Books

Placeholder Content Image

The “cruel” letter Camilla sent Prince Charles that broke his heart

<p>After dating Camilla Shand for six months, 24-year-old Prince Charles was forced to put his relationship “on hold” as he went on tour as part of the Royal Navy.</p> <p>In March 1973, the heir to the throne was in the West Indies when he learned the devastating news that Camilla was going to marry another man.</p> <p>Royal spectators have previously revealed that the royal family put pressure on Camilla and Charles to end their relationship as they didn’t think the daughter of a British Army major was a suitable match for the future king.</p> <p>However, Charles was said to be devastated when 25-year-old Camilla wrote him a letter to let him know that she said yes to tying the knot with her on-again-off-again boyfriend Andrew Parker Bowles.</p> <p>Royal author Penny Junor described Charles’ heartache in her biography of Camilla, <em>The Duchess: The Untold Story</em>.</p> <p>“She wrote to Charles herself to tell him. It broke his heart," she wrote.</p> <p>Charles, who is described as a “prolific letter-writer”, responded to the devastating news by sending letters to his family and friends.</p> <p>"He fired off anguished letters to his nearest and dearest," Juror wrote.</p> <p>"'It seemed to him particularly cruel', he wrote in one letter, that after 'such a blissful, peaceful and mutually happy relationship' fate had decreed that it should only last a mere six months."</p> <p>Charles was upset that he had “no one” to go home to when he returned to England.</p> <p>"I suppose the feeling of emptiness will pass eventually," Charles wrote.</p> <p>Charles then went on to date Amanda Knatchbull, who later rejected his proposal in 1979.</p> <p>The now 70-year-old then started courting Lady Diana Spencer in early 1980.</p> <p>When Charles and Diana married in July 1981, Camilla had already been married to Andrew for eight years and had two children, Tom and Laura.</p> <p>However, both marriages eventually ended in divorce, with Camilla splitting from her husband in 1995.</p> <p>One year later in 1996, Charles and Diana’s marriage officially ended.</p> <p>In 2005, Charles and Camilla finally married in a civil ceremony at Windsor Guildhall. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Newspaper's awkward Julia Roberts typo goes viral

<p>A local newspaper has had its chance in the spotlight after making an unfortunate typo in the headline of a Julia Roberts story.</p> <p>The <em>Post-Journal</em> of Jamestown, New York, paid tribute to the Hollywood actress and her phenomenal career spanning over 30 years, but while their intentions were pure, the headline was what caught people’s attention the most.</p> <p>It read: “Julia Roberts Finds Life And Her Holes Get Better With Age.”</p> <p>While it meant to say her “Roles Get Better W<span>ith Age”, it was too late to retract the mistake, as the article on the 51-year-old had been published and soon, was in the hands of readers around the city.</span></p> <p>It didn’t take long for the blunder to make its way around the world as users took to Twitter to share photos of the printing error.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Headline of the day <br /><br />Julia Roberts Finds Life And Her Holes Get Better With Age <a href="https://t.co/85oU83ijgi">pic.twitter.com/85oU83ijgi</a></p> — raf taylor (@truthis24fps) <a href="https://twitter.com/truthis24fps/status/1072126786253791232?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 December 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I feel this title about Julia Roberts and Holes perhaps needs a little finessing <a href="https://t.co/z2o7EmJKbk">pic.twitter.com/z2o7EmJKbk</a></p> — Jennifer Gunter (@DrJenGunter) <a href="https://twitter.com/DrJenGunter/status/1072268067181289472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 December 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/TheEllenShow?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheEllenShow</a> can’t believe this headline in our local paper... Julia Roberts will be glad to know her holes are getting better with age😂😂 <a href="https://t.co/gvZkOsBjyN">pic.twitter.com/gvZkOsBjyN</a></p> — elizabeth (@eadavisus) <a href="https://twitter.com/eadavisus/status/1071797333497647104?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">9 December 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In the story, the Oscar winner spoke about her age and how her life experiences reflect the roles she chooses to play.</p> <p>“You know, I’m happy and I have fun at home, so it would take a lot for someone to say: ‘Look, you can play this part where you’re happy and have fun.’ Well, I just do that at home,” she said.</p> <p>Despite starring in mega hit rom-coms in the past, back in October, Julia said she was done playing the damsel in distress as she cannot convince the audience that she’s a naïve character.</p> <p>“There came a point in my career where people thought I had turned on romantic comedies, which I love them, I love to be in them, I love to watch them,” she told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.etonline.com/" target="_blank"><em>Entertainment Tonight</em></a>.</p> <p>“But sometimes, they just don’t work at a certain point of life experience.”</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

The impact of “Little Women” 150 years on

<p><strong><em>Ryna Ordynat is a PhD candidate in History at Monash University. </em></strong></p> <p>It’s 150 years since <em>Little Women</em> by Louisa May Alcott was published and, in the time since, the book has never been out of print. The story of the March sisters struck a chord with readers – especially young girls – early on, and continues to resonate today.</p> <p>The book’s continuing popularity is evident in the many film, theatre and TV adaptations. In 2018 alone, it was adapted into <span><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6495094/">a film set in our modern-times</a></span> and a heavily stylised <span><a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/05/little-women-review-pbs-bbc/560144/">TV mini-series</a></span>, starring Emily Watson and Maya Thurman-Hawke. It is scheduled for yet <span><a href="https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/a22002071/little-women-adaptation-greta-gerwig-saoirse-ronan-timothee-chalamet/">another major Hollywood adaptation in 2019</a></span>, directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Meryl Streep, Emma Watson and Saoirse Ronan.</p> <p><em>Little Women</em> follows the lives of the four March sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy – as they endure hardships, learn life lessons and build enduring bonds on their passage from childhood to womanhood. The first part of the book depicts the girls’ childhoods – their struggles with poverty and their own personalities and faults, and how they overcome these obstacles. The second part is about them entering womanhood, marrying and becoming good wives, mothers and women.</p> <p>The genteel poverty the March family endures is based on the real poverty the Alcott family experienced. The difference is that the poverty of the Alcott family was mostly imposed on them by Louisa’s father, <span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Bronson_Alcott">Amos Bronson Alcott</a></span>, a famous Transcendentalist educational reformer in his day.</p> <p>In stark contrast to the book, and at a time when social conventions actively discouraged and frowned upon women undertaking paid employment, Bronson Alcott’s noble willingness to, as he put it, <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=9A7W4RKHLXYC&amp;dq=louisa+may+alcott&amp;lr=&amp;source=gbs_navlinks_s">“starve or freeze before he will sacrifice principle to comfort” </a></span>resulted in him not supporting his family financially. This forced his wife and daughters to provide for the family, and in Louisa’s case to write for money.</p> <p>Bronson was wholly supported and encouraged by his wife, Abigail (Marmee in <em>Little Women</em>), to the complete bafflement and increasing frustration of Louisa. One of Alcott’s biographers suggests that the familiar sentimental tone in <em>Little Women</em> of poverty being dictated by circumstance, and something we should learn to bear, comes from her trying to cope with, and somehow justify her father’s outrageous lack of concern for the <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Louisa_May_Alcott.html?id=9OB_2sFqYtsC&amp;source=kp_book_description&amp;redir_esc=y">family’s financial wellbeing</a></span>.</p> <p>Louisa Alcott was devoted to and dominated by her parents, especially her father. His worldview was based on the romanticised and spiritual idea of inherent goodness and perfection of human beings. For many years, Bronson Alcott insisted to his daughter on the need for simple stories for boys and girls about how to overcome selfishness and anger, faults which he constantly pointed out in Louisa. Eventually, Bronson’s ideas made their way into <em>Little Women</em>, where the March sisters strive to achieve their perfect “womanliness”.</p> <p>Louisa was a problem and a disappointment to her father – she was impatient and energetic, always “subject of her instinct” and showing what Bronson called <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=9A7W4RKHLXYC&amp;dq=louisa+may+alcott&amp;lr=&amp;source=gbs_navlinks_s">early signs of “impending evil”</a></span>. Alcott made the choice to remain unmarried, yet – against her wishes, but mainly due to the demands of her publisher and her growing fan base – she did make Jo marry in the end.</p> <p>Alcott may never have written <em>Little Women</em> at all had she been more financially successful in the types of gothic fiction she excelled at and enjoyed writing. But she dreaded debts <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=9OB_2sFqYtsC&amp;dq=editions:yjioZcBIkHEC&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjKpoSAgZfdAhXCM94KHRMtAjoQ6AEIKTAA">“more than the devil”</a></span>. And her publisher pressured her with continuous requests for a book for girls – and a promise to publish her father’s book, <span><em><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=HGnopNYgga4C&amp;pg=PA115&amp;source=gbs_toc_r&amp;cad=4#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">Tablets, if she wrote one</a></em></span>.</p> <p>The death of Jo’s younger sister Beth is a memorable and tragic event in <em>Little Women</em>. Beth is the shyest of the sisters and lives a very secluded life. Her death is portrayed by Alcott as a sort of “self-sacrifice” as she gives up her life knowing that it has had only private, domestic meaning.</p> <p>Alcott’s sister Elizabeth or “Lizzie”, did in fact die due to complications of scarlet fever. Beth’s death in the book is written to resemble a <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=9ebLwkriWEC&amp;dq=children+victorian+literature&amp;source=gbs_navlinks_s">typical trope of Victorian literature</a></span> – the sentimental, suffering, pathetic yet angelic “ideal” child. But Lizzie died in 1858, aged 22: in pain, angry and frightened, resenting the invisible, stifling life that was imposed on her <span><a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=9OB_2sFqYtsC&amp;dq=editions:yjioZcBIkHEC&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjKpoSAgZfdAhXCM94KHRMtAjoQ6AEIKTAA">largely by her parents</a></span>. She may also have suffered from anorexia. Alcott witnessed the death of her sister in horror.</p> <p>Ultimately, <em>Little Women’s</em> themes of love, grief and sisterly bonds still appeal to us. As <span><a href="http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-mn-little-women-meryl-streep-greta-gerwig-20180703-story.html">Robin Swicord, who will produce the upcoming 2019 film adaptation</a>,</span> says: “It’s really taking a look at what it is for a young woman to enter the adult world.” (She adds that, “given the material, it’s always going to be romantic”.)</p> <p>Yet many of the themes and morals of this book are sentimentalised and outdated today. They were inserted for reasons of convention, in order to provide moral instruction, or to appeal to the requests of a publisher.</p> <p>Alcott wrote <em>Little Women</em> because her father wanted her to, and he dictated its terms, morals and lessons. It was an instant and enduring success, even though she did not want to write it, and it forced her to relive some of the most difficult years of her life. For readers (and viewers) today, understanding these circumstances enables a much more authentic, multi-layered and complex interpretation.</p> <p>Do you remember how old you were when you first read <em>Little Women</em>? Tell us in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Ryna Ordynat. Republished with permission of <span><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/little-women-at-150-and-the-patriarch-who-shaped-the-books-tone-102565">The Conversation.</a></strong></span> </em></p> <p><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/102565/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

13 books we bet you never knew were banned

<p><strong>The Dictionary</strong></p> <p>Wait … what? Some students working on their spelling might have been out of luck when the teacher asked them to “look it up”. In 1987, the Anchorage School Board in Alaska <span><a href="https://theweek.com/articles/459795/17-americas-most-surprising-banned-books">banned</a></span> the American Heritage Dictionary because it had “objectionable” entries, like the slang definitions for “balls,” “knocker” and “bed.” A California elementary school <span><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/29/the-11-most-surprising-ba_n_515381.html?slideshow=true#gallery/5635/0">banned</a></span> Merriam Webster from its shelves because the definition of oral sex was “not age appropriate”.</p> <p><strong>The Lorax</strong></p> <p>Dr. Seuss may have endeared the hearts of millions, but <em>The Lorax</em>, about the perils of deforestation, didn’t sit well with California loggers. One community <span><a href="https://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/09/24/banned-books-week-green-eggs-and-ham">banned</a></span> the book for its negative portrayal of the industry. (By the way, you've been saying "Dr. Seuss" wrong.) </p> <p><strong>Yertle the Turtle</strong></p> <p>Anti-deforestation wasn’t Dr. Seuss’s only political message to make schools squirm. One Canadian school announced <em>Yertle the Turtle</em> one of its <span><a href="https://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/09/24/banned-books-week-green-eggs-and-ham">banned books</a></span> in 2012 because of this line: "I know up on top you are seeing great sights, but down here at the bottom, we too should have rights." Apparently, that line was too partisan for a school that had banned political messages.</p> <p><strong>James and the Giant Peach</strong></p> <p>No matter how you feel about human-sized bugs, Roald Dahl’s <em>James and the Giant Peach</em> seems innocent enough at first glance. Some schools have challenged it for language, and tobacco and alcohol references. But perhaps the oddest? In 1999, one small Wisconsin town officially made it one of its banned books after <span><a href="http://orgs.utulsa.edu/spcol/?p=3246">claiming</a></span> a scene when the spider licks her lips could be “taken in two ways, including sexual”. Can’t say that would have been our first thought.</p> <p><strong>Where the Wild Things Are</strong></p> <p>It was tough enough for author Maurice Sendak to get his borderline dark and scary children’s book published. When it finally did hit the shelves, it got in even more trouble. <em>Where the Wild Things Are</em> is now a fun classic, but it was initially <span><a href="https://theweek.com/articles/459795/17-americas-most-surprising-banned-books">banned</a></span> because little Max’s punishment was starvation– well, lack of supper – and the story had supernatural themes.</p> <p><strong>Where the Sidewalk Ends</strong></p> <p>You might want to reread Shel Silverstein’s collection of poems, <em>Where the Sidewalk Ends</em> – you may have missed something in its quirky, funny and touching verses. <span><a href="https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/giving-tree-50-sadder-remembered">According to some schools</a></span>, the book actually promotes everything from drug use and suicide to ignoring parents and telling lies. Yikes.</p> <p><strong>Harriet the Spy</strong></p> <p>Who knew a child misfit could create such a stir? Sure, kids loved Harriet for her strong will and rebelliousness, but critics <span><a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=87779452">argued</a></span> the “spy” was less of a good-girl Nancy Drew and more of a mean-spirited gossip. Some schools banned Louise Fitzhugh’s <em>Harriet the Spy</em> to keep students from the bad influence.</p> <p><strong>The Giving Tree</strong></p> <p>To some, this was Shel Silverstein’s sweet story about unconditional love. But to one bitter Colorado librarian who <span><a href="http://articles.latimes.com/1989-09-26/entertainment/ca-340_1_fullerton-college">took it off the shelves</a></span>, <em>The Giving Tree</em> was just plain “sexist”.</p> <p><strong>Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?</strong></p> <p>Might as well stop trying to wrack your brain for what in the world could have been grounds to take <em>Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?</em> out of schools. It was all an awkward mistake. Eric Carle might be a famous children’s illustrator, but the Texas State Board of Education <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/richard-adams-blog/2010/jan/28/brown-bear-banned-texas">wouldn’t approve</a></span> the storybook after recognising writer Bill Martin Jr.’s name from another book: <em>Ethical Marxism</em>. There was just one problem – the political Bill Martin was not the same Bill Martin Jr. as had written the children’s book. Next time, maybe the school board should do its homework.</p> <p><strong>The Diary of a Young Girl</strong></p> <p>No, Anne Frank’s diary hasn’t been removed from libraries because of the terror of hiding from Nazis. Schools have <span><a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/09/27/351811082/banned-books-remind-us-of-the-power-of-the-written-word">deemed</a></span> some of the 14-year-old’s descriptions of her anatomy as “pornographic”. More cringe-worthy? One Alabama textbook committee asked for it to be <span><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/28/AR2010012804001.html">banned</a></span> because it was “a real downer”. </p> <p><strong>Charlotte’s Web</strong></p> <p>The unlikely friendship between a pig and spider sparked a much bigger controversy among Kansas parents in 1952. They had Charlotte's Web <span><a href="https://theweek.com/articles/459795/17-americas-most-surprising-banned-books">banned</a></span> because talking animals went against their religious beliefs, arguing humans are "the only creatures that can communicate vocally. Showing lower life forms with human abilities is sacrilegious and disrespectful to God”. We wonder what they’d think about the <em>Cat in the Hat</em> and Mickey Mouse and the three little bears and ...</p> <p><strong>The Grapes of Wrath</strong></p> <p>John Steinbeck’s work of fiction was based on the reality of the Dust Bowl that left migrants homeless and in search of work. In Kern County, California, where the protagonists land, the real-life county board of supervisors didn’t appreciate the author’s portrayal of how locals didn’t help migrants. A 1939 vote <span><a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=95190615">removed</a></span> <em>The Grapes of Wrath</em> from the area’s schools and libraries.</p> <p><strong>To Kill a Mockingbird</strong></p> <p>Despite being so beloved, Harper Lee’s novel is still the <span><a href="http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/classics">fourth most-challenged or banned</a></span> classic book. Advocates of banning it argue its issues with racism and sexuality aren’t suitable for young readers.</p> <p><em>Written by Marissa Laliberte. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/13-books-we-bet-you-never-knew-were-banned?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

The "naughty" birthday card Princess Diana sent to her accountant

<p>An inside look into Princess Diana’s sense of humour has been revealed after a birthday card she sent to her accountant has been put up for auction.</p> <p>Assumed to be from the '90s, the cheeky card, which includes a handwritten note from the late royal is featured on LA-based celebrity auction site Julien’s Auctions after its owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, decided to part ways with the valuable item.</p> <p>The seller believes that the card was sent by Diana – who passed away in 1997 after a tragic car crash in Paris – to her accountant and close friend Anthony Burrage.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821813/4_thp_chp_031118slug_1786jpg.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f84db9a247cb42f39817134c4293706c" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Julien's Auctions</em></p> <p>The card shows an illustrated Sleeping Beauty and includes a witty anecdote that says: “A little prick in the hand sent Sleeping Beauty to sleep”.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821812/2_thp_chp_031118slug_1787jpg.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fcf845e11fcd4c0080af0a8dd29cbcdd" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Julien's Auctions</em></p> <p>And while it may seem innocuous, as on first glance it seems to be referring to the classic fairytale where Sleeping Beauty pricks her finger on a spinning wheel, the cheeky humour is revealed once the card is opened. Inside the card the punchline reads: “Only the big ones are worth staying awake for!”</p> <p>The message written by the Princess says: “A belated Happy Birthday for the 5th! From Diana.”</p> <p>Bidding for the card is currently standing at $250 but the price is expected to increase each day and go up to $800-$1200.</p> <p>The bidding site has described the card as: “A humorous birthday card with ‘Sleeping Beauty’ on the cover, handwritten in black felt pen by HRH Princess Diana: ‘Tony, A belated Happy Birthday for the 5th, from, Diana.’ Tony refers to Anthony Burrage, accountant and trusted employee of HRH Princess Diana.”</p> <p>The owner of the prized possession recently spoke to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/princess-diana-sent-friend-cheeky-13527095" target="_blank">The Mirror</a> </em>and said: “I know that Diana liked to send humorous cards, but I haven’t seen any quite this naughty, so for me it really shows that she was a fun human being that could share some dirty jokes with her closest friends."</p> <p>They added, “This is a secret card that has been kept hidden for many years. A true gem for anyone that is a fan of this special human being.”</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

How to start your own book club

<p>Starting a book club is easy – all you need is to love reading. Here’s how to get yours off to a flying start.</p> <p><strong>Finding Fellow Readers</strong></p> <p>Ask around your existing personal networks, including neighbours, friends, social media, or a community noticeboard. Once you mention you want to start a club, you’ll be surprised how many people may want to come along. Ask at your local bookshop and library for ideas – many run regular reading groups and can point you in the right direction for good books. Identify what common interests you and your group have and use these to help draw like-minded people. Once you start looking, you’ll find book clubs for men or women, seniors, sci-fi lovers, teenagers or cookery buffs.</p> <p><strong>The Time, the Place</strong></p> <p>Once you have a group, agree on how often you want to meet – typically clubs meet monthly, though the time-poor may want to make it bi-monthly.</p> <p>For many clubs, meeting at home works best as you don’t have to get dressed up, and noisy public venues can make talking hard. If members bring a plate of food or a bottle, it takes the pressure off the host. But try rotating your meeting location as this will help to stimulate fresh thoughts.</p> <p><strong>Idea</strong></p> <p>Tailor your venue according to the book’s subject matter. The Light Between the Oceans by M.L. Stedman was discussed over fish’n’chips by one club, while The Red Tent by Anita Diamant was chewed over at a Middle Eastern restaurant.</p> <p><strong>Size Matters</strong></p> <p>According to Christine Callen, a book club veteran of 15 years, you need a minimum number of people per meeting to make it interesting. “Seven is the magic number – fewer and there’s not enough for healthy debate,” she says. “You can have ten people in the club – not everyone will be able to make it every time – seven provides enough opinions.”</p> <p><strong>Choosing the Books</strong></p> <p>If you’re the club instigator, it’s easier if you pick the first book. Seek out book reviews in good magazines and newspapers and at bookshops. The flavour of the books you choose will be largely dictated by the personalities attending – you might like to have a wide range of genres from sci-fi to romance to travel epics. Or stick to one genre, such as history books. Decide on a strategy and a time frame – say five to 12 books across the year – then review how everything appeals to the majority.</p> <p>Take turns to come up with a list of four or five titles, then circulate the list via email shortly after your last discussion.</p> <p>Members can then vote on their preferred next book and meeting time. The member scheduled to host the next meeting coordinates the responses to decide the title and date most voted for.</p> <p><strong>Starting Discussion</strong></p> <p>Callen recommends beginning by asking all members to briefly give their opinion on the book. “Everyone arrives and has a drink to loosen up,” she explains. “Then we take it in turns to go around the room and each give the book a mark out of ten, saying in a few sentences what we liked or disliked about it. This gives everyone a chance to speak early in the night and stops one person dominating the conversation from the start.”</p> <p><strong>Tip</strong></p> <p>There is no one way to interpret a book. In fact, differing opinions are good.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/How-to-Start-Your-Own-Book-Club">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

1950s magazine unearthed: You won't believe the dating advice on “how to get a husband”

<p>A magazine article dating back to 1958 that advises women on how they can attract a potential husband has resurfaced through social media and has quickly gone viral.</p> <p>The piece, which featured in American magazine <em>McCall’</em>s is titled “129 Ways to Get a Husband” and includes a variety of advice on how to do just that. While many find the article hilarious, others have slammed it as sexist and bizarre.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 379.68749999999994px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7821731/44225012_2159481040729742_6926440358930808832_n.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/49f154d225ec4d77955c56807a49516d" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Facebook - <a id="js_86p" href="https://www.facebook.com/kim.marxkuczynski?__tn__=%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R&amp;eid=ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2&amp;tn-str=%2AF" class="_hli" data-hovercard="/ajax/hovercard/user.php?id=100000036012261&amp;extragetparams=%7B%22__tn__%22%3A%22%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R%22%2C%22eid%22%3A%22ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2%22%2C%22tn-str%22%3A%22%2AF%22%7D" data-hovercard-prefer-more-content-show="1" aria-describedby="u_84_1" aria-owns="js_86j">Kim Marx-Kuczynski</a></em></p> <p>The list ranges from semi-strange to completely outlandish, with one of the instructions advising women to be flexible when it comes to their potential partner's schedule: “If he decides to skip the dance and go rowing on the lake, GO – even if you are wearing your best evening gown.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkim.marxkuczynski%2Fposts%2F2146971265314053&amp;width=500" width="500" height="624" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Quickly gaining traction, the Facebook post has been shared 13,750 times and has obtained over 4600 likes. The controversy has spread throughout Facebook and users have questioned the motive behind the article.</p> <p>The feature was a collaboration between 16 people and they were chosen specifically for the task due to their “good minds, lively ideas and mature experience".</p> <p>The group came from a diverse background as it included a songwriter, a marriage consultant, an airline stewardess, a police commissioner, a housewife, a banker, a psychologist and a bachelor.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 418.75px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7821730/43698308_2146971158647397_4244957925166022656_n.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a52cfe8d2ad447f79d35d397574588ef" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Facebook - <a id="js_86p" href="https://www.facebook.com/kim.marxkuczynski?__tn__=%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R&amp;eid=ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2&amp;tn-str=%2AF" class="_hli" data-hovercard="/ajax/hovercard/user.php?id=100000036012261&amp;extragetparams=%7B%22__tn__%22%3A%22%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R%22%2C%22eid%22%3A%22ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2%22%2C%22tn-str%22%3A%22%2AF%22%7D" data-hovercard-prefer-more-content-show="1" aria-describedby="u_84_1" aria-owns="js_86j">Kim Marx-Kuczynski</a></em></p> <p>One of the sections titled “How to let him know you’re there”, informed women of men being attracted to material items, and recommended readers to buy objects to garner their attention.</p> <p>“Buy a convertible – men like to ride in them,” said number 43.</p> <p>“Stumble when you walk into a room that he's in. Wear a band aid, people always ask what happened.”</p> <p>A user on Facebook commented how number 40 was her favourite piece of advice as it told girls to “stand in a corner and cry softly” so a man can approach you and ask what’s wrong.</p> <p>Other strategies were far more blunt, with one saying, “Make a lot of money.”</p> <p>And no listicle on how to get yourself a husband would be complete without a guide informing you on how to make yourself attractive.</p> <p>The “How to look good” section had a few things to say when it came to how women present themselves.</p> <p>“Get better-looking glasses – men still make passes at girls who wear glasses, or you could try contact lenses,” said number 49.</p> <p>“Wear high heels most of the time – they’re sexier! Unless he happens to be shorter than you.”</p> <p>Other suggestions included going on a diet “if you need to” and making yourself stand out from a crowd by dressing differently than other women.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 423.43750000000006px;" src="/media/7821729/43554515_2146971021980744_2357359153359355904_n.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/de4da15e8c794318b06fad52ca58ca15" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: Facebook - <a id="js_86p" href="https://www.facebook.com/kim.marxkuczynski?__tn__=%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R&amp;eid=ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2&amp;tn-str=%2AF" class="_hli" data-hovercard="/ajax/hovercard/user.php?id=100000036012261&amp;extragetparams=%7B%22__tn__%22%3A%22%2Cd%2AF%2AF-R%22%2C%22eid%22%3A%22ARDYz95D77BVmKXwesPenDidfCJCPH4Hx2b0E8VdQ4w7dweGrc5Nm3ox37F3gMWauTkB_Zyya899ciJ2%22%2C%22tn-str%22%3A%22%2AF%22%7D" data-hovercard-prefer-more-content-show="1" aria-describedby="u_84_1" aria-owns="js_86j">Kim Marx-Kuczynski</a></em></p> <p>And if you’re someone who just can’t seem to find a single man, then according to the writers, buying a dog and taking it for a walk will help you come across one.</p> <p>But if that doesn’t work then don’t fear, as the list also included: “Looking in the census reports for places with the most single men”, having your car break down in certain locations, working as a doctor, dentist or lawyer so you can be around educated, rich men, and reading obituaries to find widowers.</p> <p>To finish off the ridiculous article, the final section was titled “How to land him".</p> <p>From chatting to your date’s father about business or researching his exes to avoid “repeating the mistakes they made”, the advice just kept getting more and more bizarre.</p> <p>The vintage article gathered a lot of mixed reactions on Facebook with one saying, “In this day and age it looks more like a manual of how to get kidnapped!”</p> <p>“So, apparently, I’m doing a LOT wrong, is that why I don’t have a husband?!” questioned one woman jokingly.</p> <p>Others wondered if the story was real or was it written as satire, while others joked saying they had “been doing it wrong for years".</p> <p>“Thank God for the women’s movement!” said one user.</p> <p>“Wow – finding a man is not for the faint of heart!” wrote another.</p> <p>What do you think of this dating advice from the 1950s? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

The 1957 photo that shows uncanny resemblance between Prince Harry and Prince Philip

<p>Although Prince Harry has been plagued with nasty speculation about whether his birth was the result of his late mother’s five-year affair with James Hewitt, a new photo proves that his genes run deep in the royal family.</p> <p>After Princess Diana’s riding instructor went public with their affair, some claimed the Duke of Sussex resembled Mr Hewitt because they both have red hair.</p> <p>However, a resurfaced photo of a young Prince Philip has gone viral, with many royal fans noticing his “uncanny” likeness to his 34-year-old grandson.</p> <p>The vintage photo taken in 1957 shows Prince Philip in his mid-30s appearing on the cover of Paris Match magazine wearing a military uniform.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpK9n6KhzDB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpK9n6KhzDB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Chris Jackson (@chrisjacksongetty)</a> on Oct 20, 2018 at 3:14pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Photographer Chris Jackson shared a photo of the publication to Instagram and wrote: “I spotted this beautiful 1957 vintage cover of a @parismatch_magazine… Who does it remind you of?”</p> <p>According to the <em>Evening Standard,</em> the vintage shot shows the 97-year-old husband of the Queen “wearing the tropical dress of the Blues and Royals” – the same uniform worn by Harry at the ANZAC Memorial in Sydney during his Australian tour.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7821558/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1c1d42298b6740a9b12583a9cd7ead49" /></p> <p>The image has since gone viral, with many admitting they mistook Prince Philip for his grandson at first.</p> <p>“That’s amazing! The resemblance is spot on. I thought it WAS Harry on the Paris Match cover and had to re-read the post. Awesome comparison,” one Instagram user wrote.</p> <p>Another added: “What a find. Uncanny resemblance. Quite handsome both of them.”</p> <p>“Think this photograph may put some of those ugly rumours to bed,” a follower posted.</p> <p>James Hewitt made headlines after he revealed his affair with Diana and attempted to sell 64 personal letters from the People’s Princess – a move that many fans were disgusted by.</p> <p>Before her death in 1997, Diana attributed the colour of her youngest son’s hair to her side of the family, referring to him as her “little Spencer”.</p> <p>Do you think Prince Philip and Prince Harry share a resemblance in the photos? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

James Packer breaks his silence on why he and Mariah Carey split: "I had become toxic"

<p>Billionaire James Packer and pop star Mariah Carey dated for 18 months before their highly-publicised engagement was called off in 2016.</p> <p>Now, the Australian businessman has candidly discussed the couple’s failed relationship in his new biography <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Price of Fortune: The Untold Story of Being James Packer.</em></p> <p>According to an excerpt published by <a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>The Daily Telegraph</u></em></strong></a><em>,</em> the 51-year-old says he became “toxic” at the time of their split.</p> <p>“By the time the Israel so-called Case 1000 had become public, the China arrests, and Crown's sale of Macau had occurred and the breakup with Mariah had happened, I had become toxic,” he says in his book.</p> <p>James also denies leaking any details of Mariah’s settlement after the pair’s failed engagement.</p> <p>“I had absolutely nothing to do with the story,” he says.</p> <p>The superstar singer reportedly received AUD$70 million after the breakup for an “inconvenience fee”.</p> <p>She was initially “poised to accept $7 million to walk away” before allegedly increasing the figure, reported <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Daily Telegraph.</em></p> <p>In another published excerpt, James said his relationship was initially “fun”, but his mental health was in a dark place.</p> <p>James also describes his former fiancée as “insanely bright”.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7821526/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b7de77764f31439b9d8703bce79e16de" /></p> <p>However, underneath the surface, he was struggling mentally with the casino mogul later being admitted to a rehabilitation centre in March 2018.</p> <p>In February 2016, just a month after he proposed to Mariah with an AUD$12.7 million 35-carat ring, he admitted he was not coping well.</p> <p>The toll eventually became too much for James and the relationship collapsed, with the couple announcing their split in October 2016.</p> <p>After their split, Mariah sold the engagement ring for a fraction of the price to an LA jeweller for $2.78 million, reported the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">New York Post.</em></p> <p>The singer’s publicist told <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Page Six</em> at the time: “Mariah has been very vocal recently about her choice to move forward in her life surrounded by positivity.”</p> <p>They added, “That requires leaving emotional and material baggage behind, including an old engagement ring from an ex-boyfriend.”</p> <p>Recently, Seven Network owner Kerry Stokes’ role in the breakdown of the high-profile engagement was also revealed.</p> <p>As James struggled to cope with his business and personal life, Mr Stokes stepped in and took charge of his friend’s private affairs in 2016.</p> <p>Mr Stokes encouraged James to spend time alone in Israel so that his friend could improve his mental health before going ahead with his big day.</p> <p>“Away from all the controversies and the pressures and the intensities ... My concern was that (he and Mariah) were both in bad places and that James needed some space,” Mr Stokes said.</p> <p>“I did postpone his wedding ... James was upset at not seeing her. But he wasn't sure. He was obviously engaged to her. He was obviously emotionally involved. The fact it was postponed, he was happy to get the chance to get himself into a better place.”</p> <p>James still wanted to marry Mariah after his time in Israel but the relationship “fell apart”.</p> <p>Later, James told <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Australian</em> that their relationship was a “mistake” for both of them. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Man returns library book after 84 years

<p>Eighty-four years ago, a library book was borrowed by an 11-year-old girl.</p> <p>A few days ago, it was returned to the Shreve Memorial Library in Louisiana, USA, by her adult son.</p> <p>Borrowed by his mother when she was a child, the man came across the book – which a library official described as “in pretty rough shape” –whilst cleaning the house.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fshrevememorial%2Fposts%2F1866746696693950&amp;width=500" width="500" height="707" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The novel, <em>Spoon River Anthology</em>, is a book of free verse by Edgar Lee Masters, with each poem written in the perspective of a dead person within the fictional town.</p> <p>An image of the old book was posted on the library’s Facebook page along with the statement: “We thought that the title was appropriately spooky to turn up again after all this time, right around Halloween.”</p> <p>According to the rules listed in the book, titles would be charged 5 cents each day the work is overdue. Stroud and his family calculated the cost of the fine which exceeded $1500. The library refrained the son from the charge.</p> <p>Although, in honour of his mother the Stroud family paid the $1542.65 fine in the form of a donation, “My brother and sisters determined (paying the fine) would be a befitting honour to my mum, and also we have an aunt who’s a librarian.” Robert Stroud shared.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fshrevememorial%2Fphotos%2Fa.816859941682636%2F1896284213740198%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="586" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> </p> <p>He goes on to state, “My mum had a great sense of humour, I think she would see a lot of levity in this.”</p> <p>Shreve Memorial Library Executive Director, John Tuggle, joked “What I’m going to use it for is to remind all of our patrons that it’s never, ever too late to return an overdue book,” he hopes this story can become a funny lesson to others in the future.</p> <p> </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

The 10 best romance novels of all time

<p>Books in which man meets woman, man woos woman (or woman woos man), and man and woman live happily ever after are a dime a dozen. Enjoyable, for sure, but not what you'd call memorable. So, Reader’s Digest have come up with a list of 10 of the best romance novels that tell favourite, and timeless, love stories, each of which goes above and beyond basic romance.</p> <p>Whether it’s glimpsing 19th-century Russia in <em>Anna Karenina</em> or witnessing endless family drama on the Australian outback in <em>The Thorn Birds</em>, each of these fabulous books has something special.</p> <p>“These are much more than love stories; they are life stories,” says US Select Editions editor-in-chief Laura Kelly.<br /><br />“If you like a good love story, books are so much more satisfying than movies,” she continues.<br /><br />“Books take you into the minds of all the characters, where their hopes and dreams will really fire up your own imagination.”</p> <p><strong>1. <em>The Thorn Birds</em> by Colleen McCullough (1977)</strong></p> <p>Set in 1915 Australia, this remarkable saga chronicles the forbidden love between a beautiful, headstrong young girl and a priest.</p> <p>You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, and you’ll stay up way too late reading this fabulous story.</p> <p><strong>2.<em> Jane Eyre</em> by Charlotte Brontë (1847)</strong></p> <p>“Reader, I married him.” Charlotte Brontë’s gothic masterpiece, with its unyielding heroine, dashing love interest Mr. Rochester, creepy manor house, and foggy English countryside, has become synonymous with 19th-century romance.</p> <p>And writing love stories ran in the Brontë family – Charlotte’s sister Emily’s classic <em>Wuthering Heights</em> is also a strong contender for this list of best romance novels.</p> <p><strong>3. <em>This Is How You Lose Her</em> by Junot Díaz (2013)</strong></p> <p>Technically a collection of short stories, <em>This Is How You Lose Her</em> counts as a novel because the stories all somehow connect back to the same one character’s life.</p> <p>The impressive way the Pulitzer Prize-winning Díaz weaves together multiple love stories – happy and sad, fleeting and lasting – from all around the world makes this one of the best romance novels of the 21st century.</p> <p><strong>4. <em>The Notebook</em> by Nicholas Sparks (1996)</strong></p> <p>Nicholas Sparks has made a name for himself as the writer of some of the best romance novels in recent years.</p> <p>Though he’s written more than 20 books, his first has stood the test of time for a reason.</p> <p>Noah and Allie’s tear-jerking, decade-spanning story remains the wonderfully escapist romantic read it was 20 years ago.</p> <p><strong>5.<em> Call Me By Your Name</em> by André Aciman (2007)</strong></p> <p>Even if you’ve seen the Academy Award-winning film, this enchanting story of first love and self-discovery is still more than worth a read.</p> <p>Prepare to fall just as in love with the magnificent Italian setting as with the story of summer romance and intoxicating attraction.</p> <p><strong>6.<em> The French Lieutenant’s Woman</em> by John Fowles (1969)</strong></p> <p>A Victorian gentleman is engaged to a wealthy and suitable woman, but when he encounters a beautiful, mysterious woman rumoured to be the forsaken lover of a French lieutenant, he becomes utterly smitten.</p> <p>Truly magnificent entertainment.</p> <p><strong>7. <em>Beautiful Disaster </em>by Jamie McGuire (2012)</strong></p> <p>With an edgy, modern twist on the good-girl-meets-bad-boy theme, <em>Beautiful Disaster</em> has topped must-read romance lists for a reason.</p> <p>After reinventing herself just before college, Abby finds herself involved in a tantalising bet with her school’s resident tattooed player.</p> <p>Neither of them is prepared for the results.</p> <p><strong>8.<em> The Time Traveler’s Wife</em> by Audrey Niffenegger (2003)</strong></p> <p>Every love has its challenges, and while your husband being an unwitting time traveller may not be one you’re familiar with, this four-hanky tale will still tug on your heartstrings.</p> <p><strong>9. <em>Anna Karenina </em>by Leo Tolstoy (1877)</strong></p> <p>Trapped in a loveless marriage, Anna Karenina succumbs to temptation and embarks on a dangerous affair with the handsome Vronsky.</p> <p>Tragedy unfolds amid the canvas of 19th-century Russia, in the most famous of doomed love stories.</p> <p>A memorable and enduring classic.</p> <p><strong>10. <em>Outlander </em>by Diana Gabaldon (1991)</strong></p> <p>A powerhouse time-travel romance, this is the first in Gabaldon’s hugely successful series.</p> <p>Strong, beautiful Claire Randall leads a double life, married to a man in one century, with a lover in another century.</p> <p>Filled with humour, passion, wit and wonderful Scottish scenery, this is one fast read for a 600-plus page book.</p> <p>Enjoy the wallow!</p> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/book-club/10-best-romance-novels-all-time">Reader’s Digest</a></em></span><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><strong><em><u><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></u></em></strong><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Harsh new $337 road rule you need to know

<p>Harsh new laws that were introduced yesterday could see drivers being fined hundreds of dollars and possibly lose their license if they are caught touching their phone when driving.</p> <p>The new laws introduced across New South Wales on September 17 mean drivers will now lose five demerit points rather than four if they are caught using their phones.</p> <p>NSW motorists will also receive a $337 fine, making the state the strictest in the country for the offence.</p> <p>During double demerit periods, including public holidays and long weekends, those who touch their phone while driving can be penalised up to 10 demerit points.</p> <p>Drivers or motorcyclists with a Learner, P1 or P2 licence cannot use their phone under any circumstances while on the road.</p> <p>“These drivers may only use a mobile phone if their vehicle is parked,” a spokesperson for Transport NSW said.</p> <p>Under the stricter new laws, if a Learner or P1 is caught using their phone they will automatically incur a three-month driving suspension as they only have a threshold of four demerit points.</p> <p>P2 drivers will have three demerit points remaining if they are caught illegally using a mobile phone on the road.</p> <p>When NSW Roads Minister Melinda Pavey announced the increased penalties in July, she said a government survey showed that 74 per cent of the community supported further limiting in-car mobile use.</p> <p>“We all see it and the community has had enough,” Ms Pavey said.</p> <p>NSW motorists are only legally allowed to use their phone while driving for calls, music and navigation if it is secure in a cradle fixed to the car and doesn’t obscure a driver’s vision.</p> <p>Drivers can also only use their phones for the same purposes if they can activate it without touching it, such as through Bluetooth or voice activation.</p> <p>The only time a motorist can hold a phone is if they are passing it across to a passenger.</p> <p>A spokesperson for Transport NSW warned that using your phone legally can still be risky.</p> <p>“Drivers are reminded that using a mobile phone legally can still be distracting and should always consider the current road conditions before using a mobile phone while driving.”</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Duchess Meghan's touching gesture after tragedy

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has started a very touching project in the wake of London’s tragic Grenfell Tower fire disaster which killed 71 people.</p> <p>In her first solo royal project, Duchess Meghan has lent her support for a charitable cookbook that contains recipes from women who were affected by the tragedy.</p> <p>The idea for the <em>Together</em> cookbook came from a group of women who started gathering in a communal kitchen at the Al Manaar Muslim Cultural heritage Centre in West London last summer to prepare food for their loved ones.</p> <p>The women’s gathering quickly formed into the Hubb Community Kitchen.</p> <p>Last night, photos were released of Meghan cooking in the kitchen with mainly Muslim women who were affected by the fire.</p> <p>The Duchess first visited the kitchen in January this year and returns regularly for private visits.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 419.2176870748299px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7820863/kensingtonpalace.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/17e92b3dd9cb458d8eaf24d3ccea79da" /></p> <p>Meghan’s passion for food is no secret and the former-actress used to write about food on her now-defunct lifestyle blog, <em>The Tig.</em></p> <p>Meghan’s character in <em>Suits</em>, the legal drama which first made her famous, was also tweaked to mirror her food enthusiasm.</p> <p>Kensington Palace said Meghan believed in the powerful project and wanted to support the community kitchen so it could continue changing lives.</p> <p>The proceeds from the book will fund the Hubb to stay open seven days a week and welcome more people through its doors.</p> <p>The book, which has a forward written by Meghan, contains personal recipes by women from across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean.</p> <p>In her foreword, Meghan wrote: “I immediately felt connected to this community kitchen; it is a place for women to laugh, grieve, cry and cook together.</p> <p>“Melding cultural identities under a shared roof, it creates a space to feel a sense of normalcy — in its simplest form, the universal need to connect, nurture, and commune through food, through crisis or joy — something we can all relate to.</p> <p>“Through this charitable endeavour, the proceeds will allow the kitchen to thrive and keep the global spirit of community alive.”</p> <p>A good friend of Meghan’s, tennis star Serena Williams, tweeted her support of the project.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I used to call you Meghan (and I still do) but dear Duchess of Sussex your first project “Together” a cookbook bringing women of all cultures together. I could not be more excited about it and proud of you. <br />It’s beautiful - diversity, inclusivity, coming together in grief or joy <a href="https://t.co/RkB2O35qmG">pic.twitter.com/RkB2O35qmG</a></p> — Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) <a href="https://twitter.com/serenawilliams/status/1041669645844078599?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 17, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The cookbook will be published by Penguin Random House and supported by The Royal Foundation.</p> <p>Penguin Random House chair Baroness Rebuck said the company was captivated by the vision of the cookbook.</p> <p>“Every woman who has contributed a recipe to this book has also contributed a fragment of their lives and memories,” he said.</p> <p>“Each dish tells a story of culture, family and a sense of home.</p> <p>“But most of all <em>Together</em> is a homage to life and friendship and we hope it will act as a symbol to all communities and encourage cooking together for life and joy.”</p> <p>The Royal Foundation will administer the transfer of funds from the sale of the cookbook to the Hubb Community Kitchen and related projects. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

6 things you should do when reading with your grandkids

<p><em><strong>Ameneh Shahaeian is a Research Fellow in Developmental and Educational Psychology at the Australian Catholic University.</strong></em></p> <p>There is magic in stories. We all remember hearing them as children, and we loved them. Imaginary adventures set in faraway places. Tales about how the dishwasher isn’t working. It doesn’t matter! Whether made up by parents or read from books, kids love to hear stories.</p> <p>Our <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10888438.2018.1482901">recent work</a> showed reading to children positively impacts long-term academic achievement more than many other activity (including playing music with them, or doing craft). We found the more frequently parents read to their children, the better their children’s NAPLAN scores in different areas.</p> <p>In our most recent study, we asked parents to read a wordless storybook to their three to five-year-old children titled <em>The Wolf and Seven Little Goats</em>. We also tested children in many areas of their important cognitive skills, such as language proficiency, memory, self-control, and friendship skills.</p> <p>Through examining the different ways parents tell stories, we have pinpointed which elements of shared reading are most beneficial for children’s <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272775714000156">cognitive development</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>1. Tune in to your child</strong></p> <p>Perhaps the most important aspect of reading to children is to tune in to your child. Listen to your child’s cues. Do they like the story? Do they know the vocabulary? Are they paying attention to the pictures more, or the text?</p> <p>Try to coach your child, not to instruct them. Instead of saying: “Look they are going to cook some food, maybe they are hungry”, you can ask “What are they doing?” or “Why do you think they’re doing that?”</p> <p>Be sensitive about whether they are listening and engaged or uninterested and disengaged. If they are disengaged, are there questions you can ask to make them more interested? Do you think they’ll like a different type of story better? The best books for your child are the ones they <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181204/110118.pdf">enjoy</a></span> most.</p> <p><strong>2. Ask questions</strong></p> <p>Parents who ask lots of questions engage in a more fun and informative way with their children. Ask them if they know the vocabulary, if they can guess what the characters are going to do next, and why they’ve done what they’ve done.</p> <p>These questions are not only helpful because they help children gain new knowledge and ways of thinking, it also <a href="https://theconversation.com/reading-to-your-child-the-difference-it-makes-57473">helps strengthen</a> the emotional bond between parent and child. Children <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337405/">like to feel</a> they’re a part of the task, not that they’re being told how to do things.</p> <p><strong>3. Go beyond describing images or reading text</strong></p> <p>In our study, we gave parents a wordless picture book. An important difference we observed between parents was some only describe what they see. Some go beyond the picture.</p> <p>For example, when the mother goat in the picture book comes home and sees the door to the house open, one parent said:</p> <p><em>When their mother came home and was looking forward to seeing her children and hugging them and telling them a story, she suddenly saw that the door is open. She was shocked!</em></p> <p>Another parent said:</p> <p><em>The mother came home and saw the door is open; she went inside and looked for the children.</em></p> <p>This parent is only describing the picture.</p> <p>The first parent is imagining what is beyond the picture and text. This is a richer way to tell a story to children, and ultimately leads to better cognitive developmental outcomes for children. This is because it teaches abstract thinking, which is the basis for many of the <a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9781351236898/chapters/10.4324%2F9781351236904-7">higher order cognitive abilities</a> such as problem solving and critical analysis.</p> <p><strong>4. Make logical links between different parts of the story</strong></p> <p>Another element that has a strong link to the development of children’s cognitive skills is the way parents build logical links between different parts of the story.</p> <p>Often the events in books unfold very quickly. One minute, the wolf eats the little goats, and the next minute he is found by the mother. Some parents try to make the sequence of events more logical than others.</p> <p>For example, in this picture, when the wolf is coming to knock on the door, one parent said:</p> <p><em>The wolf, who realised the mother is not home, came and knocked on the door.</em></p> <p>This sentence is lacking logical links. How did the wolf know the mother is not home? Why should he come and knock on the door? What did he want?</p> <p>Another parent said:</p> <p><em>The wolf, who was sunbathing in the bush, saw that the mother is going to get some food. He thought, ‘Oh, the little goats are alone at home, and it’s a good time for me to go and trick them and maybe get a good lunch!’</em></p> <p>The parent here is clearly providing logical links between these different parts of the story.</p> <p><strong>5. Add relevant details</strong></p> <p>We also found most parents add many details to the story to make it more interesting or comprehensive. But <em>relevant </em>details are the most useful in terms of improving children’s learning. Relevant details are the kind of details that help make the story easier to understand.</p> <p>For example, one parent said:</p> <p><em>The little goat, who was wearing the yellow shirt and was the smallest said: ‘We shouldn’t open the door! How do we know this is our mother? She has just left.’</em></p> <p>Here, wearing a yellow shirt is a descriptive detail, but it doesn’t add much to the story.</p> <p>Another mother said:</p> <p><em>The smallest one, who was also the cleverest and very careful, said…</em></p> <p>This second parent is clearly adding a detail (that the smaller one is also the cleverest and careful) that makes the story more meaningful and easier to follow.</p> <p><strong>6. Talk about mental and emotional concepts</strong></p> <p>We found parents who not only describe the events of a story but also discuss <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00506/full">abstract concepts</a> related to emotions, desires and thoughts tend to have children who are better cognitively skilled. These children develop a better understanding of others’ emotions, better friendship skills, and even improved memory and higher order cognitive skills that are useful in later life. These lead to <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;id=cvLWDQAAQBAJ&amp;oi=fnd&amp;pg=PP1&amp;dq=abstract+concepts+children+better+cognitive+ability&amp;ots=DtILotRFSV&amp;sig=FftCKFka4vA-j2mpu3iY8UxDopY#v=onepage&amp;q=abstract%20concepts%20children%20better%20cognitive%20ability&amp;f=false">academic success</a> as well as better skills to build friendships and perform well in social relationships.</p> <p><em>Written by Ameneh Shahaeian. Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.theconversation.com" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Conversation.</span><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/99637/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></strong></a></em></p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Why Camilla didn't want Prince William to marry Kate

<p>An author reveals that Prince William and Duchess Kate were nearly “broken up by Camilla".</p> <p>It is said that the Duchess of Cornwall wanted her eldest step-son to end all ties with “pretty but dim” Kate, partly due to her “lowly” roots, reports <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/7219341/camilla-william-marry-pretty-but-dim-kate-prince-charles-split-them-up/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>.</p> <p>The claims were made by author Christopher Anderson in his book: <em>Game of Crowns: Elizabeth, Camilla, Kate, And the Throne</em>.</p> <p>According to Anderson, Camilla did not approve of Prince William’s relationship with the now Duchess, and the two women failed to see eye to eye.</p> <p>She allegedly also disapproved of Kate’s non-royal background, which made her “too lowly” to marry into the family.</p> <p>While they seem to share a good relationship now, it is said that in the past, Camilla thought Kate to be “pretty, but rather dim".</p> <p>The rivalry went so far that Camilla allegedly is said to have asked Prince Charles to convince his son to end things with Kate.</p> <p>Anderson also claims that Camilla was jealous of Kate and felt threatened by her growing popularity and had concerns that the young couple would overshadow her and Charles.</p> <p>While Prince William and Duchess Kate did go through a brief break-up while at university, whether it has something to do with Camilla is yet to be confirmed.</p> <p>The two women seem to get along well now as they are regularly seen attending events together. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Cassandra Thorburn opens up about divorce from Karl Stefanovic in first TV interview

<p>Karl Stefanovic’s ex-wife Cassandra Thorburn has opened up about life after divorce in her first TV interview this morning.</p> <p>Cassandra, who is promoting her first children’s book <em>Leo Lion’s Big Bed</em>, appeared on Channel 7’s <em>The Morning Show</em> with Kylie Gillies and Larry Emdur.</p> <p>She described writing her children’s book as a “passion project” to help other women, and children, going through the breakdown of a relationship.</p> <p>All profits of the book will go to <strong><u><a href="https://www.relationships.org.au/">Relationships Australia</a></u></strong>, a resource she used during her high-profile breakup from her <em>Today</em> show host husband.</p> <p>She said of Relationships Australia: “They prioritise children in the separation process. It was a perfect thing for us to put all profits there because it important to me, it is part of what me and my children have been through that led to me writing a children’s book.</p> <p>“I’m stepping out to say be comfortable in yourself and be comfortable in your skin and pursue the things that you want to pursue regardless of what is going on the sidelines.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Cassandra Thorburn has released her very first children's book, with the profits helping families going through separation. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TMS7?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TMS7</a> <a href="https://t.co/ES46wdOL1e">pic.twitter.com/ES46wdOL1e</a></p> — The Morning Show (@morningshowon7) <a href="https://twitter.com/morningshowon7/status/1036399967714201600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 2, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Cassandra and Karl announced their split in 2016 after 21 years of marriage. A few months after their split, Karl met shoe designer Jasmine Yarbrough. The pair are engaged to marry later this year.</p> <p>Speaking of her public divorce, Cassandra said: “I think everyone knows separating and divorce is particularly challenging for the children especially.</p> <p>“And it being so public probably wasn’t perfect.”</p> <p>But right now, Cassandra is focused on looking ahead.</p> <p>“Hopefully more books but I’m not focused that far ahead in my life at the moment,” she said.</p> <p>“I don’t feel the need to look that far ahead. I want to focus on my children and making sure that we are all happy and well and looking that far ahead and focusing on myself is not something that I am wanting to do right now.”</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Barnaby Joyce reveals why he lied to the media about being the father of his new child

<p>When journalists asked Barnaby Joyce whether he was the father of Vikki Campion’s unborn child, the former deputy prime minister struggled to give an answer, saying it was a “grey area”.</p> <p>The ambiguous answer caused even more controversy for the scandal-ridden politician, who later had to backtrack his denial and clarify that Sebastian was his son.</p> <p>Now, Mr Joyce has explained the thinking behind his bizarre answer in his new book <em>Weatherboard and Iron: Politics, the Bush and Me</em>.  </p> <p>The politician said his “terrible mistake” was made because he didn’t want to give the media any further details about the affair.</p> <p>“Somehow I thought that creating doubt by not having all the details might switch this frenzy off,” he wrote.</p> <p>“You are not logical when under intense pressure for weeks.”</p> <p>The “grey area” comments made by Mr Joyce opened him up to further ridicule, including from his New England rival Tony Windsor.</p> <p>Mr Windsor tweeted at the time: “If anyone had doubts about Joyce’s character I think they now have a clear picture of this grub, will sacrifice others on his blundering self-centred path. How many more women does he have to damage?”</p> <p>Mr Joyce also revealed in the book that he wanted to go away and die following the scandal that ruined his marriage and career.</p> <p>“When you stop thinking about how sad it will be when you have gone, to thinking, I have hurt so many that I want to go without anybody knowing,” he wrote.</p> <p>In an interview with the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sydney Morning Herald</em></strong></span></a>, Mr Joyce said he had to receive help from a psychiatrist, who diagnosed him with depression.</p> <p>In his book, he describes how he grew apart from his now estranged wife, Natalie, as he drank heavily and pursued other women in Canberra for years.</p> <p>“When I was at home I was a lie, and when I was in Canberra I was ashamed,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Winston Churchill had his black dog: mine was a half-crazed cattle dog, biting everything that came near the yard.</p> <p>“But the downside comes as well, when you get sad in the afternoon because it’s the afternoon and there are not enough clouds in the sky …</p> <p>“When you stop thinking about how sad it will be when you have gone, to thinking, I have hurt so many that I want to go without anybody knowing.”</p> <p>Mr Joyce dedicated the book to his “beloved daughters and son” and wrote to them: “I wish I could have given you a life outside the spotlight I turned on.”</p> <p>“I wanted the best for you but was blinded in the glare of the exertion.”</p> <p>He also describes Ms Campion as “my at times, typist, editor, critic and ever-patient partner, sitting tortured behind her keyboard trying to make sense of me.”</p> <p>It is believed Ms Campion became pregnant around July or August last year, a time in which she transferred from Resource Minister Matt Canavan’s office into a newly created role for Nationals MP Damian Dunn.</p> <p>During the transition, she did return to Mr Joyce’s office for a number of weeks.</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Palace releases official photo album of Prince Louis’ christening

<p>It has nearly been a week since Prince Louis was christened at The Chapel Royal at St James’ Palace, and now the royal family have released the official portraits from the day.</p> <p>The photos were taken by Matt Holyoak in the Morning Room at Clarence House following the christening.</p> <p>The official portraits show the 11-week-old royal being photographed with various members of his family.</p> <p>The photoshoot included three group shots and one shot of the Duchess Catherine cradling her son in the gardens of Clarence House.</p> <p>The photographer behind the royal snaps talked about what an honour it was to take the photos.</p> <p>"I was truly honoured at being asked to take the official photographs at the christening of Prince Louis, and to witness at first hand such a happy event,” he said.</p> <p>"Everyone was so relaxed and in such good spirits, it was an absolute pleasure. I only hope I have captured some of that joy in my photographs."</p> <p>Prince Louis Arthur Charles of Cambridge was baptised into the Church of England on July 9.</p> <p>The christening was an intimate gathering, with only 30 people attending the ceremony.</p> <p>Among the guests were Louis’ grandfather Prince Charles and his wife Duchess Camilla, uncle and aunt Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan, and his brother and sister Prince George and Princess Charlotte.</p> <p>Also attending the service was the Middleton family, which included Carole Middleton, Michael Middleton, James Middleton and Pippa Middleton.</p> <p>Sadly, the Queen and Prince Philip did not attend the christening.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the beautiful official christening portraits of Price Louis and his family. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

Prince Harry’s incredibly rare $15,000 christening gift for Prince Louis

<p>To celebrate his nephew’s christening, Prince Harry has forked out $15,000 for a very thoughtful gift for three-month-old Prince Louis.</p> <p>According to reports, the Duke of Sussex bought a rare first-edition copy of A.A. Milne’s <em>Winnie-the-Pooh</em>, which dates back to 1926.</p> <p>Harry is believed to have purchased the book from Peter Harrington, a rare book store in London.</p> <p>It is understood that Harry has decided to build up a library for his two nephews and niece, in memory of his mum, the late Princess Diana.</p> <p>“One of Harry’s happiest childhood memories was being read a bedtime story by his mother,” a palace insider revealed to <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6727671/prince-harry-louis-winnie-the-pooh-christening/" target="_blank"><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Sun</span></em></strong></a><em>.</em></p> <p>“She loved all the old classics and Harry had the brilliant idea of starting a little library of first editions for Louis, Charlotte and George to enjoy as they get older.”</p> <p>According to the palace source, Harry originally planned to buy a copy of Lewis Carol’s <em>Through The Looking Glass</em> to mark the occasion – which would’ve set him back $46,490 – but he decided <em>Winnie-the-Pooh</em> was more age appropriate.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were among just 30 guests invited to the intimate christening.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BlBAyMPHpOK/" target="_blank">Members of the Royal Family arrive at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace for the christening of Prince Louis.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" href="https://www.instagram.com/kensingtonroyal/" target="_blank"> Kensington Palace</a> (@kensingtonroyal) on Jul 9, 2018 at 8:25am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Meghan wore an olive Ralph Lauren dress with a Stephen Jones fascinator to the ceremony.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Prior to the christening, Meghan was seen laughing with the Most Reverend Justin Welby, who also baptised her before her wedding to Prince Harry in May.</p> <p>The couple were seen <a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/entertainment/art/2018/07/first-pictures-of-prince-louis-christening-at-st-james-palace/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">holding hands</span></strong></a> as they walked behind Prince William and Kate, before entering Chapel Royal and St James’s Palace in London. </p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

“Enough is enough!”: Karl Stefanovic slams “hurtful” magazine stories

<p>Karl Stefanovic has taken aim at Australian women’s magazine <em>Woman’s Day</em> for publishing false stories about him on the cover of their latest edition.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram, the Today host slammed the publication, writing: “Another week another BS cover. Enough is enough,” alongside an image of their latest cover, featuring him and fiance Jasmine Yarbrough.</p> <p>The weekly magazine claimed that Stefanovic’s bosses at Channel 9 banned Yarbrough from walking the Logies red carpet with him.</p> <p>Stefanovic responding, writing: “Jas was invited to the Logies and the red carpet by Nine. We had a wonderful time. These mags are bullies, hurtful and always wrong. Pls stop [sic].”</p> <p><img width="449" height="645" src="/media/7819684/capture_449x645.jpg" alt="Capture (13)" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>Yarbrough attended the 60th annual Logies celebrations at the Gold Coast with Stefanovic but did not walk the red carpet with him.</p> <p>The TV personality is no stranger to calling out the tabloids.</p> <p>Just last week, Stefanovic took to Instagram to chastise <em>New Idea</em> magazine for publishing photos of himself and his fiancée supposedly looking tense while playing a game of tennis.</p> <p><img width="445" height="627" src="/media/7819685/2_445x627.jpg" alt="2 (6)" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>"Another day another cover from No idea. Just for the record the only thing broken in this photo was my serve," he wrote, alongside a picture of him holding up the cover which reads in bold, yellow letters: “Karl at breaking point”.</p>

Books