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Virologist claims drinking alcohol can protect against the coronavirus

<p>A critically acclaimed German virologist has claimed drinking whisky can aid in warding off the COVID-19 infection.</p> <p>Dr Juergen Rissland, who is the head doctor at the Institute for Virology at Saarland University Hospital in Germany, has gone against advice from the World Health Organisation that explicitly states drinking alcohol does not protect a person in any way from testing positive for COVID-19 and can in fact be dangerous.</p> <p>While speaking on the show <em>Health Issues</em>, Dr Rissland answered a question from one audience member who wanted to know if it was a good idea to drink alcohol to kill any viruses he has possible swallowed.</p> <p>“Yes, of course, that’s true,” the expert replied. “And the higher the percentage of alcohol, the better it is.</p> <p>“For example, if you are a whisky lover, then that certainly isn’t a bad idea.</p> <p>“But of course you need to bear in mind that you can’t do that every 15 minutes, that is something else to consider.”</p> <p>The presenter interrupted to say “Are we really advising our viewers to drink high-proof alcohol?”</p> <p>Dr Rissland continued by saying, “I would say it can’t do any harm although we need to remember that it’s not a guaranteed cure for the problem.”</p> <p>The health professional later defended his claims and made it clear the virus was susceptible to alcohol due to it having a fatty coating.</p>

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McDonald's incredible gesture coming to every store across Australia

<p>McDonald’s has announced they will begin selling groceries amid the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>A spokeswoman for the fast-food chain explained to<span> </span><em>7NEWS<span> </span></em>the new move had been created as part of Maccas’ commitment to supporting local communities during this difficult and uncertain times.</p> <p>“Macca’s will now offer customers another way to access milk and bread, through its contactless drive-thrus and takeaway service, across the country,” the spokeswoman said in a statement.</p> <p>“From Wednesday onwards, in addition to our usual Macca’s menu, customers will also be able to pick-up two or three litre bottles of full cream or skim milk, as well as packs of English muffins and gourmet bread rolls.</p> <p>“Our contactless service removes any need for touch contact between our employees and customers, making it a safe way for people to get food and drinks, as well as these essential basics.”</p> <p>The franchise closed its restaurant to customers last week and just leaving their drive-thru windows and takeaway operations still accessible, in a bid to stop spreading the deadly virus</p> <p>“At Macca’s, looking after you, our team and the wider community is our priority, so in line with government guidance, we’re making a few changes,” McDonald’s said via a Facebook post.</p> <p>Customers can still walk into restaurants and order food to take away but won’t be allowed to sit and eat it inside.</p> <p>Orders are also being accepted on the fast-food chain’s app and other delivery services including UberEats.</p>

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Chinese wet markets still selling bats

<p>As the number of new coronavirus cases in China continues to decline, customers are returning to wet markets across the country.</p> <p>The COVID-19 first emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan in late 2019, with the first few admitted hospital patients being linked to the city’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, where a variety of wild animals were sold.</p> <p>While it is believed that the new coronavirus came from bats and possibly other animals sold at the market, scientists are still <a href="https://theconversation.com/scientists-are-still-searching-for-the-source-of-covid-19-why-it-matters-133467">tracking down the origin of the virus</a>.</p> <p>The market was shuttered on January 1, and China soon banned wild animals in markets, restaurants and online marketplaces.</p> <p>However, a <em><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8163761/Chinese-markets-selling-bats.html?ito=social-facebook&amp;fbclid=IwAR1Y1rAxuYUlKwnHtaxvGjADtT7gJrmDnEs3AuAsjbjmDDaO_ots1LyxeQk">Daily Mail</a> </em>report found that animals such as bats and scorpions were still on offer in various cities across China over the weekend.</p> <p>A medicine seller in a market in Dongguan, southern China put on a sign advertising bats and other animals, including scorpions and snakes.</p> <p>“The markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus,” a correspondent told the outlet.</p> <p>“The only difference is that security guards try to stop anyone taking pictures which would never have happened before.”</p> <p>This is not the first time Chinese officials have attempted to contain wild animal trading over health issues. In 2003, civets were banned and culled civets after it was discovered they likely <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/05/asia/china-coronavirus-wildlife-consumption-ban-intl-hnk/index.html">transmitted the SARS virus to humans</a>.</p> <p>Wild animals have been widely used in China for food as well as traditional medicine, clothing and ornaments.</p>

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Woolworths steps up with new care package for elderly and vulnerable

<p>Woolworths has introduced a new initiative to help the elderly and other vulnerable people who are currently quarantined due to coronavirus.</p> <p>The supermarket is rolling out an $80 box of essential groceries that will be delivered using Australia Post and other distribution channels to help get orders to isolated people faster.</p> <p>The box contains meals, snacks and a few other items, and cannot be customised. Those interested can order it online from this week in the ACT, NSW and Victoria.</p> <p>Orders are expected to arrive at people’s doorsteps with two-to-five working days and phone support will be available to those who are not comfortable shopping online.</p> <p>Other states will be added in the coming weeks.</p> <p>The government has strongly advised those over the age of 70 to stay at home for their own wellbeing as the country’s COVID-19 tally reaches over 4000 cases, with 17 deaths.</p> <p>The $80 price includes contactless doorstep delivery by Australia Post and Woolworths has said it won’t be making a profit from the service.</p> <p>Woolworths has recommended those who can shop for their friends and families who are isolated to do so, to limit the demand on the online service.</p> <p>“There will be some in our community who don’t have that option, and we need your help to put the most vulnerable first,” said Woolworths Group CEO Brad Banducci in a statement on Monday.</p> <p>The supermarket giant has been offering priority assistance home deliveries since March 13, to help the elderly, those with disabilities and those in mandatory isolation.</p> <p>Customers can apply for priority assistance by going to woolworths.com.au/priorityassistance</p>

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Latest changes to Coles and Woolies restrictions

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Coles has announced a raft of new measures in response to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.</p> <p>In a letter to customers, CEO Steven Cain explained that there are new and tougher guidelines in place regarding cleaning and sanitation in stores.</p> <p>“We know that health and safety is front of mind for lots of our customers at the moment, and we want to let you know that we’re working closely with the Department of Health to ensure the most effective protection for both you and our team members in our stores during the COVID-19 situation,” Mr Cain wrote, according to <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/coronavirus-coles-strict-new-rules-woolworths-may-bring-back-free-bags/news-story/9646108ac7b2947029076399a404a0eb" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p>He also explained that customers are not to enter the store if they’re unwell as well as the company adding “extra cleaning and sanitisation” to high contact areas of the stores.</p> <p>“We ask all customers not to enter a store if they are unwell, to wash or sanitise their hands before entering stores, and to remind everyone to not touch their face unless your hands have been sanitised,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>Shoppers must now pack their own bags to “minimise both handling and close contact time” as well as discouraging cash transactions.</p> <p>“When paying, we recommend card payments instead of cash, and we encourage you to use tap and go to make checking out as easy as possible,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>Coles is also making changes to the bakery section, with single item bakery goods to be individually pre-wrapped.</p> <p>“Finally, we’ll be regularly rotating our teams on checkouts throughout the day to help keep everyone safer,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>“Please respect the guidelines we’re putting in place as your health and safety remains a priority for us.”</p> <p>Meanwhile, Woolworths boss Brad Banducci explained to the ABC this morning that the chain had considered bringing back the option of free bags. However, there is not enough stock to make this option possible.</p> <p>“Look, we are working through that in New Zealand and you will have noticed Coles decided to get customers to pack their own bags and the issue we have in terms of giving bags away which we are open to, is the number of bags we have in stock,” Mr Banducci said on air.</p> <p>“The team are working through that issue as we talk and we will make further announcements over the weekend, but we are listening to our team and taking the advice seriously."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Jamie Oliver to the rescue with easy homemade bread recipe

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Jamie Oliver has impressed fans with an easy guide on how to make homemade bread with just three ingredients in his new cooking show ‘Keep Cooking and Carry On’.</p> <p>The new series aims to help viewers during the coronavirus pandemic by offering easy recipes and cooking tips on items usually found in a person’s cupboard.</p> <p>The first episode was met with praise, as viewers called it “Helpful, resourceful and creative” as many people struggle to find basics in their local supermarket due to panic buying from the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>Oliver, 44, revealed how you can make bread in just two hours using water, yeast and flour as shoppers are struggling to find any in supermarkets.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-IDQi8FSO6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-IDQi8FSO6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jamie Oliver (@jamieoliver)</a> on Mar 24, 2020 at 11:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Cooking can be good for the soul and making bread is such a rewarding, therapeutic, tactile thing – you’ll be so proud of yourself when you’ve cracked it,” Oliver says on his<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/bread-recipes/easy-homemade-bread/" target="_blank">recipe to make the bread</a>.</p> <p>From one simple bread recipe like this, there’s a million things you can do – big ones, small ones, in a tin, on a tray, get creative. There are also loads of lovely flours you can experiment with – wholewheat, rye, spelt, using a blend of a couple of different ones. Plus, making bread is a great thing to do with the kids – they'll love it. ”</p> <p>Fans on Twitter were quick to praise Oliver for being innovative in times of crisis.</p> <p>“Can I just say a huge thank you Mr Oliver. I was feeling somewhat overwhelmed, low in energy and unenthused about cooking and your recipes perked me up and for a brief moment I felt the stress slip away, plus some yummy food! I for one really appreciate your help x”</p> <p>“Cooking nutritious meals for yourself and your loved ones has never been more important,” Oliver said in a statement for the show.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Can you get coronavirus from takeaway food?

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>As coronavirus continues its rapid spread across the world, many are being advised to practice social distancing. This means gatherings of people are limited to a specific number, and it also means no hanging out with your friends at restaurants.</p> <p>Home delivery has therefore become more popular, with many getting takeaway or ordering supplies to their door.</p> <p>However, the rise in home deliveries has led to concerns as to whether or not coronavirus can be contracted from touching packages.</p> <p>Experts in the US and the UK are adamant that having items delivered is a low-risk activity.</p> <p>"It's very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food," reports the UK's <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/" target="_blank" title="National Health System website's coronavirus page">National Health System website's coronavirus page</a>.</p> <p>Dr. Ian Williams, chief of the Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch of the US <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html" target="_blank">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a> echoed the sentiment in a recent information webinar.</p> <p>"There is no evidence out there that, so far with [Covid-19], that it's foodborne-driven or food service-driven," Williams said.</p> <p>"This really is respiratory, person-to-person. At this point there is no evidence really pointing us towards food [or] food service as ways that are driving the epidemic."</p> <p>Delivery services such as UberEats have adapted to the threat of coronavirus and offer options such as having deliveries left in a designated area. Companies are also practicing social distancing amongst delivery partners.</p> <p>However, some companies are taking the initiative to close as countries escalate their lockdowns worldwide, including McDonalds.</p> <p>Here are a few things to be mindful of while ordering packages or deliveries to your door.</p> <p><strong>Practice social distancing</strong></p> <p>Social distancing involves minimising contact with people and keeping a distance of over one metre between you and others. You should avoid public transport and limit non-essential traveling during this time. This includes contact with your delivery driver.</p> <p><strong>Wash your hands</strong></p> <p>As soon as you’ve brought the package inside, wash your hands immediately. If you’ve ordered food, wash your hands before and after eating.</p> <p><strong>Put the packaging in the rubbish ASAP</strong></p> <p>Although there is little evidence that supports the notion that COVID-19 can be transmitted through food and packaging, coming into contact with any surface that carries the virus can put you at risk.</p> <p>For your safety, throw away the packaging your delivery comes in and wash your hands straight after.</p> <p>With food deliveries, use your own plates and cutlery instead of eating right out of the container it came in. It’s also good practice to disinfect your countertops and tables before eating.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Satay chicken jacket potato

<p>Caught in a pinch with just the basic ingredients? This satay chicken jacket potato dish can keep your dinner exciting with flavoursome spices and sauces that you should already have in the pantry. Pre-cut, frozen and pre-packaged vegetables can also easily take the place of fresh ingredients and herbs where needed.</p> <p>For those with peanut allergy, replace the peanut butter with the equally tasty tahini.</p> <p><strong><span>Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>2 large sweet potatoes</span></li> <li><span>1 tablespoon coconut oil</span></li> <li><span>400g chicken mince</span></li> <li><span>2 cloves of garlic, crushed</span></li> <li><span>1 teaspoon ginger</span></li> <li><span>2 tablespoon tamari</span></li> <li><span>4 tablespoon Mayver’s <a href="https://mayvers.com.au/product/mayvers-dark-roasted-smooth-peanut-butter/">Dark Roasted Peanut Butter</a>or <a href="https://mayvers.com.au/product/mayvers-hulled-tahini/">Tahini</a></span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>To serve:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>2 spring onions, thinly sliced</span></li> <li><span>1 chilli, thinly sliced (optional) </span></li> <li><span>Micro herbs to garnish</span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>Method:</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 200°C and line a baking tray. Cook the potatoes whole, for 60 minutes or until tender and soft when cut with a knife.</li> <li>When there is 20 minutes to go, start making the chicken satay.</li> <li>Heat the coconut oil in a fry pan and brown the chicken mince. Add the garlic, ginger, tamari and peanut butter or tahini and mix to combine. Allow to simmer on low heat for 10 minutes. If your mince is getting a little bit dry, add a splash of chicken stock to help keep the moisture in.</li> <li>Cut the sweet potato in half and add half the satay to each potato. Garnish each with half the spring onion, half the chilli and half the micro herbs.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p><em><span>Recipe by Monica of <a href="https://www.instagram.com/monicayateshealth/">@monicayateshealth</a>.</span></em></p>

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Supermarket’s genius plan to stop panic buying

<p>The internet may be laughing at people hoarding items such as toilet paper in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, but a Danish supermarket has found a genius way to combat people from stocking up on items unnecessarily – in particular, hand sanitiser.</p> <p>Using a simple yet brilliant pricing trick, the supermarket has put an end to bulk buying.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">A supermarket in Denmark got tired of people hoarding hand sanitizer, so came up with their own way of stopping it.<br /><br />1 bottle kr40 (€5.50)<br />2 bottles kr1000 (€134.00) each bottle.<br /><br />Hoarding stopped!<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/COVID19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#COVID19</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/coronavirus?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#coronavirus</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hoarding?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hoarding</a> <a href="https://t.co/qaJb7UZwLr">pic.twitter.com/qaJb7UZwLr</a></p> — 𝙎𝙘𝙝𝙪𝙚𝙧𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙣 🕯️ 🇪🇺🇩🇰🇩🇪🇸🇬 (@_schuermann) <a href="https://twitter.com/_schuermann/status/1239294777452974080?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 15, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Rotunden supermarket in Denmark consider themselves to be the country’s most prestigious supermarket, aiming to create an exclusive experience for each shopper that walks through their doors.</p> <p>Keeping their customer’s busy lifestyles in mind, they also make sure to not just sell as much as possible, but to get their products out to as many people as possible.</p> <p>The store is selling one bottle of sanitiser for 40 DKK ($4.09) while two bottles cost 1,000 DKK ($95).</p> <p>Similar to other supermarkets around the world, they recently experienced people attempting to hoard certain items and took it upon themselves to do something about it. Which is why they came up with the unconventional pricing idea.</p> <p>The business took to Facebook to explain their motivation behind the pricing.</p> <p>“Dear customers, we have a great responsibility to keep the business running, and we can only do that with everyone’s help and understanding. I can help in the following way: We ask all customers to respect the distance between each other and our co-workers; Sprinkle (likely sanitise or wash) hands off at the entrance and use gloves; If you are a family, please allow only one person to purchase the purchases if possible; There may be times when we limit how many customers we accept in the store at one time. We will keep you informed about any operating changes on Facebook. Take care and thank you for your understanding,” they state in the letter.</p> <p>The decision quickly went viral, with people all over the globe praising the supermarket for their decision.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Brilliant. Simple yet innovative. We need more innovative ideas to prevent the current empty shelves. Are our complacent supermarkets taking note? <a href="https://twitter.com/sainsburys?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@sainsburys</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/asda?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@asda</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/waitrose?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@waitrose</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/AldiUK?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AldiUK</a></p> — savvytraveller #FBPE #RejoinEU (@wineexpert1968) <a href="https://twitter.com/wineexpert1968/status/1240055854772215808?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 17, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Magnificent idea! We should do this in UK (although the shelves are bare anyway 🤪) but we could apply it for toilet roll, cans of soup, pasta...the essentials lol 🧻💷🧻🧻💎<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/panicbuyuk?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#panicbuyuk</a></p> — kathryn f (@verdiKat) <a href="https://twitter.com/verdiKat/status/1239494910820126722?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 16, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Brilliant idea. Instead of making multiples cheaper, or supermarkets should do this. That would stop the panic buying.</p> — Gary Cook (@orak100) <a href="https://twitter.com/orak100/status/1239638122092265472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 16, 2020</a></blockquote>

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Restaurant shock as diner leaves $16,000 tip to help pay staff

<p>A customer at a restaurant in Texas has made the restaurant owner’s day by leaving a very generous tip.</p> <p>It was left by a regular customer who had been dining at Houston’s Irma’s Southwest restaurant for the last 15 years and left a $9,400 tip on an order of shrimp tacos earlier this week.</p> <p>The tip equates to $16,700 AUD and was left with an instruction to the restaurant owner to “pay your guys over the next few weeks”.</p> <p>"Basically we are going to split that among the staff members, not management. So, about 30 people will split the $9,400 evenly," restaurant owner Louis Galvan<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/texas-restaurant-receives-9400-tip-coronavirus-outbreak" target="_blank">told</a><span> </span>Fox News.</p> <p>Galvan says the tip "reinvigorated" the restaurant. </p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835221/tips.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d8cb6aac8aaf45ec8cb34a21a8903e5a" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>"Honestly, we were going to close, but now we're going to try and make the best out of this deal," he said. "We're going to make this thing work."</p> <p>"I think he came here just to [give that tip]. He came down here specifically to do that and wish us the best of luck. Everyone was amazed."</p> <p>The customer’s act of kindness inspired others to visit the restaurant.</p> <p>"Another regular customer came in and left a $100 tip on a $90 ticket after he saw the report," Galvan said. "He came in just to purchase lunch and leave another gratuity."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Quinoa pilaf stuffed white onions

<p>Who knew simple ingredients could make for a show-stealing side dish? Serve this gluten-free, vegetarian delicacy with your protein of choice for a delightful dinner.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 medium white onions, peeled and cut in half</li> <li>1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1/2 (80g) red capsicum, seeds removed, diced</li> <li>2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander</li> <li>2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley</li> <li>3/4 cup quinoa</li> <li>2 cups (500ml) vegetables stock</li> <li>1/4 teaspoon cinnamon</li> <li>100g feta</li> <li>2 tablespoon pinenuts, toasted</li> <li>2 tablespoons pomegranate seeds</li> <li>Extra herbs for garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Take each white onion half and trim a small portion from the base so you can push the inner layers through and out of the onion, leaving about 3 layers to create the onion cup to hold the pilaf. Do this with each white onion and set aside about 120g of white onion to dice for the pilaf.</li> <li>Set the rest of the inner white onion pieces aside to use in another recipe or pop in the freezer and store for when you need next.</li> <li>Add finely chopped white onion, extra virgin olive oil, capsicum and herbs so a small saucepan, place on medium heat and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.</li> <li>Add quinoa, 1 cup (250ml) vegetable stock and cinnamon to pan, stir, cover to bring to boil then reduce heat to simmer and cook for 10-12 minutes, the pilaf at this stage will still be relatively loose in nature but the quinoa should be cooked.</li> <li>Heat oven to 180C, and pour the remaining 1 cup (250ml) vegetable stock into a shallow baking dish. Arrange white onion cups around the dish so they are snug, then fill each half way with the pilaf. Sprinkle about half the feta in each cup and repeat finishing with the feta on top.</li> <li>Cover with foil then place in oven to cook for 20 minutes, the stock from the base of the dish will steam the onion cups in this time.</li> <li>Remove the foil, change oven to grill and pop back under to make a little more golden on top for 5-6 minutes.</li> <li>Sprinkle pinenuts, pomegranate and extra herbs over the top and serve as part of a shared meal.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe by Jacqueline Alwill.</em></p>

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Coles receives 36,000 job applications in one day during coronavirus crisis

<p>After announcing a huge recruitment push, Coles received 36,000 job applications in one day, in what one politician described as a sign of the huge economic challenge the country faces during the coronavirus outbreak.</p> <p>Supermarkets have been under the pump these past few weeks as Australians attempt to stock up due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is putting unnecessary demand on stores to restock.</p> <p>Footage of people fighting over toilet paper have emerged as well as heart-warming moments of shoppers sharing their groceries with the elderly and the disadvantaged, as shelves around the country are being stripped bare.</p> <p>As stores implement stricter rules, Coles announced it is recruiting 5,000 casual workers “to help us continue to offer the best possible service to customers during this busy time”.</p> <p>“This will allow us to serve more customers and replenish shelves faster, while offering employment opportunities for Australians working in other industries impacted by COVID-19,” Coles said on Monday.</p> <p>The next day, thousands of people registered their interest.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>10 daily</em>, a spokesperson from Coles revealed that they received 36,000 job applications on Tuesday alone. That’s about 45 times its average daily intake of 800 applications.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Just 1 indicator of the economic challenge we face <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a> 👇 <a href="https://t.co/8WBuSjm2Z4">https://t.co/8WBuSjm2Z4</a></p> — Jason Clare MP (@JasonClareMP) <a href="https://twitter.com/JasonClareMP/status/1240135686767939585?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 18, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Labor MP Jason Clare appeared on Sky News on Wednesday and said the huge uptake points to the size and scale of the country’s economic challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>Clare said that many of those applications are most likely from those who work in the tourism or hospitality industry, which have been the hardest hit.</p> <p>“They’re the sort of people that would ordinarily work at the bars and coffee shops that I walked past to get to this interview that are shut,” said Clare.</p> <p>“People are looking for a safe haven … for a place where they know there is going to be a job tomorrow.”</p> <p>Coles said casuals will have their inductions fast-tracked to boost numbers of staff on shop floors across the country.</p>

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ALDI's savage solution to “sneaky” toilet paper trick

<p><span>ALDI has announced their drastic new measures to crack down on shoppers who are using “sneaky” tricks to get around grocery bulk-buying restrictions during the coronavirus outbreaks.</span><br /><br /><span>CEO Tom Daunt says customers who attempt to get around the product policies will be handed to police.</span><br /><br /><span>“Together with our store employees we’ve developed new conditions of entry to our stores,” Mr Duant said.</span><br /><br /><span>Rules for entry into ALDI Australia’s stores now include “respecting employees and their physical space” and “practising good hygiene”.</span><br /><br /><span>“Do not attempt to ‘game’ our product restriction policies,” Mr Duant went on to say.</span><br /><br /><span>“We remind you that we will not accept any violent behaviour (verbal or physical) in or around our stores and the police will be called immediately if required.”</span><br /><br /><span>The German grocery chain’s major move follows after it was realised parents were getting young children to line up and buy toilet paper packets on their own to get past the “one pack per customer” rule.</span><br /><br /><span>People on social media shot back at the sneaky trick by labelling the act “un-Australian” and “sneaky”.</span><br /><br /><span>“When the chips are down people think of themselves,” one frustrated person said on Facebook as fears gear up over COVID-19.</span><br /><br /><span>“These people are greedy and selfish,” another wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>One angry shopper could be heard shouting “that’s un-Australian – there will be nothing left for anyone else” in a store as parents were allegedly handing their children cash to carry out the task.</span><br /><br /><span>The bizarre tactic comes as Coles, Woolworths and Aldi battle to deal with the “unprecedented” demand for essential supplies over the weekend.</span><br /><br /><span>The supermarket giants introduced new grocery limits not long after, with ALDI Australia’s CEO Tom Daunt announcing on Wednesday morning that the supermarket was introducing limits on dry pasta, flour, dry rice (excludes microwave rice), paper towels and hand sanitiser – two packs per customer.</span><br /><br /><span>ALDI had previously held off introducing grocery limits, only restricting shoppers to just one pack of toilet rolls.</span></p>

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ALDI finally announces its shopping restrictions

<p>ALDI is hitting back at panic buyer by restricting purchases on a number of items, including sought after products such as toilet paper, pasta and rice.</p> <p>From March 17, ALDI Australia’s CEO Tom Daunt says the restriction will begin in order to discourage hoarders from wiping out shelves.</p> <p>Mr Daunt has also called for shoppers to remain calm as demand for products skyrocket.</p> <p>"All Australians deserve access to groceries and we are working extremely hard to deliver on this promise," Daunt said in a press release.</p> <p>"We know many of you are worried about the spread of coronavirus and your ability to access fresh food, hygiene products and essential items. We want to let you know that there is more than enough food to go around; we just need your patience and support."</p> <p><strong>Here is what ALDI will be restricting.</strong></p> <ul> <li>Toilet paper – 1 unit</li> <li>Dry Pasta – 2 units</li> <li>Flour – 2 units</li> <li>Dry Rice (excludes microwave rice) – 2 units</li> <li>Paper Towels – 2 units</li> <li>Tissues – 2 units</li> <li>Hand Sanitiser – 2 units</li> </ul> <p>Coles has also told shoppers their will be a one packet restriction for toilet paper and a two packet restriction for these items:</p> <ul> <li>Pasta</li> <li>Flour</li> <li>Dry rice</li> <li>Paper towels</li> <li>Paper tissues</li> <li>Hand sanitisers</li> <li>Mince meat - includes Beef, Pork, Lamb, Chicken &amp; Turkey</li> </ul>

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Special shopping periods announced for elderly and disabled

<p>Australian supermarket, Woolworths made an announcement on Monday morning to say they will be allowing a one hour shopping grace period for senior Australians in an attempt to ease chaos that has ensued among stores across the country. </p> <p>The new move has introduced a shopping hour for help elderly people and those with a disability to move freely across the store without feeling the pressure to rush. </p> <p>Woolworths has said it will begin from Tuesday until Friday for now and occur between 7 am and 8am.</p> <p>It follows after chaos in supermarkets across the country as many vulnerable people have been left unable to fight for purchases to essential items including toilet paper, tissues, pasta and rice.</p> <p>“While we’ll continue to do our very best to restock our stores during this period of unprecedented demand, we know many of our elderly customers have been missing out on essential items when they shop,” Woolworths Supermarkets Managing Director Claire Peters said in a statement.</p> <p>“This temporary measure will give them, and those with a disability, the opportunity to shop before our stores officially open - helping them obtain the essential items they need most in a less crowded environment.</p> <p>“We continue to encourage all Australians to be mindful of those in our communities who might need extra help at this time. Now - more than ever - we need to be kind to each other, especially to those most vulnerable.</p> <p>“We’d like to thank our customers for their patience and apologise for any inconvenience caused by the revised opening hours.”</p> <p>Wilkinson said those at greatest risk of suffering from the deadly virus are the elderly, the weak, the unwell and the vulnerable.</p> <p>In a shocking move, Woolworths has also gone as far to halt its click and collect services for customers and have also stopped a popular delivery service.</p> <p>Coles has also introduced a new limit on customers stockpiling mince – it has now been restricted to two packs per person from today.</p> <p>This rule includes all cuts – beef, pork, lamb, chicken and turkey.</p> <p>The supermarket giants have urged customers to “shop as they normally would” and not panic buy to help stop the stripping bare of shelves across the country.</p> <p>As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread around the world customers are swarming to supermarkets and filling their trolleys to the brim with their essentials.  </p> <p>The Victorian chief health officer Brett Sutton in the<span> </span>Sunday Herald Sunurged shoppers to have a “two-week supply of food and a 60-day supply of prescription medication”.</p>

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Shoppers throw punches in packed Woolworths in front of shocked onlookers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A fight between shoppers broke out at a packed Woolworths in south-west Sydney as panic buying due to coronavirus sees empty shelves and high tensions.</p> <p>Footage of the incident was posted to social media, and a young man can be seen being led from the checkouts to the exit by Woolworths staff.</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-video" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=631885920878127&amp;external_log_id=ace4c9727848c5ddb6e71ce40e9906d9&amp;q=woolworths%20fight"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/9News/videos/631885920878127/">WOOLWORTHS CUSTOMER CLASH</a> <p>#WATCH: Police were called in this afternoon after a clash between customers at Woolworths Bass Hill Plaza got out of hand. Woolworths has just released a statement saying they “will not tolerate violence of any kind from customers”. #9News</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/9News/">9 News</a> on Saturday, March 14, 2020</blockquote> </div> <p>Two men get into a fist fight as shocked onlookers watch on.</p> <p>Woolworths said it was aware of the incident and that it doesn’t tolerate any violence.</p> <p>"We're grateful for the efforts of our team members to calm the situation down and pleased none of them were harmed," a Woolworths spokesperson said in a statement.</p> <p>"Our team members are doing the very best they can to serve the needs of the community, so we ask customers to be respectful to them, and each other."</p> <p>According to<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/coronavirus-panic-woolworths-fight-bass-hill-shoppers/ff0f62c1-c7c3-4139-adfa-72c8ae8f0340" target="_blank"><em>9News</em></a>, NSW Police arrested a 39-year-old man yesterday evening and he has been charged with common assault after the brawl.</p> <p>Police do not believe that the two men were fighting over groceries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Mums condemn limits at supermarkets amid coronavirus stockpiling

<p>Frustrated Australian mums have taken to Facebook to criticise the limits enforced on household goods at supermarkets.</p> <p>In recent weeks, limits have been introduced at grocers on various items, including toilet paper, rice and hand sanitiser. Authorities have also urged Australians to refrain from <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/beauty-style/why-are-people-stockpiling-toilet-paper-we-asked-four-experts">stockpiling supplies</a>.</p> <p>But mums have argued that the limit is preventing them from acquiring goods for their big families, with one sharing her <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/mums-slam-grocery-item-limits-due-to-coronavirus/news-story/a62567a2207af90a3a375ab41bb26aca">experience</a> shopping for her eight children in the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/402639530073131/?ref=nf_target&amp;fref=nf">Budgeting, Food, Stockpiling, Savings, Ideas, Life Help Australia Facebook group</a>.</p> <p>“I was at Woolworths this morning to get some things I could not get last week and this smartass b**ch in front of me at the checkout kept looking at my stuff and shaking her head,” she wrote.</p> <p>“[She] then asked the lady at the register if those paper towels were for sale, the lady said, ‘yes you can have two packets’, she said, ‘no I only want one’, and looked at me and said, ‘I am not greedy’.</p> <p>“I said, ‘WTF come talk to me when you (are) feeding eight kids and not one … None of the stuff I bought had restrictions on them and no it’s not for my stockpile, it’s just stuff I could not get last week!”</p> <p>The post prompted other mums to share the difficulties they had faced to buy groceries for their families.</p> <p>“I have eight kids with five at home, these limits are killing me. I have to try and shop every two days to try and get what I need,” one wrote. “My trolley was FULL and people were sniggering about me and my panic buying mode — umm this was about a five day worth shop.”</p> <p>“We get filthy looks for buying 12 cartons of rice milk last week and again today! I have a dairy-free child and this is a weeks’ worth for us,” another shared.</p> <p>One woman advised other shoppers to make an online order instead. “Shop online. Just did a $600 shop &amp; not one single judgmental look.”</p>

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Bunnings selling years’ worth of toilet paper for $42

<p>Bunnings Australia is selling jumbo toilet paper rolls that could last an entire year as “panic buying” continues due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>The hardware store is now offering shoppers industrial sized toilet papers, which is usually used in public bathrooms and shopping centres.</p> <p>For $42, shoppers can purchase eight rolls of Scott Essential Jumbo Tissue Rolls – measuring 2,400 metres, while the six-pack of Kleenex rolls, which total 1,800 metres will cost $75.</p> <p>The website states the jumbo-sized toilet papers “deliver quality with superior softness, strength, absorbency and comfort.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 311.216429699842px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835078/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a2a38cc4393d48f6b00bb308cb2eb53f" /></p> <p>“If anyone gets truly desperate Bunnings sells the industrial rolls, the ones you usually find in public toilets in the large dispensers,” wrote one shopper.</p> <p>“It’s not going to run out on you anytime soon.”</p> <p>According to some shoppers, the toilet rolls could last an entire year, but that depends on how many people live in one household.</p> <p>The item comes after the Australian Government and health authorities pleaded with people to not panic-buy, but after chaotic scenes at supermarkets around the country, it was evident that people were not taking notice.</p> <p>As of Thursday, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Australia was 129.</p>

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ALDI takes a swipe at coronavirus panic buyers

<p>ALDI is just one of many supermarkets to introduce tough new limits as panic buying toilet paper has gripped Australia.</p> <p>Just like Woolworths and Coles, ALDI has dropped its toilet paper limits to one pack per customer instead of the previous limit of four.</p> <p>A new sign was spotted by a customer, saying “We apologise if this act of courtesy is a disruption to your shop”.</p> <p>“The sign is across all stores and reflects the current sentiment of the brand,” an Aldi spokesperson told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/coronavirus-australia-aldi-sign-takes-swipe-at-toilet-paper-crisis/news-story/4da15f872ede00a245b2e95f3889a9e0" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Customers were fans of the sign.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835041/aldi-sign.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/24e2b2faa23845249b9b0e49cd8eef53" /></p> <p>“Love the little dig at the end to the uncourteous shoppers,” one person wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>“Exactly what EVERY supermarket chain should be doing,” another said.</p> <p>ALDI has also put a post on its Facebook page explaining the changes.</p> <p>“To help improve access to toilet paper for our customers, we have limited the purchase of all toilet paper lines to one pack per customer,” it reads.</p> <p>“We ask our customers to remember to show kindness, empathy and calmness when shopping with us.”</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/photos/a.637019469688891/3179491655441647/?type=3&amp;theater" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>To help improve access to toilet paper for our customers, we have limited the purchase of all toilet paper lines to one...</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/">ALDI Australia</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/posts/3179491655441647:0">Sunday, March 8, 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>Customers are on board with the new limits, saying that it’s a welcome change.</p> <p>“Thank you for helping reduce the insanity and greed and helping those with limited funds and access,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“Thank goodness. All stores need to do this … stop the madness!!” someone else added.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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