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“Today was your last day”: Lisa Wilkinson reveals brutal dismissal

<p>After suddenly disappearing from the Channel Nine breakfast show <em>Today</em> in 2017, viewers around Australia were shocked at Lisa Wilkinson's quiet exit. </p> <p>Now, Lisa has revealed exactly what happened the day she was axed in an <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/national/lisa-wilkinson-finally-reveals-the-truth-about-leaving-today-and-her-last-show-with-karl-stefanovic/news-story/ef89081ecb766cac59cae0ba2909351a" target="_blank">exclusive extract</a> from her tell-all memoir called <em>It Wasn't Meant To Be Like This. </em></p> <p>After sitting alongside co-host Karl Stefanovic for more than a decade and appearing to be close friends, Lisa discussed how Karl <span>treated her with an unusual “disregard” on what ultimately became her final day on-air.</span></p> <p>Hours later, she was sacked over the phone while shopping at Woolworths. </p> <p>In her book, Lisa writes of her <span>awkward final on-air encounter with Karl Stefanovic, as she says he ignored her for a week in the lead-up to her brutal axing.</span></p> <p><span>The tension between the hosts came after he ditched her 25th wedding anniversary celebration and vow renewal with a last-minute text cancellation.</span></p> <p><span>“Karl and his new partner Jas had been invited but dropped out just two days before via a text to Pete saying that they were extending an overseas trip and wouldn’t be attending,” she wrote, adding how strange it was he hadn’t contacted her with apologies nor congratulations.</span></p> <p>“In the 10 days since, Karl hadn’t contacted me, his co-host of almost eleven years, at all. No phone message, no text, no apology, not even a simple congrats,” she wrote. “Just complete silence.”</p> <p>She added, “In all the years we’d sat next to each other, even though there were the occasional frustrations on both sides, upsets were rare."</p> <p><span>“But on this particular morning, I was upset. With limited numbers, there were two precious spots at the wedding we could so easily have filled with dear friends, but Karl’s late text meant those seats had gone empty.”</span></p> <p><span>Lisa wrote that as their first show after the wedding began, Karl arrived at his desk just in time to appear live on air, leaving no room for small talk and disappeared at his earliest chance. </span></p> <p>“Not a mention. Not a ‘how was the holiday?’ And certainly no ‘Sorry about that no-show at the wedding’. Not … anything,” she wrote.</p> <p>“What I felt in that instant was hard to put into words. More than anything, I felt just a little bit pathetic. What was this thing Karl and I had between us?"</p> <p>“I’d presumed that along with our work relationship, there was a friendship as well. I must have been wrong.”</p> <p>As Karl finally congratulated Lisa on her vow renewal while the cameras were rolling, Lisa said she felt taken aback by his unusual actions. </p> <p>Despite being hurt by the situation, Wilkinson said she took a deep breath and said: “Yeah, I did Karl, but why would anybody care about that when it’s news time? Good morning.”</p> <p>After that comment, she said: “Karl knew I had cut him dead, something I had never done on or off air before.”</p> <p>“For the next two hours, I exchanged not a single word with Karl outside of what was scripted – because for the first time, I just didn’t trust myself to ‘play nice’,” she wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRgGAJRlPGB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRgGAJRlPGB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Lisa Wilkinson (@lisa_wilkinson)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In the wake of these extracts being published, on Monday morning's edition of <em>Today</em>, Karl Stefanovic took the day off. </p> <p>His absence wasn't acknowledged by the hosts, as he was replaced for the day by <em>Today Extra</em> host David Campbell. </p> <p>Lisa's autobiography, <em>It Wasn't Meant To Be Like This</em>, will be released on November 3rd. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Instagram @lisa_wilkinson</em></p>

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Rare May Gibbs book published for the first time in Australia and New Zealand

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before May Gibbs wrote </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Snugglepot and Cuddlepie</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the iconic Australian author wrote a picture book about a “dear, nice little girl” separated from her dog, and the journey to undergo to find each other.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over 100 years after Gibbs first wrote and published the book, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mamie and Wag</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has been published for </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.smh.com.au/culture/books/may-gibbs-picture-book-published-for-the-first-time-in-australia-20210920-p58t7r.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">the first time</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in Australia and New Zealand.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The title comes from Gibbs’ childhood, when she had the nickname Mamie.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gibbs wrote the book under the pseudonym Silvia Hood and originally set the story in the Australian bush.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But she was only able to find a publisher after changing the setting to Edwardian London.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Along the way, the lost little girl and her dog meet a beggar girl, a king and a queen, lots of cats, and chimney pot people, inspired by the chimney pots around the Holborn district in central London.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT3G_fPBTAb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT3G_fPBTAb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by May Gibbs (@maygibbsofficial)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Changing the name to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">About Us</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the altered book was published in London and New York in 1912.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Maureen Walsh’s </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">May Gibbs Mother of the Gumnuts</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Gibbs received a grand total of 20 pounds for the work.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stewart Reed, a historian specialising in May Gibbs who runs tours of her former Neutral Bay home, said the book will have a wide appeal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[The book] is very different to all her other work, but it’s got a little girl, a dog, lots of cats and the chimney people, and that appeals to kids,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The message that is good for parents to reinforce for their kids, that they’re not in this world alone. It’s not exactly Buddhist for karma, but it goes part way down there.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now, publisher Scholastic has released the book and plans to publish a compendium of the beloved author’s unpublished works over the next few years.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: maygibbs.org, @thelittlebooklovers / Instagram</span></em></p>

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Revealed: 2021 Booker Prize shortlist

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The shortlist for the 2021 Booker Prize for Fiction has been announced, with six authors in the running for the coveted title and £50,000 prize money.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Booker Prize is open to authors of any nationality who have published a novel in the UK or Ireland, which has been written or translated into English.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The authors were selected from the 158 novels published in the UK or Ireland between October 1, 2020 and September 30, 2021.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judging this year’s finalists, the panel includes historian Maya Jasanoff, writer and editor Horatia Harrod, actor Natascha McElhone, two-time Booker-shortlisted novelist and professor Chigozie Obioma, and writer and former Archbishop Rowan Williams.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Jasanoff, the chair of the judging panel, said “With so many ambitious and intelligent books before us, the judges engaged in rich discussions not only about the qualities of any given title, but often about the purpose of fiction itself.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are pleased to present a shortlist that delivers as wide a range of original stories as it does voices and styles.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The shortlist for the 2021 Booker Prize for Fiction include:</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Promise</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Damon Galgut</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Passage North</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Anuk Arudpragasam</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">No One is Talking About This</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Patricia Lockwood</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Fortune Men</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Nadifa Mohamed</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bewilderment</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Richard Powers</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Great Circle</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Maggie Shipstead</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The winner will be announced on November 2.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: The Booker Prizes</span></em></p>

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Salman Rushdie announces novella in unusual form

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie, author of the controversial book </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Satanic Verses</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, has </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.goodreadingmagazine.com.au/latestnews/salman-rushdie-serialises-novella.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">announced</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> he will be writing his next book on the newsletter platform Substack.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The newsletter is called </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://salmanrushdie.substack.com/p/welcome-to-my-sea-of-stories?showWelcome=true" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Salman’s Sea of Stories</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in a reference to his 1990 novel </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.goodreadingmagazine.com.au/haroun-and-the-sea-of-stories.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Haroun and the Sea of Stories</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and will be where his new book </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Seventh Wave</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will be published, along with short stories, essays and other works.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speaking to </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Guardian, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rushdie revealed that </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Seventh Wave</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> totals at 35,000 words and is about a “film director and an actor slash muse written in the style of New Wave cinema”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to his website, most of his work will be free to access.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, a paid subscription is needed to access additional works, including </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Seventh Wave</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which will be released in weekly instalments. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The point of doing this is to have a closer relationship with readers, to speak freely, without any intermediaries or gatekeepers,” his website reads.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There’s just us here, just you and me, and we can take this wherever it goes. I hope you’ll enjoy the ride. I’ll try to make it fun.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: salmanrushdie.com</span></em></p>

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Unsung Heroes tells the real-life stories we may not usually hear

<p>In an effort to get the stories of our many unsung heroes heard, a retirement village called NewDirection Care in Bellmere, Queensland, has launched the first issue of a new magazine which will feature resident’s real-life stories.</p> <p>Called <em>Unsung Heroes</em>, the magazine tells the stories of the village’s residents and is written by award-winning journalist Michael Sheather.</p> <p>Natasha Chadwick, CEO and founder of NewDirection Care, explained how she and her co-workers had heard so many amazing stories from residents that they wanted a format where they could tell these stories to a wider audience.</p> <p>“These stories reach out to us and draw us in because it is in these stories that we see the echoes of who we want to be,” said Chadwick.</p> <p>“It’s a privilege – by allowing us to gently pull back the curtain on these lives that matter, lives that show us all what it means to find a purpose, we find hope and we find love in what is an increasingly uncertain and complex world,” she added.</p> <p><strong>Debut issue has 104-year-old WW2 veteran on the cover</strong></p> <p>The debut issue features a photo of 104-year-old WW2 veteran Bill Bruce on the cover and in his story inside the magazine, he reveals his secrets for a long and happy life.</p> <p>We also get to hear the inspiring story of Jeanie Bell, who became one of Australia’s most accomplished indigenous linguists and academics and helped to preserve the indigenous languages of Australia.</p> <p>Another story features war veteran Alex McCabe who shares his fascinating experience living through some of history’s greatest moments. Then we hear about Trudi and David Stretton sharing the story of how they renewed their wedding vows.</p> <p>Chadwick says the magazine is in line with the philosophy of the NewDirection Care community, adding: “Everything we do stems from our values of individuality, community, relationships, respect and empathy. I am proud of our staff and in constant awe of the residents who live at our MicroTown in Bellmere, Queensland, so it’s a privilege to celebrate the rich fabric of our community which is evident in the pages of this magazine.”</p> <p>The <em>Unsung Heroes</em> magazine is available to download via <span><a href="https://issuu.com/robynfoyster/docs/newdirectioncarejuly2021">issuu</a></span>. </p> <p><em>Image: Courtesy of Unsung Heroes</em></p> <p> </p>

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New book claims man from Snowy River “had to be Aboriginal”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The man from Snowy River from Banjo Paterson’s famous poem has always been depicted as a white man, but one author claims the character was based on an Indigenous stockman.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 1890 poem regales the story of a runaway horse, with various stockmen pursuing the colt and attempting to separate it from a herd of brumbies. When the wild horses descend an apparently impassable slope, the man from Snowy River is the only one who continues the chase.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Brumby Wars</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, author and Walkley Award-winning journalist Anthony Sharwood claims that the poem indicates the story takes place in the Byadbo region of the Snowy Mountains, where he says all the local stockmen were Indigenous.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Brumbies. A vision of the legendary Man from Snowy Riveror a spectre of ecosystems destroyed by feral pests? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheBrumbyWars?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheBrumbyWars</a> by <a href="https://twitter.com/antsharwood?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@antsharwood</a> is the riveting account of a major national issue and the very human passions it inspires.<br /><br />Out now: <a href="https://t.co/WF0FKMsEHu">https://t.co/WF0FKMsEHu</a> <a href="https://t.co/Gh8je2ciRa">pic.twitter.com/Gh8je2ciRa</a></p> — Hachette Australia Books (@HachetteAus) <a href="https://twitter.com/HachetteAus/status/1432938770370727940?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 1, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His theory relies on lines from the poem’s final stanza, which mention an area near Mount Kosciuszko “where the pine-clad ridges raise”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sharwood said Byadbo is “the only part of Australia’s alpine region and nearby foothills with cypress pine forests, a native conifer that thrives in dry country”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If the poem were sourced from stories of the Byadbo area, then the stockman had to be Aboriginal because all the best riders in the area had Indigenous blood,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In his newly-released book, Sharwood considers the controversial case for reducing brumby numbers due to their overgrazing of national parks, versus the calls to protect them because of their romanticised image.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Forget that Patterson knew they were pests and advocated for them to be shot to protect the pasture for cattle,” Sharwood said. “The brumbies are characters in the poem and that makes them sacred, eternal, untouchable, as quintessentially Australian as Vegemite and thongs.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Sharwood isn’t the first to suggest the titular character was Indigenous.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 1988, Victoria’s official historian Bernard Barrett proposed the character may have been based on a young Indigenous rider named Toby, with Barrett claiming “a better rider never sat a horse”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 331.0546875px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843655/gettyimages-542638958.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cb8bd6984579401690c748346937c534" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Professor Jakelin Troy, director of Aboriginal research at the University of Sydney and an Aboriginal Australian from the Ngarigu community of the Snowy Mountains, said we may never know who the rider was based on.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t think any of us really care who the man, or woman, from Snowy River was, but it is an interesting thing to explore because it definitely plays into the mythology of the area,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“One piece of research says he was my father’s great uncle called Jim Troy. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Banjo stayed with the family and Jim Troy fits the description even down to the horse. They bred them tough like their horses were a mixture of Timor pony which are really tough and thoroughbreds with a bit of Arab to make them a bit finer. The horses were a mixed breed … We will probably never know who the actual person was.”</span></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hachette.com.au/anthony-sharwood/the-brumby-wars-the-battle-for-the-soul-of-australia" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Brumby Wars</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was released on Wednesday, August 1 by Hachette.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p>

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“Outstanding accomplishment”: Cassandra Pybus wins National Biography Award

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Acclaimed author Cassandra Pybus has won the 2021 National Biography Award and a $25,000 prize for her account of Truganini, a Nuenonne woman from Tasmania.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The award recognises the best works across the categories of biography, autobiography, and memoir writing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judges praised </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.allenandunwin.com/browse/books/other-books/Truganini-Cassandra-Pybus-9781760529222" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Truganini: Journey Through the Apocalypse</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, describing it as “the standout work in an impressive field”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The restoration of its subject elevates this book. Tuganini’s voice has been lost in the self-serving narrative of modern Australia. Reclamation is an outstanding accomplishment for any subject, and a thrilling one for a woman who stood against an empire,” the judges said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The judging panel included Senior Judge Suzanne Falkiner, 2019 National Biography Award winner Rick Morton, and 2000 National Biography Award winner Mandy Sayer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We were all impressed by <em>Truganini</em>, which combined evocative writing with scholarly research” Senior Judge Suzanne Falkiner said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Given the limitations of assembling Truganini’s biography through the contemporary accounts of third-person witnesses, and where the subject’s own voice is entirely absent, Cassandra Pybus has deftly attempted to reverse the gaze of history.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“She reveals the sexual politics at play in areas depleted of young Indigenous women by European depredations, while recognising the agency, shrewdness, and refusal to accept the roles of passive victim of Truganini and her companions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pybus, an award-winning author and historian, made the </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/books/2021-national-biography-award-finalists-announced" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">shortlist</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> alongside five other works - including a biography of Senator Penny Wong and Archie Roach’s memoir.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each shortlisted author received a $2,000 prize.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Truganini</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> recounts the journey Truganini took around Tasmania with missionary George Augustus Robinson, to try and end the violence between colonists and Indigenous Australia.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Allen &amp; Unwin, Cassandra Pybus / Twitter</span></em></p>

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Campaigner sparks controversy after blasting picture book

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A British domestic violence campaigner has called out Judith Kerr’s 1968 picture book, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Tiger Who Came to Tea</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, as a reinforcement of problematic ideas.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rachel Adamson, the co-director of charity Zero Tolerance, which aims to end men’s violence against women, has claimed the book is an “old fashioned” depiction of women.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We know that gender stereotypes are harmful and they reinforce gender inequality, and that gender inequality is the cause of violence against women and girls,” she told </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC Radio Scotland</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kerr’s picture book tells the story of a tiger who arrives on a family’s doorstep and, once invited in for tea, proceeds to consume all of their food and drinks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Adamson criticised the “stereotypical” ending to the book, where the dad comes home from work and saves the day by taking his family to a cafe.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The campaigner also questioned why the tiger was not female or gender neutral.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We need to recognise these aren’t just stories… it is reflective of a society that we need to think more closely about,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Adamson described Kerr as a “wonderful author”, but was aware that her comments would “make a lot of people unhappy”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite her strong views about the book, Adamson has stressed that she doesn’t want it banned.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead, she believes it could be used to “raise a conversation” in nurseries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speaking to </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Daily Telegraph</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Meghan Gallacher, the Scottish Conservatives spokesperson for children and young people, described Adamson’s language as “completely unhelpful”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“While attitudes change over time, parents will be left bemused at some of these claims by Zero Tolerance,” Gallacher </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9920825/Tiger-Came-Tea-lead-rape-harassment-campaigner-claims.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This sort of language is completely unhelpful as we try to educate children about much-loved publications from days gone by.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There are far better ways for this publicly funded group to go about changing attitudes, rather than simply calling for these books to be banned from nurseries.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kerr, who had fled Nazi Germany when she was just 13, had previously denied claims there was a darker meaning to the story.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The idea came to her while she was a stay-at-home mother of her two small children.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It got really very boring,” she later recalled. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’d go for a walk and have tea, and that was it really. And we wished someone would come. So I thought, why not have a tiger come?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kerr continued to write and illustrate books from 1968 until she passed away in May of 2019.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Instagram, Rachel Adamson</span></em></p>

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Dolly Parton and James Patterson to release a novel

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">From singing hit country songs to contributing to COVID-19 vaccine research, Dolly Parton has a diversified set of skills.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In her latest venture, the songstress has teamed up with bestselling author James Patterson to pen her first-ever fiction novel, due to be released on March 7, 2022.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The novel, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Run, Rose, Run</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, is a thriller that follows a young woman on the run who moves to Nashville to pursue her dreams as a singer-songwriter and will do anything it takes to survive.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When she announced her debut novel, the star shared a photo of herself with the legendary novelist, as well as a picture of the book’s front cover.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CScLi_DLNIH/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CScLi_DLNIH/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Dolly Parton (@dollyparton)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I cannot be more excited about the release of my very first novel #RunRoseRun with @jamespattersonbooks,” she captioned the post.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alongside the novel, Dolly plans to release a companion LP of new music based on the characters and situations in the novel.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I hope you enjoy the book and the songs as much as we’ve enjoyed putting it together,” she concluded.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just two days before making the announcement on social media, Dolly hinted at the idea on Book Lovers Day, disclosing her dream of writing her own novel.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The seeds of dreams are often found in books, and the seeds you help plant in your community can grow across the world,” she captioned a retro snap of herself holding a book.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I dream of writing my own novel one day 😉”.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CSW-D-JLob_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CSW-D-JLob_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Dolly Parton (@dollyparton)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Previously, Dolly has written autobiographical books, including </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which was released last year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The famed singer has also started a weekly YouTube series called </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Goodnight with Dolly</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, where she reads children’s books for kids who are stuck at home and bored during the COVID-19 pandemic.</span></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/james-patterson/run-rose-run/9780759554375/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Run, Rose, Run</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is now available to preorder from </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.jamespatterson.com/titles/james-patterson/run-rose-run/9780759554344/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patterson’s website</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, as well as other bookstores.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Dolly Parton / Instagram</span></p>

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Author recalls swimming with Prince Charles in her new book

<p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6769599ade9143b4beea9b742c4674a9" /><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/401044158a9d43b69893430da54a1b30" />In her new book <em>Finding Fabulous Over 60</em>, Lesley Thomas opens up about how she had some drinks and swam with Prince Charles in 1983 – as well as a collection of other amazing life lessons. </p> <p>Lesley Thomas was the woman we saw swimming with Prince Charles on the front page of all the newspapers when he visited back in 1979 and 1983. She says, however: "I was not the model who ran up and kissed him in the surf!"</p> <p>But she did swim with Prince Charles several times at the North Cottesloe surf club beach when he visited Perth. She adds: "He turned up unexpectedly late one Sunday afternoon. The full story is in my book, but he came to the party and stayed two hours and had a great time because there were no press, no cameras, no mobile phones and he could relax, have a couple of drinks and enjoy himself - which is exactly what he and his entourage did."</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843165/lesley-thomas-book-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/401044158a9d43b69893430da54a1b30" /></p> <p>As well as these stories there's much more from Thomas in her new book including how she overcame serious addictions, ended toxic relationships and lost weight, to wind up as she says: “a fit, vibrant 67-year-old woman – or so I’m told!”</p> <p>Her autobiographical book documents her darkest moments when she prayed to a power greater than herself for help. Even though the road was rocky, she based her recovery, weight loss, fitness, and absolutely brilliant sense of wellbeing on those prayers being answered and her path being guided.</p> <p><strong>Here at <em>Over 60</em>, we talked with Thomas and asked her what inspired her to sit down and write her book – <em>Finding Fabulous Over 60?</em></strong></p> <p>I wanted to help others to know it is possible to overcome and recover from addictions, childhood traumas, weight issues and toxic relationships and find for themselves the level of inner peace and joy that I have experienced more and more in my life. When Covid arrived in 2020, space opened for me when I lost my job and that is when I was guided to start writing.</p> <p><strong>Your book is autobiographical and you’ve said it’s about a “transformation” and “overcoming addictions – in particular alcohol addiction.” Was this something you struggled with yourself and you wanted to write and let people know how you became sober?</strong></p> <p>Yes, the 'disease of addiction' is debilitating, more so when you are trying to quit. You are fighting with your body, which wants a substance far more than you can cope with. It may sound dramatic, but anyone who has experienced it will know exactly what I am talking about. You feel like you are going insane and that you can hardly bear to be awake at times. The mental and physical anguish and torment are unbearable. I am hoping that the stories of my experiences with overcoming my addictions to nicotine and alcohol in particular, but also my struggles with my addiction to processed sugar and flour and overeating will give people hope that they too can overcome their addictions.</p> <p> <img style="width: 428.2700421940928px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843166/lesley-and-children-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6769599ade9143b4beea9b742c4674a9" /></p> <p><strong>You also talk about ‘overcoming childhood traumas’ in your book. Was this another area you found helped you in your life?</strong></p> <p>Unprocessed childhood traumas crippled me mentally and emotionally, especially in my adult life and I wasn't even aware of it. I didn't start seeking professional help until I was 45 and it was the best thing I could have done for myself. Starting the process of dealing with childhood traumas assisted me enormously as I worked on overcoming my addictions. It wasn't easy and it took a long time, but it was certainly worthwhile.</p> <p><strong>Many people would be interested in how you ‘detached from a three-year toxic relationship’. Does it inspire you to let people how you’ve dealt with issues so you can help them?</strong></p> <p>Absolutely. It is so wonderful seeing 'hope' or 'the realisation of possibilities' come into someone's eyes. I used the word 'detached' in that phrase because it wasn't just a matter of physically leaving, I had to detach mentally and emotionally (from what seemed like a soul level) as well as physically and I could hardly believe how painful that was, but I knew in my heart I had to do it and get through it for my sanity and wellbeing.</p> <p>Key to this was a willingness to look at and address honestly my own 'stuff'. In any relationship, we each have our part and we kid ourselves if we think it's 'all' someone else's fault when the relationship breaks down. Also, if we don't do this work, we will take out 'stuff' into the next relationship and it will all happen again.</p> <p><strong>So many men and women would be keen to know how you ‘lost weight and dealt with food addictions.’ Can you please give us a teaser of how you did this?</strong></p> <p>I had to accept the fact that nobody was going to do it for me. I also acknowledged that to be successful I needed to get out of my own way, become accountable, and get professional guidance.</p> <p><strong>Do you feel your life after death experiences with each of your parents after they passed has helped you on your journey?</strong></p> <p>Yes, enormously. Each of the visits of my parents after they passed that I describe in my book absolutely astounded me and left me in no doubt at all that there is life after death. It was a great comfort to me knowing that and that they are around me when I need them and are helping me.</p> <p><strong>Is there anything else you’d like to share with the readers of Over60?</strong></p> <p>With a grateful heart and a willingness to look on the bright side, I believe anything is possible for anyone. Truly! You are never too young or too old to take the first step to freedom, a better life, inner peace and a lot of laughs along the way. It's just the <em>best </em>feeling.</p> <p><strong>Lesley Thomas’s book is available on her website here: - </strong><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.findingfabulousover60.com/" target="_blank"><strong>www.findingfabulousover60.com</strong></a></p> <p><strong>Here are some of the reviews of the book:</strong></p> <p>“An incredible read! A hugely inspirational story of transformation”<br /><strong>- Sue Stone - UK Author, Secret Millionaire and Inspirational Speaker</strong></p> <p>A recommended read for sure this book left me motivated to change ...in my case to lose weight (which I have since done) and in places the stories gave me a good old fashioned laugh. And who does not need a dose of that!!!!</p> <p><strong>- Henry Blatman</strong></p> <p>Photos: Courtesy of Lesley Thomas</p>

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2021 National Biography Award finalists announced

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The National Biography Award, a yearly recognition of the best biographies and life stories across Australia, has returned for another year, with the State Library of NSW announcing the finalists for 2021.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judges Suzanne Falkiner, Rick Morton, and Mandey Sayer selected six works to shortlist out of 101 entries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the winner set to be announced on August 26, here is a roundup of the shortlisted autobiographies and biographies for this year.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843075/archie-roach.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8ea1f6a7e50240c7a5735aae3a0ed503" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Simon &amp; Schuster, Getty</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>Tell Me Why</em>, Archie Roach</strong></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.simonandschuster.com.au/books/Tell-Me-Why/Archie-Roach/9781760854539" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tell Me Why: The Story of My Life and My Music</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is a memoir detailing Roach’s life - from his forcible removal from his family as a small child to finding his biological family and becoming the legendary songwriter we know today.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Roach’s memoir touches on love, heartbreak, family, survival, and renewal, and has won the 202 Indie Book of the Year Non-Fiction and 2021 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843079/clements-lotus.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3ffd7e60cf1b46d1bb6ff87019e2aba3" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Hardie Grant Publishing</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>The Lotus Eaters</em>, Emily Clements</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Clement’s memoir recounts the young writer’s teenage years and early twenties, covering her time living in Vietnam. After a dispute between her best friend sees Emily stranded in the country, alone for the first time in her life, she decides to stay and attempts to combat her newfound loneliness.</span></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hardiegrant.com/au/publishing/bookfinder/book/the-lotus-eaters-by-emily-clements/9781743795699" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Lotus Eaters</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has been praised for its deep dive into a range of subjects, including body image, friendship, sex and consent.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843078/kwong-moon.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/14cd1ca7800f4534b4bc6a8ebda28baf" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: HarperCollins Publishers</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>One Bright Moon</em>, Andrew Kwong</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.harpercollins.com.au/9781460758625/one-bright-moon/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">One Bright Moon</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Kwong details the trials he experienced as a child fleeing Chairman Mao’s China to a new life in Australia. Having witnessed his first execution when he was just seven years old and growing up facing persecution and famine, he and his family decided they had to escape. And, twelve-year-old Andrew would be the first to make the journey.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Critics have praised Kwong for his “startling clarity” and “profoundly moving” story.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843077/max-miller.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5b4d72b2976b404b9a726b591b9378e7" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Allen &amp; Unwin</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>Max</em>, Alex Miller</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A tribute to Miller’s friend, Max Blatt, </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.allenandunwin.com/browse/books/other-books/Max-Alex-Miller-9781760878160" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Max</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> follows Miller’s journey as he pieces together Blatt’s life from the Melbourne Holocaust Centre’s records to his former home in Poland. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Max</em> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">explores the subjects of friendship, memory, and history that critics describe as a “compelling and tender story of one man’s hidden history”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843076/truganini-pybus.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/396a7b91980240358009a931877c4fd8" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Allen &amp; Unwin, Cassandra Pybus / Twitter</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>Truganini: Journey Through the Apocalypse</em>, Cassandra Pybus</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pybus, an award-winning author and historian, has pored over eyewitness accounts to tell the story of Truganini, who has since become widely referred to as the ‘last Tasmanian’ in a perpetuation of the myth of the extinction of Tasmanian Aboriginal culture.</span></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.allenandunwin.com/browse/books/other-books/Truganini-Cassandra-Pybus-9781760529222" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Truganini: Journey Through the Apocalypse</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> recounts Truganini’s story of journeying around Tasmania with self-styled missionary George Augustus Robinson to help him try to negotiate an end to the violence between white colonists and Indigenous Australians.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843074/wong-margaret.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b85afede9d5e46b6b5b3abaf635c7369" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Black Inc Books</span></em></p> <p><strong><em>Penny Wong: Passion and Principles</em>, Margaret Simons</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Journalist Margaret Simons has penned the first biography of Senator Penny Wong, tracing her story from her early life in Malaysia, to becoming a student activist in Adelaide, and her time in parliament. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.blackincbooks.com.au/books/penny-wong" target="_blank">Penny Wong: Passion and Principles</a></em>, Simons includes exclusive interviews with Wong and her Labor colleagues, as well as parliamentary opponents, close friends, and family members, to provide an insight into the Australian politician’s life.</span></p>

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Melbourne mum's children's book gets the royal treatment

<p>A mother-of-two from Melbourne woke up on Wednesday morning to see her children's book receiving unexpected attention from the Royal Family. </p> <p>Emma Macey, author of Matilda and the Bear, was shocked to see <span>Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, reading her acclaimed book on her popular Storytime with Fergie &amp; Friends YouTube channel.</span></p> <p><span>The Melbourne mum told 9Honey that she was thrilled to know her book had been read to an audience of tens of thousands of people around the world by such an important person.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CSHCiEkHppe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CSHCiEkHppe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Emma Macey (@matildaandthebear)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>"I loved how even Fergie could relate to situations Matilda found herself in that made her feel a bit anxious," the excited mum says. </span></p> <p><span>"It goes to show that this book is very relatable to adults just as well as the children they may be reading it to!"</span></p> <p><span>Emma was inspired to write her book last year when she saw how lockdown was affecting the mental health of her young daughters, who couldn't understand why their lives had changed so drastically.</span></p> <p><span>Emma wanted her girls to "feel safe" and discovered that having open conversations with them about anxiety and listening to them helped.</span></p> <p><span>After self-publishing her book, she has sold thousands of copies worldwide and is overwhelmed by the </span>positive response, and was elated to have Fergie relate to the book in her own way.</p> <p><span>Emma hopes the book helps offer comfort to children experiencing any kind of hardship.</span></p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram @matildaandthebear</em></p>

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2021 Miles Franklin Award winner announced

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tasmanian author, Amanda Lohrey, has been awarded the 2021 Miles Franklin Literary Prize for her novel </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.textpublishing.com.au/books/the-labyrinth" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Labyrinth</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, making her the second Tasmanian to win in the coveted award in its 64-year history.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Set up in 1957, the Miles Franklin award was established after the death of the author, Miles Franklin, to recognise novels of literary merit that reflect Australian life.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Australia’s most significant literary prize, Lohrey has been awarded a $60,000 prize.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My husband calls it the Wimbledon of literary awards. It’s just an honour [to win],” Lohrey said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There’s something nice about being associated with Miles Franklin; she was such a larrikin, such a non-conformist.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The judges praised Lohrey’s book as a “beautifully written reflection on the conflicts between parents and children, men and women, and the value and purpose of creative work”.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Labyrinth</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> follows Erica Marsden, a hotel receptionist, as she moves from Sydney to coastal NSW to be closer to her mentally ill son in prison. While looking for a house to purchase, Erica has a dream imploring her to build a labyrinth - a mission which quickly becomes an obsession.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lohrey was shortlisted in the 1996 Miles Franklin for her novel, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Camille’s Bread</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and longlisted in 2005 for </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Philosopher’s Doll</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Text Publishing</span></em></p>

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Against cancelling Chaucer

<p>Was Chaucer a toxic misogynist, or a staunch women’s ally?<span></span></p> <p>Spying is a risky profession. For the 14th-century English undercover agent-turned-poet Geoffrey Chaucer, <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com/books?id=kYzgDwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PA95&amp;dq=Chaucer+military+intelligence&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwikmuL34d_xAhWRcc0KHRMHB0kQ6AEwAHoECAkQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Chaucer%20military%20intelligence&amp;f=false" target="_blank">the dangers</a> – at least to his reputation – continue to surface centuries after his death.</p> <p>In his <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/why-is-chaucer-disappearing-from-the-university-curriculum-leicester-essay-a-s-g-edwards" target="_blank">July 2021 essay</a> for the Times Literary Supplement, A.S.G. Edwards, professor of medieval manuscripts at the University of Kent in Canterbury, England, laments the removal of Geoffrey Chaucer from university curricula. Edwards says he believes this disappearance may be propelled by a vocal cohort of scholars who see the “father of English poetry” as <a rel="noopener" href="https://muse.jhu.edu/article/727754" target="_blank">a rapist, racist and antisemite</a>.</p> <p>The predicament would have amused Chaucer himself. Jewish and feminist scholars, among others, are shooting down one of their earliest and wisest allies. This is happening when <a rel="noopener" href="https://voegelinview.com/feminist-thought-of-geoffrey-chaucer-the-wife-of-bath-and-all-hire-secte" target="_blank">new research reveals</a> a Chaucer altogether different from what many current readers have come to accept. My decades of research show he was no raunchy proponent of bro culture but a daring and ingenious <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/for-the-birds-hardly-valentines-day-was-reimagined-by-chivalrous-medieval-poets-for-all-to-enjoy-respectfully-155099" target="_blank">defender of women and the innocent</a>.</p> <p>As a <a rel="noopener" href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=iDoS8ewAAAAJ&amp;hl=en" target="_blank">medievalist who teaches Chaucer</a>, I believe the movement to cancel Chaucer has been bamboozled by his tradecraft – his consummate skill as a master of disguise.</p> <p><strong>Outfoxing the professors</strong></p> <p>It’s true that Chaucer’s work contains toxic material. His “<a rel="noopener" href="https://chaucer.fas.harvard.edu/pages/prologue" target="_blank">Wife of Bath’s Prologue</a>” in “The Canterbury Tales,” his celebrated collection of stories, quotes at length from the long tradition of classical and medieval works on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/12914/" target="_blank">evils of women</a>, as mansplained by the Wife’s elderly husbands: “You say, just as worms destroy a tree, so a wife destroys her husband.”</p> <p>Later, “<a rel="noopener" href="https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/%7Echaucer/teachslf/pri-par.htm" target="_blank">The Prioress’s Tale</a>” repeats the anti-Semitic <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.adl.org/education/resources/glossary-terms/blood-libel" target="_blank">blood libel</a> story, the false accusation that Jews murdered Christians, at a time when Jews across Europe <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.montana.edu/historybug/yersiniaessays/pariera-dinkins.html" target="_blank">were under attack</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/411132/original/file-20210713-21-fxqh4g.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/411132/original/file-20210713-21-fxqh4g.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="An illustration of two women characters from Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The Canterbury Tales'" /></a> <em><span class="caption">The Prioress and the Wife of Bath from Geoffrey Chaucer’s ‘The Canterbury Tales.’</span> <span class="attribution"><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/the-prioress-and-the-wife-of-bath-from-old-england-a-news-photo/1036139720" target="_blank" class="source">Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)</a></span></em></p> <p>These poems in particular generate accusations that Chaucer propagated sexist and antisemitic material because he agreed with or enjoyed it.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com/books?id=5rDoDwAAQBAJ&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;dq=elaine+tuttle+hansen+chaucer+and+the+fictions+of+gender&amp;source=gbs_navlinks_s" target="_blank">Several</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/40555" target="_blank">prominent</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691160092/chaucer" target="_blank">scholars</a> seem convinced that Chaucer’s personal views are the same as those of his characters and that Chaucer is promoting these opinions. And they believe he abducted or raped a young woman named Cecily Chaumpaigne, although the <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.umsl.edu/%7Egradyf/chaucer/cecily.htm" target="_blank">legal records</a> are enigmatic. It looks as though Cecily accused Chaucer of some such crime and he paid her to clear his name. It’s unclear what actually happened between them.</p> <p>Critics cherry-pick quotations to support their claims about Chaucer. But if you examine his writings in detail, as I have, you’ll see themes of concern for women and human rights, the oppressed and the persecuted, reappear time and time again.</p> <p><strong>Chaucer the spy</strong></p> <p>Readers often assume Chaucer’s characters were a reflection of the writer’s own attitude because he is such a convincing role player. Chaucer’s <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com/books?id=E4DXD7Sk7WcC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=life+of+Chaucer+Riverside+Chaucer&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiws4jr0uXxAhWnEFkFHXbCAOQQ6AEwAHoECAsQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=life%20of%20Chaucer%20Riverside%20Chaucer&amp;f=false" target="_blank">career in the English secret service</a> trained him as an observer, analyst, diplomat and master at concealing his own views.</p> <p>In his teens, Chaucer became a confidential envoy for England. From 1359 to 1378, he graced English diplomatic delegations and carried out missions described in expense records only as “<a rel="noopener" href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-riverside-chaucer-9780199552092?lang=de&amp;cc=lt" target="_blank">the king’s secret business</a>.”</p> <p>Documents show him scouting paths through the Pyrenees for English forces poised to invade Spain. He lobbied Italy for money and troops, while also perhaps investigating the suspicious death of Lionel of Antwerp, an English prince who was probably poisoned soon after his wedding.</p> <p>Chaucer’s job brought him face to face with the darkest figures of his day — the treacherous <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.britannica.com/biography/Charles-II-king-of-Navarre" target="_blank">Charles the Bad, King of Navarre</a>, a notorious traitor and assassin, and Bernabò Visconti, lord of Milan, who helped devise a <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com/books?id=0YoxAAAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PA179&amp;dq=Bernabo+Visconti+torture&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwizxdyM8t_xAhVZGs0KHZgQCn0Q6AEwCHoECAQQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Bernabo%20Visconti%20torture&amp;f=false" target="_blank">40-day torture protocol</a>.</p> <p>Chaucer’s poetry reflects his experience as an English agent. He enjoyed role-playing and assuming many identities in his writing. And like the couriers he dispatched from Italy in 1378, he brings his readers covert messages split between multiple speakers. Each teller holds just a piece of the puzzle. The whole story can only be understood when all the messages arrive.</p> <p>He also uses the skills of a secret agent to express dangerous truths not accepted in his own day, when misogyny and antisemitism were both entrenched, especially among the clergy.</p> <p>Chaucer does not preach or explain. Instead, he lets the formidable Wife of Bath, the character he most enjoyed, tell us about the misogyny of her five husbands and fantasize about how ladies of King Arthur’s court might take revenge on a rapist. Or he makes his deserted <a rel="noopener" href="http://mcllibrary.org/Houseoffame/" target="_blank">Queen Dido cry</a>: “Given their bad behavior, it’s a shame any woman ever took pity on any man.”</p> <p><strong>Chaucer the chivalrous defender</strong></p> <p>While current critiques of Chaucer label him as an <a rel="noopener" href="https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/40555" target="_blank">exponent of toxic masculinity</a>, he was actually an <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com/books?id=E5BCs9mylBsC&amp;pg=PA379&amp;dq=Chaucer+human+rights&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjKqeXc1OXxAhV3F1kFHZztDcYQ6AEwAXoECAoQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Chaucer%20human%20rights&amp;f=false" target="_blank">advocate for human rights</a>.</p> <p>My own research shows that in the course of his career he supported women’s right to choose their own mates and the human desire for freedom from enslavement, coercion, verbal abuse, political tyranny, judicial corruption and sexual trafficking. In “The Canterbury Tales” and “The Legend of Good Women,” he tells many stories on such themes. There he opposed assassination, infanticide and femicide, the mistreatment of prisoners, sexual harassment and domestic abuse. He valued self-control in action and in speech. He spoke out for women, enslaved people and Jews.</p> <p>“Women want to be free and not coerced like slaves, and so do men,” the narrator of <a rel="noopener" href="https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/%7Echaucer/teachslf/frkt-par.htm" target="_blank">“The Franklin’s Prologue” says</a>.</p> <p>As for Jews, Chaucer salutes their ancient heroism in his early poem “<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/English/Fame.php" target="_blank">The House of Fame</a>.” He depicts them as a people who have done great good in the world, only to be rewarded with slander. In “The Prioress’s Tale” he shows them being libeled by a desperate character to cover up a crime of which they were manifestly innocent, a century after all Jews had been brutally expelled from England.</p> <p>Chaucer’s own words demonstrate beyond the shadow of a doubt that when his much underestimated Prioress tells her antisemitic blood libel tale, Chaucer is not endorsing it. Through <a rel="noopener" href="https://sites.fas.harvard.edu/%7Echaucer/teachslf/pri-par.htm" target="_blank">her own words and actions</a>, and a cascade of reactions from those who hear her, he is exposing such guilty and dangerous actors as they deploy such lies.</p> <p>And was he a rapist or an abductor? <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jun/07/document-casts-new-light-on-chaucer-rape-case" target="_blank">It’s unlikely</a>. The case suggests he might well have been targeted, perhaps even because of his work. Few authors have ever been more <a rel="noopener" href="https://scholarship.depauw.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1133&amp;context=studentresearch" target="_blank">outspoken about man’s inhumanity to women</a>.</p> <p>It is bizarre that one of the strongest and earliest writers in English literature to speak out against rape and support women and the downtrodden should be pilloried and threatened with cancellation.</p> <p>But Chaucer knew the complexity of his art put him at risk. As his character the Squire dryly observed, people all too often “demen gladly to the badder ende” – “They are happy to assume the worst.”<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/152312/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jennifer-wollock-1179510" target="_blank">Jennifer Wollock</a>, Professor of English, <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/texas-aandm-university-1672" target="_blank">Texas A&amp;M University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/calls-to-cancel-chaucer-ignore-his-defense-of-women-and-the-innocent-and-assume-all-his-characters-opinions-are-his-152312" target="_blank">original article</a>.</p>

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“The no going back moment”: Palace insiders slam Prince Harry’s memoir

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Palace insiders have described Prince Harry’s new memoir as the “final nail in the coffin” for his relationship with the Royal Family.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Duke of Sussex announced that he will release an “intimate and heartfelt” memoir next year, which he says will be “accurate and wholly truthful”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become,” the 36-year-old said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Royal sources have spoken out about a “growing sense of shock and fury” within the family about the book, claiming Harry’s decision ruined any hope of reconciliation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is the no going back moment - the final nail in the coffin of the Royal Family’s relationship with Harry,” a “senior royal source” told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9806777/DAN-WOOTTON-reveals-growing-royal-fury-Harrys-tell-book.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Daily Mail</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The emotional turmoil as they wait over a year for publication is going to be torturous.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another source told the publication: “Prince Charles didn’t know anything about it. This is really painful, it’s going to be difficult for him to take. The assumption is that he will take another kicking from Harry.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The real disappointing thing for Charles is that he used to get on with Harry so well, actually far better than William. He feels so let down by the whole thing.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Insiders also claim that the book will damage Harry’s relationship with Prince William.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Harry’s been going around to people saying he can’t remember his childhood and his mother that much. Now he’s going to write a book about it. How does that stack up?” a source said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What’s really telling is even the relatives he remains closest to, like princesses Eugenie and Beatrice, are stunned by what he’s up to.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the book expected to be published in 2022, there are said to be concerns that it could “overshadow” significant royal events, such as the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee, Prince William’s 40th birthday, and the 25th anniversary of Princess Diana’s death.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With that mix, it should have been a really positive year for the Royal Family,” a source said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But Harry doesn’t care. He’s acting like a child. We need to remember he’s a nearly 37-year-old man, not a 21-year-old. He’s on the cusp of middle age.”</span></p>

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Adaptations of Brian Jacques ‘Redwall’ series announced

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The beloved </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Redwall</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> series by Brian Jacques is being adapted into a feature film and animated series following a new rights deal between Netflix and Penguin Random House Children.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The books will be adapted for the first time as a film, which will draw on the titular novel in the series and will be written by Patrick McHale (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over The Garden Wall</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">).</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">...i - am that is... <a href="https://t.co/Aau3o8bKHu">pic.twitter.com/Aau3o8bKHu</a></p> — Patrick McHale (@Patrick_McHale) <a href="https://twitter.com/Patrick_McHale/status/1359608617935265813?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 10, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The television series will be based on the second book, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Martin the Warrior</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and will be the first television adaptation of the books since the series that ran from 1999 until 2002.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We couldn’t be more delighted to announce this deal,” Ben Horlson, Fiction Publisher at Penguin Random House Children told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://variety.com/2021/film/news/netflix-redwall-movie-tv-show-brian-jacques-1234904865/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Variety</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">magazine. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These perennially popular stories have been etched onto the hearts of millions of readers, and we are thrilled to partner with Netflix to bring those beloved characters on screen for families worldwide to enjoy.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jacques; </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Redwall</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> series follows anthropomorphic animals - including mice, rabbits, badgers, and moles - that live in the Redwall abbey and the surrounding Mossflower Woods as they defend themselves against bands of foxes, rats, and weasels.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Variety</span></em></p>

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Lisa Wilkinson "completely opened up" in new autobiography

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Australian journalist Lisa Wilkinson is thrilled to annouce her latest project, an autobiography called<span> </span><em>It Wasn't Meant To Be Like This</em>.</p> <p>The autobiography is set to outline her entire life from where she started as a "magazine-junkie" kid in Western Sydney to a successful journalist in the mainstream Australian media.</p> <p>She shared the news on Instagram.</p> <p>"I've been working on something that is very close to my heart over the last couple of years - in fact, when I think about it, I've been working on this my entire life."It's my autobiography, and I'm excited (and just a little bit terrified) to be sharing the cover with you today," she wrote in the caption.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRgGAJRlPGB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRgGAJRlPGB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Lisa Wilkinson (@lisa_wilkinson)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"It's called<span> </span><em>"It Wasn't Meant To Be Like This"</em>, and tells the story of how this magazine-junkie kid from (proudly) the western suburbs of Sydney, worked hard to survive the bumps and bruises of my teenage years, and went on to find myself in situations and places I could have once only ever dreamt about," she explained.</p> <p>"In it, I've completely opened up on things I've never talked about before, not even with some of my closest girlfriends."</p> <p>"I share the roller coaster ride of joys, and sadnesses, the pinch-myself moments, and the hard lessons I've had to learn along the way.</p> <p>"I've left no stone unturned, particularly when it comes to some of the more public moments you've seen in the headlines. Now, you'll know the truth," she finished.</p> <p>The post was a hit with fans, quickly hitting over 21,000 likes and other Aussie celebrities commented saying they were proud of Wilkinson.</p> <p>"Can't wait!" Turia Pitt commented.</p> <p>"This is great Lisa, when will the audio book be available? I struggle with those big words you like,"<span> </span><em>The Chase</em><span> </span>host Larry Emdur joked.</p> <p>Comedian Peter Helliar couldn't contain his excitement and commented "Woohoo!! Can't wait!".</p> <p>The book will be released on October 27th, 2021.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Prince Harry's latest announcement has fans stunned

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Prince Harry has shocked fans and the royal family with his latest announcement, as he plans on publishing a tell-all book about his life.</p> <p>Penguin Random House made the announcement, saying it was "honoured" to publish the memoir by the Duke of Sussex.</p> <p>“In an intimate and heartfelt memoir from one of the most fascinating and influential global figures of our time, Prince Harry will share, for the very first time, the definitive account of the experiences, adventures, losses and life lessons that have helped shape him,” it said.</p> <p>“Covering his lifetime in the public eye from childhood to the present day, including his dedication to service, the military duty that twice took him to the frontlines of Afghanistan, and the joy he has found in being a husband and father, Prince Harry will offer an honest and captivating personal portrait, one that shows readers that behind everything they think they know lies an inspiring, courageous and uplifting human story.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Prince Harry is ready to tell his story. <a href="https://twitter.com/penguinrandom?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@penguinrandom</a> announced today that the Duke of Sussex will publish “an intimate and heartfelt memoir” in late 2022. It will be “the definitive account of the experiences, adventures, losses, and life lessons that have helped shape him.” <a href="https://t.co/wqiv7jUM8v">pic.twitter.com/wqiv7jUM8v</a></p> — Omid Scobie (@scobie) <a href="https://twitter.com/scobie/status/1417175401324064768?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 19, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Prince Harry confirmed the news, saying he was excited to share his life in a way that was "accurate and wholly truthful".</p> <p>“I’m writing this not as the Prince I was born but as the man I have become,” he said.</p> <p>“I’ve worn many hats over the years, both literally and figuratively, and my hope is that in telling my story – the highs and lows, the mistakes, the lessons learned – I can help show that no matter where we come from, we have more in common than we think.</p> <p>“I’m deeply grateful for the opportunity to share what I’ve learned over the course of my life so far and excited for people to read a firsthand account of my life that’s accurate and wholly truthful.”</p> <p>Markus Dohle, the CEO of Pengiun Random House, said the company was “thrilled” to be releasing the book.</p> <p>“Prince Harry has harnessed his extraordinary life experience as a Prince, a soldier, and a knowledgeable advocate for social issues, establishing himself as a global leader recognised for his courage and openness,” said Mr Dohle.</p> <p>“It is for that reason we’re excited to publish his honest and moving story.”</p> <p>However, the announcement wasn't without its critics.</p> <p>Piers Morgan led the charge, tweeting "You've got to be f---ing joking?????"</p> <p>"Oh Harry, leave the ghost-written autobiographies to the footballers. Your Granny hasn't felt the need to tell 'her story' having lived three times as long as you," GB News presenter Colin Brazier tweeted.</p> <p>Royal biographer Robert Jobson wrote, "I'd say the Windsor Christening of 'Lilibet' with the Queen present might well be off! Unless 'H' intends to combine it with a book signing tour of the UK that is…"</p> <p>Random House hasn't confirmed how much Prince Harry will be paid for his memoir but Prince Harry says that he will be donating the proceeds to charity.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Five books to read before you watch them

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the pandemic sees us continuing to stay inside and look for ways to entertain ourselves, adaptations of beloved books on screens big and small are just one way to while away the hours.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are five books that are worth a read before their adaptations are released.</span></p> <p><strong>1. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga (Netflix)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 2008 Booker winning novel will be hitting Australian Netflix on January 14, 2022. Adiga’s darkly humorous debut novel follows the rags-to-riches story of Balram Halwal (played by Adarsh Gourav in his debut role), the son of a rickshaw driver, as he climbs the social ladder in India after murdering his master.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The film will be written, directed, and produced by Ramin Bahrani (</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Fahrenheit 451</em></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chop Shop</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">).</span></p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oM-Nw9XzqVM" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><strong>2. Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney (BBC Three)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the successful TV adaptation of Sally Rooney’s second novel </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Normal People</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, BBC Three is doing the same with Rooney’s debut novel </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Conversations with Friends</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.  The book details the relationships between Dublin college students Frances and Bobbi and an older married couple, Nick and Melissa.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The adaptation is due to be released in 2022 and will star Alison Oliver as Frances, Sasha Lane (</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>American</em> <em>Honey</em></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">) as Bobbi, Jemima Kirke (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Girls</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">) as Melissa, and Joe Alwyn (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mary Queen of Scots</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">) as Nick.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Daisy Jones &amp; the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid (Amazon Prime Video)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 2020, Reese Witherspoon announced her production company Hello Sunshine would adapt </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daisy Jones &amp; the Six</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> after claiming she “devoured [it] in a day”. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BueVkgqjuWV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BueVkgqjuWV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Reese’s Book Club (@reesesbookclub)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reid’s novel tells the story of a rock band’s rise to fame in the 1970s, led by titular character Daisy Jones played by Riley Keough (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mad Max: Fury Road</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The miniseries is expected to air on Amazon Prime Video sometime this year.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughn (Netflix)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sara Vaughn’s 2008 thriller is hoped to arrive on Netflix sometime this year as a six-episode series. The book follows the crumbling marriage of James, a Home Office minister, and Sophie, after James’ affair comes to light. Meanwhile, young barrister Kate prosecutes some of the UK’s most serious cases of sexual assault.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The producers behind </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Big Little Lies</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Gone Girl</em></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> are on board, and the series’ main cast will include Sienna Miller, Michelle Dockery, Rupert Friend, and Naomi Scott.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty (Hulu)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Following the success of Liane Moriarty’s </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Big Little Lies</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> as a series, another of her bestsellers is hitting the small screen. Nicole Kidman, Melissa McCarthy, Luke Evans will join the series, which follows nine strangers who gather at a remote health resort run by shady host Masha (Kidman).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The series has been filmed in Byron Bay, New South Wales and is set to debut on Hulu from August 18.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Instagram</span></em></p>

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Adam Goodes to release first picture book

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Former footy player Adam Goodes is set to release his first picture book this year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Titled </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.booktopia.com.au/somebody-s-land-welcome-to-our-country-adam-goodes/book/9781760526726.html?irclickid=2MXT8RXVdxyLRd8ztDxgm11DUkByTbxdtyxlxo0&amp;bk_source=1426251&amp;bk_source_id=1426251&amp;irgwc=1&amp;utm_campaign=Good%20Reading%20Magazine&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_source=Impact" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Somebody’s Land</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Goodes co-authored the book with journalist and Deputy Chief of Staff to the Speaker of NSW Parliament Ellie Laing, illustrated by Barkinjill artist David Hardy.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Goodes said fatherhood inspired his debut book.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I love reading to my daughter Adelaide,” he said. “I hope the series gives readers the opportunity to learn something new and have more conversations because of it. This book is a reflection of me. I’m incredibly hopeful. I choose to be positive, to help us heal as a nation.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The first in a five-part book series called </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Welcome to Country</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> published by Allen &amp; Unwin Children’s Books, the picture books aim to educate young readers between four to eight-years-old about </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">terra nullius</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and Indigenous sovereignty.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Somebody’s Land</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will be available in November 2021, and can now be pre-ordered.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Booktopia / Twitter</span></em></p>

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