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5 minutes with author Kate Forsyth

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in the series is Kate Forsyth, a novelist and children’s book author. After writing her first novel at the age of seven, Forsyth went on to publish more than a dozen titles. Her retelling of Rapunzel, <em>Bitter Greens</em>, won the 2015 American Library Association Award for Best Historical Fiction. Her latest book, <em>The Blue Rose</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with Forsyth about the Brontë sisters, a romance trope she can’t get enough of, and the importance of setting small, achievable targets.</span></p> <p><strong><em>Over60: </em></strong><strong>What is your best writing advice?</strong></p> <p><span>Kate Forsyth: Write what you like to read, get in the habit of writing every day, and set yourself small achievable targets such as writing one chapter a month – then slowly increase the difficulty of the target. </span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now? </span></strong></p> <p><span>I'm reading <em>Circe</em> by Madeline Miller.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>When Breath Becomes Air </span></em><span>by Paul Kalanithi – it choked me up.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think is underrated? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>The Tenant of Wildfell Hall</span></em><span> by Anne Brontë.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Any story of star-crossed lovers who need to overcome enormous obstacles before they can be together.  </span></p> <p><strong><span>Is there any book by other writers that you wish you had written? </span></strong></p> <p><em><span>Daughter of the Forest </span></em><span>by Juliet Marillier. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Do you have any writing routine? If so, what does it look like? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Every morning I have a cup of tea in bed and write in my journal – I’ve done so since I was 11 and so I have a great many volumes! Then I have breakfast, tidy the house and then walk with my dog somewhere beautiful for an hour, and think about what I plan to write that day. I settle down to work around 10am, work through till lunchtime, have a little break to eat and chat to my husband, and then work through until it's time to start cooking dinner. In the evening, I usually read - either for pleasure or for research. </span></p> <p><span>I try and have Sundays away from my computer, though I still write in my journal and read. The only time this routine varies is when I’m on the road, talking about my books, teaching and telling stories and/or travelling for research.    </span></p> <p><strong><span>Which author(s) – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with? </span></strong></p> <p><span>The Brontë sisters.</span></p>

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Living in your seventies: How to revive your best life

<p><em>Andrew Fuller is a clinical psychologist, author and Fellow of the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Learning and Educational Development at the University of Melbourne. Here now, in an excerpt from his book </em>Your Best Life At Any Age <em>(Bad Apple Press, 2019)</em><em>, he discusses how people aged 71 to 77 could navigate their lives</em><em>.</em></p> <p><span>Most people don’t fear being old when they finally get there. They do fear being bored, lonely or being treated as invisible, silly or confused. Loneliness can stem from the lack of close intimate relationships or social networks.</span></p> <p><span>The sense of indignity that can affront people at this age is life robbing. If you are surrounded by people who act as if you are mentally deficient or unable to complete rudimentary tasks it can cause feelings of deep hurt, rage and embarrassment. Extreme embarrassment can kill you years before your time.</span></p> <p><span>There is a lot of bunkum written about this time of life. Despite the prevailing myth that these years are accompanied by fragility and senility, only 5 per cent of people over sixty-five are in nursing homes and less than 10 per cent will ever be. Only 5 per cent of people over sixty-five suffer from dementia.</span></p> <p><span>Psychiatrist Gordon Livingstone wisely says that old age is not for sissies. It’s not, but it’s also not a time to turn into a dodo. Author and physician Oliver Wendall Holmes, at the age of eighty–four, upon seeing a beautiful woman said, ‘Oh to be seventy again!’ People are just as smart, switched on and shrewd as ever but the world seems to be intent on labelling them as incapable and old. Ageing does not have to mean growing old.</span></p> <p><span>This is the time of life to insist on being in the world; being part of your community and spending time with people that you love. It is easy to feel that you should really pack yourself off somewhere – to a home, to a gated community (or penitentiary for the aged) or to a highly desirable but almost inevitably lonely location.</span></p> <p><span>People may want to make arrangements and plans for you. Tell them decidedly to go and get stuffed. There is a dignity in controlling your own destiny.</span></p> <p><span>Others want to be helpful. Let them help but don’t let them control what happens to you.</span></p> <p><span>It is a time when the body does not work as it once did. Twinges turn into aches, aches turn into pain, power turns to frailty. Sleep can prove elusive. You may be up roaming in the middle of night and then unable to keep your eyes open after lunch. Names can fail to arrive on your lips. Clarity of purpose can become wayward.</span></p> <p><span>This phase of life is unknown territory. Most of your ancestors did not achieve this age. For most of history people couldn’t dream of living into their seventies.</span></p> <p><span>Across history the average life span has varied dramatically. In classical Greece and Rome it was twenty-eight years, in medieval Britain it was thirty-three years, by the end of the 19th century in Western Europe it was thirty-seven. Historically speaking, you are doing very well.</span></p> <p><span>There has been a 50 per cent increase in life expectancy since 1900, especially for women. Despite this, many people use this additional time waiting and ailing and complaining. It is an important time of life to question the contemporary view of ageing, and ask how are you going to use this additional lifetime. Will you embrace life or just spend more time being old?</span></p> <p><span>I was delighted to discover a 1933 issue of Time magazine that contained an interview with Li-Chang Yuen, a man who purportedly lived to the age of 256. For those of you interested in attaining this fine age, I include Li-Chang Yuen’s four-step formula for living for your consideration:</span></p> <ol> <li><span> Keep a quiet heart.</span></li> <li><span> Walk sprightly like a pigeon.</span></li> <li><span> Sit like a tortoise.</span></li> <li><span> Sleep like a dog.</span></li> </ol>

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5 minutes with author Fiona McArthur

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Fiona McArthur, an author based in country New South Wales. Drawing from her life as a former rural midwife, McArthur has shared her experience and love of working with women, fellow medical professionals and the outback community in her fiction and non-fiction books. Her latest novel, <em>The Desert Midwife</em> is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with McArthur about outback heroes, a book series she wished she had written, and a scene she could not bring herself to write.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>Over60</span></em><span>: What is the worst writing advice you’ve ever received?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Fiona McArthur: That was a question I really had to think about. Most of the writing advice I’ve been given has been all about adding to the toolbox, full of good intentions, and most of it works in some little nugget for me if I interpret it in my way. But, most amusingly, the one that didn’t work for me was, “Write more sex.” I’m sorry. Not me. I’m a closed-door writer, a sweet writer, though sometime characters do surprise me with their intentions, they just have to do it when I’m not looking. </span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now? </span></strong></p> <p><span>I’ve gone crazy for Darynda Jones’ paranormal romance works – I love her fast-paced <em>Charley Davidson</em> <em>Series</em> and of course I’m hooked on series books. Which is why I do link my books though each can be read as a stand-alone book. I can’t help wanting to revisit past towns and people. I should say I mostly read on audiobooks.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Darynda Jones’ <em>Eleventh Grave in Moonlight</em>.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think is underrated? Alternatively, is there any book that you think gets more credit than it deserves?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I think <em>Mills &amp; Boon </em>medical romance novels are underrated. Australian Marion Lennox is a writer who has the most amazing small town, feel good, incredibly three-dimensional romances that can change your day to smiles. She’s a romance author and is underrated for the star she is. Her 120th book just came out.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? Alternatively, which trope grinds your gears?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I love ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Like single mum makes it big. Like outback heroes. Like midwives and doctors who live to help people/patients/clients/ mums when they are vulnerable. I don’t like violence and unhappy endings.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Is there any book you wish you had written?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Absolutely. <em>Outlander</em> – also known as <em>Cross Stitch</em> – LOVE that book. Though I skimmed the really violent parts.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How do you deal with writer’s block?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I haven’t suffered yet, sympathy to those who have, and I hope I won’t. 500 words a day keeps me going forward. There are much faster days but if I feel blocked just 500 words will do. Even if it’s on a different project. But don’t stop writing. </span></p> <p><strong><span>Which three authors – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Peter O’Donnell/Madeleine Brent – he was my author hero when I was young and he taught me about strong heroines and having men as friends. Georgette Heyer who taught me about subtle humour and, again, strong heroines. And for the third, I’d say Diana Gabaldon but I’d be in too much awe, so Darynda Jones as she’d be hilarious as a dinner guest.</span></p>

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Affect or effect?: How to use the terms

<p><span>It is one of the most popular conundrums in the English language. Choosing between the word “affect” and “effect” can indeed be confusing – they are both verbs and nouns, and their meanings overlap.</span></p> <p><span>To help quash any doubt, there is a simple trick. In most contexts, the acronym RAVEN – Remember Affect Verb, Effect Noun – can be applied.</span></p> <p><span>Affect is more often used as a verb, meaning to influence, produce a change, make a difference in something. For example, bad habits <em>affect </em>your health, an argument <em>affects </em>your relationship, and a nightmare will <em>affect </em>your mood. </span></p> <p><span>Effect is generally used as a noun, meaning a result or a consequence. The group warns of the <em>effects </em>of climate change. Cycling has positive <em>effects</em> on your health. The <em>effect</em> of the policies has been overwhelming.</span></p> <p><span>The word can also be used as part of phrasal verbs, such as take <em>effect</em> (rather than <em>affect</em>) and in <em>effect</em>. For example, the new rule may take effect soon and once it does, it is in effect.</span></p> <p><span>Keep in mind that some exceptions apply – affect can be used as a noun, and effect can be used as a verb. In the noun context, affect means a feeling or an emotion: “My friend has a sad affect”. Effect as a verb could be defined as to bring about or cause something to happen: “The government is unable to effect any change”, or “The tax cut is hoped to effect economic growth”.</span></p> <p><span>These cases are less common, but it is good to understand how the two words can be used in different ways.</span></p>

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5 minutes with author Annie Seaton

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Annie Seaton, a writer based on the mid-north coast of New South Wales. Her romance fiction works have earned her numerous acclaims, including the titles of Author of the Year (2014) and Best Established Author (2015 and 2017) in the </span>AusRomToday.com Readers’ Choice AwardsAusRomToday.com Readers' Choice Awards<span>. Her latest novel, <em>Undara</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with Seaton about romance tropes, time travel, and the historical authors she would love to have dinner with.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>Over60</span></em><span>: What is your best writing advice?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Annie Seaton: The best writing advice I can give comes down to three essentials: Have passion, determination and tenacity. Believe in yourself, work hard and you will succeed. Also joining a writer’s association when I began writing and learning about the craft of writing and self-publishing was a key factor in my own development as an author.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Dervla McTiernan’s second <em>Cormac Reilly</em> book, <em>The Scholar</em>. Absolutely awesome! And Nora Roberts’ <em>Under Currents</em>. I’ve gone off Nora Roberts’ books lately, but thought I’d give this one a chance.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Jojo Moyes’ <em>Me Before You </em>had me ‘ugly crying’ on a bus tour in Europe. I missed a lot of Swiss scenery because I couldn’t see through the tears! It was a wonderful story that has stayed with me for a long time. Her characterisation was superb.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think is underrated?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Rebecca Wells’ <em>Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood</em> is a powerful, poignant and moving book about mother-daughter relationships, female friendships, alcoholism and abuse. Unfortunately it was trivialised by the movie. It is one of my ‘read again’ books every couple of years.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? </span></strong></p> <p><span>I love paranormal tropes with witches and magic, and the romance trope where the characters are isolated together in a location where they must survive. I indulged and wrote a novella a couple of years ago called <em>Sorry We’re Closed</em> where a maybe-ghost locked my two characters in a room together for a night. I also adore time travel books and indulged my love of seventies music in writing a time travel series.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Alternatively, which trope grinds your gears?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Star crossed lovers – you know that the characters should be together, but fate always throws everything at them to stop it happening, to make a story! I get impatient and frustrated!</span></p> <p><strong><span>Is there any book you wish you had written? </span></strong></p> <p><span>The <em>Harry Potter</em> books, of course!</span></p> <p><strong><span>How do you deal with writer’s block?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I have a very strong work ethic, and I know I have words to write each day. I sit at my desk and write until they are down. I am a prolific writer, and always have deadlines to meet, so I can’t afford to indulge in procrastination.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Which three authors – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with?</span></strong></p> <p><span>The first is Anya Seton, who wrote wonderful historical books over fifty years ago. <em>Katherine</em> is my favourite ever book. The second is Diana Gabaldon, who wrote about time travel and history in the <em>Outlander</em> series. The third is Sharon Penman, who wrote the Welsh historical series that began with <em>Here Be Dragons</em>. Hearing how they did/do their research would be fascinating. </span></p>

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In praise of the printed book: The value of concentration in the digital age

<p>There is an old saying that anxiety is the enemy of concentration.</p> <p>One of the best pieces of sports journalism I ever read was by <a href="http://spectator.org/archives/2007/02/22/the-man-who-wasnt-there">Gene Tunney</a>, world heavyweight champion of the 1920s, writing about how reading books helped him stay calm and focused in the lead-up to his most famous fight against former champion Jack Dempsey. While members of Dempsey’s camp ridiculed Tunney for his bookishness, Tunney kept calm, and went on to win.</p> <p>Most of us would feel stressed at the prospect of stepping into the boxing ring, but stress-related illnesses, especially depression and forms of anxiety and attention disorder, are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in wealthy societies. According to a major <a href="http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CCIQFjAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.plosmedicine.org%2Farticle%2FfetchSingleRepresentation.action%3Furi%3Dinfo%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.0030442.sd004&amp;ei=_3mgULrKOoWRigeI6IDoCw&amp;usg=AFQjCNFMmbioHNEqLYDf0H8jduBX-qV_hw">2006 projection of global mortality by Mathers and Loncar</a>, by 2030, unipolar depression will be almost 40% more likely to cause death or disability than heart disease in wealthy societies.</p> <p>Stress can of course have many causes, but in the most general sense, it spreads from factors that impact negatively on focus and concentration. We fear interruption or a surplus of tasks, responsibilities or options to choose, leading to heightened stress levels.</p> <p>The digital age is an age of distraction; and distraction causes stress and weakens concentration. Concentration, as the philosopher <a href="http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/james/">William James</a> argued in his classic 1890 work <a href="http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/James/Principles/"><em>Principles of Psychology</em></a>, is the most fundamental element of intellectual development. He wrote:</p> <blockquote> <p>The faculty of voluntarily bringing back a wandering attention over and over again, is the very root of judgement, character, and will … An education which should improve this faculty would be the education par excellence.</p> </blockquote> <p>Concentration is equally important emotionally, as is being increasingly revealed by new research into <a href="http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/collections/monash-authors/2008/9781741667042.html">“mindfulness” and meditation</a>. The inability to focus is associated with depression and anxiety and, amongst other things, an underdeveloped sociability and human empathy. Tests have revealed that people report greater happiness from being effectively focused on what they are doing than from daydreaming on even pleasant topics.</p> <p>How many memoirs include stories of the author surreptitiously reading books by torchlight underneath the blankets, with parents fearful of the child reading too much? (In my case I was reading The Hardy Boys so my mother’s objections were probably justified.)</p> <p>As <a href="http://www.jamescarroll.net/JAMESCARROLL.NET/Welcome.html">James Carroll</a> has argued, at its core, reading is <a href="http://www.commondreams.org/views01/0130-02.htm">“the occasion of the encounter with the self”</a>. In other words, the ultimate object of reading is not to take on information but to absorb and reflect upon it and, in the process, hopefully, form a more developed version of one’s own identity or being.</p> <p>It seems likely that the concentration required and encouraged by books is extremely valuable. Reading books is good for you. And this seems especially so in the case of print books, where a reader is most completely free from distraction.</p> <p>Ebooks, and more pertinently perhaps, the digital reading environment, are unquestionably transformative in the opportunities and experiences they offer to readers. Great oceans of knowledge otherwise only obtainable through tracking down print books or physical archives and records, have become available and, much more easily searchable. <a href="http://websearch.about.com/od/h/g/hyperlink.htm">Hyperlinks</a> mean readers no longer have to read in a straight line, as it were, but can follow innumerable paths of interest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.unimelb.edu.au/copyright/information/guides/wikisblogsweb2blue.pdf">Web2 technologies</a> enable “talking back” to publishers and media, the formation of groups of readers with common interests, easy (sometimes too easy) sharing of files and other information. Stories can be enriched by animated graphics and interactivity. And so on.</p> <p>No-one in their right mind would imagine that the e-reading environment can or should somehow be wound back.</p> <p>Nonetheless, by their nature e-reading devices facilitate and encourage the constant, inevitably distracting consideration of other reading options, more or less instantly attainable. This is probably their main selling point. <a href="http://ase.tufts.edu/epcd/faculty/wolf.asp">Maryanne Wolf</a> has even asked:</p> <blockquote> <p>“if the assumption that ‘more’ and ‘faster’ are necessarily better (will) have consequences that radically affect the quality of attention that can transform a word into a thought and a thought into a world of unimagined possibility?”</p> </blockquote> <p>It is interesting to consider, in light of this possibility that the greatest benefit of reading may come from its capacity to assist in the development of focus and concentration, that the print book may not actually have been superseded or, indeed, be supersede-able.</p> <p>This, I think, is what the novelist, critic, philosopher and communications historian <a href="http://www.umbertoeco.com/en/">Umberto Eco</a> means when he argues: “The book is like the spoon, scissors, the hammer, the wheel. Once invented, it cannot be improved.”<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/9855/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Nathan Hollier, Director, Monash University Publishing, Monash University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/in-praise-of-the-printed-book-the-value-of-concentration-in-the-digital-age-9855"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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“Man-eater:” The man who almost ruined Princess Diana’s reputation

<p>Our beloved Princess Diana had a life that was far from perfect. Afterall, if you were to strip back her beaming smile, elegant clothing and gleaming facade of happiness, the royal was dealing with a crumbling marriage, a world of criticism on her shoulders from the media and the world, and an uncertain future in Britain’s most famous family. </p> <p>However, there were reports that there was one thing – other than her beautiful boys, Prince William and Prince Harry – who brought her comfort and joy, and this was art dealer Oliver Hoare. </p> <p>The dashing, married tycoon was a close pal to both Prince Charles and his wife at the time, Princess Diana, in the early '90s – years before a royal divorce would be announced and fill the tabloids around the world. </p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7829235/di-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/750a7c3b900148f99c99fbfc364e46fc" /></p> <p><em>Prince Charles and Princess Diana with Oliver Hoare and his wife Diane behind at Royal Ascot horserace meeting, June 1986. </em></p> <p>Formal protection officer Ken Wharfe wrote in his book, <em>Diana: Closely Guarded Secret</em>, that the princess was “instantly” attracted to Oliver. </p> <p>“Diana later confessed to me that she had felt a little shy when, at Windsor [in 1992], she shook his hand for the first time, and had blushed as she flirted with him,” Wharfe wrote.</p> <p>“That conversation ended abruptly when Charles and the Queen Mother joined them.”</p> <p>Despite the 16-year age difference, Princess Di was said to have become “obsessed” with the married father-of-three. </p> <p>“She needed him at every conceivable moment,” Wharfe wrote.</p> <p>“She confided to me that he was the first man who had ever aroused her physically. That admission did much to explain the humiliating events that followed.”</p> <p>The pair were linked between 1990-1994 and the relationship, according to Chris Dicker in the 2018 book, <em>Princess Diana Biography: The Astonishing Life of the Princess of Wales</em>, was “damaging to Diana’s reputation.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829236/di.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/44ed7c2d26c8480695dd34819196ceac" /></p> <p>"Diana's reputation as a man-eater was derived from her affair with Oliver Hoare. He was a married man and this was damaging to Diana's reputation.</p> <p>"She was convinced he was going to marry her. The press was very aggressive about getting pictures of them.</p> <p>"Hoare started sneaking into Kensington Palace with his head under a blanket. It was degrading to her.</p> <p>"Their affair was all over the tabloids. James Hewitt and Oliver Hoare were such rollercoaster romances for her."</p> <p>Princess Di said in the groundbreaking 1995 <em>Panorama</em> interview, she did indeed call Hoare over a period of six to nine months, however “certainly not in an obsessive manner.”</p> <p>Reports also said the royal was convinced they were going to be married and “daydreamed of living in Italy with the handsome Hoare.”</p> <p>Their relationship came to an end when Hoare’s wife complained about hundreds of nuisance phone calls. </p> <p>An investigation revealed the calls could be traced to the royal’s home in Kensington Palace, her mobile phone, Notting Hill and the home of Diana's older sister, Lady Sarah McCorquodale. </p> <p>Wharfe explained he was forced to tell Scotland Yard who was making the numerous phone calls. </p> <p>"I was asked to speak to a senior officer of mine who said to me, 'Somebody is using the princess’s telephone to make phone calls to Oliver Hoare’s household and even spoken to his wife.'</p> <p>"At that point I said to him, 'The Princess of Wales is having a relationship with this man and that she is making telephone calls'."</p> <p>While this relationship is widely believed and a number of close companions of the late Princess Di confirm a number of details, the world will never be able to know with absolute certainty. </p> <p>To the day he died, in August 23, 2018, Oliver Hoare refused to speak about the alleged affair he had with the most famous woman in the world.</p>

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5 minutes with author Dominic Smith

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Dominic Smith, a Sydney-born author and essayist based in Seattle, Washington in the US. His acclaimed novel, <em>The Last Painting of Sara de Vos</em> was a <em>New York Times </em>bestseller and won various awards, including the Literary Fiction Book of the Year from the Australian Book Industry Awards and the Fiction Indie Book of the Year Award from the Independent Booksellers Association. His latest novel, <em>The Electric Hotel</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em>Over60</em> talked with Smith about the challenges in reading James Joyce’s works, the travel book that makes him laugh, and the redemption tropes he has no interest in.</p> <p><strong><em>Over60:</em></strong> <strong>What is the worst writing advice you’ve ever received?</strong></p> <p>Dominic Smith: “Write what you know.” So much of fiction writing, for me, is about discovering new worlds. I’ve always thought telling aspiring writers to write about what they know is terrible advice. Write about what you want to know!</p> <p><strong>What book(s) are you reading right now?</strong></p> <p>I’m reading Jane Gardam’s wonderful <em>Old Filth</em>, about a British barrister who returns to England after a career in Hong Kong — FILTH stands for: Failed in London, Tried Hong Kong. I’m also reading Lisa Halliday’s very smart and affecting novel <em>Asymmetry</em>.</p> <p><strong>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh?</strong></p> <p>I recently read<em> Italian Neighbors</em>, by Tim Parks, about his experiences living in Italy. Parks has that rare ability to poke fun at cultural norms, types and beliefs without ever being condescending. As a devoted traveler to Italy, I found it to be a very astute and funny read.</p> <p><strong>What book do you think is underrated?</strong></p> <p>In 1992, two books won the Man Booker Prize: Michael Ondaatje’s <em>The English Patient</em> and Barry Unsworth’s <em>Sacred Hunger</em>. Almost everyone has read the former and very few the latter. <em>Sacred Hunger</em> is a brilliant and harrowing account of an African slave trade ship that ventured out from the Liverpool docks in England during the 18th-century.</p> <p><strong>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? Alternatively, which trope grinds your gears?</strong></p> <p>I’m a sucker for tropes about discovery, exploration and sprawling family sagas. I’m less enthused about tropes of redemption through romantic love.</p> <p><strong>What do you think is the most challenging work you’ve ever read?</strong></p> <p>As an undergraduate, I was determined to read all of James Joyce. When I got to <em>Finnegans Wake</em> I made it about halfway through before giving up. All those dense, dreamy associations, the obscure usages and the layers of wordplay took me too far away from readerly pleasure.</p> <p><strong>How do you deal with writer’s block?</strong></p> <p>I accept writer’s block, or a lack of inspiration, as just part of the process. I tend to schedule my writing — mornings, before noon — so that I don’t wait for inspiration to strike before I sit down at the laptop. In a sense, I believe inspiration comes out of the work. If you show up, inspiration bubbles up from the page. A runner doesn’t always enjoy the first mile, but then the endorphins kick in. Writing is the same.</p> <p><strong>Which three authors – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with?</strong></p> <p>Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Bruce Chatwin – though I expect Bruce and I would be doing most of the work to keep the conversation flowing.</p>

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Lisa Marie Presley set to write “shocking” tell-all book about Michael Jackson and Elvis

<p>Lisa Marie Presley is close to signing a blockbuster book deal which is said to reveal “shocking” details about her ex Michael Jackson while also providing a new perspective on her father, Elvis Presley.</p> <p>Reported by the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://pagesix.com/" target="_blank"><em>New York Post’s Page Six</em></a>, Lisa Marie’s book is allegedly such an explosive piece of work that Gallery Books purchased it for between $4.3 million and $5.8 million.</p> <p>An insider told<span> </span><em>Page Six</em><span> </span>that the book “promises shocking revelations about Michael Jackson and a completely new understanding of Elvis.”</p> <p>The 51-year-old was married to the entertainer from 1994 to 1996.</p> <p><img style="width: 333.99906015037595px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7829147/elvis.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1ed7c226b3c1412895b43f4d678bd21d" /></p> <p>They wed in secrecy as their ceremony was kept private before unveiling the relationship on MTV and splitting two years later.</p> <p>Lisa sat down with Oprah Winfrey in 2010, providing a cryptic account for why the marriage was destined to fail: “There was a very profound point in the marriage when he had to make a decision. Was it the drugs and the sort of vampires, or me? And he pushed me away.” She then clarified that by “vampires” she meant “sycophants”.</p> <p>She also said, “The one thing that correlates with Michael and with my father on this subject is that they have the luxury of creating whatever reality around them they wanted to create.”</p> <p>However, despite their relationship ultimately not working out, Lisa believes that claims about Jackson’s inappropriate actions towards children are false, telling Diane Sawyer in 1995, “I know that he’s not like that.”</p>

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Never seen before video footage of Duchess Meghan emerges

<p>It may have been only a few seconds the camera graced the Duchess of Sussex’s face, but it sure was memorable for royal fans.</p> <p>In a short video to launch UK<span> </span><em>Vogue’</em>s September issue, the Duchess – who was reportedly around five months pregnant with baby Archie at the time the clip was shot – is shown working alongside the magazine’s editor-in-chief Edward Enninful.</p> <p>With her baby bump on show to the world, the 37-year-old described working with the<span> </span><em>Vogue</em> team as “rewarding.”</p> <p>“These last seven months have been a rewarding process, curating and collaborating with Edward Enninful, British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief, to take the year’s most read fashion issue and steer its focus to the values, causes and people making impact in the world today,” she said in a statement.</p> <p>The<span> </span><span>@</span>SussexRoyal Instagram account said of the partnership: “Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Sussex is the first Guest Editor for British Vogue’s September Issue and for the last seven months has worked to create an issue of inclusivity and inspiration, focusing on what connects us rather than what divides us.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ff0ctlVYT/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ff0ctlVYT/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Jul 29, 2019 at 12:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light.</p> <p>“I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the 'Forces for Change' they’ll find within these pages.”</p> <p>Duchess Meghan’s two brief appearances in the short film was purposeful and aimed to keep the attention away from herself and on the 15 women selected as “Forces for Change" for the empowering September issue of UK <em>Vogue</em>.</p>

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Samuel Johnson's $10 million cancer fight: "I'm tantalisingly close"

<p>Samuel Johnson, actor and self-proclaimed “cancer vanquisher”, has almost hit the $10 million mark through his charity “Love Your Sister”. The charity was started after his sister Connie was diagnosed with terminal cancer for a third time back in 2012.</p> <p>He spoke to <a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/latest/samuel-johnson-book-cancer/38a99c3a-c565-4cbb-bc9c-6bf8697b1c46" target="_blank">9Honey</a> about how close he is to his goal.</p> <p>"We've raised $9.6 million and I'm tantalisingly close to reaching the $10 million mark," Johnson revealed.</p> <p>The actor is motivated to keep his fundraising efforts strong for the hundreds of thousands of cancer sufferers he’s met over the years, as well as witnessing his sister’s battle with the disease.</p> <p>"I'm so proud of the progress that's been made in my sister's name," he says. "My sister was kept alive for seven years courtesy of a recently developed drug.</p> <p>"If she had been diagnosed just 10 years earlier, she would have had more like seven weeks."</p> <p>He also said that he’s often asked how he copes with meeting cancer sufferers and hearing their heartbreaking stories.</p> <p>Johnson said he “welcomes their pain”.</p> <p>"I welcome their pain and encourage it and ask for it," he says. "I take it on and carry it with me and I listen to each cancer story for the first time. No two cancer stories are the same.</p> <p>"I've digested about a quarter of a million cancer stories face-to-face over the past seven years and I've spent time with communities effected by it," he continued. "It motivates me."</p> <p>Johnson added, "I am in a position to help and that's what I offer, so I cope fine. I don't have cancer. It's really the people with cancer that are struggling to cope."</p> <p>Johnson says he thinks he’ll reach his fundraising goal by Christmas this year, and it will be helped in part by his new book <em>Dear Dad</em>. It features prominent Australians writing letters to their fathers, and includes Steve Waugh, Shane Jacobson, Shannon Noll, as well as Johnson himself.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0fYVLUh-2C/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0fYVLUh-2C/" target="_blank">MY JOHN LAWS CHALLENGE Love catching up with Lawsy; he always tells me off and we love ribbing each other...thank YOU Lawsy, for bringing YOUR customary cheer! Been hawking our new tome 'Dear Dad'. It's a collection of letters to dads or dad-like dads, written by notable Aussies, with proceeds to cancer bashing. Link in profile. Go on then! Xsammy PS : @johnlaws2sm I challenge you to write a Dear Dad letter for us within 48 hours! If you do, I'll include it as an insert in every copy we sell through our charity's online village market! Villagers, please tag @johnlaws2sm in the comments here and encourage him to come along!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/loveyoursister/" target="_blank"> Love Your Sister</a> (@loveyoursister) on Jul 28, 2019 at 11:17pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"The book is a surprising, hilarious, sometimes confronting collection of letters to fathers written by notable Aussies," Johnson said. "It really is the whole kit and caboodle. It's as raw and as confronting as it is heartfelt.</p> <p>"When I read it, it showed me just how lucky I was to get the father I had."</p> <p>Johnson was raised in Victoria with his two sisters Connie and Hilde by their father alone, after his mother passed away by suicide.</p> <p>The 41-year-old credits being the way he is today to his father.</p> <p>"He held his approval just beyond my reach which meant I was always reaching, and if he hadn't held the approval just beyond my grasp then I wouldn't be the type of person I am today, who tries to reach everyday towards something better," he says.</p>

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10 great books that all children should read

<p>The books we remember strongly as adults are often the ones we read as children. Not only do we remember particular books, but the emotions we experienced.</p> <p>Children’s books are reread and remembered over a lifetime, and many authors believe their <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/16/childrens-books-are-never-just-for-children">best writing is for children</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/16/childrens-books-are-never-just-for-children">Rereading favourites</a> is a good thing. With each rereading, deeper meanings emerge and understanding becomes richer.</p> <p>Reading books aloud, and being read to, is also important, with <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/bedtime-stories-for-young-brains/?emc=eta1&amp;_r=1">research</a> pointing to enhanced levels of brain activity for children who are read to before bed. Some research even recommends <a href="http://onecapehealthnews.com/reading-is-good-for-the-brain-even-for-babies/">reading to a child from birth</a> to help stimulate brain development and build language, literacy and social-emotional skill.</p> <p>For young people, reading fiction can provide excellent training for <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2015/may/13/reading-teach-children-empathy">developing and practising empathy</a> and understanding how others feel and think.</p> <p>Here is a selection of some of the best books to share with your child over the festive season on the topic of family and friends:</p> <p><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/10-great-books-that-all-children-should-read-51203">1. <em>Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes</em> by Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury</a></strong></p> <p>(<em>Penguin Books Australia, 2008</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 0-2 years</p> <p>Fox’s exuberant rhythm, rhyme and repetition feature in a short 148-word story, making it perfect read to aloud for babies. The book features eye-catching watercolour illustrations and a series of fun activities, including counting fingers and toes and an end game of a kiss on the nose.</p> <p><strong>2.<em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22759458-over-the-hills-and-far-away"> Over the Hills and Far Away: A Treasure of Nursery Rhymes from Around the World</a> </em>by Elizabeth Hammill</strong></p> <p>(<em>Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 0-6 years</p> <p>A collection of nursery rhymes should be in every home. They are perfect for dipping into from birth and throughout the preschool years. This one features a multitude of enticing brief stories from different cultures, rhymes honed to perfection, and rich illustrations by 77 of the world’s best illustrators.</p> <p><strong>3. <em><a href="http://www.australianpicturebooks.com/2011/11/bear-and-chook.html">Bear and Chook</a></em> by Lisa Shanahan</strong></p> <p>(<em>Hodder Headline Australia, 2002</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 2-5 years</p> <p>Bear and Chook are close friends, loving and patient with each other’s eccentricities. Bear is adventurous and accident-prone. Chook is cautious and careful. As friends, they have an immense respect for each other. A perfect combination of rollicking, rich and enticing read-aloud language and humorous, touching illustrations.</p> <p><strong>4. <em><a href="http://www.enchantedlionbooks.com/node/231">The Lion and the Bird</a> </em>by Marianne Dubuc</strong></p> <p>(<em>Enchanted Lion Books, 2013</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 3-7 years</p> <p>The text says little. The illustrations are minimal. Yet we experience an immense satisfaction in this deep friendship between Bird and Lion. Lion nurses Bird back to health after an injury, and they share winter together. With spring’s return, Bird must leave and Lion is alone again. The illustrations convey the seasonal cycle, and we cheer as Bird returns. A powerful story of friendship with perfect images that linger.</p> <p><strong>5. <a href="http://www.harpercollins.com.au/9780007513765/the-day-the-crayons-quit"><em>The Day the Crayons Quit</em></a> by Drew Daywalt</strong></p> <p>(<em>HarperCollins, 2013</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>A highly original, quirky and funny story for sophisticated readers. Duncan reaches for his crayons, but instead finds they have left him handwritten letters. They have quit their jobs as crayons and complain bitterly. Purple laments Duncan colouring outside the lines. Grey is tired of colouring large objects like elephants. Black wants to be more than an outline. Duncan finds a clever solution to remain friends with his crayons.</p> <p><strong>6. <a href="https://www.penguin.com.au/products/9780670076031/herman-and-rosie"><em>Herman and Rosie</em></a> by Gus Gordon</strong></p> <p>(<em>Penguin Books Australia, 2012</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>An unlikely pair explore the meaning of friendship, loneliness and life in the big city in this unforgettable, multi-layered picture book. Herman, a crocodile, and Rosie, a deer, each lives alone on different floors of the same New York apartment block. They do not know each other, but they have common interests in music and both love films about the sea. Music brings them together when each loses their job. This story reveals the importance of friendship and belonging in understated elegance with quirky, whimsical illustrations.</p> <p><strong>7. <em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20793857-my-two-blankets">My Two Blankets</a> </em>by Irena Kobald</strong></p> <p>(<em>Little Hare Books, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>A young girl arrives in Australia unable to speak English. She wraps herself in her familiar blanket woven with cultural familiarities. A girl in the park befriends her and together they share experiences and language. Gradually she relinquishes her blanket, realising that her culture comes from within. A moving story for exploring cultural similarities and differences.</p> <p><strong>8. <em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20724592-animalium">Animalium</a> </em>by Katie Scott and Jenny Broom</strong></p> <p>(<em>Five Mile Press, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 5+</p> <p>Animalium explores the animal kingdom with clarity, precision, excitement and highly detailed illustrations. Excellent features include its large size, sumptuous layout, tantalising questions and answers, clever analogies, multi-layered information and detailed index. Seven sections cover brief differences and commonalities, environment, food and behaviour. A perfect coffee table book for sharing among the family.</p> <p><strong>9. <em><a href="http://www.bloomsbury.com/au/harry-potter-and-the-philosophers-stone-9781408845646/">Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone</a> </em>(illustrated edition) by J K Rowling</strong></p> <p>(<em>Bloomsbury, 2015</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 6+</p> <p>Harry Potter appeals to all ages, making the series of seven books an ideal family sharing experience. The unique aspect of this book is its copious illustrations, which capture mood, magical moments, unique characters and above all a sense of other-worldliness. This illustrated edition is the perfect opportunity for families to share a reading aloud experience with bonus images.</p> <p><strong>10. <em><a href="http://www.philip-pullman.com/hdm?pageID=2">His Dark Materials</a> </em>trilogy by Philip Pullman</strong></p> <p>(<em>Scholastic Books, 1995</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 10+</p> <p>His Dark Materials trilogy is a contemporary epic high-fantasy adventure with lyrical writing, highly original, memorable characters and a story with dazzling originality. It is the perennial story of pure evil and angelic good, of bravery and courage and inventive ideas rarely explored with such conviction and believability. A great book to share with the family.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/51203/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Belle Alderman, Emeritus professor of children's literature, University of Canberra</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/10-great-books-that-all-children-should-read-51203"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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The palace confirms Duchess Meghan's big new role

<p>It has been confirmed by the palace that the Duchess of Sussex is the guest editor for British <em>Vogue</em>’s famed September issue. </p> <p>While we won’t be seeing the royal grace the cover herself, she is choosing to include a number of other big names in September’s Forces of Change edition. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ebh7tlnVl/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ebh7tlnVl/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Jul 28, 2019 at 2:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Some of the faces that will be gracing the cover include New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, boxer Ramla Ali and actress Gemma Chan. </p> <p>The collection will feature 15 women who are “changemakers, united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers”.</p> <p>The palace also revealed a candid conversation with former US First Lady, Michelle Obama, and an interview between Prince Harry and ethologist and primatologist Dr Jane Goodall will be included. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ejj5dn6o9/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ejj5dn6o9/" target="_blank">A post shared by The British Royal Family🇬🇧👑 (@royalwindsors.__)</a> on Jul 28, 2019 at 3:36pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"These last seven months have been a rewarding process, curating and collaborating with Edward Enninful, British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief, to take the year’s most read fashion issue and steer its focus to the values, causes and people making impact in the world today," the Duchess said in a heartfelt statement. </p> <p>"Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829020/new-project.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ae3eb501672c4f66a9eee53fe028becb" /></p> <p>"I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the 'Forces for Change' they’ll find within these pages."</p> <p>The magazine’s cover displays 15 women personally chosen by the Duchess of Sussex, along with a mysterious blank space which was revealed to be a mirror “so that when you hold the issue in your hands, you see yourself as part of this collective".</p> <p>The issue will be available online from this Friday, August 2.</p>

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5 minutes with author Sophie Green

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Sophie Green, a Sydney-based author and publisher. Her debut novel, <em>The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club</em> was shortlisted for the Australian Book Industry Awards for General Fiction Book of the Year 2018. Her latest book, <em>The Shelly Bay Ladies Swimming Circle</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> talked with Green about her (lack of) writing routine, the one book that makes her cry, and why she wants to have dinner with Simone de Beauvoir.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Over60: What is your best writing tip?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Sophie Green: Read a lot before you start writing, while you are writing, and any other time you have. Reading is the best possible education for a writer.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now?</span></strong></p> <p><em><span>H.R.H. The Princess Margaret</span></em><span> by Nigel Dempster, <em>Where the Crawdads Sing</em> by Delia Owens and <em>The Beautiful Fall</em> by Alicia Drake.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry? </span></strong></p> <p><span>Music makes me cry more often than books, so I could easily tell you the last five songs that made me cry, but the only book that comes to mind is <em>Guarding the Moon</em> by Francesca Lia Block, which I read a long time ago.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What does your writing routine look like?</span></strong></p> <p><span>When I’m writing a first draft I write on public transport, on the way to and from work. When I’m rewriting, I need longer blocks of time to be able to make headway, but that means there is no routine – it could be at 4.30am or late at night, depending on when I can find the time.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Paperback, e-book or audiobook?</span></strong></p> <p><span>All of them, depending on the book. I have a lot of print books in my reading pile and a lot of e-books queued up to be read, but I also love audiobooks because for some stories it’s easier to be swept away on audio. </span></p> <p><strong><span>What do you think is the most challenging work you’ve ever read?</span></strong></p> <p><em><span>The Ground Beneath Her Feet</span></em><span> by Salman Rushdie – not because I didn’t love it, but because it took a little while to find the rhythm of it. Once I did, it was a wonderful ride.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What do you do when you’re not writing or reading?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Apart from work and housework and all the usual things, I play piano and guitar, I practise and teach yoga, play tennis as often as I can, swim in the sea when the temperature allows and go for walks. </span></p> <p><strong><span>If you could invite three authors – living or deceased – to a dinner party, who would you choose and why?</span></strong></p> <p>I’ll start with James Baldwin, because he would be brilliant and arch and passionate; Simone de Beauvoir, because as much as we know of her life I suspect there was so much she didn’t say, and perhaps she could divulge that over dinner; and Herodotus, because I’d like to quiz him about his source material and find out how much of the truth he liked to bend.</p>

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What we know about the new Lord of the Rings series

<p><span>More <em>Lord of the Rings </em>is coming to your screen – after the success of the trilogy and its <em>Hobbit </em>prequels, Amazon is set to adapt the story into a high-budget TV series.</span></p> <p><span>Set in Middle-earth, the upcoming <em>The Lord of the Rings </em>TV series will explore new storylines preceding J.R.R. Tolkien’s <em>The Fellowship of the Ring</em>. Writers JD Payne and Patrick McKay are set to develop the series along with <em>Game of Thrones </em>alumna Bryan Cogman.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LOTRonPrime?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#LOTRonPrime</a> <a href="https://t.co/7TuQh7gRPD">pic.twitter.com/7TuQh7gRPD</a></p> — The Lord of the Rings on Prime (@LOTRonPrime) <a href="https://twitter.com/LOTRonPrime/status/1103656820130775050?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 7, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>Australian actress <a href="https://variety.com/2019/tv/news/lord-of-the-rings-series-amazon-cast-markella-kavenagh-1203268175/">Markella Kavenagh</a> has been revealed as the first cast member on the show. Kavenagh, who won the Rising Stars Award at the 2018 Casting Guild of Australia Awards for her performance on BBC drama <em>The Cry</em>, will be playing a character named Tyra on the Amazon adaptation.</span></p> <p><span>The streaming service reportedly acquired global TV rights to <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>, based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendary novels, in a deal that was reported to be worth nearly US$250 million in <a href="https://deadline.com/2017/11/amazon-the-lord-of-the-rings-tv-series-multi-season-commitment-1202207065/">2017</a>.</span></p> <p><span>“We are delighted that Amazon, with its longstanding commitment to literature, is the home of the first-ever multi-season television series for The Lord of the Rings,” said Matt Galsor, a representative for the Tolkien Estate and Trust and HarperCollins at the time. </span></p> <p><span>“[The team] at Amazon Studios have exceptional ideas to bring to the screen previously unexplored stories based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s original writings.”</span></p> <p><span>More news is expected to come as the series develops.</span></p> <p><span>The <em>Lord of the Rings </em>series is expected to launch on Amazon Prime Video in 2021.</span></p>

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64 and still got it! Greg Norman poses shirtless for new photoshoot

<p>He’s an Australian golfing legend who has reached the heights of success in both sport and business.</p> <p>Now, Greg Norman has revealed the secret behind his triumphs, which he says is all due to believing in the “American dream”.</p> <p>The 64-year-old posed shirtless for a photoshoot with<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://hauteliving.com/2019/07/greg-norman-haute-living-cover-story/671666/?fbclid=IwAR29zgJkbHWeMQ6nAk578uTRVLlY6OKE3RGZGwZZpZMBedKTGTTt1QiMNX4" target="_blank">Haute Living </a></em>magazine as he shared his life philosophy.</p> <p>“I do think I’m American in my business philosophy,” said Greg, who is famously known as “The Shark”.</p> <p>Despite being in love with his home country, Greg truly believes that his enormous success is all thanks to his move to the US.</p> <p>“There is nowhere else in the world I could have started and done what I’ve done,” he explained.</p> <p>Greg, who currently resides in Florida, added: “Here in the United States, with the reach it’s got and the reputation it has for allowing people to chase their dreams, it’s doable … and I’m not afraid to go after things.”</p> <p>The former sportsman has multiple businesses which includes his own brand of wine, a golf course design firm and clothing line, and he even runs a real estate development company.</p> <p>He’s now worth a cool $300 million, and he says his passion for business has taken over his “desire” to play golf.</p> <p>“I don’t like to hit golf balls anymore,” he said.</p> <p>The photographs were taken at a $11 million mansion in Florida as he posed in a white Louis Vuitton suit.</p> <p>Greg is widely considered to be one of the greatest golfers of all time and retained his world number one title for 331 weeks.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Greg Norman for<span> </span><em>Haute Living<span> </span></em>magazine.</p>

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Ted Kennedy car crash scandal that killed Mary Jo Kopechne: Letter exposes new claims

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>After 50 years, the Ted Kennedy Chappaquiddick incident has remained one of the biggest mysteries surrounding the Kennedy family.</p> <p>The car crash on the US island ended the life of 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne and derailed Ted Kennedy’s presidential chances.</p> <p>On the evening of July 18, 1969, the then US senator Kennedy hosted a party on the small island for the Boiler Room Girls, a group of six women who had worked on his brother Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign the year before. One of the women was 28-year-old Kopechne.</p> <p>Despite extensive reports on the incident, details of the events of the night have remained shrouded. Kennedy reportedly left the party with Kopechne, even though she did not bring her purse or hotel room key with her. The two drove off in his 1967 Oldsmobile Delmont 88.</p> <p>Kennedy said the car went over the bridge into Poucha Pond after he made a wrong turn. While he managed to escape the sinking vehicle, Kopechne remained trapped and was later found dead in the morning.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 368.449px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828778/kennedy-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6ea10144582044f594787fdf71a993a4" /><img style="width: 301.887px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828803/kennedy-2-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0d363094141545378a703127593d6400" /></p> <p>But a letter to Kopechne’s surviving family has challenged this story.</p> <p>The letter, recently revealed by <a href="https://people.com/politics/ted-kennedy-chappaquiddick-car-accident-50-years-later/"><em>PEOPLE</em></a>’s Cover-Up podcast, came from a man who claimed to have met a woman who had attended the party the night Kopechne died.</p> <p>The woman, referred to as “Betty”, said Kopechne had had too much to drink at the event. Betty then brought Kopechne to Kennedy’s car to rest, and then went back to the cottage.</p> <p>The letter claimed that Kennedy and another female guest went for a drive in the car. When the sedan plunged into the water, Kennedy and the passenger survived and returned to the party, unaware that Kopechne had been in the vehicle all along.</p> <p>Betty shared the story, and the letter said that was when “…the Kennedy damage control machine kicked in and informed the shocked senator.”</p> <p>After receiving the letter in 2018, Kopechne’s cousin Georgetta Potoski said the full story might not yet be revealed. </p> <p>“I’m not convinced the mystery has been solved,” she told <em>PEOPLE</em>. </p> <p>“I know there are things that we do not know about what happened that night. The truth, even if it’s not what you want to hear, at least has some dignity around it.</p> <p>“I don’t think there will ever be justice for the loss of her life. [But] I think the truth would make our hearts rest easier.”</p> <p>A week after the incident, Kennedy pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of the accident and was given a two-month suspended sentence. Later on the same day, he gave a national broadcast statement in which he said, “I regard as indefensible the fact that I did not report the accident to the police immediately.”</p> <p>Kennedy, who was preparing for his presidential run, delayed his campaign until 1980. His run for the country’s top office was unsuccessful, but he continued to be re-elected as senator seven more times until his death in 2009.</p> <p>In his posthumously published memoir <em>True Compass</em>, Kennedy described the incident as “a horrible tragedy that haunts me every day of my life”.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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5 minutes with author Alli Sinclair

<p><span>In <em>5 minutes with author</em>, <em>Over60</em> asks book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next in this series is Alli Sinclair, a romance author and avid traveller. The award-winning writer has lived in Peru, Argentina and Canada as well as worked on hosting writers’ retreats and writing workshops around Australia. Her latest book, <em>The Cinema at Starlight Creek</em>, is out now.</span></p> <p><em><span>Over60</span></em><span> spoke with Sinclair about romance tropes, <em>Crazy Rich Asians</em>, and why she would love to have dinner with Ernest Hemingway.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>Over60</span></em><span>: What is your best writing tip?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Alli Sinclair: Some days the words will flow, other days it will be a struggle but each word you get on the page is a step forward to finishing your story. Don’t worry if you have holes in the first draft, you can always go back and fix them. Just get the story down first, everything else will fall into place on subsequent edits. You can do it!</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book(s) are you reading right now?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I’m currently reading an advance reader copy of <em>Postscript</em>, the sequel to Cecelia Ahern’s brilliant book, <em>P.S. I Love You</em>. It’s been years in the making so I’m excited to be reading it! I’m also reading non-fiction books as research for my book that is coming out in 2020, so I’m learning a lot about the airline industry in the 1940s.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What was the last book that made you cry or laugh?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I’m a crier so it doesn’t take much to set me off. The last book that made me laugh and cry was <em>Crazy Rich Asians</em> by Kevin Kwan. I recently saw the movie and I laughed and cried in that as well!</span></p> <p><strong><span>What book do you think is underrated?</span></strong></p> <p><em><span>A Suitable Boy</span></em><span> by Vikram Seth. It came out in 1993 and it’s a book I often go back to read again even though it is a whopping 1,349 pages! It is a beautiful story set in India post-partition and is about four families struggling to cope with their new India. At the heart of the story is a romance and it is uplifting and heartbreaking at the same time. The characters are wonderfully complicated and the setting is divine. I’ve read a lot of books over the years and this one has sat firmly at number one on my list since I first read it in 1993. I think people are put off by the length of the book but if they give it a try, I’m sure they’d be delighted to step into this magnificent world.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What are the tropes that you can’t help but love? Alternatively, which trope grinds your gears?</span></strong></p> <p><span>My favourites are friends to lovers, fish out of water, soul mate/fate, secret romance and second chance at love. There’s no particular trope that grinds my gears, but there are some I favour more than others.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What do you think is the most challenging work you’ve ever read?</span></strong></p> <p><em><span>Midnight’s Children</span></em><span> by Salman Rushdie. Another book set in India it is about a group of children born between 12am and 1am on the night India gained independence in 1947. The story uses the technique of magical realism and covers a great deal of Indian history. It took me three tries before I finally finished the book because the style of writing was unlike anything I’d read before. But it was absolutely worth persevering because Midnight’s Children is one of my all-time favourite books. </span></p> <p><strong><span>What do you do when you’re not writing?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I love spending time with my young family, whether it’s playing board games, watching a movie or travelling. I’ve recently started working on some projects for the screen, which is very exciting, so I’m doing a lot of study about writing for film and TV. And, of course, I read for fun in my spare time as well. I have a very large pile of books that grows every week, but I’ll get through them eventually!</span></p> <p><strong><span>Which three authors – living or deceased – would you most like to have dinner with?</span></strong></p> <p><span>I’d love to have dinner with Isabel Allende, a South American author who writes the most beautiful, haunting books that speak to the soul. </span></p> <p><span>[The second is] Nina George, a German author who kindly wrote a wonderful recommendation that went on the cover of one of my books that have been translated into German. Nina’s books are lyrical and whisk the reader off into worlds that capture the heart. </span></p> <p><span>[The third is] Ernest Hemingway because I have visited many of the places he has travelled and lived in and I’d love to ask him about all the adventures he’s been on and the people he met.</span></p>

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Rare Harry Potter book set to sell for $54,000 at auction

<p><span>If you have some old <em>Harry Potter </em>books at home, check them out today – you might be sitting on a copy worth tens of thousands of dollars.</span></p> <p><span>A 1997 print version of JK Rowling’s <em>Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone </em>bought for less than $2 at a yard sale is expected to sell for up to £30,000 (about AU$53,600) at an auction at the end of July.</span></p> <p><span>The book, owned by a 54-year-old English office worker, is one of the only 500 copies in the world of the particular first edition. </span></p> <p><span>The owner, whose name is not revealed, told <a href="https://nypost.com/2019/07/02/rare-harry-potter-book-bought-at-yard-sale-could-fetch-thousands-at-auction/"><em>SWNS</em></a> that he bought the book in 1999 for a pound. “I thought nothing of it at the time. I read the book … and then put it away in a cupboard for years,” he said. </span></p> <p><span>“It’s so exciting to think that a holiday read could be worth so much now.” </span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828733/harry-potter-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4af587c5fe9341fcadf09f7f7c266320" /></p> <p><span>The rare edition was published by Bloomsbury on June 30, 1997 and came with numerous misspellings and typos. </span></p> <p><span>Jim Spencer, rare books expert at Hansons Auctioneers said 300 of the first edition copies went to schools and libraries. “They are extremely rare,” he told the <a href="http://bit.ly/32cy6Gy"><em>Daily Mirror</em></a>.</span></p> <p><span>“This is a landmark in children’s literature, but it appeals to young and old. Everybody knows this book. This is the holy grail for so many collectors.”</span></p> <p><span>The book will be auctioned on July 31 at Hansons’ Library Auction at Bishton Hall, Wolseley Bridge, in Staffordshire, England.</span></p> <p><span>In April, another book of the same edition was <a href="https://www.gq.com.au/entertainment/film-tv/a-first-edition-harry-potter-book-just-fetched-126k-at-auction/news-story/3c7211062cb7c94c3184e32754b31e0a">sold at a Bonhams auction</a> in London for £68,812 or nearly AU$126,000, above the original estimated worth of £40,000 to £60,000 ($AU73,000 to 110,000).</span></p>

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Worth reading: Tried and true manuals for success

<p><em>The Conversation Canada asked our academic authors to share some recommended reading. In this instalment, Michael Armstrong, an operations research professor at Brock University who has written for</em> The Conversation Canada <em>on topics as diverse as <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-well-do-students-perform-when-retaking-courses-82559">student success rates in school</a> to the <a href="https://theconversation.com/picketts-charge-what-modern-mathematics-teaches-us-about-civil-war-battle-78982">mathematics of Civil War battle</a>, shares the top three books that he recommends for guidance on making the most of your career at any age.</em></p> <p>Here are three books that I often recommend to my students and friends. All are practical guides that have stood the test of time. The first will help you start your career, the second will help you succeed in it and the third will help you profit from it.</p> <p><strong><em>What Color Is Your Parachute? </em></strong><strong><em>A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers </em></strong>by Richard N. Bolles (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2016 and others. Ten Speed Press.)</p> <p>This is a popular guide for job seekers. Like most such books, it gives advice on the mechanical details of job hunting, such as good ways to organize a resume.</p> <p>More importantly — and less commonly — it helps people figure out what they want to do with their lives. What kind of career will best fit your personality? Will you be happier working with people or with data?</p> <p>The book is an obvious fit for graduates seeking their first job. But it could also help teenagers choose the best education to pursue after high school, or adults trying to make their careers more satisfying.</p> <p><strong><em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know: </em><em>Studies in Organizational Theory and Behavior </em></strong>by R. Richard Ritti, Steve Levy and Neil Toucher (Non-fiction. Hardcover, 2016 and others. Chicago Business Press.)</p> <p>Don’t let the academic-sounding subtitle deter you. This is a highly readable book. It consists of short stories or parables that illustrate how people behave and interact at work.</p> <p>Every workplace has an official structure and formal rules. But workplaces contain people with individual personalities and relationships. This book will help you understand the unofficial structures and unwritten rules, before they get you into trouble.</p> <p>I often recommend <em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know</em> to people starting their first job. It would be especially good for someone promoted to their first management or supervisory role.</p> <p><strong><em>The Wealthy Barber: </em><em>The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning </em></strong>by David Chilton (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2002 and others. Stoddart.)</p> <p>Once you receive your first paycheque, you’ll want to read this beginner’s guide to personal finance. It covers the basics of investing: retirement savings, mutual funds, etc. It also introduces a lot of other financial topics: savings versus spending, insurance that you do or don’t need, and so on.</p> <p>This probably isn’t the only financial guide you’ll ever need, but it is a good first one. I typically recommend it to recent graduates starting their careers. But it also suits mature adults dealing with money issues for the first time, perhaps after the death or divorce of their spouse.</p> <p>Have an enjoyable and productive season!<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/82305/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Michael J. Armstrong, Associate professor of operations research, Brock University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/worth-reading-tried-and-true-manuals-for-success-82305"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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