass gatherings, I will not hesitate to clamp back down.”</p> <p>Victoria however is not so ready to ease restrictions and Premier Daniel Andrews told reporters on Tuesday he wants to see at least 100,000 people get tested for coronavirus within the next two weeks before a decision is made on whether they will ease state restrictions.</p> <p>“This is the biggest public health testing program that our state has ever seen and it will give us the data that will underpin the options that we will have in just a couple of weeks’ time,” he said on Monday.</p>

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Coronavirus: The restrictions that will be lifted from today

<p>Western Australia has announced it will begin to carefully ease coronavirus restrictions starting from today.</p> <p>Here are the following social distancing measures that will be lifted across WA:</p> <p><strong>•</strong> Non-contact recreational activities such as picnics in parks, fishing, boating, hiking and camping will be allowed but people must comply with travel restrictions.</p> <p>• Ten people will be allowed at weddings</p> <p>• Outdoor personal training will also be allowed for up to 10 people, provided groups adhere to social distancing and do not share equipment.</p> <p>• Open houses and display villages will be permitted but records must be kept of everyone who enters a home.</p> <p>• Outdoor gyms and playgrounds will stay closed, while food outlets remain restricted to takeaway.</p> <p>Premier Mark McGowan said it was a “cautious relaxation” of restrictions acknowledging it had been difficult for everyone, but especially the elderly, to not see friends and family during the pandemic.</p> <p>“We need to remember we remain in a state of emergency,” he told reporters on Sunday.</p> <p>“I strongly encourage that everyone must continue to practice appropriate social distancing.”</p> <p>Queensland will also begin to relax its laws, with Premier Annastacia Plaszczuk announcing some of the state’s strict isolation measures will be lifted at the end of this week.</p> <p>From Saturday May 2, Queenslanders will be able to do the following:</p> <p>• Shop for non-essential items</p> <p>• Travel within 50km of their home</p> <p>• Have picnics</p> <p>• Meet people not from their own households</p>

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135 communities could be released from quarantine in Australia in the coming weeks

<p>A leading immunologist has said coronavirus-free areas outside of major cities could soon be given the go ahead to re-open their communities and come out of lockdown.</p> <p>Rural areas in regional Australia with no coronavirus cases could have the possibility of returning to their normal lives if they remained COVID-19 free.</p> <p>Professor Ian Frazer told SBS it would be the “logical” decision to make but stresses lifting the lockdown is purely a “political decision” and not a scientist’s role.</p> <p>More than 135 rural and remote parts of the country remain largely unaffected by the pandemic currently plaguing major cities around the world.</p> <p>As of Friday, the 10th, 135 local government areas have recorded no COVID-19 cases in NSW, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia and South Australia.</p> <p>Prof Frazer explained that regions within states could be locked off from other parts of the state and then safely return to a more normal existence.</p> <p>“It would be logical if there were no cases in the rural Queensland community (to end the lockdown) and get on with being a community,” he said.</p> <p>“At the moment, Australia is in the middle of the balancing act.</p> <p>“It’s too early to stop restrictions on social interaction … just look at the northwestern Tasmania cluster.</p> <p>“That could very easily happen anywhere in Australia.</p> <p>“The other states were all in a downward trajectory and I think the trend will continue downward and governments will start having restrictions eased.</p> <p>“Cities will be more difficult because we want to move around.</p> <p>“If the new infection rate did get into single figures it would be highly unlikely there would be many community transmissions.</p> <p>“I think people will have to get used to the idea that relaxation will occur and some people will feel more sociable and others will continue to social distance.</p> <p>“The last of the restrictions to be lifted will be the first ones put in place: football matches and concerts, where contact tracing would be impossible.</p> <p>“The other places would be cruise ships and public transport.”</p> <p>Torrest Strait and Cape York communities in Queensland’s northern region is largely coronavirus-free and reports zero cases.</p> <p>“Queensland towns like Mt Isa in the northwest, St George in the southwest, and Barcaldine in the state’s central west are also reporting no COVID-19 cases,” a report read.</p> <p>Forbes, Gilgandra, Bourke, Junee, Leeton, Kyogle and Bourke are all NSW towns that are free of the virus.</p> <p>South Australian towns in the Flinders Range and Franklin Harbour have reported no cases and greater Adelaide holds 77 per cent of the state’s population.</p>

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Health Minister Greg Hunt's Easter report card

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Health Minister Greg Hunt has said that due to Australians staying home and successfully following instructions, the coronavirus curve is officially flattening.</p> <p>"We are now seeing consolidation of the flattening of the curve," Hunt said Monday.</p> <p>"The latest data shows that we have had consistent growth in new cases of below two percent a day."</p> <p>Hunt confirmed that Australia is working to a strategy of “eradication” of the virus and again rejected the concept of “her immunity”, saying that the nation’s success in keeping numbers low said that it is now time to “plan the road out”.</p> <p>The latest Australian statistics show that cases of coronavirus have reached 6,335 with 3,338 having officially recovered from the virus. There are also currently 238 people in hospital, with 81 in intensive care and 35 on ventilators.</p> <p>"These numbers have reduced and now stabilised. That's a very important sign for the future. All of this is an indication that we are making real progress, not just here in Australia, but on a global scale," Hunt said.</p> <p>However, Hunt was quick to remind everyone that “we’re not out of our challenge”, warning that “there could, at any time, be outbreaks and spikes”.</p> <p>"But this is a cause for real hope and real aspiration. We said at the start that we would get through this. We are getting through this," he said.</p> <p>Hunt said that it was “still too soon” to talk about lifting restrictions on gatherings or leaving home, but said that things are moving in the right direction due to the restrictions in place.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">"The rest of world would, overwhelmingly in a heartbeat, swap positions with Australia ... the curve really is flattening, but it hasn't stopped."<br /><br />Health Minister <a href="https://twitter.com/GregHuntMP?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@GregHuntMP</a> says Australians have done well, but there is still a long way to go. <a href="https://t.co/ydi9yWcCG9">pic.twitter.com/ydi9yWcCG9</a></p> — News Breakfast (@BreakfastNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/BreakfastNews/status/1249815357860151296?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 13, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>"Australians have done what we had hoped and more. They have stayed at home. They have self-isolated. They have responded with the best sense of Australia imaginable," he said.</p> <p>Hunt said that data showed between Thursday and Sunday that Australians were moving around at a rate of 13 per cent of normal, which is a sign people were staying safe at home.</p> <p>"That means that Australians are making a difference. They are saving lives and protecting lives with their own actions," he said.</p> <p>"I couldn't be more impressed, more honoured, and more heartened by the work of Australians over the Easter weekend and in the weeks before."</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Chief Medical Officer warns Easter will be “very different”, but it’s not all bad news

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Chief medical officer Brendan Murphy has urged Australians to avoid the temptation of travelling or spending Easter long weekend with family and friends this year.</p> <p>"Easter is going to be very different this year," he told reporters yesterday. "We're asking you to stay with your family, in your residence."</p> <p>However, he confirmed that there has been some good news after Australia made the decision to close its borders, quarantine travellers and impose strict social distancing measures.</p> <p>"We're in a good place at the moment, we're achieving good control because the community has done what we have asked," he said, according to the<em> <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-05/chief-medical-officer-brendan-murphy-confident-coronavirus/12123154" target="_blank">ABC</a>.</em></p> <p>"It's been hard, it's been really hard."</p> <p>With a total of 5,687 cases reported and an increase of 139 cases in 24 hours, Professor Murphy is pleased by the low rise.</p> <p>"That is probably the lowest rise we've had for a few days and it does tend to continue the trend we've seen of flattening of the curve," Professor Murphy said.</p> <p>Professor Murphy explained that his biggest concern continued to be community transmission and the fact that 10 percent of people with coronavirus had no known contact with a COVID-19 case.</p> <p>"We all know just how infectious this virus can be," he said.</p> <p>"Just look at what it did on some cruise ships."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Coronavirus: When will social distancing and restrictions end?

<p>In the last few weeks you may have heard the term ‘social distancing’ being thrown around a lot, as it’s being hailed as the solution to end this pandemic.</p> <p>And they aren’t wrong, as social distancing is something everyone needs to be adhering to. It’s an emergency response in an emergency situation. It’s slamming the door on the face of a viral pandemic. The issue is that the virus lurks for a terribly long time. It’s not going anywhere, anytime soon.</p> <p>So the question remains, when will the emergency be over? When can we open our doors? When can we go back to our offices, cafes, clubs? To socialise? To be free?</p> <p>Before we can ease up, we have a mountain to crush.</p> <p>The only way restrictions will start to lift is when it’s known for certain that COVID-19 has been slowed to a point where our hospitals are coping well. But the good news is, that Australia’s early measures to “flatten the curve” may be starting to have a positive impact.</p> <p>This means our hospitals will be able to cope with the inevitable emergency cases as they keep rolling in. Resulting in fewer Australians dying.</p> <p>But that means we’ll be in quarantine for months to come.</p> <p>“For most of March, the total number of cases doubled in Australia every three to four days. That rate has now slowed to doubling every six to seven days,” <span>a report released Wednesday </span>from the Grattan Institute reads.</p> <p>“Over the past week the growth pattern has slowed and shifted from the exponential doubling to a linear trend with the number of new cases in Australia increasing by about 350 per day. If this rate continues, Australia’s current ICU capacity will be able to cope.”</p> <p>But there’s always a “but”.</p> <p>“But it is still early days. And our current testing regimen may not be shedding as much light on community transmission as we need. With limited community testing, and a disease which is asymptomatic or mild for many, we don’t know how far infections have spread into the community and so we don’t know the actual number of new cases each day.”</p> <p>So when will things return back to normal?</p> <p>The simple answer: When people build up immunity.</p> <p>“It will largely depend on being able to say who is safe from contracting the coronavirus,” says University of Queensland research fellow Larisa Labzin.</p> <p>No one knows yet if those who have contracted the virus are now immune from catching it again, which is why according to the molecular bioscientist, it’s crucial to test those who have the virus, but also those who have already had it.</p> <p>“An antibody test – which would identify those whose immune systems have already encountered the virus, as opposed to current tests that reveal the presence of the virus itself – will be an important part of efforts to track the true extent of the outbreak,” Labzin writes.</p> <p>Australia has ordered 1.5 million antibody testing kits, so it can be understood whether the immune system can recognise and fight off COVID-19 after recovering from the virus.</p> <p>It’s a different testing process to what is currently being applied. But Australia has ordered 1.5 million antibody test kits.</p> <p>We need to confirm immune systems can recognise – and fight off – COVID19 after recovering from the virus.</p> <p>“These kinds of tests will help clinicians and scientists measure exactly how soon after infection we develop antibodies, what levels are needed to be protective and how long these antibodies stay in our body,” Labzin writes.</p> <p>“But there is still a long way to go before we can test people’s blood for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and confidently say it is safe for people to go back to work or into the community without getting sick,” Labzin warns.</p> <p>With a vaccine still at least 18 months away, the recurring message is the need to test, and to keep the number of active cases down to levels the health care system can handle.</p>

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ANZAC Day services have been cancelled across Australia

<p>ANZAC Day services have been cancelled in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania after the federal government banned mass gatherings in response to the coronavirus crisis.</p> <p>The decision was made by the Returned and Services League of Australia NSW branch, announcing that all public ANZAC Day services across the state on Monday will be cancelled.</p> <p>“The risk to vulnerable people during the current health situation is simply too high for these events to continue in their traditional format,” read a statement.</p> <p>“Given the significant concerns around the spread of COVID-19, it would be irresponsible to allow such large gatherings as we see each year on ANZAC Day to go ahead. This is not a decision we have taken lightly.</p> <p>“The RSL has a responsibility to act in the best interests of veterans and the general public. In these uncertain times, we must follow the advice of medical experts and do everything we can to protect the community.”</p> <p>Some of the events cancelled include the Melbourne City March, with RSL Victoria confirming the state will host one dawn service at the Melbourne Shrine of Remembrance, however, the public will not be allowed to attend.</p> <p>"The Dawn Service at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance will be conducted with a small number of official guests and modified to minimize COVID19 risk," RSL Victoria updated on Monday.</p> <p>"The ANZAC Day march through Melbourne’s CBD and midday service at the Shrine of Remembrance is cancelled. RSL Sub-Branches across Victoria will also be asked to conduct a single ANZAC Day commemorative service only. The public will also be asked not to attend these services."</p> <p>“ANZAC Day 2020 will not look like the ANZAC Day that so many of us are used to participating in. But there will be a service, wreaths will be laid, the last post will still be played, a minute’s silence in memory of the fallen will be held but the public will be asked to stay at home," RSL Victoria President Robert Webster said.</p> <p>"This is not a decision that the RSL takes lightly, but public health and safety must be our priority."</p> <p>RSL Queensland has also advised its Sub Branches to cancel ANZAC Day commemorations.</p> <p>“Our older veterans are particularly at risk from this virus, so we believe this is the responsible thing to do to ensure their health and wellbeing,” QLD Branch President Tony Ferris said.</p> <p>“ANZAC Day is an opportunity for Australians to remember all those who have served and sacrificed, and we are pleased that so many Queenslanders recognise its significance more than a century after it was first commemorated,” he said.</p>

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Bus driver hailed a hero after heartwarming act

<p>Canberra bus driver Jeet Gill has been hailed a hero after he drove to “the other side of town” to reunite a scared boy and his distraught parents.</p> <p>The incident took place several months ago, after the young boy decided the catch the bus home from school – but then accidentally switched to the wrong bus at the interchange.</p> <p>He was on Mr Gill’s bus – and in an act of pure kindness, the driver decided to drop him off right to his front door after he discovered the mix-up towards the end of his shift.</p> <p>The boy’s parents initially grew concerned after their son was no where to be found when they went to pick him up from school, but they started to panic shortly after as he still wasn’t home half an hour after he should have been had he caught his regular school bus.</p> <p>His mother left the family home to search for him while his father remained at the residence in case the child turned up.</p> <p>Just as the father was gearing up to call the police, Mr Gill pulled up outside to deliver the child to his frantic parents.</p> <p>“After realising the situation, the driver drove all the way to our place to drop him off … completely the other side of town,” said the boy’s father.</p> <p>“That bus driver went above and beyond, and I hope he gets thanked.”</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Our Canberra</em>, Mr Gill said the child had approached him towards the end of the route, and explained that he had caught the wrong bus and didn’t know how to get home.</p> <p>Mr Gill then called his managers to ask whether he could drive the boy home, and Transport Canberra approved the request.</p> <p>The little boy gave directions to his home where his parents were waiting.</p> <p>“The parents were so glad and thankful,” said Mr Gill.</p> <p>“It was nice to see that they were happy that their kid was safe.”</p> <p>He said he enjoyed his job and loved meeting new people every day.</p> <p>“I love meting different kinds of people every day,” he said.</p> <p>“When people say hello, it makes your day.”</p> <p>He stressed the importance of parents and caregivers to teach children their home address and the carer’s mobile phone number, and how to identify a trusted adult if they need help.</p>

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”What a crock!”: David Koch and Sam Armytage butt heads over coronavirus predictions

<p><span><em>Sunrise </em>host David Koch has slammed predictions almost 100,000 Australians could die if the coronavirus crisis becomes a pandemic.</span></p> <p>Former Reserve Bank of Australia board member Warwick McKibbin said a global pandemic could wipe out 68 million people around the world, which included 96,000 Australians.</p> <p>He said, even if the pandemic was mild, 21,000 Australians could die with 15 million being affected globally.</p> <p>Koch slammed the predictions on<span> </span><em>Sunrise</em><span> </span>on Wednesday morning, saying they’re “ridiculous”.</p> <p>“I don’t want to be one of the 96,000 that die in Australia … what a crock that is, that’s ridiculous,” he told co-host Sam Armytage and panel members Nat Barr and Ryan Phelan.</p> <p>“Alright, I’ve done the numbers, China has 1.4 billion people and they’ve had just over 3,000 deaths from the coronavirus and he’s telling us we’re going to get 96,000 deaths out of 25 million people?”</p> <p>Armytage chimed in, saying she “didn’t believe the numbers coming out of China”, which caused Koch to roll his eyes.</p> <p>“That is such a lame argument to back up a personal opinion,” he said.</p> <p>Barr then said that Armytage believing the death toll in China was higher than reported was the same as Koch slamming the economist’s predictions.</p> <p>“But he’s predicting those, they’re not facts,” said Koch.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>7NEWS</em>, Mr McKibbin said despite the predictions being “irresponsible”, the study discussed a number of scenarios.</p> <p>“They are the assumptions of different combinations of infection rates and mortality rates from historical pandemics,” he said.</p> <p>“I guess David Koch didn’t read the paper.”</p>

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From the Red Centre to the green tropics, Australia’s Outback presents a palette like no other

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">From the sunburnt sands and ochre-hued escarpments of its Red Centre to the lush green rainforests of Tropical North Queensland, Australia’s Outback packs a punch when it comes to the kaleidoscope of colours on show. </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aptouring.com.au/?utm_source=over60s&amp;utm_medium=advertorial&amp;utm_content=20200302_outback2020_over60s_native&amp;utm_campaign=outback2020" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">APT</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has been operating tours in the Outback for more than 50 years, and are experts in tailoring holidays to showcase the best of each magical region.</span></p> <p><strong>A world of rainforest and reef</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Cape Tribulation, rainforest-clad mountains tumble down to meet the coastline, where pure white sands and turquoise waters dazzle. This is the only place on Earth where two World Heritage-listed sites meet – the Great Barrier Reef and the Daintree Rainforest. The Daintree is the oldest tropical lowland forest in the world and is home to thousands of species of birds, animals and reptiles. Here, giant fan palms, emerald green vines and ancient ferns tangle together, forming a dense rainforest that makes you feel as though you are stepping into Jurassic Park.</span></p> <p><em>On tour</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">APT offers an 11-day 4WD adventure through Cooktown &amp; Cape York. Arrive in Cairns and transfer to Port Douglas, where you’ll spend a night at the luxurious Sheraton Grand Mirage Resort. Travel to Mossman Gorge in Daintree National Park and set off on a Dreamtime Gorge Walk. Explore Cape Tribulation and Cooktown then visit Split Rock, an intriguing Indigenous rock art site. Take a helicopter flight into the Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve before continuing north to the tip of Cape York. Here, set out on a walk to the tip of the peninsula and enjoy a helicopter flight for an aerial perspective on this incredible landscape. </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aptouring.com.au/trips/australia/qld/gocy11?utm_source=over60s&amp;utm_medium=advertorial&amp;utm_content=20200302_outback2020_over60s_native_gocy11&amp;utm_campaign=outback2020" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take me there.</span></a></p> <p><strong>Be moved by the outback's heart</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the light shifts and changes throughout the day, so does the landscape at Uluru – the Outback’s spiritual heart. At sunrise, feel an overwhelming sense of calm as you watch this mighty monolith come to life against a pastel-coloured sky. In the afternoon, Uluru appears as an ochre-brown hue, scored with dark shadows. As the sun begins to set, it bathes the rock in burnt orange, then a series of deeper and darker reds, before it finally fades into charcoal as night falls. Spend a night at the Field of Light and savour dinner under the stars, accompanied by the soothing sounds of the didgeridoo. With Uluru in the background, watch in awe as 50,000 soft lights cover the desert floor behind you.</span></p> <p><em>On tour</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On APT’s 11-day Central to South Explorer tour, start your journey in Uluru, where you’ll embark on a base tour at sunrise and experience a night at the Field of Light. Learn about the history of opal mining in Coober Pedy then travel along the iconic Oodnadatta Track to WIlliam Creek. Take an included scenic flight over spectacular Kati Thanda–Lake Eyre before journeying to Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park. While here, spend two nights at the Ikara Safari Camp – the perfect base for exploring Wilpena Pound National Park. A winery lunch in Adelaide’s Clare Valley is the perfect ending to your journey. </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aptouring.com.au/trips/australia/nt/gosa11?utm_source=over60s&amp;utm_medium=advertorial&amp;utm_content=20200302_outback2020_over60s_native_gosa11&amp;utm_campaign=outback2020" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take me there.</span></a></p> <p><strong>Getting your fill of Lake Eyre</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Few sights in Australia stir the soul more than that of the normally dry Lake Eyre filling with water and suddenly teeming with life. The lake, properly known as Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre, relies on monumental rains in Queensland and the Northern Territory for water to begin to flow into it. Last year saw the lake reach levels unseen for almost half a century, and it is hoped that 2020’s northern monsoon season will see the region once again alive with fish surging through the rivers that feed Lake Eyre, and its surface thronged with an array of birdlife including hundreds of thousands of pelicans. In a land battling drought and bushfires, the vision of water shimmering on the surface of the lake is life affirming. And it is something to be treasured and celebrated, so take this rare chance to go with the flow. </span></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7834872/travel-marvel-lake-eyre.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/dae070e4b00d4b49ba34857d1b37ffb2" /></strong></p> <p><strong>Paradise found amid corals and blooms</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stretching over 1,100 kilometres of seemingly untouched coastline, Western Australia’s Coral Coast is a marine paradise like no other. Here, waves lap lazily on pristine white-sand beaches and turtles sweep through sheltered turquoise bays.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The crystal-clear waters of Ningaloo Marine Park harbour the world’s largest fringing reef. Beneath the surface, you’ll find dolphins, dugongs, manta rays, and more than 500 species of fish. There’s more to discover on land, where colourful blankets of native wildflowers burst into bloom between August and September along the spectacular Wildflower Way. For a whole new perspective on the region, take to the skies on a helicopter flight over the Dampier Archipelago. The staggering contrast between brilliant white beaches, aquamarine waters, and the rugged red Pilbara landscape is a breathtaking sight – one that can only be experienced from the air.</span></p> <p><em>On tour</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Board the MS Caledonian Sky in Broome and navigate the remote islands of Western Australia’s Coral Coast on a 15-day small ship expedition cruise and 4WD adventure. Discover life below the surface while snorkelling the clear waters of this marine paradise. Disembark in Geraldton and continue the adventure as you explore Kalbarri National Park and the eerie limestone Pinnacles. To finish up your journey, there’s a stay in a luxury eco-tent on the beautiful Rottnest Island. </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aptouring.com.au/trips/australia/wa/gkccb15?utm_source=over60s&amp;utm_medium=advertorial&amp;utm_content=20200302_kimberleycruise2020_over60s_native_gkccb15&amp;utm_campaign=kimberleycruise2020" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take me there.</span></a></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aptouring.com.au/destinations/australia/kimberley-outback?utm_source=over60s&amp;utm_medium=advertorial&amp;utm_content=20200302_outback2020_over60s_native_cta&amp;utm_campaign=outback2020" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Find out more about APT’s Kimberley &amp; Outback Wilderness Adventures.</span></a></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a sponsored article in partnership with APT.</span></em></p>

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“These people are a******s”: Post about quiet carriage sparks heated debate

<p>A reddit user has sparked a heated debate over the best way to approach people who ignore signs on public transport.</p> <p>A photo of a woman talking on her phone while sitting in a “quiet carriage” on a Brisbane train was recently posted on the forum, with the caption reading: “These people are a******s and obviously should learn to read!”</p> <p>In the snap, the woman is seen sitting directly underneath signs asking passengers to “please refrain from loud conversations, use of loud music and mobile phones.”</p> <p>The image instantly ignited a heated response with users asking the poster why they didn’t approach the passenger at the time and ask her to observe the sign.</p> <p><img style="width: 386.47342995169083px; height:500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7834887/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5d4b0443f74844ccb23ad51a1694c4af" /></p> <p>“If it p***** you off, tap her shoulder and let her know,” said one person.</p> <p>“Don’t let them get away with it. They just get worse. A tap on the shoulder and ‘this is a quiet carriage, can you please get off your phone’ is what is required,” responded another.</p> <p>There was also a debate over the context of the sign.</p> <p>“It’s a quiet zone, not a total silence zone, a conversation at normal volume does not breach any of those rules,” said a user.</p> <p>“Still seems strange to me that people always sit directly under a sign saying something along the lines of ‘please be quiet’ with no intention of being quiet whatsoever,” added another.</p> <p>While reddit users couldn’t come to an agreement regarding etiquette in quiet carriages, Queensland Rail asks passengers who are travelling in quiet carriages to “refrain from having loud conversations, using mobile phones and noisy musical devices”.</p> <p>And despite there being no penalties for having a conversation in a quiet carriage, Queensland Rail encourages all customers to respect those who may wish to take advantage of the service.</p>

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Prince William and Kate’s sweet message to Fire Fight supporters

<div class="body_text "> <p>Prince William surprised fans at Sydney’s ANZ stadium for the Fire Fight Australia concert as he shared a message of support about the devastating bushfires that have ravaged the country.</p> <p>The message was beamed to the tens of thousands inside the stadium as well as countless others watching the live broadcast at home.</p> <p>“Hello, everyone. Catherine and I just wanted to say that we were very shocked and saddened to see the damage and devastation caused by the bushfires recently,” Prince William said.</p> <p>“We know it’s been a terrible time for all of those affected by the bushfires.</p> <p>“We want to commend the bravery and resilience of all Australians involved, particularly the volunteer firefighters who have put their lives on the line to protect lives, livelihoods and wildlife. We think that’s been a fantastic effort all ‘round by everyone down there looking after each other.</p> <p>“We know there’s been lots of incredible acts of generosity as well and communities coming together to support each other.</p> <p>“We wish you all the best for the rebuild and have a good evening.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Thank you Prince William. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FireFightAustralia?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#FireFightAustralia</a> <a href="https://t.co/uA66Ga4Xor">pic.twitter.com/uA66Ga4Xor</a></p> — Channel 7 (@Channel7) <a href="https://twitter.com/Channel7/status/1228961282251870208?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 16, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge sent their message of support ahead of the pair’s expected tour to bushfire-ravaged parts of the country.</p> <p>Communities on the bushfire-destroyed NSW south coast hope that a potential royal visit will boost tourism to the region and showcase its reconstruction efforts.</p> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that a formal invitation to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will be extended “soon” once discussions with Kensington Palace are concluded.</p> <p>Cabinet minister Simon Birmingham said that previous visits from members of the royal family have boosted tourism.</p> <p>“We hope that can all be locked down with an announcement from the royals pretty soon because it is going to be a great opportunity to remind the rest of the world that Australia is still a fantastic place to visit full of rich and amazing experiences,” the senator told the Nine Network last week.</p> <p>It would be the couple’s first visit since 2014.</p> </div>

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George Calombaris to sell lavish Toorak mansion amid collapse of food empire

<p>The embattled MasterChef judge has quietly listed his lavish Toorak home for a hefty $4.1 million as his restaurant empire sits on the brink of collapse.</p> <p>Calombaris’ MaDE Establishment risking going into administration with around 500 staff at 18 restaurants currently employed.</p> <p>The celebrity chef first made headlines in 2019 for underpaying staff of up to $7.83 million.</p> <p>"My thoughts and concerns would be for all of the employees of his company," Victorian Jobs Minister Martin Pakula said on Monday.</p> <p>"In that regard, I would hope that any conversations that are had with bankers and administrators are such that those people are able to keep their jobs."</p> <p>Calombaris has quietly listed his and his partner Natalie Tricarico’s impressive Toorak mansion weeks after selling his Safety Beach holiday house in January. </p> <p>The couple bought the home, held in Tricarico’s name, in 2013 for $4.75 million. </p> <p>The spacious home boasts a generous five bedrooms as well as has bathrooms and five car spots, a swimming pool and an indoor space that can be converted into a gym or theatre. </p> <p>It also features marble kitchen benches fit for a talented chef, according to the 2013 listing of the home.</p> <p>The family faced an intense lashing from locals while they lived at the house after adding a gym to the backyard.</p> <p>Neighbour Helen Elsworth <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/home-garden/masterchef-australias-george-calombaris-in-neighbourhood-row-over-outdoor-gym/news-story/7db6414cfce0f8ebe92826497cf79805" target="_blank">previously told the </a><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/lifestyle/home-garden/masterchef-australias-george-calombaris-in-neighbourhood-row-over-outdoor-gym/news-story/7db6414cfce0f8ebe92826497cf79805" target="_blank">Herald Sun</a></em><span> </span>the addition was a “hideous black box” and Calombaris was “the worst neighbour I’ve had in my life”.</p> <p>Kay &amp; Burton South Yarra managing director Ross Savas has confirmed Calombaris had listed the property and was in discussions with the family about the upcoming sale.</p> <p>Pursuit Property buyer’s advocate Brad Willmott said the family would likely make “capital gains” from the five-bedroom house.</p> <p>“It’s in a small court off Lansdowne Rd, so it’s going to appeal to business people and families downsizing from larger properties in the area,” Mr Willmott said.</p> <p>“It used to have a whole bunch of trees in the backyard, but those have been replaced with some new additions.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the Toorak mansion.</p>

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Shock as Pauline Hanson calls for Australian borders to be closed

<div class="body_text "> <p>Controversial One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has made her thoughts about the coronavirus known and has doubled down on her idea for Australia’s borders to be closed.</p> <p>“We cannot be too cautious when dealing with such a contagious disease that’s killed far too many people across the globe already,” she wrote on Facebook on Thursday.</p> <p>“If we reopen our borders to China ahead a vaccine being discovered, we will only cripple our own domestic tourism based on a sense of fear.”</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/photos/a.127409370796717/1209097549294555/?type=3&amp;theater" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>KEEP CORONAVIRUS OUT OF AUSTRALIA I will always put the safety of Australians ahead of tourists and strongly support an...</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/">Pauline Hanson's Please Explain</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/photos/a.127409370796717/1209097549294555/?type=3">Wednesday, February 12, 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>Her post was quickly inundated with support.</p> <p>“Yep, close it down. Safety before money. Unfortunately too many countries, like Australia, have relied too heavily on the Chinese economy, instead of protecting their own economies,” one person commented.</p> <p>“Something fundamentally wrong with a nations management when its wellbeing is so heavily reliant on the trade of one other country,” another agreed.</p> <p>However, not all commenters were agreeing with the idea of closing Australia’s borders.</p> <p>“Closing borders temporarily could help but it isn't a permanent solution,” one person explained.</p> <p>Senator Hanson’s latest idea about the coronavirus comes after her inflammatory comments about Aboriginal people, where she said children who get raped should be taken away from their communities.</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-video" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/videos/189736492233309/?__xts__[0]=68.ARAPkXkVRWQ4NHdMDp1Lb4QqLBxbc91cWUwqHo_pbxv4ACjxvY4PGnY2f6O9Aldtb0d-hgk2iNbZog8FoI37guR9QG-_Tulf2cqmNV6iy39tJyP77biZwZAwcUyKZq8ECO0BquI2uHImG2hnnHs0y0xpcSW45ZUTcJdlWnQFlHcq6AJzZ7fg9j-SndDZB9jZoF8RFLKtBAHWBAX_TaJAaQfvCaDLLA30pFtMErBSo26BuIIvw9ZTMJ4yvvz1K7u8u1dBLNUNErQYc5xLog9ZiWYGlR2Sfs2mmYxdgSrZ32nS1YVRT4qtybE_culUL_I6tz9lpwnZC1e0aCWVo9kBc7PAOywE9TxUalUiqQ&amp;__tn__=-R"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/videos/189736492233309/">Pauline Hanson defends her Closing the Gap speech</a> <p>CLOSING THE GAP - IT'S A SPEECH SOME TOOK OFFENCE TO Last night on Paul Murray Live, Labor couldn't help themselves but to have a go at my closing the gap speech. #Auspol #OneNation #PaulineHanson #CloseTheGap #Australia</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/PaulineHansonAu/">Pauline Hanson's Please Explain</a> on Wednesday, February 12, 2020</blockquote> </div> <p>“The biggest problem facing Australian and Aboriginal Australians today is their own lack of commitment and responsibility to helping themselves,” Ms Hanson told parliament on Wednesday.</p> <p>Labor frontbencher Jenny McAllister said that Hanson’s speech was not okay.</p> <p>Her racist comments – and they are racist – have no place in this chamber,” she told the upper house.</p> <p>Greens Senate leader Larissa Waters also apologised to anyone who was listening to the comments made by Hanson.</p> <p>“It’s the racism that we’ve come to expect from her and her party,” she said. “They don’t reflect the sentiment of this chamber or (the) vast majority of Australians.”</p> </div> <div class="post_download_all_wrapper"></div>

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