Food & Wine

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Do different drinks make you different drunk?

<p><a href="http://www.bbc.com/news/av/health-42072497/how-different-drinks-alter-your-mood">Reports of a study</a> linking different kinds of alcoholic drinks with different mood states were making the rounds in 2017. The <a href="http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/10/e016089">research used</a> 30,000 survey responses from the <a href="http://www.globaldrugsurvey.com">Global Drug Survey</a> and found that people attached different emotions to different alcoholic drinks.</p> <p>For instance, more respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits than when drinking wine.</p> <p>We all have friends who swear they feel differently when drinking different types of alcohol. But can different drinks really influence your mood in different ways?</p> <p><strong>Alcohol is alcohol</strong></p> <p>Let’s cut to the chase. No matter what the drink, the active ingredient is the same: ethanol.</p> <p>When you have a drink, ethanol enters the bloodstream through the stomach and small intestine and is then processed in the liver. The liver can process only a limited amount of alcohol at a time so any excess remains in the blood and travels to other organs, including your brain where mood is regulated.</p> <p>The direct effects of alcohol are the same whether you drink wine, beer or spirits. There’s no evidence that different types of alcohol cause different mood states. People aren’t even very good at recognising their <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2167702616689780?journalCode=cpxa">mood states</a> when they have been drinking.</p> <p>So where does the myth come from?</p> <p><strong>Grape expectations</strong></p> <p>Scientists have studied specific <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2965491/">alcohol-related beliefs</a> called “expectancies”. If you believe a particular type of drink makes you angry, sad or sexed up, then it is more likely to.</p> <p>We develop expectancies from a number of sources, including our own and others’ experiences. If wine makes you relaxed, it’s probably because you usually sip it slowly in a calm and relaxed atmosphere. If tequila makes you crazy, maybe it’s because you usually drink it in shots, which is bound to be on a wild night out.</p> <p>Or if you regularly saw your parents sitting around on a Sunday afternoon with their friends and a few beers, you might expect beer to make you more sociable. Kids as young as six have been <a href="http://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsa.1990.51.343">found to have expectancies</a> about alcohol, well before any experience of drinking.</p> <p>We build conscious and unconscious associations between alcohol and our emotions every time we drink or see someone else drinking.</p> <p>We could even be influenced by music and art. “Tequila makes me crazy” is a common belief, which also happens to be a line in a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8XkLrErSHw">Kenny Chesney</a> song, and Billy Joel’s <em><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxEPV4kolz0">Piano Man</a> </em>might reinforce the idea that gin makes you melancholy.</p> <p><strong>It’s the ‘how’ more than the ‘what’</strong></p> <p>Other chemicals, called congeners, can be produced in the process of making alcohol. Different drinks produce different congeners. Some argue these could have different effects on mood, but the only real effect of these chemicals is on the taste and smell of a beverage. They can also contribute to a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20712591">cracker of a hangover</a>.</p> <p>But there is no evidence that these congeners produce specific mood or behavioural effects while you are drinking.</p> <p>The critical factor in the physical and psychological effects you experience when drinking really comes down to how you drink rather than what you drink. Different drinks have different alcohol content and the more alcohol you ingest – and the faster you ingest it – the stronger the effects.</p> <p>Spirits have a higher concentration of alcohol (40%) than beer (5%) or wine (12%) and are often downed quickly, either in shots or with a sweet mixer. This rapidly increases blood alcohol concentration, and therefore alcohol’s effects, including changes in mood.</p> <p>The same goes for mixing drinks. You might have heard the saying “Beer before liquor, never been sicker; liquor before beer, you’re in the clear”, but again it’s the amount of alcohol that might get you into trouble rather than mixing different types.</p> <p>Mixing a stimulant (like an energy drink) with alcohol can also mask how intoxicated you feel, allowing you to drink more.</p> <p>You can reduce the risk of extreme mood changes by drinking slowly, eating food before and while you drink, and spacing alcoholic drinks with water, juice or soft drink. Stick to drinking within the Australian <a href="https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-topics/alcohol-guidelines">alcohol guidelines</a> of no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion.</p> <p><strong>Party animals and bad eggs</strong></p> <p>Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, which means it slows the brain’s functioning. Alcohol’s effects include reducing activity in the part of the brain that regulates thinking, reasoning and decision-making, known as the <a href="http://universe-review.ca/I10-80-prefrontal.jpg">prefrontal cortex</a>. Alcohol also decreases inhibitions and our ability to regulate emotions.</p> <p>“In vino veritas” (in wine there is truth) is a saying that suggests that when drinking we are more likely to reveal our true selves. While that’s not completely accurate, the changes in mood when someone is drinking often reflect underlying personal styles that become less regulated with alcohol on board.</p> <p>Studies of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791902/">aggression and alcohol</a>, for example, show that people who are normally irritable, cranky or low in empathy when they are not drinking are more likely to be aggressive when their inhibitions are lowered while drinking.</p> <p>As with all drugs, the effect alcohol has on your mood is a combination of the alcohol itself, where you are drinking it and how you’re feeling at the time.</p> <p>So does alcohol make you crazy, mean or sad? If it does, you were probably a bit that way inclined already, and if you believe it enough it may just come true.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/88247/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicole-lee-81635">Nicole Lee</a>, Professor at the National Drug Research Institute, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/do-different-drinks-make-you-different-drunk-88247">original article</a>.</em></p>

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What makes wine dry?

<p>When you take a sip of wine at a family meal or celebration, what do you notice?</p> <p>First, you probably note the visual characteristics: the color is generally red, rosé or white. Next, you smell the aromatic compounds wafting up from your glass.</p> <p>And then there’s the sensation in your mouth when you taste it. White wine and rosé are usually described as refreshing, because they have brisk acidity and little to moderate sweetness. Those <a href="https://www.winemag.com/2017/09/21/why-calling-a-wine-dry-or-sweet-can-be-simply-confusing/">low levels of sugar</a> may lead you to perceive these wines as “dry.”</p> <p>People also describe wines as dry when alcohol levels are high, usually over about 13%, mostly because the ethanol leads to hot or burning sensations that <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.6b03767">cover up other sensations</a>, especially sweetness. People also perceive red wines as dry or astringent because they contain a class of molecules called polyphenols.</p> <p><a href="https://www.scopus.com/authid/detail.uri?authorId=55360215200">As an enologist</a> – a wine scientist – I’m interested in how all the chemistry in a glass of wine adds up to this perception of dryness. People are good at evaluating a wine’s dryness with their senses. Can we eventually come up with a way to automatically assess this dryness or astringency without relying on human tasters?</p> <p><strong>The chemistry at the vineyard</strong></p> <p>Everything starts with the grapes. If you taste a mature grape skin or seed at harvest, it will seem dry or astringent to you, thanks to a number of chemical compounds it contains.</p> <p>Large molecules called condensed <a href="https://www.wineaustralia.com/getmedia/df422991-82ed-4125-b0f7-8395a63d438f/201005-tannin-management-in-the-vineyard.pdf">tannins</a> are mostly responsible for the astringency perception. These compounds are made up of varying types and numbers of <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2002-0825.ch015">smaller chemical units called flavanols</a>. Tannins are in the same family of molecules, the polyphenols, that give grapes their red or black color. They tend to be larger in grape skins than in grape seeds, and consequently the skins tend to be more astringent, while the seeds are more bitter.</p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2002-0825.ch015">Grape varieties differ in how much</a> of each of these compounds they contain. In <em>Vitis vinifera</em> cultivars, like Pinot noir and Cabernet sauvignon, the tannin concentration varies from a relatively high 1 to 1.5 mg/berry. In cold-hardy hybrid grapes found in the Midwestern United States, <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation3030047">like Frontenac and Marquette</a>, the concentrations are much lower, ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 mg/berry.</p> <p><a href="https://www.wineaustralia.com/getmedia/df422991-82ed-4125-b0f7-8395a63d438f/201005-tannin-management-in-the-vineyard.pdf">Factors in the vineyard</a> – including site, soil qualities and amount of sun – affect the final concentration of tannins in the fruit.</p> <p><strong>The chemistry in your mouth</strong></p> <p>Basically, the more tannin there is in a wine, the more astringent it will be.</p> <p>When you take a sip, the large tannin molecules <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2014.08.001">interact with proteins from your saliva</a>. They combine and form complexes, reducing the number of salivary proteins available to help lubricate your mouth. It leaves your mouth with a dry sensation – like if a snail were to lose its mucus layer, it would dry out.</p> <p>Because everyone has a different composition and concentration of saliva proteins, and because the flow rate of saliva as you bring wine into your mouth varies, your perceptions of an astringent or dry wine won’t be the same as those of your friends or family. The alcohol level, pH and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aca.2011.12.042">aroma of the wine</a> also influence how intensely and for how long you perceive a red wine’s dryness.</p> <p>Since wine dryness is a perception, the most appropriate tool to appraise it is sensory evaluation. It requires panelists trained on the wine aroma, taste and mouthfeel based on prepared standards and other wines.</p> <p>But winemakers would love to have a quick, simple way to objectively measure astringency without relying on human tasters. That way, they could easily compare this year’s wine to last year’s, or to another wine that is not available to be tested.</p> <p><strong>Can we scientifically evaluate dryness?</strong></p> <p>The challenge for me and my colleagues was to <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.9b01480">see if we could match up</a> the quantified chemical <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2018.09.043">and physical properties</a> in a wine to the trained panelists’ perceptions.</p> <p>First, we used analytical methods to figure out the different sizes of tannins present in particular wines, and their concentrations. We investigated how these tannins interacted and formed complexes with standard salivary proteins.</p> <p>My collaborators and I also used a physical approach, relying on a piece of equipment with two surfaces that are able to mimic and measure the forces of friction that occur in a drinker’s mouth between the tongue and the palate as wine and saliva interact. The friction forces increase between drier surfaces and decrease between more lubricated surfaces.</p> <p>Then, we trained human panelists to evaluate the intensity of dryness in the same wines and in a wine containing no tannins.</p> <p>People perceived the wine containing the higher concentration of larger tannins as drier for a longer time than the wine without tannins. That made sense based on what we already knew about these compounds and how people sense them.</p> <p>We were surprised, though, by our physical measurements in the lab, because they provided the opposite result as our human tasters’ perception. In the presence of too large or too many tannins in the wine, we recorded lower friction forces than in wines low in tannins. Based on the mechanical surfaces test, it seemed like there would be less dry mouthfeel than we’d expect in high-tannin wines.</p> <p>My colleagues and I are planning to investigate this unexpected result in future research to improve our understanding of the dryness perception.</p> <p>All its chemical and physical variables are part of what makes drinking wine a richly personal and ever-changing experience. Considering the impact of astringency on how individuals perceive a particular wine, a quick measure could be very helpful to winemakers as they do their work. So far, we haven’t been able to create a simple scale that will tell a winemaker that tannins at one certain level match up with a very particular dryness perception. But we enologists are still trying.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/aude-watrelot-831853">Aude Watrelot</a>, Assistant Professor of Enology, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/iowa-state-university-1322">Iowa State University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-makes-wine-dry-its-easy-to-taste-but-much-harder-to-measure-123506">original article</a>.</em></p>

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German supermarket giant Kaufland pulls out of Australia

<p>German supermarket chain Kaufland has announced its decision to exit the Australian market, just months after it began construction on its first stores.</p> <p>Kaufland’s 200 Australian employees were informed of the decision on Wednesday, with the company saying “an assurance that generous packages including all entitlements will be offered, as part of a thorough support and consultation process for all”.</p> <p>The retailer said the decision was “in no way a reflection of the efforts of our local employees or management, or the support Kaufland has received from the Australian business community or governments”.</p> <p>“This was not an easy decision for us. We always felt welcome in Australia,” Kaufland International acting CEO Frank Schumann said in a statement.</p> <p>“We would like to thank our employees and we apologise for the disruption this decision will cause.”</p> <p>The company said it would focus on the European market for the “foreseeable future”.</p> <p>Last year, Kaufland <a href="https://www.insideretail.com.au/news/all-over-before-it-began-kaufland-cans-plans-for-australia-202001">commenced construction of stores</a> in South Australia’s Prospect and Victoria’s Dandenong as well as a $255 million distribution centre in Mickleham, Victoria. It also revealed plans to open more than 20 stores across Australia.</p> <p>Kaufland, the world’s fourth biggest retailer, has more than 1,200 stores with 130,000 employees across eight European countries.</p>

Food & Wine

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A sweet treat: apple pie from Milan

<p>Serves 8</p> <p>Is there anything better than a delicious home cooked apple pie? Get ready for rave reviews to roll in!</p> <p>“I have such beautiful memories of my early days in Lombardy. The lessons I learned about family, food and tradition, and how intertwined they are, are at the heart of everything I do today,” says chef Alessandro Pavoni. “This dish reminds me of British apple pie. Russet apples have the perfect texture for it, plus they don’t release too much liquid. If they’re unavailable, use another similar apple that’s not too juicy, such as gala.”</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 kg russet apples</li> <li>1/3 cup (80 ml) dry white wine finely grated zest of 1 lemon 180 g caster sugar</li> <li>1 pinch of fine salt</li> <li>¼ cup (40 g) sultanas 60 g mixed peel</li> <li>60 g unsalted butter 18 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed</li> <li>1½ tablespoons dark rum Mascarpone Cream (to serve)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>Preheat the oven to 180°C.</p> <p>1. Peel and core the apples and cut each one into 16 thin wedges. Place in a heavy-based saucepan over high heat with the wine, lemon zest and 90 g of the caster sugar. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to medium and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. Uncover, add the salt and cook for another 15 minutes or until the liquid has evaporated.</p> <p>2 Remove from the heat, stir in the sultanas and mixed peel, then cover and set aside.</p> <p>3. Beat the butter and remaining sugar with a wooden spoon until well combined. Use three-quarters of this mixture to butter the base and side of a 23 cm round springform cake tin. Completely line the base and side of the tin with the bread, cutting the slices to fit as necessary and reserving some for the top, pressing gently to secure them in place.</p> <p>4. Fill with the apple mixture, then top with the remaining bread and spread the remaining butter mixture over the top.</p> <p>5. Bake for 40 minutes or until the bread is lightly golden. Remove from the oven, immediately pour the rum over the top and set aside for 30 minutes.</p> <p>6. Serve warm with a bowl of mascarpone cream on the side.</p> <p>Recipes from the book, <a href="https://www.penguin.com.au/products/9781921383380/lombardian-cookbook"><em>A Lombardian Cookbook</em></a> by Alessandro Pavoni and Roberta Muir, with photography by Chris Chen, published by Lantern, RRP $59.99.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/apple-pie-from-milan.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Why eating insects is good for you

<p>Does the idea of eating insects bug you?</p> <p>Well, think about this: the United Nations predicts that by 2050, if current trends continue, the <a href="https://population.un.org/wpp/DataQuery/">world’s population will reach 9.8 billion</a>. As a result, <a href="http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/templates/wsfs/docs/expert_paper/How_to_Feed_the_World_in_2050.pdf">global demand for food and feed is expected to increase by 70 per cent</a>, putting additional pressure on already overexploited agricultural resources.</p> <p>Global demand for meat in particular will continue to increase as dietary habits in developing countries change, due to rapid urbanization and economic growth.</p> <p>The oceans are already over-exploited and climate change will have a profound impact on food production. Meanwhile, <a href="http://www.fao.org/state-of-food-security-nutrition/en/">nearly one billion people worldwide suffer from chronic food deprivation</a>.</p> <p>Among the possible solutions, one is quietly making its way into the public’s attention: eating insects.</p> <p><strong>Alternatives to animal protein</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.fao.org/edible-insects/en/">To meet current and future food challenges</a>, the agri-food sector needs to be rethought. We need to find new ways to grow food, address inefficiencies and develop new approaches to production methods.</p> <p>In addition to population growth, urbanization and the rise of the middle class in developing countries are increasing global demand for food, especially animal protein. The production of traditional feed ingredients such as cereals, fish meal and oilseeds must be reduced and substitutes found to make more efficient use of resources.</p> <p>The billions of animals raised each year for food are putting increasing pressure on land and water resources and contributing to climate change and <a href="http://www.fao.org/newsroom/en/news/2006/1000448/index.html">other negative environmental impacts</a>.</p> <p>Livestock farming for meat production puts considerable pressure on global land and water use. At present, a large proportion of the protein produced for livestock feed comes from sources that are sometimes unsustainable and harmful to the environment.</p> <p><strong>Eating insects</strong></p> <p>To meet the considerable challenge of ensuring food security for the future, it is imperative to find alternative and sustainable sources of protein, both for direct human consumption and for animal feed. Insect-derived proteins are one possible solution. Insects, especially fly larvae, have many qualities that make them well adapted to animal feed.</p> <p>For example, insects are already a natural source of food for pigs and poultry as well as for many fish species. In addition, insect larvae are generally high in protein and are rich in other beneficial nutrients such as fats, minerals and vitamins.</p> <p>As a source of protein for direct human consumption, <a href="https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150609124315.htm">insects offer several advantages</a> over traditional sources of meat. They have a significantly higher feed conversion rate than other livestock, which means they are more effective at converting the ingredients used to feed them into nutrients.</p> <p>In addition, insect production is more environmentally friendly than conventional livestock production. Insects release much lower amounts of greenhouse gases and ammonia into the atmosphere per kilogram of meat than cattle or pigs.</p> <p><strong>Larvae that recycle</strong></p> <p>Insect larvae, in particular, are efficient consumers of a wide range of organic materials. They have the ability to “over-cycle” relatively low quality organic residues as feedstock into valuable proteins and lipids.</p> <p>Although direct human consumption of insects is not widespread in Western countries, raising insects to transform organic waste streams offers an interesting opportunity to produce food ingredients for animal production. In particular, the larvae of the <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/9/3/98">black soldier fly</a> has a nutritional profile that makes them a potential ingredient to replace traditional food ingredients intended for human consumption.</p> <p><strong>Multinational munching</strong></p> <p>The cultivation of insects raised specifically for domestic animals and fish has been the subject of sporadic assessments for several decades. However, the widespread adoption and commercialization of these approaches remains difficult. The methods are still artisanal and have been mainly developed and deployed in emerging countries with limited resources.</p> <p>However, a convergence of factors has revived interest in this area, particularly from a number of multinationals in the agri-food sector. A combination of new municipal regulations limiting organic waste disposal and the need to find sustainable ingredients for animal feed have led to renewed interest in insects and their ability to transform organic waste into valuable food resources.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/118675/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/grant-vandenberg-744406">Grant Vandenberg</a>, Professeur titulaire – Groupe de recherche en recyclage biologique et aquaculture, Faculté des sciences de l’agriculture et de l’alimentation, Université Laval, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/universite-laval-1407">Université Laval</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/eating-insects-is-good-for-you-and-the-planet-118675">original article</a>.</em></p>

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“Pretty rank”: Karl Stefanovic slams odd request from French tennis player

<p>Tennis fans and Karl Stefanovic watched on in shock as French tennis player Elliot Benchetrit was told off by the umpire for asking a ball girl to peel a banana for him.</p> <p>The World No. 228 was taking part in qualifying for the first grand slam of the year when he requested a banana for some energy.</p> <p>However, with his hands bandaged heavily due to blisters, he asked the ball girl delivering the banana to peel it for him.</p> <p>This was met with a scolding from the umpire, John Blom, who told him to peel it himself.</p> <p>Stefanovic has since let his thoughts be known on the matter.</p> <p>“That is pretty rank isn’t it, asking a ballgirl to peel a banana?” Stefanovic said on Tuesday.</p> <p>“Asking a ball-person to do that is disgusting. I think it’s terrible.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">French tennis player Elliot Benchetrit has been told off by an umpire after he asked a ball girl to peel his banana for him. Thoughts? 🚫 🍌 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9Today?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9Today</a> <a href="https://t.co/VWiTHeffjB">pic.twitter.com/VWiTHeffjB</a></p> — The Today Show (@TheTodayShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheTodayShow/status/1219349644498612225?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 20, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Sydney Morning Herald<span> </span>columnist Jessica Irvine agreed, saying that ball kids should not be given “outrageous” tasks.</p> <p>“It’s rigorous training to be a ball-person, you’ve got to be very professional, and I really don’t think that peeling bananas is part of the division of labour,” Irvine said on the Channel 9 program.</p> <p>“If she did it, she should get a pay rise. That is not the point of having ballgirls and ballboys around, their job is to get the ball. That’s outrageous.”</p> <p>It appears that the banana gave the Frenchman the strength he needed as he managed to win the match and qualify for the main draw of the Australian Open.</p> <p>He will now face Japanese World No. 91 Yuichi Sugita in the opening round and has earned himself a nice $90,000 payday by qualifying for the Open.</p>

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“A miracle no one was killed:” Woolworths shopper recalls horror as ceiling collapses

<p>A Woolies shopper says it is a “miracle no one was killed” after a ceiling collapsed following torrential rain in Melbourne’s Templestowe store.</p> <p>Chris Kounelis told Yahoo News Australia that while shopping with a number of other customers, multiple panels holding the ceiling together crashed to the floor along with a torrent of rain.</p> <p>“The torrential downpour and subsequent collapse of the ceiling resembled a scene from Titanic,” Mr Kounelis said.</p> <p>Rattled customers were shown the door while staff evacuated the building.  </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Just before at Templestowe <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/woolies?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#woolies</a>. Multiple parts of the ceiling collapsed and all customers were forced to evacuate. Like a scene from Titanic. Stay safe all! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/melbweather?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#melbweather</a> <a href="https://t.co/bD3cqo2VHO">pic.twitter.com/bD3cqo2VHO</a></p> — Chris Kounelis (@ChrisKounelis) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChrisKounelis/status/1218775257009442817?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 19, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Mr Kounelis shared a clip of the store after the ceiling collapsed his Twitter account, and showed customers dodging the rain pouring through gaps above.</p> <p>The Templestowe local said other shoppers were left questioning the durability of the roof.</p> <p>“A few customers I spoke to immediately raised concerns about the structural integrity of this apparently paper-thin ceiling,” he said.</p> <p>“Woolworths... clearly owes customers an explanation.</p> <p>“It’s a miracle no one was killed.”</p> <p>A Woolworths spokesperson told Yahoo News Australia no one was physically hurt during the incident.</p> <p>“The safety of our customers and team members is our number one priority,” the spokesperson said.</p> <p>“Our Templestowe team acted quickly to evacuate the store in line with our established safety procedures and alongside local authorities.”</p> <p>The store was shut down for around five hours on Sunday before it reopened. Two aisles remain inaccessible to customers and other staff within the store.</p> <p>In Melbourne, the northeast and inner east have been hit with severe thunderstorms, including giant pieces of hail.</p> <p>Further rain is expected, with widespread falls of between 10 and 30mm predicted.</p> <p>However, some areas could see isolated totals of up to 80mm or 100mm.</p> <p>The wet conditions could lead to flash flooding in some areas, but the weather bureau says rainfall is unlikely to put out remaining blazes.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

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How Turia Pitt's Spend With Them campaign is changing lives

<p>Turia Pitt continues to be an inspiration to many as her latest business endeavour to help those impacted by the bushfires that have ravaged the nation has had a huge impact on those who need it.</p> <p>The 32-year-old motivation speaker and her friend Grace McBride started an initiative called<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.instagram.com/spendwiththem/" target="_blank">Spend With Them</a><span> </span>to help support businesses that have been affected by the bushfires, and the two-person team have been overwhelmed with support.</p> <p>Pitt herself said that “s*** got real” as the team initially started off small.</p> <p>"Within an hour, we had over 10k followers. Grace was fielding phone calls from the Today Show and The Project (I was still working out how to switch between my personal instagram account and the @spendwiththem account ). We worked until 11pm, answering every email and DM that came in," she explained in a recent Instagram post.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7U9HFJg5u4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7U9HFJg5u4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Turia (@turiapitt)</a> on Jan 14, 2020 at 8:47pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>"At 5 am the next morning, we were overwhelmed. We had more than 50,000 followers. Hundreds of emails. Thousands of DMs. Kelly Rowland gave us a shoutout. That night, we went to bed at 2am. We didn't get through all the emails or even a quarter of the DMs."</p> <p>By day three, the two person team were drained both physically and emotionally and took on all the help they could get.</p> <p>"My sister-in-law. Mates from the surf. A friend's mum. A copywriter in Sydney. Dani at @soda_sydney jumped on board and the legends at Westpac Group (@westpac) started helping us too," she added.</p> <p>Pitt finished her post by saying, "To say it's been a crazy week is an understatement. But we can't thank you enough for the way you've supported these businesses. Who knew that purchasing a bar of goat milk soap or a jar of honey could have such an impact? The ripple effect has been enormous."</p> <p>She shared some good news stories from people who have reached out to the business account, saying just how much the initiative has helped out their businesses.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7CZJfmg-yM/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7CZJfmg-yM/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Honestly you guys are UNBELIEVABLE. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing @spendwiththem and for supporting the businesses we’re profiling. Grace and I are seriously blown away by the way you’re jumping on board to help these local business owners. I wanted to share some of these updates with you and let you know that the ripple effect this is having on communities goes far further than you know. I’m so grateful to you all. We’ll keep sharing businesses so keep browsing the page - and if you see something you like #spendwiththem. THANK YOU again. You legends. ❤️❤️❤️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/turiapitt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Turia</a> (@turiapitt) on Jan 7, 2020 at 3:46pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Mate we have done more coffee orders in the last 24 hours than the entirety of our business! It’s insane and they keep coming. It seriously has created another job already. We just hired someone to pack orders for tomorrow,” one business owner excitedly shared.</p> <p>“The outpouring of love that people have just wanted to help. Thanks so much!”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Are McDonald’s toys coming to an end after 40 years?

<p>A mother has taken to social media to campaign against the McDonald’s children’s toy handed out with every Happy Meal after finding an excessive amount in a rubbish bin in Sydney.</p> <p>The woman, named Tara, says she saw a bin overflowing with the Macca’s happy meal boxes in Darling Harbour, Sydney and after rummaging through the contents found 30 plastic toys destined for landfill.</p> <p>Tara took to social media to share on a mothers’ group what she had found and to discuss her outrage over the plastic toys that “end up in landfill or our oceans”.</p> <p>She wrote: “Found all these in the bin at Darling Harbour. This is so distressing to me. </p> <p>“There were even more in other bins! There was probably a total of around thirty spotted in under ten minutes.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7834022/mcdonalds-toys-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12168499ffb446519f69846d1a2b2dcc" /></p> <p>The mother added: “All of this plastic will end up in landfill or our oceans. Why are people buying happy meals for a toy their kids play with for less than a few minutes? </p> <p>“This is a disgrace. Please, could someone use one of these photos and put a caption on it saying 'ban the happy meal toy' so it can be shared to spread awareness about this issue?”</p> <p>The angry post was met with hundreds of comments mostly agreeing with Tara that the happy meal toy, that has been handed out to kids for over 40 years, should be completely canned.</p> <p>The toy first began being handed out in 1979.</p> <p>One disgruntled user pointed out that McDonald's could change its pricing to stop adults buying the happy meal.</p> <p>“Part of the problem is that a cheeseburger happy meal ($5.50) is cheaper than a small cheeseburger meal ($6.40) - leading teens and adults with no interest in the toys to buy the meal and dump the toy,” they said.</p> <p>“Maybe making the prices equal or having the toy come at a cost would reduce how often people get the meal with the toy.”</p> <p>Another said it wasn't McDonald's' fault but that parents were to blame. </p> <p>“Why can parents not say no,” they wrote.</p> <p>Other commenters felt the toy shouldn’t be banned, as it is no different from any other plastic toy purchased for children.</p> <p>“Banning that toy would be like banning any toy or junk aimed at kids,” they wrote. </p> <p>An international study calculated that 192 nations produced an amount of 275 million tonnes of<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-02-27/plastic-and-plastic-waste-explained/8301316" target="_blank">plastic waste in 2010.</a></p> <p>Images: Facebook.</p>

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Why iron is such an important part of your diet

<p>According to the <a href="http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/ida/en/">World Health Organisation</a>, iron deficiency – a condition where your body doesn’t have enough of the mineral iron – is a global public health problem of “epidemic proportions”. It is the single most prevalent nutrient deficiency in developing and industrialised countries, and the most common cause of anaemia.</p> <p><a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00277-010-1144-5">Anaemia</a> occurs when our red blood cell count and/or haemoglobin levels are too low, resulting in an inability to transport sufficient oxygen throughout the body. Iron is required in order for haemoglobin to transport oxygen.</p> <p>In 2016, <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/correcting-iron-deficiency#r3">Australian Prescriber</a> published an update on the problem of iron deficiency in Australia. Young women, children and disadvantaged groups are at <a href="http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/9076267">highest risk</a>. Around 12-15 per cent of women who are pregnant or of reproductive age and 8% of preschool children in Australia are estimated to have <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2010/193/9/diagnosis-and-management-iron-deficiency-anaemia-clinical-update?0=ip_login_no_cache%3D5b5ca34fad730a23f7740f2b74d0b0e4">iron deficiency anaemia</a>. Iron deficiency without clinical anaemia is <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/126/5/1040.full.pd">even more widespread</a>.</p> <p>Although vegetarians and vegans are broadly thought of as being at high risk of iron deficiency due to an absence of red meat in the diet, there is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8172127">little evidence</a> to <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2013/199/4/iron-and-vegetarian-diets">support</a> this. However restricted diets can confer higher risk if not well balanced, for instance in <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/open/2012/1/2/iron-and-vegetarian-diets">young overweight women</a> who are trying to lose weight.</p> <p><strong>Why is iron important?</strong></p> <p>Iron has an <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098299700000066">essential role</a> in numerous <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/correcting-iron-deficiency#r3">metabolic pathways</a> in the body, including transport of oxygen in the blood, DNA synthesis, breathing, immune function and energy production.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/correcting-iron-deficiency#r3">Symptoms</a> of iron deficiency include tiredness, neurobehavioural disorders like <a href="http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/66/10/558.long">attention deficit hyperactivity disorder</a> and <a href="http://www.webmd.com/brain/restless-legs-syndrome/restless-legs-syndrome-rls#1">restless leg syndrome</a> (a nervous system disorder that creates an irresistible and sometimes unbearable urge to move the legs), and cognitive impairment in children. Iron deficiency can have a <a href="http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/ida/en/">serious impact</a> on health and productivity.</p> <p>Iron is essential for the developing <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/126/5/1040.full.pdf">brain</a>. Iron deficiency with and without anaemia in infancy can have long term negative impacts on brain function and behaviour, and even when levels are corrected, those effects may not be completely reversed.</p> <p>Maternal anaemia can result in <a href="http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/71/5/1280s.short">preterm birth</a>, and along with high blood pressure or diabetes can compromise <a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/126/5/1040.full.pdf">fetal iron levels</a> in pre-term or term infants.</p> <p><a href="http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/126/5/1040.full.pdf">Breastfeeding</a> provides adequate iron to meet infant needs up to the age of six months. However from seven to 12 months the requirement for iron increases significantly (up to 11 milligrams per day), and must be provided via solid food in addition to breast milk.</p> <p>It’s important to understand problems can be caused by both too little as well as too much iron. Hence iron concentrations in the body are <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098299700000066">carefully regulated</a> and professional advice must be sought before supplementing with iron.</p> <p><strong>Causes of iron deficiency</strong></p> <p>There are <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/correcting-iron-deficiency#r3">lots</a> of <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2010/193/9/diagnosis-and-management-iron-deficiency-anaemia-clinical-update?0=ip_login_no_cache%3D5b5ca34fad730a23f7740f2b74d0b0e4">complex</a> causes of iron deficiency and anaemia, and they should be carefully investigated before being addressed.</p> <p>Poor dietary intake is an important cause of iron deficiency, particularly when requirements are increased during infancy, menstruation and pregnancy.</p> <p>Iron is one of a number of essential nutrients we need to get through our diet. Iron deficiency is therefore one of <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-29/resurgence-of-the-rare-condition-of-scurvy-among-diabetics/8073136">several casualties</a> of <a href="http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737422319">poor dietary patterns</a> in Australia and other westernised countries, characterised by excessive intake of highly processed foods and inadequate intake of nutritious whole foods.</p> <p><strong>Iron requirements</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2013/199/4/iron-and-vegetarian-diets">Dietary iron requirements</a> vary by age and gender. The recommended daily intake (average daily intake that is sufficient to meet the needs of the majority of people) for males varies from eight to 11 milligrams a day for ages one to 18 years, and eight milligrams for all other ages.</p> <p>Women have higher requirements. For ages 14-50 years, recommended daily intakes range from 15 milligrams (14-18 years) to 18 milligrams a day. Needs are higher during pregnancy, jumping to 27 milligrams per day. However during lactation they are slightly less, at nine to ten milligrams a day.</p> <p>Iron requirements for vegetarians have been estimated as 1.8 times more than non-vegetarians, however this conclusion was based on <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/open/2012/1/2/iron-and-vegetarian-diets#0_CBBJFGAA">limited research</a>.</p> <p><strong>Dietary sources of iron</strong></p> <p><a href="http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1233S.long">Dietary iron</a> is obtained in the form of <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2013/199/4/iron-and-vegetarian-diets">haem iron or non-haem iron</a>. Haem iron sources include red meat, poultry and fish, while non-haem iron comes from a variety of plant foods such as legumes, wholegrains, green leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, fresh and dried fruit. These plant sources are core components of both vegetarian and vegan diets.</p> <p>Non-haem iron is believed to be <a href="http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1233S.long">less available</a> than haem iron. This is because plant foods contain substances that can inhibit absorption of iron.</p> <p>However, vitamin C can enhance non-haem iron absorption thereby counteracting these inhibitory effects. To address this in your diet, you might like to try:</p> <ul> <li>eating hummus that contains chickpeas and lemon juice</li> <li>lemon juice drizzled over Indian dal or <a href="http://helfimed.org/recipes/red-lentil-soup/">lentil soup</a></li> <li>salads containing high vitamin C sources such as red capsicum or tomato as a side dish</li> <li>kiwi fruit, strawberries, papaya or a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice with muesli</li> <li>a side dish of <a href="http://helfimed.org/recipes/steamed-vegies/">lightly steamed</a> broccoli, cauliflower and/or brussel sprouts - good sources of vitamin C – which can be boosted with lemon juice (plus extra virgin olive oil, garlic and salt for ultimate flavour and nutrition)</li> <li>mixing baby spinach in salads - green leafy vegetables contain iron and vitamin C, a complete package.</li> </ul> <p><a href="https://www.mja.com.au/system/files/issues/196_10_040612_supplement/sau11494_fm.pdf">Soaking and sprouting</a> legumes, wholegrains and seeds makes the iron more available from these foods.</p> <p>It is important to note the absorption of non-haem iron varies considerably, and has been shown to be <a href="http://www.andjrnl.org/article/S2212-2672(16)31192-3/pdf">higher</a> in people who have greater iron requirements. This suggests the body adapts to low iron by increasing its absorption.</p> <p><a href="http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/59/5/1233S.long">Vegetarians</a> who follow a balanced diet have been shown to have higher iron intake than that of non-vegetarians and there is <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/system/files/issues/196_10_040612_supplement/sau11494_fm.pdf">little evidence</a> of lower iron status.</p> <p>A table of the iron content of foods commonly available in Australia is provided <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/system/files/issues/196_10_040612_supplement/sau11494_fm.pdf">here</a>.</p> <p>Iron is an essential nutrient with a range of critically important functions in the body and brain. Assessing iron stores and causes of anaemia is complex and should be performed by a professional.</p> <p>We can ensure adequate intake of iron by eating a healthy balanced diet with a variety of whole foods including (but not limited to) meat as well as plant sources.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/69974/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/natalie-parletta-153245">Natalie Parletta</a>, Adjunct Senior Research Fellow, Freelance Science Writer, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-iron-is-such-an-important-part-of-your-diet-69974">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Relax with a mandarin margarita

<div class="article-body"> <p>Grab your cocktail shaker in one hand (or a blender in this case) and some tequilla in the other and create this fruity cocktail sensation!</p> <p><strong>28.2% alc/vol</strong></p> <p><strong>2.4 standard drinks</strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>45ml gold tequila</li> <li>20ml Mandarine Napoleon</li> <li>15ml Cointreau</li> <li>30ml fresh lemon juice</li> <li>Slice of fresh orange</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Prepare a margarita glass with a salt-frosted rim.</li> <li>Pour tequila, Mandarine Napoleon, Cointreau and juice into a blender over cracked ice then blend.</li> <li>Strain into prepared glass and garnish with a slice of orange then serve with a short straw.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image from<span> </span></em>The Margarita Guide<em><span> </span>by Steve Quirk (New Holland Publishers RRP $24.99), available from all good bookstores or online<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a></em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/mandarin-margarita.aspx" data-title="Mandarin Margarita | WYZA" data-description="Grab your cocktail shaker in one hand (or a blender in this case) and some tequilla in the other and create this fruity cocktail sensation! - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-0d972b42-1df1-4030-af34-357e19efee11"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/mandarin-margarita.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Try this for a sweet delight: Chocolate mousse cake with poached pears and crème fraîche

<p><strong>Time to prepare 30 mins + Overnight refrigeration, Cooking time 1h 40 mins | Serves 8</strong></p> <p>This melt-in-your-mouth mousse cake is beautifully garnished. It's the perfect sweet treat with the one you love.</p> <p><em>Recipe from </em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><em>MKR: Best of the Best Cookbook</em></a><em> (RRP $39.99), published by Hachette Australia. </em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><strong>Get 70% off</strong>*</a><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><strong> the RRP - Order here</strong></a><strong><u>.</u></strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>340g dark chocolate, broken into small pieces</li> <li>225g unsalted butter, softened</li> <li>5 eggs</li> <li>340g caster sugar</li> <li>Crème fraîche, to serve</li> <li>½ teaspoon black salt, to garnish</li> <li>Extra cocoa, for dusting</li> <li>Mint leaves, to garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Poached pears</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 Beurre Bosc pears, peeled, cored and halved</li> <li>1 cinnamon stick, broken into pieces</li> <li>100g brown sugar</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. To prepare the pears, place in a small casserole dish and add the cinnamon, sugar and enough boiling water to cover the pears. Cover with foil and cook in the oven for about 40 minutes or until very tender. Remove the pears and set aside to cool. Refrigerate, covered, until required.</p> <p>2. To prepare the cake, preheat the oven to 160°C. Grease a 22cm round springform tin and line the base and sides with baking paper.</p> <p>3. Melt the chocolate and butter in a medium heatproof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water, stirring to combine. Remove from the heat and cool for 10 minutes.</p> <p>4. Whisk together the eggs and sugar until pale and creamy. Fold half the cooled chocolate mixture into the egg and sugar mixture, then repeat with the remaining batch.</p> <p>5. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin. Place in a roasting pan and add enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the cake pan. Cook in the centre of the oven for 55 minutes. Remove the cake pan from the roasting dish, set aside to cool and refrigerate overnight.</p> <p>6. To serve, remove the outer ring of the pan and cut the cake into generous slices. Place each slice on a serving plate, spoon over a generous amount of crème fraîche and garnish with black salt. Place a pear half beside each slice of cake, dust over a little cocoa and garnish with fresh mint.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>If black salt is unavailable, try garnishing the crème fraîche with a little grated chocolate.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/chocolate-mousse-cake-with-poached-pears-and-creme-fraiche.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Food & Wine

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ALDI shopper shares brilliant checkout trick

<p>A shopper has shared her favourite <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/mums-genius-aldi-checkout-hack/news-story/706aa80430140bdc120835380a778441">checkout trick for speedy grocery packing</a> in store.</p> <p>Posting on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/1034012533313136/">the Aldi Mums Facebook group</a>, the woman showed how she made her shop easier at the supermarket by using two large plastic tubs.</p> <p>According to the mum, the tubs “fit perfectly into the trolley and so easy to get in and out of the car”.</p> <p>The shopper also revealed her strategy to fit all the groceries in the tubs and get them checked out quickly at the conveyor belt.</p> <p>“I put the heaviest items in the front tub so that they come out first onto the belt and then I distribute the heavy things evenly into the two tubs after they’ve been swiped through the register,” she explained.</p> <p>“You’ll be surprised how much you can fit into them.”</p> <p>The hack has been praised by fellow shoppers in the group, with one calling it “a brilliant idea”.</p> <p>Other shoppers pointed out that the trick could also be carried out using laundry baskets or Ikea blue bags.</p> <p>ALDI has previously caught flak over its “<a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/the-real-reason-why-aldi-checkouts-are-so-stressful">stressful</a>” checkout experience, with customers calling for <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/aldi-slammed-for-not-having-express-checkouts">express lanes</a> to be installed in stores.</p> <p>“... the dirty looks I got when I filled up the conveyor belt at Aldi by other impatient customers, who thought it was the end of the world that someone was doing a big shop, was phenomenal,” a shopper wrote on the Facebook group.</p> <p>A spokeswoman for the retailer said in a statement then: “We constantly review our processes and are open to receiving customer feedback to ensure we continue to deliver exceptional value and great service to our customers.”</p>

Food & Wine

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Burger King offers Prince Harry a job

<p>Burger King has offered Prince Harry a job.</p> <p>The fast-food chain has kindly put forward a proposition, as they offered the 35-year-old royal and his wife Duchess Meghan a job at one of their franchises after the couple announced they were stepping down as “senior royals” and plan on becoming “financially independent”.</p> <p>Burger King Argentina was the first to reach out to the Duke of Sussex as they tweeted: “We found out that the prince and the duchess decided to give up their roles in the royal family and will work to become financially independent.</p> <p>“So, we have a proposition for you: Do as thousands of people and take your steps in the world of work with us.</p> <p>“You know that the crown will suit you perfectly. Also, after so many years of living as dukes, it is time for you to start eating like kings.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">@ harry, this royal family offers part-time positions</p> — Burger King (@BurgerKing) <a href="https://twitter.com/BurgerKing/status/1216823135359635456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 13, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Burger King US later followed suit, by saying: “This royal family offers part-time positions.”</p> <p>Last week, the couple dropped a bombshell after they announced plans to “carve out” new roles.</p> <p>They said: “After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution. We intend to step back as 'senior' members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.</p> <p>"It is with your encouragement, particularly over the last few years, that we feel prepared to make this adjustment. We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America, continuing to honour our duty to The Queen, the Commonwealth, and our patronages. This geographic balance will enable us to raise our son with an appreciation for the royal tradition into which he was born, while also providing our family with the space to focus on the next chapter, including the launch of our new charitable entity."</p>

Food & Wine

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“Tough times”: Here's how much fresh food prices will leap due to bushfires and drought

<p><span>Aussies can expect price hikes for groceries as farmers and industries continue to struggle with ongoing drought and bushfires.</span></p> <p><span>At a press conference in Canberra on Tuesday, Minister for Agriculture Bridget McKenzie warned that shoppers will have to pay more for fresh food staples, including fruits, vegetables, meat and milk.</span></p> <p><span>“In terms of prices for food, you might have seen reporting that supermarkets are letting the Australian public know that they’ll have to pay more for their red meat. Yes, you will,” McKenzie said.</span></p> <p><span>“That they’ll have to pay more for their fruit and vegetables because of the bushfires and the drought. Yes, you will.</span></p> <p><span>“The supermarkets also need to let the Australian public know that, because of the bushfires and the drought, you will have to pay more for your milk. Processors are doing the right thing by farmers by actually paying milk cheques when in many cases they’re not getting the product.</span></p> <p><span>“Tough times such as we’re experiencing now, drought and bushfire, are severely impacting the costs of our farmers and now our processors in the supply chain, so the other end of the supply chain needs to stump up.”</span></p> <p><span>There are 19,000 “primary producers, farmers, fishers and foresters” within the impacted areas, she said.</span></p> <p><span>Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that farmers affected by bushfires will be eligible for grants of up to $75,000, with the money taken from the $2 billion bushfire recovery fund. </span></p> <p><span>The PM also warned that Australia’s hot and dry conditions will continue for several months. </span></p> <p><span>The vegetable industry’s representative body AUSVEG forecast that vegetable prices will soar by up to 50 per cent due to destroyed crops and added transport costs from highway closures.</span></p> <p><span>“I wouldn’t be surprised to see prices moving up between 20 per cent and 50 per cent,” chief executive James Whiteside told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-14/vegetable-prices-in-australia-set-to-rise-fire-drought-impact/11866038">ABC</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>“Those sort of larger increases are unlikely to be sustainable, but consumers will see a range of higher prices across pretty well everything.”</span></p>

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How steak became manly and salads became feminine

<p>When was it decided that <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/food-gender-marketers-yogurt-women-chicken-men/405703/">women prefer some types of food</a> – yogurt with fruit, salads and white wine – while men are supposed to gravitate to chili, steak and bacon?</p> <p>In my new book, “<a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43726541-american-cuisine">American Cuisine: And How It Got This Way</a>,” I show how the idea that women don’t want red meat and prefer salads and sweets didn’t just spring up spontaneously.</p> <p>Beginning in the late 19th century, a steady stream of dietary advice, corporate advertising and magazine articles created a division between male and female tastes that, for more than a century, has shaped everything from dinner plans to menu designs.</p> <p><strong>A separate market for women surfaces</strong></p> <p>Before the Civil War, the whole family ate the same things together. The era’s best-selling household manuals and cookbooks never indicated that husbands had special tastes that women should indulge.</p> <p>Even though “<a href="https://academic.oup.com/jsh/article-abstract/48/1/1/947457">women’s restaurants</a>” – spaces set apart for ladies to dine unaccompanied by men – were commonplace, they nonetheless served the same dishes as the men’s dining room: offal, calf’s heads, turtles and roast meat.</p> <p>Beginning in the 1870s, shifting social norms – like the entry of women into the workplace – <a href="https://theconversation.com/in-americas-sandwiches-the-story-of-a-nation-86649">gave women more opportunities to dine without men</a> and in the company of female friends or co-workers.</p> <p>As more women spent time outside of the home, however, they were still expected to congregate in gender-specific places.</p> <p>Chain restaurants geared toward women, such as <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2008/08/27/when-ladies-lunched-schraffts/">Schrafft’s</a>, proliferated. They created alcohol-free safe spaces for women to lunch without experiencing the rowdiness of workingmen’s cafés or <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2011/09/06/lunch-and-a-beer/">free-lunch bars</a>, where patrons could get a free midday meal as long as they bought a beer (or two or three).</p> <p>It was during this period that the notion that some foods were more appropriate for women started to emerge. Magazines and newspaper advice columns identified fish and white meat with minimal sauce, as well as new products like packaged cottage cheese, as “female foods.” And of course, there were desserts and sweets, which women, supposedly, couldn’t resist.</p> <p>You could see this shift reflected in old Schrafft’s menus: a list of light main courses, accompanied by elaborate desserts with ice cream, cake or whipped cream. Many menus <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2008/08/27/when-ladies-lunched-schraffts/">featured more desserts than entrees</a>.</p> <p>By the early 20th century, women’s food was commonly described as “<a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=nzN3bRRIH-gC&amp;pg=PA56&amp;lpg=PA56&amp;dq=dainty+women%27s+food&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=CL96BjXjf6&amp;sig=ACfU3U3Li5Ts_UqW3lKpI3C90kJxniiJzw&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwis0q3O2LLlAhWsmeAKHanXBRcQ6AEwDHoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q=dainty%20women's%20food&amp;f=false">dainty</a>,” meaning fanciful but not filling. Women’s magazines included <a href="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/HNM1A7/1928-british-advertisement-for-my-lady-tinned-fruit-salad-HNM1A7.jpg">advertisements</a> for typical female foodstuffs: salads, colorful and shimmering Jell-O mold creations, or fruit salads decorated with marshmallows, shredded coconut and maraschino cherries.</p> <p>At the same time, self-appointed men’s advocates complained that women were inordinately fond of the very types of decorative foods being marketed to them. In 1934, for example, a male writer named Leone B. Moates wrote an article in House and Garden <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=3AKLDwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT299&amp;lpg=PT299&amp;dq=%22Leone+B.+Moates%22&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=6aAZiExudB&amp;sig=ACfU3U015psSPEEQ5t7IA5wgNBqM0mNLmw&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwi_ksaw3rLlAhVinuAKHUZYBU8Q6AEwAHoECAMQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q=%22Leone%20B.%20Moates%22&amp;f=false">scolding wives</a> for serving their husbands “a bit of fluff like marshmallow-date whip.”</p> <p>Save these “dainties” for ladies’ lunches, he implored, and serve your husbands the hearty food they crave: goulash, chili or corned beef hash with poached eggs.</p> <p><strong>Pleasing the tastes of men</strong></p> <p>Writers like Moates weren’t the only ones exhorting women to prioritize their husbands.</p> <p>The 20th century saw a proliferation of cookbooks telling women to give up their favorite foods and instead focus on pleasing their boyfriends or husbands. The central thread running through these titles was that if women failed to satisfy their husbands’ appetites, their men would stray.</p> <p>You could see this in midcentury ads, like the one showing an irritated husband saying “Mother never ran out of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.”</p> <p>But this fear was exploited as far back as 1872, which saw the publication of a cookbook titled “<a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/How_to_Keep_a_Husband_Or_Culinary_Tactic.html?id=kuWlmgEACAAJ">How to Keep a Husband, or Culinary Tactics</a>.” One of the most successful cookbooks, “‘The Settlement’ Cook Book,” first published in 1903, was subtitled “The Way to a Man’s Heart.”</p> <p>It was joined by recipe collections like 1917’s “<a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=rPWI6Hy4yIYC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=%22A+Thousand+Ways+to+Please+a+Husband%22&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiF0vrT0LLlAhVBSN8KHZn_BA8Q6AEwAHoECAAQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=%22A%20Thousand%20Ways%20to%20Please%20a%20Husband%22&amp;f=false">A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband</a>” and 1925’s “<a href="https://kalesijablog.wordpress.com/2013/08/20/history-of-feed-the-brute/">Feed the Brute!</a>”</p> <p>This sort of marketing clearly had an effect. In the 1920s, one woman wrote to General Mills’ fictional spokeswoman, “Betty Crocker,” <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=qctXdfqJo50C&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=Paradox+of+Plenty&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwipiY-R0LLlAhUCT98KHX5WBmUQ6AEwAXoECAMQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Paradox%20of%20Plenty&amp;f=false">expressing fear</a> that her neighbor was going to “capture” her husband with her fudge cake.</p> <p>Just as women were being told they needed to focus on their husbands’ taste buds over their own – and be excellent cooks, to boot – men were also saying that they didn’t want their wives to be single-mindedly devoted to the kitchen.</p> <p>As Frank Shattuck, the founder of Schrafft’s, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1937/03/15/archives/frank-g-shattuck-of-schraffts-dies-founder-of-company-operating.html">observed in the 1920s</a>, a young man contemplating marriage is looking for a girl who is a “good sport.” A husband doesn’t want to come home to a bedraggled wife who has spent all day at the stove, he noted. Yes, he wants a good cook; but he also wants an attractive, “fun” companion.</p> <p>It was an almost impossible ideal – and advertisers quickly capitalized on the insecurities created by the dual pressure wives felt to please their husbands without looking like they’d worked too hard doing so.</p> <p><a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=3AKLDwAAQBAJ&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;lpg=PT287&amp;dq=american%20cuisine%20freedman%20grand%20appliance%20cooking%20in%20the%20grand%20manner&amp;pg=PT294#v=onepage&amp;q=american%20cuisine%20freedman%20grand%20appliance%20cooking%20in%20the%20grand%20manner&amp;f=false">A 1950 brochure</a> for a cooking appliance company depicts a woman wearing a low-cut dress and pearls showing her appreciative husband what’s in the oven for dinner.</p> <p>The woman in the ad – thanks to her new, modern oven – was able to please her husband’s palate without breaking a sweat.</p> <p><strong>The 1970s and beyond</strong></p> <p>Beginning in the 1970s, dining changed dramatically. Families <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1985/10/30/garden/new-american-eating-pattern-dine-out-carry-in.html">started spending more money eating out</a>. More women working outside the home meant meals were less elaborate, especially since men remained loathe to share the responsibility of cooking.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/an-excerpt-about-the-1970s-from-paul-freedmans-new-book-american-cuisine-and-how-it-got-this-way">The microwave</a> encouraged alternatives to the traditional, sit-down dinner. The women’s movement destroyed lady-centered luncheonettes like Schrafft’s and upended the image of the happy housewife preparing her condensed soup casseroles or Chicken Yum Yum.</p> <p>Yet as food historians <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/11/chefs-gone-wild/309519/">Laura Shapiro</a> and <a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520234406/paradox-of-plenty">Harvey Levenstein</a> have noted, despite these social changes, the depiction of male and female tastes in advertising has remained surprisingly consistent, even as some new ingredients and foods have entered the mix.</p> <p>Kale, quinoa and other healthy food fads are gendered as “female.” Barbecue, <a href="http://www.southerncultures.org/article/every-ounce-a-mans-whiskey-bourbon-in-the-white-masculine-south/">bourbon</a> and “<a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/11/chefs-gone-wild/309519/">adventurous foods</a>,” on the other hand, are the domain of men.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QNpfJNaRPGo?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">Actor Matthew McConaughey stars in a Wild Turkey bourbon commercial from 2017.</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/09/fashion/09STEAK.html">A New York Times article from 2007</a> noted the trend of young women on first dates ordering steak. But this wasn’t some expression of gender equality or an outright rejection of food stereotyping.</p> <p>Instead, “meat is strategy,” as the author put it. It was meant to signal that women weren’t obsessed with their health or their diet – a way to reassure men that, should a relationship flower, their girlfriends won’t start lecturing them about what they should eat.</p> <p>Even in the 21st century, echoes of cookbooks like “The Way to a Man’s Heart” resound – a sign that it will take a lot more work to get rid of the fiction that some foods are for men, while others are for women.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/124147/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paul-freedman-306213">Paul Freedman</a>, Chester D. Tripp Professor of History, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/yale-university-1326">Yale University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-steak-became-manly-and-salads-became-feminine-124147">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Coles and Woolies to be check-out free in the near future

<p>A grocery executive has shocked customers after claiming that some Australian supermarkets, such as Coles and Woolworths, could be check-out free within ten years.</p> <p>Coles head of commercial and express Greg Davis said to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/customers-will-just-walk-out-coles-exec-flags-checkout-free-stores-within-10-years-20200110-p53qbd.html" target="_blank">The Sydney Morning Herald</a></em><span> </span>that customers later this decade would be able to shop and leave the supermarket without going through a checkout.</p> <p>"I have no doubt in the next 10 years, customers will be able to take the product off the shelf, put it in their basket, walk out and have it all paid for," Mr Davis said.</p> <p>However, a Coles spokesman put a swift end to this idea saying that traditional checkouts make up “half of all sales”, but that the company is always interested in new technologies.</p> <p>“We’ve seen technology transform the shopping experience over the past 10 years to make it more convenient and tailored to individual needs,” the spokesman said to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/aussie-grocery-chains-to-go-checkout-free-in-future-but-facetoface-service-here-to-stay/news-story/11bcec57b49528e3946324e86eb86eaf" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“Coles first introduced self-serve checkouts 16 years ago, and around half of all sales are still made by Coles team members scanning customers’ groceries at belted checkouts.</p> <p>“We have trialled a number of new technologies to help our customers complete their shopping faster, however there are no plans to phase out the belted checkouts which remain a key part of our store offer.”</p> <p>The check-out free concept gained interest after retail giant Amazon trialled the Amazon Go concept store that saw shoppers using the Amazon Go app to purchase items without using a checkout.</p> <p>Customers were able to “take what they wanted and go” and there are now several locations across the US that offer this technology.</p> <p>Amazon uses cameras, algorithms and weight sensors to figure out what a customer has added to their trolleys and customers pay electronically through an account linked to their Amazon Go application.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BaFiQhzl5aj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BaFiQhzl5aj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Amazon Go (@amazon.go)</a> on Oct 10, 2017 at 4:48pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Woolworths seem to have taken this interesting concept on board, as it began trialling the Scan and Go app at its store in Double Bay in 2018. This allowed customers to scan products with their smartphone as they walked through the store and pay in the app before tapping off at a kiosk in the self-serve area.</p> <p>The technology is now available in 10 Woolworths stores, but a spokesman explained to<span> </span><em>news.com.au</em><span> </span>that self-serve and traditional checkouts weren’t going anywhere.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Woolies customers will be a test drive a new "scan and go" system which allows you to scan your groceries with your smartphone and leave without having to go through a check-out! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9Today?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9Today</a> <a href="https://t.co/bjqMOBdf44">pic.twitter.com/bjqMOBdf44</a></p> — The Today Show (@TheTodayShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheTodayShow/status/1037430374438039552?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">5 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“We’ve been trialling new technology for those who want to Scan &amp; Go but will always offer customers a choice at our supermarkets,” the spokesman said.</p> <p>“We know many of our customers shop with us because they like the personal interaction with our team, and we respect that choice.”</p>

Food & Wine

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Relax with a homemade apricot turnover

<div class="article-body"> <p>Move over apples, it's the season for apricots! This crisp and flaky pastry turnover will bring out the summer flavours you know and love.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare</strong>: 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong> <strong>time</strong>: 20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves</strong>: 4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 sheet puff pastry, thawed</li> <li>3-4 apricots, sliced and stones removed</li> <li>1 tablespoon arrowroot</li> <li>2 tablespoons sugar</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla paste</li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon juice</li> <li>1 tablespoon demerara sugar</li> <li>1 egg, beaten lightly, mixed with 1 tablespoon water</li> <li>Icing sugar for dusting</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Pre heat oven 200°C.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, toss apricot with arrowroot, sugar, vanilla, lemon juice until there are no lumps. Set aside for 10 minutes.</li> <li>Place pastry on a lightly flour surface, cut into 4 squares. Spoon apricots evenly into each square and gently pull one side over to the other, making a triangle.</li> <li>Use a fork to seal edges, brush with egg wash and cut a few slits in the top of each to allow steam to release. Sprinkle with demerara sugar and bake for 20 minutes or until risen and golden.</li> <li>Serve dusted with icing sugar.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of <a rel="noopener" href="https://summerfruit.com.au/" target="_blank">Summerfruit Australia</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/apricot-turnovers-with-sugared-puff-pastry.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/apricot-turnovers-with-sugared-puff-pastry.aspx" data-title="Apricot turnovers with sugared puff pastry | WYZA" data-description="Move over apples, it's the season for apricots! This crisp and flaky pastry turnover will bring out the summer flavours you know and love -wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-aaa92f9c-c8ff-43fb-b5a7-80605ed5ee32"></div> </div> </div>

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Enjoy a sweet peach cheesecake with peach syrup

<div class="article-body"> <p>What better way to enjoy summer than with in-season fruits? Create this delectable cake topped with fresh peaches and drizzled with an oh-so sweet syrup.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>4 hours to set + 25 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 8</p> <p><strong>Crust</strong></p> <ul> <li>250g butternut snap cookies</li> <li> <p>80g unsalted butter, melted</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Cheesecake</strong></p> <ul> <li>3 teaspoon powdered gelatine</li> <li>500g cream cheese, softened</li> <li>½ cup sugar</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste</li> <li>250ml thickened cream, whipped</li> <li>6 yellow peaches, peeled, cored, 2 sliced to garnish</li> <li>Sugar syrup, cooled (½ cup sugar, ½ cup water, boiled, then simmer to dissolve)</li> <li>Optional: Whipped cream, and white chocolate curls, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p><strong>Crust</strong></p> <ol> <li>Grease and line a 20cm spring form cake tin.</li> <li>In a food processor, place biscuits and pulse until fine crumbs. Add butter and pulse again to combine, then tip into prepared tin and press firmly into the base. Chill in the fridge until needed.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Cheesecake</strong></p> <ol> <li>Place a small heat proof jug in a small saucepan of lightly simmering water.</li> <li>Add 2 tablespoons of water, then sprinkle the gelatine into the jug. Stir to dissolve set aside to cool for 5 minutes.</li> <li>Meanwhile, place cream cheese, vanilla and sugar into a stand mixer and beat until smooth. Add the cooled gelatine mix and beat to combine.</li> <li>Gently fold in whipped cream.</li> <li>Pour into prepared pan on top of the biscuit base. Cover and refrigerate until set. Minimum 4 hours to overnight.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, puree or mash 2 peaches, add sugar syrup then set aside to infuse.</li> <li>Place in a sieve over a bowl to strain, set drained syrup aside.</li> <li>To assemble, remove cheesecake from the fridge, use the peaches to decorate, and drizzle with the syrup.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of <a rel="noopener" href="https://summerfruit.com.au/" target="_blank">Summerfruit Australia</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/peach-cheesecake-with-peach-syrup.aspx" data-title="Peach cheesecake with peach syrup | WYZA" data-description="Treat yourself this summer with a delectable cheesecake with a double dose of peaches! -wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-84bb15f3-22bb-4ec9-9b4e-48e4dea2e418"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/peach-cheesecake-with-peach-syrup.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Get into the spirit of summer with a pavlova

<div class="article-body"> <p>No cake book would be complete without a recipe for the much-loved Australian meringue cake topped with fresh cream and seasonal fruit. Unfortunately, Pavlova has the reputation of being difficult to master, but as long as you have time and patience, your results will be great!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>60 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>12</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 large eggwhites</li> <li>220g caster sugar</li> <li>2 teaspoons cornflour</li> <li>1 teaspoon white vinegar</li> <li>whipped cream, to serve</li> <li>seasonal fruit, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line a heavy baking tray with baking paper.</li> <li>Using electric beaters, beat the eggwhites on medium speed until soft peaks form, adding a pinch of salt. Begin adding sugar, a spoonful at a time, then increase the speed to high and continue beating until the mixture is thick and glossy.</li> <li>Sift over the cornflour and add the vinegar. Fold into the eggwhites using a spatula and very gentle strokes.</li> <li>Pile the mixture onto the prepared baking tray and put in the preheated oven. Immediately turn the heat down to 130°C and bake for 1 hour. Turn oven off and leave meringue to cool overnight.</li> <li>Before serving, top with whipped cream, passionfruit, berries, kiwi or other seasonal fruits of your choice.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image from Bake Your Cake &amp; Eat it Too (New Holland Publishers), RRP $29.99,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pavlova.aspx" data-title="Pavlova | WYZA" data-description="Create the much-loved Australian meringue cake topped with fresh cream and seasonal fruit - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-1686b76d-60ef-492d-b827-e0b8054211c7"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pavlova.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

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