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Students’ removal of Queen’s photo causes ire

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Students in the UK have caused a stir after voting to remove a photograph of the Queen from their university common room.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Postgraduate students at Magdalen College, Oxford, voted to take down the print, with minutes from the meeting noting that “for some students depictions of the monarch and the British monarchy represent recent colonial history.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The move drew criticism from UK Education secretary Gavin Williamson, who tweeted: “Oxford university students removing a picture of the Queen is simply absurd. She is the head of state and a symbol of what is best about the UK. During her long reign she has worked tirelessly to promote British values of tolerance, inclusivity and respect around the world.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a swift response, Dinah Rose, the president of Magdalen College, defended the decision and wrote: “Here are some facts about Magdalen College and HM the Queen. The Middle Common Room is an organisation of graduate students. They don’t represent the College. A few years ago, in 2013 they bought a print of the Queen to decorate their common room.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They recently voted to take it down. Both of these decisions are their own to take, not the College’s. Magdalen strongly supports free speech and political debate and the MCR’s right to autonomy.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She added: “Being a student is about more than studying. It’s about exploring and debating ideas. It’s sometimes about provoking the older generation. Looks like that isn’t so hard to do these days.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rose also said the print would be safely stored in the event the students vote to put the print up once more.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Matthew Katzman, Magdalen’s MCR president, told the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Telegraph</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">: “It has been taken down. It was decided to leave the common room neutral. That was what this was about. The college will have plenty of depictions of various things but the common room is meant to be a space for all to feel welcome.” </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Magdalen College, Theroyalfamily / Instagram</span></em></p>

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Remembering Marilyn Monroe on her 95th birthday

<p>Marilyn Monroe remains to be one of the world’s biggest and most enduring sex symbols, nearly 60 years on since her death.</p> <p>The legendary actress came from difficult and humble beginnings, spending much of her dreary childhood in foster homes.</p> <p>The world would get its first glimpse of her when she became a model – her illustrious career posing for the camera would lead her to receive a film contract in 1946.</p> <p>While Monroe’s appearances were minor, her performances in <em>The Asphalt Jungle </em>and <em>All About Eve (1950), </em>drew major attention to her and soon she was catapulted into a fame not previously ever seen before.</p> <p>While Monroe had mastered the art of the “dumb blonde” persona, she was anything but.</p> <p>However, it became her major trademark right next to her blonde hair, and how she was perceived by the public was what shot her into global success and lead her into some of her most well known films including <em>Gentlemen Prefer Blondes</em> (1953), <em>How to Marry a Millionaire</em> (1953) and <em>The Seven Year Itch</em> (1955).</p> <p>There are not enough words to describe the global domination of Marilyn during the 40s and the 50s, but unfortunately her wealth, status and influence would mean little in the end.</p> <p>Marred by illness, unresolved childhood issues and addiction, the star eventually succumbed to her pain and overdosed on barbiturates on August 5, 1962. She was born and died in Los Angeles, California.</p> <p>While the official classification of Monroe’s death was ruled as a “probable suicide,” curious onlookers and fans have never ruled out the possibility of an accidental overdose, or homicide.</p> <p>Monroe would go on to be buried in a crypt at the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in LA.</p> <p>The brilliant actress’ legacy continues to live on, almost 60 years since the world lost her.</p>

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Football club accused of artistic theft

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An Indigenous artist has accused Port Adelaide Football Club of using a stolen design for their 2021 Indigenous Round guernsey, prompting an investigation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The club recently revealed the new jumper and associated merchandise ahead of their match with Fremantle on May 30.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The design was chosen after the club asked high school students to “design a guernsey that represents their family, culture and heritage”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The teen who won the competition last year, which COVID-19 delayed the use of, said at the club’s press conference on Wednesday that she had spent months painting it after finding inspiration from designs she saw on Instagram.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is a big accomplishment for me to have so many people see my artwork,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But South Australian woman Elle Campbell claims the design was her “exact painting” shared online and displayed at an exhibition as early as May 2019.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 281.1418685121107px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841368/75e502b4955fd26e13b005e9c56763f0872bea54.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5c690d694e07457fa0685707e13b1890" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Wow. This is MY painting, someone has submitted it as their own and PAFC are using it for their guernsey,” Campbell wrote alongside a photo of herself holding the painting and a screenshot proving it was on public display two years ago.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I am deeply hurt by the use of this painting and the ‘artist’ claiming this work (to) be their own,” Campbell continued.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The meaning behind this painting was one of my families’ ancient burial ground at Kingston S.E. and the connection we still have with the native flora and fauna on those lands.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My mother had sent me a photo of some kangaroos coming out from the scrub to go have a dip in the water, which was the inspiration for this painting.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the press conference, the student said the top half of her design represented “the ancestors, Dreamtime stories and people looking over us” while the bottom half “represents the skin colour, the sand, the animals, the dirt, anything”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The line in the middle that’s the river, represents food source, water, it’s a way - a river that we follow in order to go somewhere.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The footprint in the river is, as I said before, the food source.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Port Adelaide confirmed they had commenced an investigation into the claims on Friday, May 21, less than 48 hours after the unveiling.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Port Adelaide is aware of allegations that surfaced on social media last night regarding the design of its Indigenous guernsey for the upcoming Sir Doug Nicholls Round,” the club said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Port Adelaide is investigating the allegations and will not make further comment until it has all the information at hand.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Campbell said she was feeling “pretty heartbroken that another Aboriginal woman has stolen my artwork that not only means so much to me but is also one of my first paintings”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The most heartbreaking part is wanting my art to be seen on my own merit, not because something like this happening. That’s now been taken away from me.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Port Adelaide and Campbell have since removed their posts from social media.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: 7NEWS</span></em></p>

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Portrait reveals Princess Diana's striking resemblance to grandmother

<p>Charles Spencer has caused a stir online after sharing a portrait of his grandmother, whom many believe shares a striking resemblance to his famous sister Princess Diana.</p> <p>The Earl posted a charcoal sketch of his grandmother, Cynthia Spencer, that was drawn in 1919 - the year she married Spencer's grandfather.</p> <p>"A very well-liked and respected figure locally, her presence is still felt: the local hospice is named 'Cynthia Spencer Hospice' in her memory," Charles wrote in an Instagram post.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CN2VRUwHZdg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CN2VRUwHZdg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Charles Spencer (@charles.earl.spencer)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The post attracted hundreds of comments from his followers.</p> <p>"I see Diana," one follower wrote.</p> <p>"Diana looked a lot like her. Beautiful portrait," another wrote.</p> <p>"A very beautiful lady… Diana really resembles her with those gorgeous Spencer eyes," yet another wrote.</p> <p>Countess Spencer passed away from a brain tumour at Althorp, the Spencer family's home, in 1972 when Diana was just 11.</p>

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Australian artists behind Prince Philip’s last official portrait speaks out: “It was a real privilege”

<p><span>The Australian artist who created Prince Philip's final official portrait has revealed what his interactions were like with the late royal ahead of his funeral on Saturday.</span><br /><br /><span>Ralph Heimans was tasked with painting the Duke of Edinburgh after he retired from royal duties in 2017.</span><br /><br /><span>He opened up to the <em>Sky News Daily</em> podcast on what it was like to spend time with the royal.</span><br /><br /><span>"As you can imagine, he's full of humour but underlying that there's a sense of seriousness about the portrait," Heimans said.</span><br /><br /><span>"And I think he was very engaged throughout the process; he enjoyed it very much and was very chatty afterwards and so it was a really enjoyable experience as well as a very extraordinary privilege."</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CNdC9Nin3wT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CNdC9Nin3wT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Ralph Heimans (@ralph.heimans)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>The artwork portrays the royal standing in the grand corridor at Windsor Castle, which is located in the private quarters he shared with Queen Elizabeth.</span><br /><br /><span>Prince Philip is standing side-on, with his arms behind his back, and adorned in a smart evening attire.</span><br /><br /><span>The royal sadly passed at Windsor Castle on April 9 after weeks of treatment in hospital, at the age of 99.</span><br /><br /><span>Reports say Prince Philip took a turn for the worse just a day before his death.</span><br /><br /><span>The Queen reportedly resisted suggestions that the royal be taken back to hospital in order to grant her husband's wish of dying at home.</span><br /><br /><span>Following Prince Philip's death, Heimans shared two photos of his portrait on to Instagram.</span><br /><br /><span>"It was a real privilege to paint this portrait of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh in 2017 when he retired from public duty after carrying out 22,219 engagements," he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>"My thoughts are with his family."</span><br /><br /><span>Prince Philip will be laid to rest at 3 pm (12 am AEST) on Saturday April 17.</span></p>

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A life in pictures: Remembering Prince Philip

<div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, has passed away at Windsor Castle, at the age of 99. The news of the death of Queen’s Elizabeth II’s husband has seen a celebration of a most extraordinary life.</p> <p>Born on 10 June 1921, this year would have marked the 100th birthday of Prince Philip. How much do you know about this royal, who spent decades upon decades travelling as an ambassador for the United Kingdom alongside his wife, Queen Elizabeth II?</p> <p>To look at Prince Philip’s photos throughout the years is to understand more about the man who helped keep the British monarchy alive and well, sometimes quietly and other times not so quietly. To mark his passing, check out these images that tell the story of Prince Philip’s life.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong>Toddler life </strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840669/prince-philip-life-in-photos-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/256c98fd6aff49388a8f83937cebcb37" /></strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"> <p>He was originally Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, and he was born on the Greek island of Corfu in 1921. The son of Prince Andrew and Princess Alice, he had an unconventional childhood marked with controversy.</p> <p>His family fled Greece when he was a baby, and his mother experienced mental health issues, which led her to become institutionalised (and not of her own choice). Looking at this early Prince Philip photo, taken in 1922 when he was just around just a year old, you’d never guess at commotion surrounding him.</p> <p><strong>Schoolboy days</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840668/prince-philip-life-in-photos-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12c8a122c66c439aac4aa7b5938c18f0" /></strong></p> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page3" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Despite his tumultuous family life, early Prince Philip photos reveal a child who doesn’t look unlike many of his peers. When he reached school age, the young prince attended the MacJannet American School in Saint-Cloud, France, outside Paris.</p> <p>Here, he engages in a round of archery with some classmates, appearing as though they are pretending to be Robin Hood. Can you spot the Queen’s future husband? Spoiler alert: He’s second from the left. It’s not all that surprising to see Philip engaging in sport at an early age, as he continued to participate in various games throughout his life.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong>Stage star </strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840667/prince-philip-life-in-photos-5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a846ad9f7c7540c188278bc23a622adc" /></strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"> <div id="page5" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Who would have thought that Prince Philip was a man of the theatre?</p> <p>Sure, we’ve seen the royal on many an occasion showing an appreciation for the arts, but apparently in his younger years (back in 1935, to be exact), he even took to the stage in a school production of<span> </span><em>Macbeth</em>.</p> <p>Prince Philip would have been around 14 years old when this photo was taken of him wearing his costume and preparing to recite lines written by the Bard. Given the drama that has played out in the royal family over the years, learning the ins and outs of this tragedy may have been good preparation.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong>Military time </strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840666/prince-philip-life-in-photos-6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e2712f1262df4076bc4fdc80e1644f0b" /></strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"> <div id="page7" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>You might be wondering what Prince Philip did for work in between the time he graduated from high school and eventually met his wife, Queen Elizabeth (then a princess). After graduating from Gordonstoun, Philip enlisted as a cadet in the Royal Navy, according to Army Cadet History.</p> <p>After training at RNC Dartmouth, he went on to work as a midshipman on the HMS<span> </span><em>Ramillies</em><span> </span>in 1940. That stint was followed by time aboard the HMS<span> </span><em>Valiant</em>, a battleship stationed in Alexandria. There are many Prince Philip photos of his time with the Royal Navy, but here he is pictured in 1947, giving a salute as Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten. This was just a few months before he and Queen Elizabeth married.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong>Royal wedding time - a true partnership </strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840665/prince-philip-life-in-photos-7.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/352b0f80b03d4592a2bd2039a39f568c" /></strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"> <p>As you can probably imagine, Elizabeth and Philip had quite an elaborate celebration when they married on November 20, 1947. According to the official royal website, their wedding cake was a 2.7 metres tall, and 2000 guests were invited to the ceremony.</p> <p>The service, performed at Westminster Abbey, aired on BBC Radio with an audience of 200 million people globally. Although their engagement was just four months long, Elizabeth and Philip had known each other for quite some time.</p> <p>They originally met at another royal wedding that took place in 1934, when Philip was a teenager.</p> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page9" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Ahead of the wedding, Prince Philip was given the title The Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich of Greenwich in the County of London. Try to say that three times fast! His first cousin David Mountbatten served as the best man at the wedding, while Elizabeth had eight bridesmaids.</p> <p>The Duke added a loving touch to the engagement ring he gave to Elizabeth: It used diamonds from a tiara that belonged to his mother, Princess Alice. Needless to say, the platinum and diamond bauble, which was crafted by jeweller Philip Antrobus, is a stunner.</p> <p><strong>A future king is born! </strong></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="advertisement"> <div data-fuse="21928475029"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840664/prince-philip-life-in-photos-8.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/578cfb5985e241b2b4ec7d6ba574dba0" /></div> </div> </div> <div class="contentAreaRight vc_hidden-xs"> <div class="advertisement"> <p>Before Elizabeth became Queen, she and Prince Philip welcomed their first child into the world. Prince Charles was born on November 14, 1948, almost a year to the date of his parents’ first wedding anniversary.</p> <p>He was actually born at Buckingham Palace and weighed 7 pounds and 6 ounces (3.34 kilograms) at birth. He was later christened at the Palace on December 15 of the same year. T</p> <p>here are rumours that have long swirled about tension between Prince Philip and Prince Charles, most notably around the Duke of Edinburgh’s decision to send Charles to his<span> </span><em>alma mater</em>, Gordonstoun School, which Charles described as “hell on earth,” according to<span> </span><em>Express</em>.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page8" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide">Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth would go on to have three more children after Charles, including Princess Anne in 1950, Prince Andrew in 1960 and then Prince Edward in 1964. </div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"></div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"><strong>Family reunion </strong></div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840663/prince-philip-life-in-photos-9.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3d92d76a262f4d868a03c6968f82669f" /></strong></div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"> <p>It’s fair to say that Prince Philip didn’t spend a lot of time with his mother, Princess Alice of Greece, while growing up as she reportedly battled mental health issues during his teen years.</p> <p>However, he is pictured with her here at the wedding of Princess Margeritha of Baden and Prince Tomislavof of Yugoslavia in 1957. According to CNN, Princess Alice became the founder of the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary, an order of nuns, in 1949.</p> <p>Their primary goal was to care for the sick. Her nickname for Prince Philip? Bubbikins.</p> <p><strong>A life at home </strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840662/prince-philip-life-in-photos-10.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f791636f0a764f1eb95fbe616f66859d" /></strong></p> <p>In terms of Prince Philip photos, we have to admit the best ones are those that seemingly depict him and his famous family in candid, casual moments.</p> <p>It’s naive to think that these photos weren’t staged, at least in some respect, but as Philip and Elizabeth look on at Balmoral Estate while a young Charles and Anne play on a makeshift teeter-totter (simply a piece of plywood atop a log), they almost look “normal.” The castle, one of the family’s many lavish residences, is situated in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page6" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"><strong>Artistic endeavours </strong></div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840661/prince-philip-life-in-photos-11.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f896f4e443f146c8950422cdda1d45b5" /></strong></div> <div class="slide listicle-slide"> <p>For an entire year in 1969, Philip and Elizabeth’s family was filmed for a BBC documentary appropriately titled<span> </span><em>Royal Family</em>. It was broadcast on both BBC One and ITV, and while the still photos, like this one of Prince Philip painting, are all kinds of fascinating, the doc was widely panned by audiences and critics alike.</p> <p>According to History.com, the film was produced in an effort to make the Queen appear more, but it backfired. Still, we wouldn’t mind watching the documentary today with a modern-day perspective.</p> <p><strong>Charles and Diana's wedding </strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840660/prince-philip-life-in-photos-12.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a7c976b1b854465eaf98300c872ea711" /></strong></p> <p>It was 1981 when the world couldn’t get enough of Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s seemingly fairy-tale wedding at St. Paul’s Cathedral.</p> <p>For the big day, Prince Philip rode to the ceremony alongside Diana’s mother, Mrs Shand Kydd. Though Charles and Diana’s marriage ended in divorce, letters released by<span> </span><em>The Telegraph</em><span> </span>between Prince Philip and his former daughter-in-law appear to prove they remained good friends despite no longer being family. In one letter, Philip wrote, “I will always do my utmost to help you and Charles to the best of my ability.”</p> <p><strong>Portrait of a Prince</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840659/prince-philip-life-in-photos-13.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a2aebd143ca94947a90e3c08fb645bc7" /></strong></p> <div id="page7" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>In 2017, Prince Philip announced that he was taking a step back from public life as a royal. The same year, this stunning painting of him standing in the halls of Buckingham Palace was released.</p> <p>According to Sky News, the Duke of Edinburgh had carried out 22,191 single engagements since his wife’s coronation in 1952. That doesn’t include the countless events he performed alongside Queen Elizabeth.</p> <p>The fact that he acknowledged this was the right move for him, personally, makes a huge statement to his desire to maintain his health as best he possibly can.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos">The Queen lost her husband, the father of her children, and her lifelong best friend after nearly 73 years of marriage on April 9, 2021. In a personal statement from 1997 that was posted on Instagram to honour the couple, it read: “𝘏𝘦 𝘩𝘢𝘴, 𝘲𝘶𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘴𝘪𝘮𝘱𝘭𝘺, 𝘣𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘮𝘺 𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘺 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘴𝘦 𝘺𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘐, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘸𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘦 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘺 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘴, 𝘰𝘸𝘦 𝘩𝘪𝘮 𝘢 𝘥𝘦𝘣𝘵 𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘯 𝘩𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘶𝘭𝘥 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘭𝘢𝘪𝘮, 𝘰𝘳 𝘸𝘦 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸.”</div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos"></div> </div> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CNevnXFnaoR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CNevnXFnaoR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Royal Family (@theroyalfamily)</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"> </p> </div> </blockquote> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Kelly Bryant. This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/history/prince-philips-life-in-50-photos?pages=5" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a rel="noopener" href="https://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> <p><em><span>Photo: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Banksy pandemic painting sells for record amount

<p><span>Banksy has achieved something not many others can claim by raking in an incredible £16.8 million ($30.18 million) for Britain’s frontline workers during an auction.</span><br /><br /><span>After selling an artwork, Christie’s auction house has said the sale would be used to fund health organisations and charities across the UK.</span><br /><br /><span>The work titled "Game Changer", features a young boy sitting on the floor playing with a nurse superhero toy while Batman and Spider-Man figurines lay in a rubbish bin next to him.</span><br /><br /><span>The picture appeared on a wall at Southampton General Hospital in southern England in May of 2020.</span><br /><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840433/banksy.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cb3d9e75e6144335be3ff1f5530cf8d1" /><br /><span>The hospital said Banksy had left a note for workers that read: "Thanks for all you're doing. I hope this brightens the place up a bit, even if it's only black and white."</span><br /><br /><span>The sale price was a world auction record for Banksy and Christie’s, the auction house said it will donate a "significant portion" of the buyer's premium to health organisations.</span><br /><br /><span>"Banksy is an extraordinary artist who is a constant barometer of nationwide sentiment," said Katharine Arnold, who runs the European post-war and contemporary art era at the auction house.</span><br /><br /><span>"With the perfect image of a little boy playing with his superhero doll, a nurse sporting the international Red Cross, he perfectly captured the essence of this moment in time."</span></p>

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A litany of losses: A new project maps our abandoned arts events of 2020

<p>There was a time when artists imagined and planned work for 2020. For some, years had gone into the planning. But, as we know, everything scheduled from the middle of March had to be cancelled. Some events may be scheduled again at another time; many will no longer happen.</p> <p>A group of artists have put together a map of the abandoned artistic projects for 2020. Conceived by artist Anna Tregloan and named <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/final-archive">The Impossible Project</a>, it is a treasury of lost work and a time capsule of what we missed out on this year due to the pandemic.</p> <p>There are already over 150 shows and events listed. More projects are being added all the time.</p> <p>The Impossible Project captures the enormous range of work by Australian artists that could have happened in every Australian city, in regional areas and overseas.</p> <p>We see the breadth and depth of artistic activity across the country; the loss for audiences, artists, and communities. Select a title, and you see the artists involved, the venue, the dates, the expected audience numbers.</p> <p>It is a sobering experience.</p> <p><em><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838514/art-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/480ac80a49974c2699701c72daf4eba7" /></em></p> <p><em>An imagined map lists more than 100 cancelled and postponed works. The Impossible Project</em></p> <p><strong>Those that will never be…</strong></p> <p>There is a re-imagined production of Thornton Wilder’s <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/our-town">Our Town</a> (projected audience: 5,000+), to be directed by Australian theatremaker Anne-Louise Sarks in Basel, Switzerland. In planning since 2018, involving performers from countries across the world, the play was cancelled five days before its March premiere.</p> <p>Patricia Cornelius’s <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/donotgogentle">Do Not Go Gentle…</a> (projected audience: 8,000) was to be directed by Susie Dee in July at the Malthouse in Melbourne.</p> <p>The play focuses on the experience of people in an aged care home; Shane Bourne was cast in the lead role. Given the experience of this year, the setting could not be more relevant. The play was presented in one sell-out season in 2009 – this 2020 production was more than 10 years in the making.</p> <p><a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/therivercrossing">The River Crossing</a> (projected audience: 4,000) was to be a large-scale outdoor performance where professional high-wire walkers and Bundjalung community members would cross the Wilsons River in Lismore in August. SeedArts Australia has been planning the project since 2018.</p> <p>The all-female Belloo Creative was the resident theatre company at Queensland Theatre for 2019-20. To premiere in 2020, Katherine Lyall-Watson wrote a re-imagined <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/phaedra">Phaedra</a> (projected audience: 7,140). The play was set in the future, with war taking place between a seceded Queensland and the rest of the country – another strangely pertinent theme.</p> <p>Matt Whittet’s new play <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/kindness">Kindness</a> (projected audience: 3,500) was to be directed by Lee Lewis at the Griffin Theatre. This loss feels particularly poignant, as the play looked at the experiences of community kindness – kindness we have all witnessed in 2020.</p> <p>Whittet says he hopes it is only on hold: “<em>Nothing is certain in the world at the moment, which means there’s no promises but always hope.</em></p> <p><strong>… and those that found a new life</strong></p> <p>The Impossible Project also finds silver linings.</p> <p>Sydney performance and visual artist Rakini Devi had planned a project with Melbourne video artist Karl Ockelford. With border closures, they were unable to work together.</p> <p>Instead, Devi developed a solo project examining the position of women from the Indian diaspora who experience violence, being “lockdowned” and various forms of misogyny.</p> <p>Melbourne musical theatre company Watch This specialises in the work of Stephen Sondheim. It had planned an exhibition of design and creative work for shows spanning seven years of the company’s productions.</p> <p>Scheduled to start in March at Northcote Town Hall, the exhibition was cancelled six days before opening. But the company was able to re-mount it as a digital documentary series, <a href="https://theimpossibleproject.com.au/theartofmakingart">The Art of Making Art</a>. Through this, Watch This has been able to expand its audience, with the series selected for Canada’s <a href="https://www.socialdistancingfestival.com/">Social Distancing Festival</a>.</p> <p><strong>Further loss</strong></p> <p>The Impossible Project documents shows that were meant to appear at the Sydney Opera House, Griffin Theatre, the Riverside Theatre and the Ensemble in Sydney; at Malthouse, the Recital Centre, the Arts Centre and Arts House in Melbourne; at La Boite, QPAC and Queensland Theatre in Brisbane.</p> <p>There are touring shows scheduled for cities and regional centres. There are festivals – all now cancelled.</p> <p>We have lost the audiences who haven’t been able to see work in a live venue; the time artists spent developing a new work, only to see it cancelled with no commitment to return; we will, inevitably, lose artists who will give up on the increasingly precarious dream of a creative life.</p> <p>When we talk about the impact of this year on the arts sector, we often focus on the economic losses. In April, the Grattan Institute estimated <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-3-in-4-australians-employed-in-the-creative-and-performing-arts-could-lose-their-jobs-136505">up to 75% of people</a> employed in the creative and performing arts could lose their jobs. By May, I Lost My Gig had recorded the loss of income for Australian artists of more than <a href="https://ilostmygig.net.au/">A$340 million</a>.</p> <p>Shows began being cancelled in March. The Federal Government didn’t announce a support package until June. Last week it was revealed <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/oct/21/arts-rescue-package-worth-250m-still-waiting-to-be-allocated-senate-estimates-told">none of the $250 million</a> package has been allocated (bar $48 million allowing Screen Australia to underwrite the insurance of films in production, which does not represent money spent).</p> <p>Without support, more work will be lost.</p> <p>It is a mystery why the government does not take the cultural sector seriously, or value the arts, or see how it contributes to our society.</p> <p>We are seeing the arts and humanities <a href="https://theconversation.com/monash-university-plans-to-cut-its-musicology-subjects-why-does-this-matter-147172">removed</a> from our universities, artists left out in the cold during this terrible time, and no indication of a way forward.</p> <p>This is a loss to Australia on a grand scale. The list of cancelled work in The Impossible Project is not one we want to see continue — but it is inevitable the list will grow.</p> <p><em>Image 1: A re-imagined production of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town was cancelled five days before opening. Anne-Louise Sarks</em></p> <p><em>Image 2: An imagined map lists more than 100 cancelled and postponed works. The Impossible Project</em></p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jo-caust-123875">Jo Caust</a>, University of Melbourne. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-litany-of-losses-a-new-project-maps-our-abandoned-arts-events-of-2020-148716">The Conversation. </a></em></p>

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Facebook is tilting the political playing field more than ever and it’s no accident

<p>As the US presidential election polling day draws close, it’s worth recapping what we know about how Facebook has been used to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3834737/">influence election results</a>.</p> <p>The platform is optimised for boosting politically conservative voices calling for <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/10/26/facebook-algorithm-conservative-liberal-extremes/">fascism, separatism and xenophobia</a>. It’s also these voices that tend to generate <a href="https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/radical-ideas-social-media-algorithms/">the most clicks</a>.</p> <p>In recent years, Facebook has on several occasions been made to choose between keeping to its <a href="https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards/introduction">community standards</a> or taking a path that avoids the ire of conservatives. Too many times, it has chosen the latter.</p> <p>The result has been an onslaught of divisive rhetoric that continues to flood the platform and drive political polarisation in society.</p> <p><strong>How democracy can be subverted online</strong></p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/20/us/politics/russian-interference-trump-democrats.html">The New York Times</a>, earlier this year US intelligence officials warned Russia was interfering in the 2020 presidential campaign, with the goal of seeing President Donald Trump re-elected.</p> <p>This was corroborated by <a href="https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/new-evidence-shows-how-russias-election-interference-has-gotten-more">findings</a> from the US Brennan Centre for Justice. A research team led by journalism and communications professor Young Mie Kim identified a range of Facebook troll accounts deliberately sowing division “by targeting both the left and right, with posts to foment outrage, fear and hostility”.</p> <p>Most were linked to Russia’s Internet Research Agency (IRA), <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-russia-sanctions/u-s-blacklists-individuals-entities-linked-to-leader-of-russias-ira-idUSKCN26E2HO">the company</a> also behind a 2016 US election influence campaign. Kim <a href="https://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/analysis-opinion/new-evidence-shows-how-russias-election-interference-has-gotten-more">wrote</a> the troll accounts seemed to discourage certain people from voting, with a focus on swing states.</p> <p>This month, Facebook <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/06/technology/facebook-qanon-crackdown.html">announced</a> a ban (across both Facebook and Instagram, which Facebook owns) on groups and pages devoted to the far-right conspiracy group QAnon. It also <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/facebook-takes-down-network-tied-to-conservative-group-citing-fake-accounts-11602174088">removed</a> a network of fake accounts linked to a conservative US political youth group, for violating rules against “coordinated inauthentic behavior”.</p> <p>However, despite Facebook’s <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/facebooks-latest-fix-for-fake-news-ask-users-what-they-trust/">repeated promises</a> to clamp down harder on such behaviour — and <a href="https://theconversation.com/facebook-is-removing-qanon-pages-and-groups-from-its-sites-but-critical-thinking-is-still-the-best-way-to-fight-conspiracy-theories-147668">occasional</a> efforts to actually do so — the company has been <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/samantha-power-facebook-reduce-spread-misinformation/2020/10/23/d54c1bda-1496-11eb-bc10-40b25382f1be_story.html">widely</a> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/oct/14/facebook-greatest-source-of-covid-19-disinformation-journalists-say">criticised</a> for doing far too little to curb the spread of disinformation, misinformation and election meddling.</p> <p>According to a <a href="https://comprop.oii.ox.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/93/2019/09/CyberTroop-Report19.pdf">University of Oxford study</a>, 70 countries (including Australia) practised either foreign or domestic election meddling in 2019. This was up from 48 in 2018 and 28 in 2017. The study said Facebook was “the platform of choice” for this.</p> <p>The Conversation approached Facebook for comment regarding the platform’s use by political actors to influence elections, including past US elections. A Facebook spokesperson said:</p> <p><em>We’ve hired experts, built teams with experience across different areas, and created new products, policies and partnerships to ensure we’re ready for the unique challenges of the US election.</em></p> <p><strong>When Facebook favoured one side</strong></p> <p>Facebook has drawn widespread criticism for its failure to remove posts that clearly violate its policies on hate speech, including <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/06/28/facebook-zuckerberg-trump-hate/">posts</a> by Trump himself.</p> <p>The company openly <a href="https://about.fb.com/news/2019/09/elections-and-political-speech/">exempts</a> politicians from its fact-checking program and knowingly hosts misleading content from politicians, under its “newsworthiness exception”.</p> <p>When Facebook tried to clamp down on misinformation in the aftermath of the 2016 presidential elections, <a href="https://www.bushcenter.org/people/joel-kaplan.html">ex-Republican staffer</a> turned Facebook executive Joel Kaplan argued doing so would disproportionately target conservatives, the Washington Post <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/02/20/facebook-republican-shift/">reported</a>.</p> <p>The Conversation asked Facebook whether Kaplan’s past political affiliations indicated a potential for conservative bias in his current role. The question wasn’t answered.</p> <p>Facebook’s board also now features a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/16/technology/peter-thiel-donald-j-trump.html">major Trump donor</a> and vocal supporter, Peter Thiel. Facebook’s chief executive Mark Zuckerberg has himself been accused of <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/21/business/media/facebook-donald-trump-mark-zuckerberg.html">getting “too close”</a> to <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/22/surprised-about-mark-zuckerbergs-secret-meeting-with-trump-dont-be">Trump</a>.</p> <p>Moreover, when the US Federal Trade Commission investigated Facebook’s role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, it was <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/jul/12/facebook-fine-ftc-privacy-violations">Republican votes</a> that saved the company from facing antitrust litigation.</p> <p>Overall, Facebook’s model has shifted <a href="https://www.theverge.com/interface/2019/4/11/18305407/social-network-conservative-bias-twitter-facebook-ted-cruz">towards increasing polarisation</a>. Incendiary and misinformation-laden posts tend to generate clicks.</p> <p>As Zuckerberg himself <a href="https://www.facebook.com/notes/mark-zuckerberg/a-blueprint-for-content-governance-and-enforcement/10156443129621634/">notes</a>, “when left unchecked, people on the platform engage disproportionately” with such content.</p> <p>Over the years, conservatives have accused Facebook of <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2019/04/10/ted-cruz-threatens-regulate-facebook-twitter-over-alleged-bias/3423095002/">anti-conservative bias</a>, for which the company faced <a href="https://www.thewrap.com/trump-campaign-halts-twitter-spending-over-disgusting-bias-against-mitch-mcconnell/">financial penalties by the Republican Party</a>. This is despite research indicating <a href="https://www.mediamatters.org/facebook/study-analysis-top-facebook-pages-covering-american-political-news">no such bias exists</a> on the platform.</p> <p><strong>Fanning the flames</strong></p> <p>Facebook’s <a href="https://www.livescience.com/49585-facebook-addiction-viewed-brain.html">addictive</a> news feed rewards us for simply skimming headlines, conditioning us to react viscerally.</p> <p>Its sharing features have been found to <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6380/1146">promote falsehoods</a>. They can <a href="https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/10/can-voting-facebook-button-improve-voter-turnout/">trick users</a> into attributing news to their friends, causing them to assign trust to unreliable news sources. This provides a breeding ground for <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2020-10-05/conspiracy-theories-coronavirus-5g-conspiratorial-psychology/12722320">conspiracies</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0207383">Studies</a> have also shown social media to be an ideal environment for campaigns aimed at creating mistrust, which explains the increasing <a href="https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/516412-polls-show-trust-in-scientific-political-institutions-eroding">erosion of trust in science and expertise</a>.</p> <p>Worst of all are Facebook’s “echo chambers”, which convince people that only their own opinions are mainstream. This encourages hostile “us versus them” dialogue, which leads to polarisation. This pattern <a href="https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2020/02/21/concerns-about-democracy-in-the-digital-age/">suppresses valuable democratic debate</a> and has been described as an <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Age-Surveillance-Capitalism-Future-Frontier/dp/1610395697">existential threat to democracy itself</a>.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Facebook’s staff hasn’t been shy about skewing liberal, even suggesting in 2016 that Facebook work to <a href="https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2016/04/facebook-employees-asked-mark-zuckerberg-if-they-should-try-to-stop-a-donald-trump-presidency/">prevent Trump’s election</a>. Around 2017, they proposed a feature called “<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2018/12/23/18154111/facebook-common-grounds-feature-conservative-bias-concerns-shelved-joel-kaplan">Common Ground</a>”, which would have encouraged users with different political beliefs to interact in less hostile ways.</p> <p>Kaplan opposed the proposition, according to <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/facebooks-lonely-conservative-takes-on-a-power-position-11545570000">The Wall Street Journal</a>, due to fears it could trigger claims of bias against conservatives. The project was eventually shelved in 2018.</p> <p>Facebook’s track record isn’t good news for those who want to live in a healthy democratic state. Polarisation certainly doesn’t lead to effective political discourse.</p> <p>While several <a href="https://about.fb.com/news/2020/10/preparing-for-election-day/">blog</a> <a href="https://about.fb.com/news/2020/08/preparing-for-myanmars-2020-election/">posts</a> from the company outline measures being taken to supposedly protect the integrity of the 2020 US presidential elections, it remains to be seen what this means in reality.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michael-brand-290376">Michael Brand</a>, Monash University. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/facebook-is-tilting-the-political-playing-field-more-than-ever-and-its-no-accident-148314">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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Prince Louis’ most precious moments in pictures

<p class="p1">It may be his goofy expressions or his attempt at perfecting the royal wave, but Prince Louis has managed to win the hearts of royal fans around the globe. The 2-year-old and the youngest of the Cambridge clan gets into plenty of mischief and thankfully, it’s all caught on camera.</p> <p class="p1">We’ve watched him grow from a newborn into a handsome little boy, and it seems people just can’t seem to get enough of the Prince.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CF4dvUDFPEK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CF4dvUDFPEK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">We've got some questions for you, @DavidAttenborough...🌍🕷️🐒</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kensingtonroyal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Duke and Duchess of Cambridge</a> (@kensingtonroyal) on Oct 3, 2020 at 5:59am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p class="p1">While he may never become king, that doesn’t take away from his popularity, and due to being the youngest, there is a certain fascination surrounding him.</p> <p class="p1">His most recent appearance was when he asked the famous Sir David Attenborough a question about animals, marking the first time people heard him speak.</p> <p class="p1">With his cherub face and golden hair, Louis has forged a name for himself.</p> <p class="p1">Take a look at some of Prince Louis’ most precious moments throughout the years.</p>

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How creative use of technology may have helped save schooling during the pandemic

<p>It <a href="https://www.unicef.org/press-releases/unicef-executive-director-henrietta-fore-remarks-press-conference-new-updated">is estimated</a> around half the world’s students’ schools remain shut down. All told, this has been a potentially damaging disruption to the education of a generation.</p> <p>But one of the few positive outcomes from this experience is an opportunity to rethink how digital technologies can be used to support teaching and learning in schools.</p> <p>Our collective experiences of remote schooling offer a fleeting opportunity for schools to think more imaginatively about what “digital education” might look like in the future.</p> <p>This is not to echo the hype (currently being pushed by many education reformers and IT industry actors) that COVID will prove a <a href="https://edtechdigest.com/2020/05/13/learning-and-leadership/">tipping-point</a> after which schools will be <a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/04/coronavirus-education-global-covid19-online-digital-learning/">pushed fully</a> into digital education.</p> <p>On the contrary, the past six months of hastily implemented <a href="https://edtechdigest.com/2020/05/13/learning-and-leadership/">emergency remote schooling</a> tell us little about how school systems might go fully virtual, or operate on a “blended” (part online, part face-to-face) basis. Any <a href="https://www.worldsofeducation.org/en/woe_homepage/woe_detail/16856/the-edtech-pandemic-shock-by-ben-williamson-anna-hogan">expectations of profiting</a> from the complete digital reform of education is well wide of the mark.</p> <p>Instead, the most compelling technology-related lessons to take from the pandemic involve the informal, improvised, scrappy digital practices that have helped teachers, students and parents get through school at home.</p> <p><strong>Technology during the pandemic</strong></p> <p>All over the world, school shutdowns have seen teachers, students and families get together to achieve great things with relatively simple technologies. This includes the surprising rise of <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-53079625">TikTok</a> as a <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/aug/28/green-teen-memes-how-tiktok-could-save-the-planet-aoe">source</a> of <a href="https://www.buzzfeed.com/angelicaamartinez/tiktok-creators">informal learning content</a>. Previously the domain of young content creators, remote schooling saw teachers of all ages turn to the video platform to <a href="https://www.aare.edu.au/blog/?p=7656">share bite-size (up to one minute) chunks</a> of teaching, give inspirational feedback, set learning challenges or simply show students and parents how they were coping.</p> <p>TikTok also been used as a place for educational organisations, public figures and celebrity scientists to <a href="https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/tiktok-announces-learnontiktok-initiative-to-encourage-education-during-lo/578805/">produce bespoke learning content</a>, as well as allowing teachers to put together materials for a wider audience.</p> <p>Even <a href="https://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2020/07/meet_the_principals_of_tiktok_.html">principals</a> have used it to keep in contact with their school — making 60-second video addresses, motivational speeches and other alternatives to the traditional school assembly speech.</p> <p>Classes in some countries have been <a href="https://uxdesign.cc/a-unique-opportunity-for-whatsapp-to-take-over-classrooms-cc9048b97ca0">run through WhatsApp</a>, primarily because this was one platform most students and families had access to, and were used to using in their everyday lives.</p> <p>Elsewhere, teachers have set up virtual <a href="https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2020/07/30/bitmoji-classrooms-why-teachers-are-buzzing-about.html">BitMoji classrooms</a> featuring colourful backdrops and cartoon avatars of themselves. These spaces act as a friendly online version of their familiar classroom space for students to check in and find out what they should be learning, access resources and temporarily feel they were back at school.</p> <p>Some teachers have worked out <a href="https://www.dailyherald.com/news/20200831/teachers-in-district-220-find-creative-ways-to-teach-virtually">creative ways of Zoom-based teaching</a>. These stretch beyond the streamed lecture format and include live demonstrations, experiments, and live music and pottery workshops.</p> <p>Social media, apps and games have proven convenient places for teachers to <a href="https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/salvadorhernandez/kindergarten-teacher-tiktok-energy-viral">share insights</a> into their classroom practice, while students can <a href="https://m.facebook.com/abcmelbourne/videos/2778263975790515/?refsrc=https%3A%2F%2Fm.facebook.com%2Fstory.php&amp;_rdr">quickly show</a> teachers and classmates what they have been working on.</p> <p>These informal uses of digital media have played an important role in boosting students, teachers and parents with a bit of human contact, and additional motivation to connect and learn.</p> <p><strong>So, what now?</strong></p> <p>All this will come as <a href="https://www.amazon.com.au/Good-Reception-Teachers-Mobile-Angeles/dp/0262037084/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&amp;keywords=antero+garcia&amp;qid=1600463690&amp;s=books&amp;sr=1-7">little surprise</a> to <a href="https://www.amazon.com.au/Beyond-Technology-Childrens-Learning-Digital/dp/0745638813">long-term</a> <a href="https://clalliance.org/publications/hanging-out-messing-around-and-geeking-out-tenth-anniversary-edition/">advocates</a> of popular forms of digital media in education. There is a sound evidence base for the educational benefits of such technology.</p> <p>For example, a <a href="https://clalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/CLRN_Report.pdf">decade’s worth of studies</a> has developed a <a href="https://clalliance.org/about-connected-learning/">robust framework</a> (and many examples) of how students and educators can make the most of personal digital media inside and outside the classroom. These include allowing students to participate in online fan-fiction writing communities, digital journalism, music production and podcasting.</p> <p>The past ten years has also seen a <a href="https://www.aare.edu.au/blog/?p=4388">rise in e-sports</a> — where teams of young people compete in video games.</p> <p>This stresses the interplay between digital media, learning driven by students’ interests and passions, and online communities of peers. Informal digital media can be a boon for otherwise <a href="https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/digital-youth-network">marginalised and disadvantaged youth</a> and allowing students to find supportive communities of like-minded peers regardless of their local circumstances.</p> <p>Australia continues to be one of the few countries in the world where <a href="https://theconversation.com/banning-mobile-phones-in-schools-beneficial-or-risky-heres-what-the-evidence-says-119456">classroom use of smartphones is banned</a> by some governments. Some of the most popular social media platforms, content creation apps, and open sites such as YouTube remain <a href="https://www.qld.gov.au/education/schools/procedures/webfiltering">filtered and blocked</a> in many schools too.</p> <p>At the same time, official forms of school technology are <a href="https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/12/19/131155/classroom-technology-holding-students-back-edtech-kids-education/">increasingly criticised</a> for being boring, overly-standardised, and largely serving institutional imperatives, rather than pitched toward the interests of students and teachers.</p> <p>Concerns are growing over the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2020/06/25/new-concerns-raised-about-well-known-digital-learning-platform/">limited educational benefits</a> of personalised learning systems, as well as the <a href="https://www.themonthly.com.au/issue/2020/june/1590933600/anna-krien/screens-ate-school#mtr">data and privacy implications</a> of school platforms and systems such as Google Classroom.</p> <p>The past six months have seen many schools forced to make the best of whatever technologies were immediately to hand. Previously reticent teachers now have first-hand experience of making use of unfamiliar technologies. Many parents are now on board with the educational potential of social media and games. Most importantly, students have been given a taste of what they can achieve with “their” own technology.</p> <p>With US schools now exploring the benefits of establishing official <a href="https://thehill.com/changing-america/enrichment/education/469079-the-tiktok-generation">TikTok creation clubs</a> to enhance their video-making skills, it might be time for Australian educators to follow suit. Let’s take the opportunity to re-establish schools as places where teachers, students and families can work together to creatively learn with the devices and apps most familiar to their everyday lives.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/neil-selwyn-765357">Neil Selwyn</a>, Monash University. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/search/result?sg=9731d812-3952-475c-9db1-cb99dba287ca&amp;sp=1&amp;sr=1&amp;url=%2Fhow-creative-use-of-technology-may-have-helped-save-schooling-during-the-pandemic-146488">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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Life on Venus? Traces of phosphine may be a sign of biological activity

<p>The discovery that the atmosphere of Venus absorbs a precise frequency of microwave radiation has just <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-1174-4">turned planetary science on its head</a>. An international team of scientists used radio telescopes in Hawaii and Chile to find signs that the clouds on Earth’s neighbouring planet contain tiny quantities of a molecule called phosphine.</p> <p>Phosphine is a compound made from phosphorus and hydrogen, and on Earth its only natural source is tiny microbes that live in oxygen-free environments. It’s too early to say whether phosphine is also a sign of life on Venus – but no other explanation so far proposed seems to fit.</p> <p>This video shows how methane was detected in the atmosphere of Mars. The process is the same for finding phosphine on Venus.</p> <p><strong>What makes an atmosphere?</strong></p> <p>The molecular makeup of a planet’s atmosphere normally depends on what its parent star is made of, the planet’s position in its star’s system, and the chemical and geological processes that take place given these conditions.</p> <p>There is phosphine in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, for example, but there it’s not a sign of life. Scientists think it is formed in the deep atmosphere at high pressures and temperatures, then dredged into the upper atmosphere by a strong convection current.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Although phosphine quickly breaks down into phosphorus and hydrogen in the top clouds of these planets, enough lingers – 4.8 parts per million – to be observable. The phosphorus may be what gives clouds on Jupiter a reddish tinge.</p> <p>Things are different on a rocky planet like Venus. The new research has found fainter traces of phosphine in the atmosphere, at 20 parts per billion.</p> <p>Lightning, clouds, volcanoes and meteorite impacts might all produce some phosphine, but not enough to counter the rapid destruction of the compound in Venus’s highly oxidising atmosphere. The researchers considered all the chemical processes they could think of on Venus, but none could explain the concentration of phosphine. What’s left?</p> <p>On Earth, phosphine is only produced by microbial life (and by various industrial processes) – and the concentration in our atmosphere is in the parts per trillion range. The much higher concentration on Venus cannot be ignored.</p> <p><strong>Signs of life?</strong></p> <p>To determine whether the phosphine on Venus is really produced by life, chemists and geologists will be trying to identify other reactions and processes that could be alternative explanations.</p> <p>Meanwhile, biologists will be trying to better understand the microbes that live in Venus-like conditions on Earth – high temperatures, high acidity, and high levels of carbon dioxide – and also ones that produce phosphine.</p> <p>When Earth microbes produce phosphine, they do it via an “anaerobic” process, which means it happens where no oxygen is present. It has been observed in places such as activated sludge and sewage treatment plants, but the exact collection of microbes and processes is not well understood.</p> <p>Biologists will also be trying to work out whether the microbes on Earth that produce phosphine could conceivably do it under the harsh Venusian conditions. If there is some biological process producing phosphine on Venus, it may be a form of “life” very different from what we know on Earth.</p> <p>Searches for life beyond Earth have often skipped over Venus, because its surface temperature is around 500℃ and the atmospheric pressure is almost 100 times greater than on Earth. Conditions are <a href="https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ast.2017.1783">more hospitable for life</a> as we know it about 50 kilometres off the ground, although there are still vast clouds of sulfuric acid to deal with.</p> <p><strong>Molecular barcodes</strong></p> <p>The researchers found the phosphine using spectroscopy, which is the study of how light interacts with molecules. When sunlight passes through Venus’s atmosphere, each molecule absorbs very specific colours of this light.</p> <p>Using telescopes on Earth, we can take this light and split it into a massive rainbow. Each type of molecule present in Venus’ atmosphere produces a distinctive pattern of dark absorption lines in this rainbow, like an identifying barcode.</p> <p>This barcode is not always strongest in visible light. Sometimes it can only be detected in the parts of the electromagnetic spectrum that are invisible to the human eye, such as UV rays, microwave, radio waves and infrared.</p> <p>The barcode of carbon dioxide, for example, is most evident in the infrared region of the spectrum.</p> <p>While phosphine on Jupiter was first detected in infrared, for Venus observations astronomers used radio telescopes: the <a href="https://www.almaobservatory.org/en/home/">Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array</a> (ALMA) and <a href="https://www.eaobservatory.org/jcmt/about-jcmt/">James Clerk Maxwell Telescope</a> (JCMT), which can detect the barcode of phosphine in millimetre wavelengths.</p> <p><strong>New barcodes, new discoveries</strong></p> <p>The discovery of phosphine on Venus relied not only on new observations, but also a more detailed knowledge of the compound’s barcode. Accurately predicting the barcode of phosphine across all relevant frequencies took <a href="http://www.tampa.phys.ucl.ac.uk/ftp/eThesis/ClaraSousaSilva2015.pdf">the whole PhD</a> of astrochemist Clara Sousa-Silva in the <a href="https://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/research/spectroscopy-exoplanets">ExoMol group</a> at University College London in 2015.</p> <p>She used computational quantum chemistry – basically putting her molecule into a computer and solving the equations that describe its behaviour – to predict the strength of the barcode at different colours. She then tuned her model using available experimental data before making the <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2917">16.8 billion lines of phosphine’s barcode</a> available to astronomers.</p> <p>Sousa-Silva originally thought her data would be used to study Jupiter and Saturn, as well as weird stars and distant “hot Jupiter” exoplanets.</p> <p>More recently, she led the detailed consideration of <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.05224">phosphine as a biosignature</a> – a molecule whose presence implies life. This analysis demonstrated that, on small rocky exoplanets, phosphine should not be present in observable concentrations unless there was life there as well.</p> <p>But she no doubt wouldn’t have dreamed of a phone call from an astronomer who has discovered phosphine on our nearest planetary neighbour. With phosphine on Venus, we won’t be limited to speculating and looking for molecular barcodes. We will be able to send probes there and hunt for the microbes directly.</p> <p><em>Written by Laura McKemmish, UNSW; Brendan Paul Burns, UNSW, and Lucyna Kedziora-Chudczer, Swinburne University of Technology. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/life-on-venus-traces-of-phosphine-may-be-a-sign-of-biological-activity-146093">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Behind the new Samsung Fold: how the quest to maximise screen size is driving major innovation

<p>To enlarge a phone, or not to enlarge a phone? That is the question. In the world of flagship smartphones, there seems to be one clear trend: bigger is better.</p> <p>Manufacturers are trying to strip away anything that might stand in the way of the largest possible slab of screen. There is also growing demand for thinner phones with diminishing <a href="https://www.lifewire.com/bezel-4155199">bezels</a> (the area surrounding a screen).</p> <p>This trend has now culminated in the latest innovation in smartphone design, the <a href="https://www.t3.com/au/news/best-folding-phones">foldable screen phone</a>. These devices sport thin <a href="https://www.techradar.com/au/news/what-is-oled">OLED</a> self illuminating screens that can be folded in half.</p> <p>The newest release is the <a href="https://www.theverge.com/21427462/samsung-galaxy-z-fold-2-review">Samsung Galaxy Z fold 2</a> – a device that is almost three-quarters screen and has extravagant overtones rivalled only by a hefty <a href="https://www.samsung.com/au/smartphones/galaxy-z-fold2/buy/">A$2,999 price tag</a>.</p> <p><strong>Hear from them</strong></p> <p>But to prevent the phones themselves from growing to unwieldy size, manufacturers are having to find ways to balance size with usability and durability. This presents some interesting engineering challenges, as well as some innovative solutions.</p> <p><strong>Internal design complexities of folding phones</strong></p> <p>Modern phones still typically use a thin LCD or plastic OLED display covered by an outer glass panel.</p> <p>Folding displays are a new category that exploit the flexibility of OLED display panels. Instead of simply fixing these panels to a rigid glass panel, they carefully engineer the panel so that it bends – but never quite tightly enough to snap or crack.</p> <p>Internal structural support is needed to make sure the panel doesn’t crease, or isn’t stressed to the point of creating damage, discolouration or visible surface ripples.</p> <p>Since this is a mechanical, moving system, reliability issues need to be considered. For instance, how long will the hinge last? How many times can it be <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/4/20898484/samsung-galaxy-fold-folding-test-failure-durability">folded and unfolded</a> before it malfunctions? Will dirt or dust make its way into the assembly during daily use and affect the screen?</p> <p>Such devices need an added layer of reliability over traditional slab-like phones, which have no moving parts.</p> <p><strong>Large screen, thin phone: a recipe for disaster?</strong></p> <p>Each generation of smartphones becomes thinner and with smaller bezels, which improves the viewing experience but can make the phone harder to handle.</p> <p>In such designs, the area of the device you can grip without touching the display screen is small. This leads to a higher chance of <a href="https://www.cnet.com/news/study-19-percent-of-people-drop-phones-down-toilet/">dropping the device</a> – a blunder even the best of us have made.</p> <p>There’s an ongoing tussle between consumers and manufacturers. Consumers want a large, viewable surface as well as an easily portable and rugged device. But from an engineering point of view, these are usually competing requirements.</p> <p>You’ll often see people in smartphone ads holding the device with two hands. In real life, however, most people use their phone with <a href="https://www.smartinsights.com/mobile-marketing/mobile-design/research-on-mobile-interaction-behaviour-and-design/">one</a> <a href="https://alistapart.com/article/how-we-hold-our-gadgets/">hand</a>.</p> <p>Thus, the shift towards larger, thinner phones has also given rise to a boom in demand for assistive tools attached to the back, such as <a href="https://www.androidcentral.com/best-popsockets">pop-out grips and phone rings</a>.</p> <p>In trying to maximise screen size, smartphone developers also have to account for interruptions in the display, such as the placement of cameras, laser scanners (for face or object identification), proximity sensors and speakers. All are placed to minimise visual intrusion.</p> <p><strong>Now you see it, now you don’t</strong></p> <p>In the engineering world, to measure the physical world you need either cameras or sensors, such as in a fingerprint scanner.</p> <p>With the race to increase the real estate space on screens, typically these cameras and scanners are placed somewhere around the screen. But they take up valuable space.</p> <p>This is why we’ve recently seen tricks to carve out more space for them, such as <a href="https://www.techradar.com/au/news/this-is-the-worlds-first-smartphone-where-half-the-screen-is-a-fingerprint-scanner">pop up</a> cameras and <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=phone+screen+hole+for+camera&amp;source=lmns&amp;bih=598&amp;biw=1280&amp;rlz=1C5CHFA_enAU871AU871&amp;safe=active&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjXvcyoveDrAhUwhUsFHXvqBYMQ_AUoAHoECAEQAA">punch-hole</a> cameras, in which the camera sits in a cutout hole allowing the display to extend to the corners.</p> <p>But another fantastic place for sensors is right in front of us: the screen. Or more specifically, under the screen.</p> <p>Samsung is one company that has suggested placing selfie-cameras and fingerprint readers behind the screen. But how do you capture a photo or a face image through a layer of screen?</p> <p>Up until recently, this has been put in the “too hard basket”. But that is changing: Xiaomi, Huawei and <a href="https://www.extremetech.com/mobile/262497-samsung-patent-shows-phone-camera-inside-display">Samsung</a> all have patents for <a href="https://www.phonearena.com/news/samsung-galaxy-s21-s30-under-display-camera_id125174">under-display cameras</a>.</p> <p>There are a range of ways to do this, from allowing a camera to see through the screen, to using <a href="https://www.rp-photonics.com/microlenses.html">microlenses</a> and camera pixels distributed throughout the display itself – similar to an insect’s <a href="https://www.britannica.com/animal/insect/Nervous-system#ref250944">compound eye</a>.</p> <p>In either case, the general engineering challenge is to implement the feature in a way that doesn’t impact screen image quality, nor majorly affect camera resolution or colour accuracy.</p> <p><strong>Laptops in our pockets</strong></p> <p>With up to 3.8 billion smartphone users <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/330695/number-of-smartphone-users-worldwide/">expected by 2021</a>, mobile computing is a primary consumer technology area seeing significant growth and investment.</p> <p>One driver for this is the professional market, where larger mobile devices allow more efficient on-the-go business transactions. The second market is individuals who who <a href="https://www.statista.com/topics/779/mobile-internet/"><em>only</em> have a mobile device</a> and no laptop or desktop computer.</p> <p>It’s all about choice, but also functionality. Whatever you choose has to get the job done, support a positive user experience, but also survive the rigours of the real world.</p> <p><em>Written by Andrew Maxwell. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/behind-the-new-samsung-fold-how-the-quest-to-maximise-screen-size-is-driving-major-innovation-145700">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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Is Australia looking the other way as Assange is hung out to dry?

<p>Right now, the substantial extradition hearings involving the US government request that the UK hand over publisher and journalist Julian Assange <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-09-09/julian-assange-what-does-extradition-hearing-mean/12642972">are underway</a>. The Wikileaks founder has been held in British custody at London’s Belmarsh prison since April 2019.</p> <p>The Trump administration is attempting to extradite the Australian through the mechanisms of the UK-US Extradition Treaty.</p> <p>However, due process has been thrown out the window when it comes to the way our fellow citizen has been dragged before the Old Bailey in London.</p> <p>The terms of the 2003 treaty specifically ban extradition over <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-assange/uk-u-s-treaty-bans-extradition-of-assange-lawyer-says-idUSKBN1YN1G9">political offences</a>. And Julian is facing multiple espionage charges in relation to the publishing of classified US government documents: distinctly political crimes.</p> <p>Another major middle finger to the rule of law is the fact that the United States has reached across international jurisdictions and arrested Assange <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/julian-assange-the-afp-raids-and-the-crime-of-dissent/">by proxy</a> for alleged crimes that were committed outside of its own borders.</p> <p>And on top of all this, the UK has been holding Assange on remand on behalf of the States <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/sep/14/julian-assange-to-remain-in-jail-pending-extradition-to-us">since September 2019</a>.</p> <p>A dangerous precedent</p> <p>“There’s no due process being followed whatsoever,” said <a href="https://www.facebook.com/julianassangesydney.townhallgathering?ref=bookmarks">Julian Assange Sydney Town Hall Gathering</a> spokesperson Tony Wakeham. “The judicial system couldn’t do more to hobble Assange, than they’re doing – short of killing him.”</p> <p>“It goes right back to him being gaoled for <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/unacceptable-risk-in-bail-laws-what-does-it-mean/">bail jumping</a>,” he told Sydney Criminal Lawyers. “By the time they put him in gaol for the maximum time for bail jumping, they did so after the Swedes had dropped their attempt to extradite him on what were false grounds in the first place.”</p> <p>Wakeham also warns that if the extradition is successful it will set a dangerous precedent for the entire planet, as anyone anywhere in the world involved in publishing information about crimes committed by the US in either the mainstream or social media will be open to the same treatment.</p> <p>Assange published over <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=where+is+the+extradition+trial+assange+taking+place&amp;rlz=1C1CHBF_en-GBAU887AU887&amp;oq=where+is+the+extradition+trial+assange+taking+place&amp;aqs=chrome..69i57j33.9919j0j7&amp;sourceid=chrome&amp;ie=UTF-8">700,000 classified US government documents</a> over 2010 and 2011. These were leaked by former US military intelligence officer Chelsea Manning. And if Assange ends up in America, he’ll be facing 18 espionage charges with a combined maximum penalty of 175 years.</p> <p>A not so fair go</p> <p>The lawyer representing the US government in the extradition proceedings, James Lewis QC, told the Old Bailey <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/this-is-nonsense-julian-assange-interjections-earn-stern-warning-20200909-p55tpj.html">on the first day of hearings</a> this week that Assange is not facing charges for the blanket publishing of the files, but rather he’s charged over conspiring to obtain some of them.</p> <p>At that point Julian was heard to call out, “This is nonsense.” But he was promptly silenced by the judge.</p> <p>Meanwhile, back in his homeland, there’s been a lot of radio silence around what’s happening to this Australian. And Wakeham’s none too impressed about it.</p> <p>The social justice activist questions why PM Scott Morrison and foreign minister Marise Payne don’t step up and speak out to protect a fellow citizen, as the government has done this before on behalf of journalists  <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/australian-journalist-imprisoned-in-cambodia-seeks-royal-pardon/">James Ricketson</a> and <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/free-assange-incarcerated-for-exposing-the-truth/">Peter Greste</a> when they were imprisoned overseas.</p> <p>Wakeham posits that the ministers of the Morrison cabinet aren’t doing their jobs because there’s not enough opposition to what’s happening to Assange.</p> <p>“And this brings me to the most disheartening thing about all of this, which is that we Australians, by and large, don’t give a shit about what’s happening to him,” the fervent Wikileaks supporter concluded.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Gregoire. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/australia-looks-the-other-way-as-assange-is-hung-out-to-dry/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a> </em></p>

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100-year-old postcard finally gets delivered!

<p>A woman from Michigan ended up receiving a postcard in her mailbox which had been sent almost exactly 100 years ago.</p> <p>Brittany Keech from Belding, east of Grand Rapids said the message took her by surprise and is now on the hunt of the relatives of the intended recipient.</p> <p>The postcard had a stamp on it with George Washington’s face and was postmarked October 29th, 1920 having been sent right before Halloween of that year, from Jamestown, Michigan.</p> <p>Keech is now hopeful that she’ll be able to track down the descendants of the people whom the message was intended.</p> <p>“This might be something that their parents can say, 'yea I remember when your great-great grandma would tell me stories’.”</p> <p>So far, she has posted it to a local Facebook group which features local stories where it has garnered over a hundred comments.</p> <p>If the family is not found, she says she may donate it to the local museum in Belding.</p> <p>One member of the community, Robby Peters, has begun the search to find relatives.</p> <p>“I do some genealogy research as a hobby,' said Peters to the<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/2020/09/12/with-1920-postmark-mail-is-delivered-michigan-home-100-years-late/" target="_blank"> Washington Post.</a> </p> <p>“I started helping my own family, and I kind of caught the bug after that.”</p> <p>Peters found a Roy McQueen in the 1920 census who lived at the same address where Keech is currently residing with her husband and two children.</p> <p>McQueen was originally from Canada and moved to America in 1887.</p> <p>He was married to a Nora Murdock and was the manager of a produce company.</p> <p>The likely author of the postcard is Florence 'Flossie' Burgess, the daughter of Nora Murdock's sister, according to Peters.</p> <p>“I found census records, death records and marriage records,” he explained. “The postcard contained a couple of names and it had a destination, so I had an idea of where to start searching.”</p> <p>“I built a family tree,” Peters said. “It doesn't look like Roy and Nora had children, and Flossie seems to have remained unmarried, so there are no direct descendants.”</p>

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‘Lit therapy’ in the classroom: Writing about trauma can be valuable if done right

<p>Some of my students have been assaulted. Others have been homeless, jobless or broke, some suffer from depression, anxiety or grief. Some fight addiction, cancer or for custody. Many are in pain and they want to write about it.</p> <p>Opening wounds in the classroom is messy and risky. Boundaries and intentions can feel blurred in a class where memories and feelings also present teachable moments. But if teachers and students work together, opportunities to share difficult personal stories can be constructive.</p> <p><strong>Writing about trauma</strong></p> <p>The health benefits of writing about trauma are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15401383.2018.1486259">well documented</a>. Some counselling theories — such as narrative therapy — incorporate writing into their therapeutic techniques.</p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1020353109229">Research suggests</a> writing about trauma can be beneficial because it helps people re-evaluate their experiences by looking at them from different perspectives.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>Studies <a href="https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/writing-about-emotions-may-ease-stress-and-trauma">suggest</a> writing about traumatic events can help ease the emotional pressure of negative experiences. But <a href="https://www.health.harvard.edu/healthbeat/writing-about-emotions-may-ease-stress-and-trauma">writing about trauma</a> is not a cure-all and it may be less effective if people are also struggling with ongoing mental health challenges, such as depression or post-traumatic stress disorder.</p> <p>Internationally acclaimed researcher and clinician Bessel van der Kolk asserts in his book, <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18693771-the-body-keeps-the-score">The Body Keeps the Score</a>, that trauma is more than a stored memory to be expunged. Rather, van der Kolk suggests our whole mind, brain and sense of self can change in response to trauma.</p> <p>Pain is complicated. And teachers in a classroom are not counsellors in a clinic.</p> <p>If properly managed, though, sharing stories about personal suffering can be a relevant and valuable educational experience. It’s a strategy that, in a professional setting, could be referred to as “lit therapy”.</p> <p><strong>An empathetic space</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.psychology.org.au/for-members/publications/inpsych/2012/feb/17-Working-with-African-refugees-An-opportunity">Dr Jill Parris</a> is a psychologist who works with refugees and uses lit therapy as an extension of trauma counselling. Parris and I also worked together on the project <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27192485-home-truths">Home Truths: An Anthology of Refugee and Migrant Writing</a>, which paired refugee authors with a writing mentor to develop personal stories about challenging migrant journeys to Australia.</p> <p>Parris says writing about trauma is helpful in most cases, as long as teachers and their students monitor stress levels and offer an empathetic space where storytellers are given the time and tools to manage the complex feelings that may surface.</p> <p>“It is important that people feel absolutely free to avoid focusing on traumatic events and this should be made clear from the start,” says Parris.</p> <p>Teachers should therefore be wary of implying traumatic personal stories are inherently worthy subjects, that divulgence alone is more likely to receive a higher grade or publication. It isn’t. In fact, sharing a story may be detrimental. It may be unfair to the author’s future self, the other people involved in their experience, or to the piece’s intention for its readers.</p> <p>Helping individual students identify their own readiness to share personal experiences is an important first step. Parris recommends asking students how they <em>know</em> they are ready to share their story. What has changed to <em>make</em> them ready? Answering these questions helps people sit outside themselves.</p> <p>As teachers, we also need to be mindful that sharing painful memories presents a risk for those hearing them.</p> <p><strong>Vicarious trauma</strong></p> <p><a href="https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/uresposters/318/">Vicarious trauma is a real threat</a>. To help mitigate the risk of emotional contagion, teachers should check in with students at the beginning and end of class to monitor feelings, reminding people they are in the present, that the trauma they recounted or heard was survived.</p> <p>If people feel stressed, Parris recommends looking around and forcing ourselves to name what we see, hear, feel, taste and smell as a way of <a href="https://positivepsychology.com/self-regulation/">returning to the present</a>. Discussing what people will do outside class to care for themselves is also useful.</p> <p>As teachers, it is important to help our students organise their thoughts and feelings in relation to the craft of professional writing, which is writing intended for consumption by an anonymous reader.</p> <p>Students are likely to write what they’re passionate about — the good, the bad and the ugly. Their best writing comes out of what’s meaningful to them. Teachers can help guide their students’ search for authenticity.</p> <p>Feelings and experiences matter, but writers and readers also want to know what they mean. Revealing how masters of personal storytelling bridge the personal and the universal is useful in demonstrating the broader purpose of sharing stories.</p> <p>Story craft is part of how author Joan Didion’s <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7815.The_Year_of_Magical_Thinking">The Year of Magical Thinking</a> is both a personal reflection and a forensic investigation of grief. Part of a writing teacher’s job is exploring how personal stories can contribute to the archive of collective human experience.</p> <p>While I work with adult students, there is also <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2015-59081-009">evidence</a> narrative writing exercises can help children and teenagers process thoughts and emotions related to challenging personal events.</p> <p>This work is emotionally demanding. Scenes of horrible things people have told me occasionally invade my mind, as if another person’s lived experience orbits my own memories. It’s unsettling. It’s also why stories matter. Because hearing them can help us better understand the people who share them. Stories help us glimpse the humanity in the hardship, showing us while pain is universal, compassion is too.</p> <p><em>Written by Yannick Thoraval. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/lit-therapy-in-the-classroom-writing-about-trauma-can-be-valuable-if-done-right-145379">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Young people are missing out on vital rites of passage during COVID

<p>As we approach the end of a uniquely challenging school year, the class of 2020 look set to miss out on many of the usual highlights of year 12.</p> <p>Graduation <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/a-really-tough-year-calls-for-covid-safe-graduations-as-year-12-suffers-20200820-p55nqy.html">ceremonies</a>, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/aug/17/nsw-bans-state-school-formals-graduation-ceremonies-and-choirs-under-new-covid-safe-rules">formals</a>, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-28/schoolies-week-cancelled-due-to-covid-19-high-risk-pandemic/12605086">schoolies week</a> and <a href="https://www.nme.com/en_au/news/music/coronavirus-covid-19-australia-festivals-concerts-cancelled-postponed-2623326">summer music festivals</a> have either been cancelled or <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/terrific-outcome-bans-on-formals-and-graduations-to-be-lifted-after-hsc-20200904-p55shh.html">restricted</a>.</p> <p>Meanwhile, those who may have been planning a gap year overseas are not able to leave the country.</p> <p>So far, public discussion of these cancellations have understandably focused <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-28/schoolies-week-cancelled-due-to-covid-19-high-risk-pandemic/12605086">on the risks</a> posed by COVID and the possible <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/a-really-tough-year-calls-for-covid-safe-graduations-as-year-12-suffers-20200820-p55nqy.html">mental health impacts</a> on young people.</p> <p>But young people aren’t just missing out on a chance to wear fancy clothes or party with their mates. Events like schoolies and formals also have a profound social purpose as rites of passage.</p> <p><strong>What are rites of passage?</strong></p> <p>Rites of passage are rituals that accompany changes in social status for individuals and groups. Their importance has been <a href="https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-1-4614-6086-2_588">recognised by social researchers</a> for more than a century.</p> <p>In ethnographer Arnold Van Gennep’s original 1909 work, which is still broadly accepted by researchers, rites of passage share three basic phases:</p> <ul> <li>a symbolic separation from normality, such as by travel or costumes</li> <li>an in-between stage, in which social norms and hierarchies are cast off and people embrace a community spirit</li> <li>a ceremonial confirmation of the new state of affairs, often with symbols like a ring or crown.</li> </ul> <p>This creates a transformative experience for people. It marks a change as special, by stepping outside ordinary life.</p> <p>The brief upturn in the social order also allows the community to strengthen its bonds and reaffirm its support for the broader, existing social system.</p> <p><strong>Traditional rites of passage are in decline</strong></p> <p>For young people today, ceremonies like school graduations or schoolies trips are even more important than for previous generations.</p> <p>Declining rates of <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/religion/religion-in-australia-what-are-the-implications-of-none-being-th/10094576">religious affiliation</a> means religious coming-of-age has also declined in importance. Changing social norms also mean events like <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6047410/debutante-ball-no-longer-a-canberra-tradition/">debutante balls</a> and <a href="https://aifs.gov.au/facts-and-figures/marriage-australia/marriage-australia-source-data">weddings</a> are no longer common practice for teenagers and those in their early 20s.</p> <p>Meanwhile, traditional economic markers of growing up - such as moving out of home, and starting full-time work - are also <a href="https://www.domain.com.au/news/one-in-four-australian-adult-children-move-back-home-new-data-shows-955703/">proving more elusive </a>for young people, thanks to challenging <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-next-employment-challenge-from-coronavirus-how-to-help-the-young-135676">job</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/first-home-buyer-schemes-arent-enough-to-meet-young-adults-housing-aspirations-121431">housing</a> markets.</p> <p><strong>Schoolies, gap years are even more important</strong></p> <p>This means other cultural traditions are a critical part of how young people transition to adulthood.</p> <p>Often when we talk about <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/parenting/school-life/sydney-hsc-student-suspended-after-encouraging-muckup-day-prank/news-story/5207d51c93e1f9b6163a00197c518cb5">“muck up” days</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-your-teen-off-to-schoolies-heres-what-to-say-instead-of-freaking-out-126203">schoolies</a> and <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/11603791/Gap-year-takers-less-likely-to-finish-university.html">gap years</a>, debates focus (not always fairly) on the risks involved with young people who are celebrating and testing boundaries.</p> <p>But research has shown how <a href="https://doi.org/10.1108/IJEFM-02-2016-0008">schoolies</a> and <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02508281.2017.1292177?journalCode=rtrr20">gap year travel</a> act as rituals to mark and manage the otherwise often unremarkable transition to adulthood.</p> <p>These episodes provide a meaningful break with normal life and past identity. They see young people leave their comfort zone to experience a sense of community with their peers, before moving to the next stage of life.</p> <p>Similarly, music festivals, while not one-off events, can also <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02614361003749793">provide these experiences</a>. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13676260500523580">Nightclubs</a> and parties - which have also been significantly curtailed during COVID - are also spaces to escape everyday rules and experience communal energy within the broader period of emerging adulthood.</p> <p><strong>Lasting impacts?</strong></p> <p>In addition to the <a href="https://theconversation.com/victorias-year-12-students-are-learning-remotely-but-they-wont-necessarily-fall-behind-143844">impact on education</a> - which has yet to be fully understood - there are other ways in which the class of 2020 may be roundly disadvantaged.</p> <p>COVID-19 has changed so many of the cultural experiences young people use to make their way into adulthood.</p> <p>So, what might be the lasting consequences for this year’s school leavers?</p> <p>Missing out on rites of passage like schoolies week and festivals could mar the transition into adult society in subtle but palpable ways.</p> <p>Without such cultural experiences it is harder to know when this change has really happened, to respect its significance and feel a sense of belonging in one’s new social role.</p> <p>As per Van Gennep’s work, this cohort of young people is also missing chances to bond as a community and to reaffirm their commitment to the social order by temporarily disrupting it.</p> <p>This is why, in the absence of formal rites of passage, people develop their own replacements, for better or worse. Recent reports of an impromptu rave inside a kebab shop show that young people will <a href="https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/brisbane-kebab-shop-fined-after-customers-break-out-in-impromptu-3am-rave-20200824-p55oum.html">find other ways</a> of crossing boundaries together - testing both legal and social norms.</p> <p>On a more positive note, our <a href="https://apraamcos.com.au/events/2020/june/call-out-for-volunteers-music-makers-during-covid-19/">ongoing research</a> with young people about making music during COVID-19 is showing their resilience and creativity in balancing safety with social needs. <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/news/musicnews/livestreaming-music-adapt-overcome-coronavirus-feature-read/12071726">Online performances</a> are providing some missing ritual and social media also allows a level of community experience.</p> <p>While we maintain our focus on community health and safety, we must recognise that what might look like frivolous or risky activities can have huge significance for young people as they move into adulthood.</p> <p>This means they also have huge significance for our society more broadly.</p> <p><em>Written by Ben Green and Andy Bennett. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/no-festivals-no-schoolies-young-people-are-missing-out-on-vital-rites-of-passage-during-covid-145097">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Nelson Mandela’s final photos

<p>Nelson Mandela, the legendary leader who helped to end apartheid in South Africa and later became the country’s first black president, had largely withdrawn from public life by 2011. But he agreed to one last photoshoot: A portrait-sitting for photographer Adrian Steirn’s “21 Icons” project, a multimedia series highlighting those who played a role in shaping modern South Africa.</p> <p>Steirn, one of South Africa’s leading photographers, captured Mandela at his boyhood home in the village of Qunu, located in the nation’s Eastern Cape Province. The photoshoot would become one of Mandela’s last.</p> <p>Mandela’s portrait in the 21 Icons project took careful consideration. “We had to come up with a concept that was both viable and meaningful,” Steirn told <em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</p> <p>The final result was a photograph titled “A Reflection of Dignity,” which captured Mandela’s “majestic aura and humble spirit simultaneously,” HuffPost.com wrote. “The concept of the mirror allowed him to step out of the portrait and ‘reflect’ on South Africa today and the part he played in that process,” according to Steirn.</p> <p>A South African himself, Steirn says that his deep admiration for Mandela inspired him to create the “21 Icons” project. Shaking the leader’s hand for the first time “was amazing,” he says.</p> <p>“You hear so much about this man, living in a country that is based around his narrative.” But Mandela – or Madiba, as he was affectionately nicknamed by South Africans – quickly put Steirn and his crew at ease.</p> <p>“He was the kind of guy that made you feel like the important one. That was his gift,” Steirn says.</p> <p>Mandela and Steirn shared a laugh together during a brief pause in the photoshoot. “At the end of the day, one of the great lessons for me was you can’t idolise anyone,” Steirn says. “We are all human.”</p> <p>In 2013, Adrian’s stunning photo of Mandela with the mirror was purchased by a private art collector for $200,000 – the highest price ever paid for a local portrait. Part of the proceeds were donated to the construction of the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg, which opened its doors in 2017.</p> <p>Damon Hyland, a member of Steirn’s crew for the “21 Icons” project, arranged the lighting for the photoshoot. The photos were not enhanced in any way, according to Steirn, allowing the room’s natural light to illuminate the shot.</p> <p>The portrait-sitting was one of the last before Mandela’s death, and the power of the moment made the crew emotional at times.</p> <p>“In those moments, it becomes very clear that no matter what colour we are or what gender we are… it doesn’t matter what we achieve in life. We’re all mortal,” Steirn says.</p> <p>Steirn, Hyland, and Meme Selaelo Kgagara positioned Mandela’s mirror for the shot. Though Steirn and his crew were nervous before the photoshoot, he says that Mandela’s good-natured and kind personality soon calmed their jitters. “There was a humbleness around Mandela, there was a humour about Mandela that set him apart,” according to Steirn. “He was a very real man.”</p> <p>Steirn photographed Mandela for the last time in 2013 – two days before the leader was admitted to the hospital with a lung infection.</p> <p>Mandela was watching the National Geographic channel, Steirn recalls. “He gave so much to this country; he represented unity to South Africa. Knowing we would lose him was an impactful, intense moment,” Steirn says.</p> <p>“In my own way, it was goodbye.”</p> <p>A few months later, Mandela passed away in his home.</p> <p><strong>IMAGES:</strong> Courtesy Adrian Steirn</p> <p><em>Written by Brooke Nelson. This article first appeared on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/see-the-last-photos-ever-taken-of-nelson-mandela" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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How to stamp out COVID-19 in New Zealand again

<p>Auckland, and possibly other parts of New Zealand, almost certainly have more cases of COVID-19 in the community than the <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/news-media/media-releases/4-cases-covid-19-unknown-source">four new cases confirmed</a> yesterday.</p> <p>Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern activated a <a href="https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/pm-comments-auckland-covid-19-case">resurgence plan</a> late yesterday, placing all of Auckland back under alert level 3 restrictions from today until midnight on Friday to allow time for contacts to be traced and tested.</p> <p>But until we can identify the chain of transmission, New Zealanders should prepare for restrictions to remain in place for longer.</p> <p>All four new cases are within one family in South Auckland, with no links yet discovered to quarantine or border facilities. But family members work in different places across different suburbs, which means the restrictions need to apply to the whole city.</p> <p><strong>Get news that’s free, independent and based on evidence.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>When Melbourne found itself in a similar position a month ago, the city’s strategy was to lockdown specific suburbs. Unfortunately this failed to contain the virus.</p> <p><strong>Quick return to restrictions</strong></p> <p>Swift and decisive action is important, and we support the decision to place stricter conditions on Auckland and to return the rest of the country to alert level 2. We should all be very cautious.</p> <p>Everyone working at the border or in managed isolation will be tested and pop-up stations have opened across Auckland to carry out mass testing. But it is quite possible someone within the wider contact network of the cases has travelled outside Auckland. People who have travelled to Auckland in the last two weeks should act as if they are under level 3 restrictions and stay home from work.</p> <p>Whether we are in Auckland or not, we should all resume social distancing, working from home if we can, and wearing a mask if possible when we go out. If we do the right things now, there’s a good chance we will be able to contain this community outbreak before it spreads too much further.</p> <p>We’re going to need to do a lot of testing to work out how far the virus has spread. It’s more effective at this stage to target high-risk groups rather than testing people at random. People with symptoms or people who have been identified as close contacts of known cases should be prioritised for testing.</p> <p>If you are offered a test or you don’t feel well, you should get tested, but if you feel fine, just stay at home.</p> <p><strong>Contact tracing</strong></p> <p>Rapid contact tracing is going to be key to getting the virus under control. <a href="https://www.tepunahamatatini.ac.nz/2020/08/10/successful-covid-19-contact-tracing-systems-for-new-zealand/">Our recent modelling</a> shows that if we can trace and quarantine 80% of contacts within two days on average, it will go a long way to containing the outbreak.</p> <p>Contact tracers are also doing backward tracing – finding the source of infection so we know how many other cases are out there – as well as forward tracing, which means quarantining contacts so they don’t pass the virus on.</p> <p>For Auckland, moving to alert level 3 reduces the number of contacts most of us have. This will make the job easier for contact tracers over the coming days as they may only have to trace one or two contacts per person rather than ten or more.</p> <p>Everyone should now draw up a list of where they’ve been and who they’ve seen for the last two weeks. This is also a wake-up call to redouble our efforts to keep diaries of activities and to use the <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-resources-and-tools/nz-covid-tracer-app">NZ COVID Tracer app</a> to keep a record.</p> <p>The Tracer app has the added advantage that the Ministry of Health can automatically notify anybody who has visited the same location as a confirmed or potential case. We encourage Aucklanders in particular to check their apps, diaries and bank accounts to compile as much detail as possible of places they have visited or people they have met over the last 14 days.</p> <p><strong>What happens next</strong></p> <p>What happens next really depends on the results of the contact tracing investigations already underway. There is a lot of luck involved in the early stages of an outbreak like this one. If we are lucky, many of those infected may not have yet have passed the virus on.</p> <p>But it’s also possible there may have been a superspreading event, for example at a workplace or social gathering. In that case, there could be a large number of cases already out there. Although the alert level is currently in place until Friday, we should be prepared for this to be extended, depending on how many cases we find in the next three days.</p> <p>Back in February, when we had our first cases of COVID-19, the situation was very different. We had an open border and most cases were international travellers or their close contacts.</p> <p>We were also getting around 80 new cases a day by the time we went into lockdown in March. This time we have locked down with a smaller number of cases and we still have strict border restrictions in place.</p> <p>This should give us confidence that if we all do the right things, we will be able to get the outbreak under control much faster than last time.</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Plank, Alex James and Shaun Hendy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/new-zealand-is-on-alert-as-covid-19-returns-this-is-what-we-need-to-stamp-it-out-again-144304">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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