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Beloved 98-year-old grandma turned Facebook chef dies of coronavirus

<p>Lucy Pollock is not the only person who turned to cooking and baking during the coronavirus lockdown.</p> <p>However, she is one that stuck out after her videos, originally meant for friends and family, online began to gain traction and stick in the hearts of everyone watching her.</p> <p>Over time, the beloved 98-year-old’s cooking show<span> </span><em>Baking With Lucy</em><span> </span>amassed over 40,000 followers.</p> <p>Sadly though, the woman did not make it long enough to share any of her delicious Christmas recipes, passing away on Sunday after being diagnosed with coronavirus and suffering from a fatal lung infection.</p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/posts/232858605036662" data-show-text="true" data-width=""> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>As Lucy would say, " Happy Tuesday!!" Here is a beautiful photo of my mom and me at an art show Latrobe Art Center when...</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/">Baking With Lucy</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/posts/232858605036662">Tuesday, November 24, 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>The Pennsylvania woman’s daughter Mary Ellen Raneri was the one who announced the sad news in a video shared to Pollock’s popular baking video page.</p> <p>"The beautiful, lovely Lucy, talented woman and amazing mother, passed away last night at 3 in the morning," she explains in the video.</p> <p>"It was very unexpected. It was due to a lung infection and also, she tested positive for COVID, so it's quite an eye-opener for us and for everybody.</p> <p>"It's kind of ironic that what she struggled so hard to help people with eventually ended up hurting her."</p> <p>Raneri was able to visit her mother prior to her death and sang<span> </span><em>You Are My Sunshine</em><span> </span>in their final moment together.</p> <p>She closed her eyes, she looked really happy, and she was at peace," she said in the video.</p> <p>Pollock brought joy to thousands in her humble kitchen, cooking up almost a century's worth of family recipes, baking dishes that had been passed down through generations, donated by friends, and taken from frayed, handwritten notes.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838935/lucy-pollock.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4ef471798165452e895bde030b4f8207" /></p> <p>In mid-March, Raneri shared a photo on Facebook of her mother making cinnamon scrolls.</p> <p>The pair were then encouraged to make "live videos" of themselves cooking up more dishes.</p> <p>Raneri would often stand nearby and read out recipes while her mother baked due to her poor eyesight.</p> <p>Pollock would bake while her husband Phil filmed her and the humble, family-friendly videos took off quickly – with Pollock earning worldwide recognition, an upcoming cookbook and a national television appearance on NBC's Today show,</p> <p>"I can't believe that I'm sitting here on a Sunday morning doing this," Raneri said in the sad video.</p> <p>"Because at this point we'd all be scurrying around, yelling at each other 'Who's going to get the flour?' and 'Where are we going to put it?' But life has twists and turns.</p> <p>"I feel like my heart is breaking right now. But I wanted to tell everybody that I think right now she's in a really good place, and I'm going to go with that."</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838934/lucy-pollock-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/10634dde307746af8dd66b63045051a8" /></p> <p>Pollock's cookbook will go ahead as planned.</p> <p>"I don't think I knew how much I loved my mum until we started to do this project together," Raneri said of the cookbook.</p> <p>"I loved her, but I don't think I knew how much I admired her. She was an amazing person."</p> <p>Pollock will be buried in a private service on Friday.</p> <p>The service will be live streamed at 11 a.m. on the Baking with Lucy Facebook page.</p>

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"Straight to jail!": Woman berated for “barbaric” steak video

<p>A woman has horrified online users after she shared a video of her cooking a steak in a toaster.</p> <p>Juliette shared her bizarre method on TikTok under the username @itsmeju1iette, captioning the clip: "Cooking steak for my boyfriend."</p> <p>She wrote "How to cook steak," across the video.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838831/tiktok-steak-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aad6f49f34fb4258b42574506b98336c" /></p> <p>It showed her placing two pieces of steak into the toaster, then slathering it in sauce and eating it.</p> <p>The clip has been viewed over 10 million times.</p> <p>One user questioned: "How do you clean the toaster?" while many others were disgruntled to see she had not seasoned her meat “properly”.</p> <p>"This is so barbaric it's not even funny," one angry user wrote.</p> <p>"Straight to jail!" another said.</p> <p>Another added: "I'm physically upset," added someone else.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838829/tiktok-steak-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12efd32f18a74140ac2acd3856062b80" /></p> <p>"How to not cook steak," one user wrote.</p> <p>Juliette has had viral clips before, with one reaching over 24 million views that shows her humorously demonstrating how to boil ice in a saucepan.</p> <p>"My grandma's secret recipe! [Please] don’t share with anyone," she captioned the video.</p>

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New names for "racist" Nestle lollies revealed

<p>Nestle's Allen's Red Skins and Chicos lollies are being rebranded after the brand announced that it would rename the products due to the names being "out of step with the company's values".</p> <p>Red Skins are being changed to Red Ripper and Chicos will become Cheekies.</p> <p><img id="__mcenew" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838837/nestle-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12be705c35f242d59e404087c693b797" /></p> <p>Nestle general manager confectionery Chris O’Donnell said the renamed products would appear on shelves early next year.</p> <p>“Nestle has an unwavering commitment to upholding respect for our friends, neighbours and colleagues,” he said.</p> <p>“We hope Australians will support the evolution of these two much-loved lollies – while the names are new, the lollies themselves remain unchanged.</p> <p>“We will keep pack changes simple to help lolly lovers find their favourites easily.”</p> <p>The intention for the name change was announced on June 20th, with Nestle vowing to "move quickly" on the issue.</p> <p>However, fans are less than impressed with the new names.</p> <p>"An absolute joke. Those lollies have had there original names for years and no one was offended until now," one person commented on Facebook.</p> <p>"Absolutely rediculous these companies need to stop bowing down to snowflakes and people who look for things to complain about," another agreed.</p>

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ALDI customers “unbelievable” act angers shoppers

<p>An ALDI shopper has furiously called out another customer after she caught them doing something others said they never thought “someone could do”.</p> <p>While it is not unusual for shoppers to open a carton of eggs to check if they are all intact before buying, one woman was caught acting strangely while standing at the display.</p> <p>Taking to the ALDI Mum’s Facebook group, the poster said: “I noticed her swapping eggs from one box to another but I wasn't sure what she was doing until she put the cage free box back.</p> <p>The woman soon realised what the sneaky shopper was doing: “She swapped caged ones with cage free”.</p> <p>Cage free eggs are typically marked at a much higher price point than caged eggs and are considered a better choice by shoppers who are conscious of their purchases.</p> <p>The woman says she alerted the manager, but the culprit had already fled.</p> <p>“It’s not fair to the person who is going pay for them not knowing what’s inside,” the annoyed customer wrote.</p> <p>A number of horrified ALDI shoppers responded to the post, with one saying: “That’s so bad and frustrating that people would do that, I always try to buy free range eggs which aren’t cheap so I wouldn’t be happy!”</p> <p>Another added: “It would never occur to me that someone could do this!”</p> <p>“Unbelievable. I’ve heard everything now. The things people do,” a third person wrote.</p>

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Arnotts reveals surprising truth about popular biscuit

<div id="slide-panel-container"> <div class="slide-panel open"> <div class="slide-panel-content"> <div class="pulse_container "> <div class="pulse_content_wrapper"> <div id="pulse-content" class="pulse_content"> <div class="tab is-active"> <div class="space_view middle_style"> <div id="wall" class="wall new_pulse"> <div class="posts_list"> <div class="post_box already_read public" data-id="836801602"> <div class="post "> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Arnott's has just revealed a little known fact about one of its most-loved biscuits.</p> <p>Ginger Nut biscuits are different depending on which Australian state you eat them in, with social media users labelling it the "2020 conspiracy".</p> <p>The renowned biscuit company was happy to confirm the news.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838792/arnotts-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3f309488ef5a4b9784c0789338edeab6" /></p> <p>“The Ginger Nut started long ago, back in the 1960s, when we used to have different bakeries in different states each making a Ginger Nut biscuit that their locals loved,” an Arnott’s spokesperson told news.com.au</p> <p>“When Arnott’s became a national company we looked at the possibility of selling one Ginger Nut nationally.</p> <p>“However, Aussies in each state made it clear they loved their homegrown variety, and there’s just no substitute for their Ginger Nut, the version they had grown up and loved.”</p> <p>This means that there are four different recipes in use across different states and territories, with the taste, texture and colour being completely different from the other.</p> <p>WA, SA and NT share the same "sweet recipe", whereas those living in Victoria and Tasmania enjoy an even sweeter flavour which is closest to traditional Giner Nuts overseas.</p> <p>NSW and ACT share the "thick and hard" recipe, while QLD loves the "thin, sweet and dark" recipe.</p> <p>Social media users were either surprised or proud it confirmed what they already knew.</p> <p>“I’ve been living a lie all my life. Why do this to me Arnotts???” a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/australia/comments/fvblnu/i_dont_mean_to_alarm_you_but_i_just_discovered/" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Reddit</a> user said.</p> <p>“I actually got relatives and friends of friends to mail all the different varieties to me, then sat down and did a taste test. Can confirm they’re all very different,” another added, while a third labelled it a “true 2020 conspiracy”.</p> <p>But another responded saying, “I can verify. I have collected Gingernuts from Vic, NSW, ACT and the NT and they are definitely different. NSW/ACT ones are by far the best. Super hard, less sweet and perfect for dipping in tea without falling apart.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Man's horror at what he found inside burger

<p>A Queensland hospital worker was disgusted to find a dead rat inside his burger that he was initially enjoying on his lunch break.</p> <p>The medic found the cooked rat between the buns of his burger from the Wellbean Co Cafe, run by the Toowoomba Hospital Foundation, according to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thechronicle.com.au/" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>Toowoomba Chronicle</em></a>.</p> <p>He took a photo to show staff, who quickly apologised.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838781/rat-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/488e3d2c876344578778af55d86e97f6" /></p> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Darling Downs Health Service released the following statement to media about the incident.</p> <p>“We have taken this incident very seriously, with our highest priority being the health and safety of our community, patients, and staff,” a spokesperson said.</p> <p>“We have been assured that the Wellbean Co cafe operators, the Toowoomba Hospital Foundation, comply with all food and hygiene standards.</p> <p>“The Toowoomba Hospital Foundation has been in contact with the supplier and has reviewed their process for washing and inspecting all products brought in to the cafe.</p> <p>“The foundation has had the Toowoomba Regional Council Food Safety Division and our Public Health Unit inspect the cafe, which has been cleared to continue operating.</p> <p>“The cafe has apologised to the customer and I would like to thank the Toowoomba Hospital Foundation for their immediate and proactive response to this incident.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/queensland-hospital-worker-finds-dead-rat-inside-burger-on-break/news-story/991a93a50e7bdd065bb26ce0c4fb2a24" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">news.com.au</a></em></p> </div>

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Furious dad told to tone down kid’s lunch box

<p>School lunches can vary from child to child, with some parents opting to keep things simple and others hand-carving fruits and vegetables into an assortment of different characters.</p> <p>But now, one dad has taken to the internet to rant about a teacher who asked him to tone the creativity down when it comes to his child’s lunches.</p> <p>“My kid is eight. Long story short, my wife tries to make really fun lunches for my daughter,” the man<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/AmItheAsshole/comments/joc042/aita_for_telling_my_kids_teacher_that_i_dont_care/" target="_blank"> wrote in his post to Reddit.</a></p> <p>“She follows a couple of those school lunches pages on Instagram for inspiration or whatever. It’s important to us that our child likes her lunches and that she’s happy.”</p> <p>The man said their teacher had called and left a message asking them to tone the lunches down.</p> <p>“My daughter’s teacher called and left a message asking us that we simplify her lunches and do the typical sandwich thing because other kids ‘don’t have as elaborate as lunches and it might make them feel bad’,” he continued.</p> <p>So the dad did what many of us would have done (and sometimes later regretted) – he wrote an angry email.</p> <p>He basically said, “no we won’t and that I really don’t care, and that if other kids get upset then maybe it would be a good teaching moment for her,” but has now asked if he was wrong to do so.</p> <p>Most people agreed that this could have been a good teaching moment for the school.</p> <p>“Does your boss request that you drive a 2007 Corolla because your co-workers can’t stand to see a Tesla?” asked one person.</p> <p>Another said, “I could see the teacher being upset if it’s just completely unhealthy like the lunch box was filled with candy or a few bags of chips and nothing else. But the fact that it’s just decent food to be fun, I don’t think this should be any sort of issue.”</p> <p>A few pointed out the dad could have handled his response a lot better: “In the real world, an email like that could be considered a tad AHish; (a**hole-ish) could have been worded better. But yeah, the teacher is tons and tons of AH, because it is a teachable moment. I remember this really good phrase: ‘The only time you look in your neighbour’s bowl is to make sure that they have enough. You don’t look in your neighbour’s bowl to see if you have as much as them’.”</p>

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Return of an iconic Bunnings tradition

<p>Bunnings has announced that its beloved sausage sizzle will be making a comeback to select stores across Melbourne next month after months of suspension due to COVID-19.</p> <p>The fundraising initiative will return from December 5 which means the sausage sizzle will have started back up in all states and territories across Australia.</p> <p>The hardware store was forced to put a pause on the community fundraiser in March when the pandemic had hit our shores, with the business opting to donate $500 gift cards to local organisations instead.</p> <p>Bunnings Chief Operating Officer Deb Poole said the iconic fundraising favourite would return next month in a COVID-safe way.</p> <p>"The sausage sizzles play such an important fundraising role for hundreds of community groups across Melbourne and we're especially pleased to be bringing them back to our Melbourne stores with COVID-safe measures to keep everyone safe," she said.</p> <p>"We know our customers have missed supporting community groups through the sausage sizzles and our store teams can't wait to help restart this weekend tradition from December 5 in Melbourne.</p> <p>"Everyone in Melbourne has done such an amazing job and we hope bringing back sausage sizzles will help return a sense of normality to people's lives.</p> <p>"It's also a very special milestone for the Bunnings team in Melbourne who have really missed helping to put them on and completes the nationwide return of sausage sizzle."</p> <p>Every year, over 40,000 sausage sizzles are run by local community groups.</p> <p>The first ever sausage sizzle was run 26 years ago at Bunnings Sunshine in Melbourne’s west.</p> <p>However, the return of the sizzle will look very different this time around - with community groups required to wear a face mask during shifts and social distance.</p> <p>Safety measures including increased cleaning requirements and hygiene processes will also be put in place.</p> <p>"While our community groups are taking a number of extra precautions, what hasn't changed is the great feeling of supporting a local community group and the unmistakable taste of an Aussie sausage sizzle," Ms Poole said.</p>

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Hugh Jackman reveals hilarious baking fail

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>He’s an acclaimed actor, singer and producer best known for playing Wolverine in the X-men movie franchise.</p> <p>But Hugh Jackman has proven he’s just like the rest of us when he took to Instagram to share a video of his epic bread baking fail.</p> <p>The 52-year-old Aussie born star couldn’t help but laugh as he panned the camera over a freshly baked loaf of lumpy and flat gluten-free bread. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CHVKnrADivG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CHVKnrADivG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Bread baking FAIL. #celebratethefail #glutenfreebaking</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/thehughjackman/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Hugh Jackman</a> (@thehughjackman) on Nov 8, 2020 at 5:03am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“People say all the time that we only show the perfect parts of our lives,” Hugh was heard saying in the clip, in between laughs.</p> <p>“So I thought let's celebrate the failures,” he continued, angling the camera to capture a good view of the lacklustre loaf.</p> <p>Hugh joked how gluten-free flour “apparently does not work the same way” as regular flour, while wife Deborra-Lee Furness wondered if it tasted “as bad as it looks”.</p> <p>Fans praised the celeb in the comments section saying he was genuine and down to earth.</p> <p>The Greatest Showman star is now based in New York with Deborra-Lee and their two adopted children, Oscar, 20, and Ava, 15. </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"></div> </div> </div>

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Five things for over-65s to consider when switching to a plant-based diet

<p>There are plenty of reasons people switch to a plant-based diet, including ethical and environmental reasons. However, a growing number of people are shunning meat for health reasons. Evidence shows that plant-based diets may help support the immune system, lower the risk of heart disease and stroke, and may be good for overall health.</p> <p>While a well-planned plant-based diet can support healthy living in people of all ages, our nutritional needs change with different life stages, so people over the age of 65 may need to take more care when opting for a plant-based diet. They may have specific nutritional needs and may need certain nutrients, vitamins and minerals to stay healthy.</p> <p>Here are some things over-65s may want to consider when switching to a plant-based diet:</p> <p><strong>1. Eat enough protein</strong><br />Older adults need more protein compared to the general adult population in order to preserve lean body mass, body function and good health. While most adults only need around 0.75g of protein per kilogram of body weight a day, it’s recommended that healthy older adults should increase their daily protein intake to 1.0-1.2g per kilogram of body weight. This is even higher for older adults who are malnourished or have a severe illness, as these conditions trigger a hypermetabolic state, where the body needs more energy and protein to function.</p> <p>To ensure adequate protein intake, make sure meals and snacks contain plant-based proteins, such as chickpeas, tofu, black-eyed beans, kidney beans, lentils, quinoa, wild rice, nuts and seeds, nut butters and soya alternatives to milk and yoghurt. Eggs and dairy products are also good protein sources if you’re including these in your diet.</p> <p><strong>2. Include calcium and vitamin D</strong><br />Calcium and vitamin D both play an important role in maintaining good bone health, which is extremely important in older age as osteoporosis and associated fractures are a major cause of bone-related diseases and mortality in older adults.</p> <p>Most adults need 700mg of calcium per day. However, women past the menopause and men over 55 should have 1200mg of calcium per day. There’s a wide range of non-dairy food products that contain calcium for those who are plant-based, including calcium fortified soya milk and almond milk, calcium fortified cereals, pitta bread, chapatti and white bread.</p> <p>For those who include fish in their diet, fish such as whitebait, and sardines and pilchards (with bones) contain good amounts of calcium per serving.</p> <p>Older adults are also recommended to get 10 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin D daily. Not only is vitamin D important for bone health, it’s also one of the nutrients involved in supporting the immune system and helping it to function properly. Older adults are more vulnerable to deficiency as they may have less sunlight exposure, and their skin is less able to synthesise vitamin D.</p> <p>Mushrooms grown in sunlight, fortified spreads, breakfast cereals, and dairy alternatives are all good sources of vitamin D.</p> <p>Having said this, it’s hard to get vitamin D from diet alone, so a supplement of 10mcg a day (especially in the winter for those who may not get outside often), is recommended. It’s worth noting that some vitamin D supplements aren’t suitable for vegans, as they may be derived from an animal source, so vitamin D2 and lichen-derived vitamin D3 may be used instead.</p> <p><strong>3. Get your vitamin B12</strong><br />Vitamin B12 is essential for making red blood cells, keeping the nervous system healthy, and providing energy. Older adults need 1.5 micrograms of vitamin B12 per day, similar to younger adults. But many older people may be at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency, affecting an estimated one in twenty people aged 65 to 74 and one in ten people over 75.</p> <p>Those who don’t eat meat, fish or eggs may not be getting enough vitamin B12, as it’s found abundantly in animal-based food sources. Some plant-based sources of vitamin B12 include fortified breakfast cereals, yeast extracts (like Marmite), soya yoghurts, and non-dairy milks. People may consider taking a Vitamin B12 supplement. Taking 2mg or less a day of vitamin B12 in supplements is unlikely to cause any harm. However, they should consult their doctor or registered dietitian first.</p> <p><strong>4. Eat iron-rich foods</strong><br />Low iron intake can be an issue for those who don’t have a varied diet, especially for men aged 65 and over living in residential care homes and women over 85.</p> <p>Iron is essential for making red blood cells, which carry oxygen around the body. It’s also essential for physical performance, wound healing, supporting the immune system, cognitive development and function and thyroid metabolism. Older adults need 8.7mg of iron a day.</p> <p>Foods containing vitamin C – such as citrus fruits – may help the body absorb iron better. Alexandra Anschiz/ Shutterstock<br />Plant sources include wholegrains, green leafy vegetables like spinach, seeds, pulses and dried fruits. Since iron in plant foods is absorbed less efficiently compared to iron in animal proteins, having vitamin C-rich foods like citrus fruits, green pepper and broccoli can help iron be better absorbed.</p> <p><strong>5. Make every bite count</strong><br />Some people find their appetite decreases as they get older. This can be caused by difficulties with chewing and swallowing, constipation, acute illness, impaired taste, vision and smell. But reduced appetite can contribute to unintentional weight loss and nutritional deficiencies. It’s therefore important to find ways to get adequate nutrition in every meal, especially when plant-based, such as:</p> <ul> <li>Including protein in each meal.</li> <li>Eat small meals and snacks in between throughout the day.</li> <li>Include plant-based milks (such as soya, almond, or coconut milk) in your tea, coffee or smoothie.</li> <li>Add olive, vegetable or sunflower oil to your favourite meals.</li> <li>Mix plant creams or vegan cheese in mashed potatoes, soups and stews.</li> <li>Add nut butters to bread, dairy-free yoghurt and smoothies.</li> </ul> <p>No matter your age, switching to a plant-based diet may have many health benefits if planned properly. Consulting with a registered dietitian before making the switch may help you develop the best plant-based diet tailored to your specific needs.</p> <p><em>Written by Taibat Ibitoye. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/vegetarian-and-vegan-diet-five-things-for-over-65s-to-consider-when-switching-to-a-plant-based-diet-144088">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Government prepared to hand out restaurant vouchers to families

<p>The NSW government may hand out restaurant vouchers to families in a bid to boost the economy. </p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/coronavirus-mealticket-plan-to-get-economy-cooking/news-story/9806e3f5f422b7a4e188d7bd8b8a1e1f" target="_blank">The Australian</a> </em>first reported the scheme, claiming it would be a part of the state’s budget plan.</p> <p>Treasurer Dominic Perrottet is reportedly considering the plan and a decision will be made in the coming weeks.</p> <p>The proposal is set to cost about $500 million and vouchers would only be given to residents older than 18.</p> <p>Families will receive the full voucher amount and single person households will receive $50.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>2GB’s<span> </span></em>Ben Fordham, Gladys Berejiklian said she could not confirm or deny whether the voucher scheme will go ahead.</p> <p>“We are still putting finishing touches on the budget,” she said on Friday morning.</p> <p>“But I want (people) to be assured of one thing … we get how tough it is for a lot of people at the moment.</p> <p>“We’re hoping to take care of everybody who’s going through those difficult times,” the Premier added in reference to the NSW budget.</p> <p>The measure has reportedly already been signed off by the government’s Expenditure Review Committee, which is chaired by Mr Perrottet.</p> <p>However the decision is yet to be put to cabinet, the publication reported.</p> <p>The state’s COVID-19 budget will be handed down on November 17.</p>

Food & Wine

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Woolworths reveals "premium" features of new supermarket

<p>Woolworths has opened a new "premium" supermarket in Erskineville which allows customers to slice their own bread or purchase pizza or pasta made right in store.</p> <p>The new Woolworths Metro opens this week and is stocked with products from local Sydney producers, offering a more handmade and organic range of products.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Woolworths said in a statement that the store was an Australian-first and includes a bakehouse managed by the Bread and Butter Project. This is an initiative offering training programs and employment pathways for refugees seeking asylum who want to become bakers.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838661/woolies-hero.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5d057e364ad64dedb36549e33b1fa1bb" /></p> <p>“We are incredibly excited to be opening our first concession store with Woolworths Metro, as it gives us the opportunity to bring our delicious bread to a wider audience, starting in Erskineville,” Bread and Butter Project chairperson Cindy Carpenter said.</p> <p>“Our trained bakers will carry out on-site mixing, proving, shaping and baking, ensuring every product will be made fresh from scratch to provide the people of Erskineville and inner Sydney with the freshest sourdough breads at regular intervals throughout the day.</p> <p>“In addition, having a presence in Woolworths Metro offers our trainees vital future retail training and employment opportunities, at a time when alternative work options are in short supply.”</p> <p>Woolworths Metro general Manager Justin Nolan said taht the supermarket giant wanted to offer a more convenient experience for customers.</p> <p>“Whether it’s the speed and ease of Scan&amp;Go shopping or the extensive range of ‘meal to go’ solutions on offer, it’s all about giving local customers time back in their busy lives,” Mr Nolan said.</p> <p>“We've focused on creating a food store that is locally relevant to the Erskineville community and we can’t wait to welcome customers into our store.”</p> <p>Scan&amp;Go technology allows customers to scan products on their phones as they walk through the store and pay on an app.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/woolworths-reveals-premium-features-new-supermarket-061057600.html" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Yahoo News</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Yes, Adele has sung its praises. But the Sirtfood diet may be just another fad

<p>The Sirtfood diet has been in the news again this week after singer Adele showed off her slimmed-down figure on US comedy show Saturday Night Live.</p> <p>Adele has previously credited her significant weight loss to the Sirtfood diet. Following her appearance on SNL, there was a spike in people searching the diet on Google.</p> <p>But what exactly is the Sirtfood diet, and does it work?</p> <p><strong>What’s the premise?</strong><br />Two nutritionists in the United Kingdom launched the Sirtfood diet in 2016.</p> <p>The premise is that a group of proteins called sirtuins, which are involved in regulation of metabolism, inflammation and ageing, can be accelerated by eating specific foods rich in a class of phytonutrients called polyphenols.</p> <p>Phytonutrients are chemical compounds plants produce to help them grow well or defend themselves. Research is continuing to shed light on their potential benefits for human health.</p> <p>The idea is that eating foods rich in polyphenols, referred to as “Sirtfoods”, will increase the body’s ability to burn fat, boosting metabolism and leading to dramatic weight loss.</p> <p>Common Sirtfoods include, apples, soybean, kale, blueberries, strawberries, dark chocolate (85% cocoa), red wine, matcha green tea, onions and olive oil. The Sirtfood diet gets some of its fame because red wine and chocolate are on the list.</p> <p><strong>Two phases</strong><br />The diet involves two phases over three weeks. During the first three days, total energy intake is restricted to 4,200 kilojoules per day (or 1,000 Calories).</p> <p>To achieve this, you drink three sirtfood green juice drinks that include kale, celery, rocket, parsley, matcha green tea and lemon juice. You also eat one “Sirtfood” meal, such as a chicken and kale curry.</p> <p>On days four to seven, you have 2-3 green juices and one or two meals up to a total energy intake of 6,300 kJ/day (1,500kcal).</p> <p>During the next two weeks — phase two — total energy intake should be in the range of 6,300-7,500 kJ/day (1,500-1,800 kcal) with three meals, one green juice, and one or two Sirtfood snacks.</p> <p>There’s a diet book available for purchase which gives you the recipes.</p> <p>After three weeks, the recommendation is to eat a “balanced diet” rich in Sirtfoods, along with regular green juices.</p> <p><strong>Positives</strong><br />The idea of losing a lot of weight in just three weeks will appeal to many people.</p> <p>The eating plan encourages a range of polyphenol-rich foods that are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and dietary fibre, and would be recommended in a range of diets designed to assist with weight management, or as part of a healthy, balanced eating plan.</p> <p>A weight loss diet will be effective if it achieves sustained total daily energy restriction. So the biggest benefit of the Sirtfood diet is the daily energy restriction — you are likely to lose weight if you stick to it.</p> <p>Also, the exclusion of energy-dense, ultra-processed “junk” foods will help lower the risk for chronic disease.</p> <p>But there are drawbacks to consider too.</p> <p><strong>Negatives</strong><br />It would be wise to watch the portion size for some of the foods listed, such as red wine and chocolate.</p> <p>Like most restrictive diets, phase one may be challenging and is not recommended for people with underlying health conditions without the supervision of a health professional.</p> <p>The rapid weight loss in the first phase will reflect a loss of water and glycogen, the stored form of energy in muscles and the liver, rather than being all body fat.</p> <p>Rapid weight loss can increase the risk of gallstones and amenorrhoea (missing menstrual periods).</p> <p>The food list includes specific products that may be hard to locate in Australia, such as lovage, a European leafy green plant whose leaves can used used as a herb, roots as a vegetable and seeds as a spice. Some other items on the list can be expensive.</p> <p><strong>Sirt science</strong><br />Most research has looked at the sirtuin-mediated effects of energy restriction in worms, mice or specific body tissues. No studies have tested the effect of diets that vary polyphenol content on the action of sirtuins in mediating weight loss.</p> <p>A search on PubMed, the scientific database of research studies, didn’t locate any human trials of the Sirtfood diet. So the short answer about whether the Sirtfood diet works or not is we don’t know.</p> <p>The authors’ claims about effectiveness are based on anecdotal information from their own research and from personal testimonials, such as the one from Adele.</p> <p>Considering the hype surrounding the Sirtfood diet against a checklist on spotting a fad diet sounds alarm bells. For example:</p> <ul> <li>does it promote or ban specific foods?</li> <li>does it promote a one-size-fits-all approach?</li> <li>does it promise quick, dramatic results?</li> <li>does it focus only on short-term results?</li> <li>does it make claims based on personal testimonials?</li> </ul> <p>Looking at the Sirtfood diet, the answers to most of these questions seem to be “yes”, or at least a partial yes.</p> <p>The best diet for weight loss is one that meets your nutrient requirements, promotes health and well-being, and that you can stick with long-term.</p> <p><em>Written by Clare Collins, Lee Ashton and Rebecca Williams. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/yes-adele-has-sung-its-praises-but-the-sirtfood-diet-may-be-just-another-fad-148902">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Coles responds to bizarre "spray tan" egg theory

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Shoppers have come up with an interesting new theory about Coles-branded eggs having a brown colour that washes off under water.</p> <p>A curious shopper asked the supermarket if it was "doing something funky" with its eggs and posted a video with proof.</p> <p>the video shows an egg that appeared to be brown become a pale beige colour after being lightly rubbed under a running tap.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcoles%2Fposts%2F3753259561404698&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=552&amp;height=735&amp;appId" width="552" height="735" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>“Hey Coles, are you guys doing something funky with your eggs these days? They look like they have been given a spray tan that rubs off when you put them in warm water or boil them,” the woman wrote.</p> <p>“Before washing the residue off, all the eggs are a pretty standard brown colour. Once you wash them, they are rather different in colour compared to each other,” she explained.</p> <p>Another shopper agreed, saying that they've discovered this from their own "anecdotal evidence" that some sort of "artificial colouring may be happening".</p> <p>“Someone somewhere has decided that an even-toned brown egg somehow sells better. If that actually is the case, that is a new and special level of dumb,” they wrote.</p> <p>Coles has since responded to the claims to <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/coles-responds-shoppers-bizarre-egg-theory-052558180.html" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>Yahoo News</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>“Egg colour including white specks can be influenced by a number of factors including bird age, access to minerals in the range and access to additional calcium in their diet,” the spokesperson told Yahoo News Australia.</p> <p>“Our egg suppliers also sometimes use oil during the egg grading process to help seal the porous shell of the egg and preserve quality. The colouration on these eggs look to be a combination of the above effects.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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“STAY AWAY”: ALDI warns customers to prepare for disappointment

<p>ALDI has announced that shoppers must be prepared for disappointment ahead of an upcoming Special Buys set to release for the festival season.</p> <p>The supermarket has said there are issues due to delays with some advertised products that can be blamed on industrial action at Port Botany in Sydney and other container terminals.</p> <p>ALDI Australia’s director of customer interactions Adrian Christie has informed news.com.au the supermarket that they are not proud in discouraging people to shop but it has little choice.</p> <p>“Stay away if what you’re after will not be in stock, but if you want the usual things like milk and bread you’ll be fine,” Mr Christie said.</p> <p>ALDI’s product page shows a number of items that will not be available in each state or territory ahead of Saturday’s Special Buys.</p> <p>One high-demand item which is currently gracing the front cover of ALDI’s Special Buys catalogue is a $99.99 seven-foot Christmas tree.</p> <p>The Winchester Luxury Pre-lit LED Christmas Tree, that is a high-demand item, will be unavailable in every state except Queensland.</p> <p>Mr Christie said the grand tree is one of the reasons ALDI is warning shoppers to be prepared for delays.</p> <p>“A seven-foot Christmas tree is not something you necessarily want to take home on the bus; so we know people recruit friends or borrow utes and big cars to get the tree. We want to minimise the disruption,” he told news.com.au.</p> <p>Another six-foot Christmas tree is delayed in all states except Western Australia, while a huge variety of festive lights, decorations and craft items will not be available for purchase around the country.</p> <p>ALDI said the products should be delivered later in the week, but it would all depend on how quickly the port could clear the backlog.</p>

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Adele has sung its praises but the Sirtfood diet may be just another fad

<p>The Sirtfood diet has been <a href="https://nypost.com/2020/10/24/snl-host-adeles-weight-loss-with-sirtfood-diet-inspires-fans/">in the news</a> again this week after singer Adele showed off her slimmed-down figure on US comedy show Saturday Night Live.</p> <p>Adele has <a href="https://coach.nine.com.au/diet/sirtfood-diet-behind-adeles-weight-loss-explained-by-a-dietitian/552b4d0e-c543-4095-8564-e9e819489215">previously credited</a> her significant weight loss to the Sirtfood diet. Following her appearance on SNL, there was a spike in people searching the diet <a href="https://trends.google.com.au/trends/explore?q=Sirtfood&amp;geo=US">on Google</a>.</p> <p>But what exactly is the Sirtfood diet, and does it work?</p> <p><strong>What’s the premise?</strong></p> <p>Two nutritionists in the United Kingdom launched the Sirtfood diet <a href="https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/what-sirtfood-diet">in 2016</a>.</p> <p>The premise is that a group of proteins called <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirtuin">sirtuins</a>, which are involved in <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24115767/">regulation of metabolism, inflammation and ageing</a>, can be accelerated by eating specific foods rich in a class of phytonutrients called polyphenols.</p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/phytonutrients-can-boost-your-health-here-are-4-and-where-to-find-them-including-in-your-next-cup-of-coffee-132100">Phytonutrients</a> are chemical compounds plants produce to help them grow well or defend themselves. Research is continuing to shed light on their potential benefits for human health.</p> <p>The idea is that eating <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21045839/">foods rich in polyphenols</a>, referred to as “Sirtfoods”, will increase the body’s ability to burn fat, boosting metabolism and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23043250/">leading to dramatic weight loss</a>.</p> <p>Common Sirtfoods include, apples, soybean, kale, blueberries, strawberries, dark chocolate (85% cocoa), red wine, matcha green tea, onions and olive oil. The Sirtfood diet gets some of its fame because red wine and chocolate are on the list.</p> <p><strong>Two phases</strong></p> <p>The diet involves <a href="https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/what-sirtfood-diet">two phases</a> over three weeks. During the first three days, total energy intake is restricted to 4,200 kilojoules per day (or 1,000 Calories).</p> <p>To achieve this, you drink three sirtfood green juice drinks that include kale, celery, rocket, parsley, matcha green tea and lemon juice. You also eat one “Sirtfood” meal, such as a chicken and kale curry.</p> <p>On days four to seven, you have 2-3 green juices and one or two meals up to a total energy intake of 6,300 kJ/day (1,500kcal).</p> <p>During the next two weeks — phase two — total energy intake should be in the range of 6,300-7,500 kJ/day (1,500-1,800 kcal) with three meals, one green juice, and one or two Sirtfood snacks.</p> <p>There’s a <a href="https://metro.co.uk/2020/10/25/adele-weight-loss-what-is-the-sirtfood-diet-and-is-there-a-sirtfood-diet-recipe-book-13476892/">diet book</a> available for purchase which gives you the recipes.</p> <p>After three weeks, the recommendation is to eat a “balanced diet” rich in Sirtfoods, along with regular green juices.</p> <p><strong>Positives</strong></p> <p>The idea of losing a lot of weight in just three weeks will appeal to many people.</p> <p>The eating plan encourages a range of polyphenol-rich foods that are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and dietary fibre, and would be recommended in a range of diets designed to assist with weight management, or as part of a healthy, balanced eating plan.</p> <p>A weight loss diet will be effective if it achieves sustained total daily energy restriction. So the biggest benefit of the Sirtfood diet is the daily energy restriction — you are likely to lose weight if you stick to it.</p> <p>Also, the exclusion of energy-dense, ultra-processed “junk” foods will help <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33012621/">lower the risk for chronic disease</a>.</p> <p>But there are drawbacks to consider too.</p> <p><strong>Negatives</strong></p> <p>It would be wise to watch the portion size for some of the foods listed, such as red wine and chocolate.</p> <p>Like most restrictive diets, phase one may be challenging and is not recommended for people with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31207126/">underlying health conditions</a> without the supervision of a health professional</p> <p>The rapid weight loss in the first phase will reflect a loss of water and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glycogen">glycogen</a>, the stored form of energy in muscles and the liver, rather than being all body fat.</p> <p>Rapid weight loss can increase the risk of <a href="https://theconversation.com/got-gallstones-heres-what-to-eat-and-avoid-53229">gallstones</a> and <a href="https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/menstruation-amenorrhoea">amenorrhoea</a> (missing menstrual periods).</p> <p>The food list includes specific products that may be hard to locate in Australia, such as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovage">lovage</a>, a European leafy green plant whose leaves can used used as a herb, roots as a vegetable and seeds as a spice. Some other items on the list can be expensive.</p> <p><strong>Sirt science</strong></p> <p>Most research has looked at the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24115767/">sirtuin-mediated effects</a> of energy restriction in worms, mice or specific body tissues. No studies have tested the effect of diets that vary polyphenol content on the action of sirtuins in mediating weight loss.</p> <p>A search on PubMed, the scientific database of research studies, didn’t locate any human trials of the Sirtfood diet. So the short answer about whether the Sirtfood diet works or not is we don’t know.</p> <p>The authors’ claims about effectiveness are based on anecdotal information from their own research and from personal testimonials, such as the one from Adele.</p> <p>Considering the hype surrounding the Sirtfood diet against a checklist on <a href="https://theconversation.com/blood-type-pioppi-gluten-free-and-mediterranean-which-popular-diets-are-fads-104867">spotting a fad diet</a> sounds alarm bells. For example:</p> <ul> <li>does it promote or ban specific foods?</li> <li>does it promote a one-size-fits-all approach?</li> <li>does it promise quick, dramatic results?</li> <li>does it focus only on short-term results?</li> <li>does it make claims based on personal testimonials?</li> </ul> <p>Looking at the Sirtfood diet, the answers to most of these questions seem to be “yes”, or at least a partial yes.</p> <p>The best diet for weight loss is one that meets your nutrient requirements, promotes health and well-being, and that you can stick with long-term.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/clare-collins-7316">Clare Collins</a>, University of Newcastle; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lee-ashton-336722">Lee Ashton</a>, University of Newcastle, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rebecca-williams-354598">Rebecca Williams</a>, University of Newcastle. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/yes-adele-has-sung-its-praises-but-the-sirtfood-diet-may-be-just-another-fad-148902">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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Woman's perfect response after bungled Woolies delivery

<p>A Woolies shopper has taken to TikTok to share the hilarious alternative to triple-A batteries after the supermarket was out of stock.</p> <p>The video by @gracevp102 which has been watched over 130,000 times shows the woman replace batteries with the next best thing: Bread.</p> <p>“Is there anyone here that works for Woolies?” Grace asks in the clip.</p> <p>“So I ordered triple A batteries and they swapped me with a loaf of bread … I’m allergic to wheat.”</p> <p>Seeing the funny side of the situation, Grace then shared footage of her using the bread in place of the batteries she had really needed to fix her smoke alarm and recharge her TV remote.</p> <p><img style="width: 376.20578778135047px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838529/screen-shot-2020-10-30-at-113435-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a35172c3bb22456faa975ce6b9108012" /></p> <p>A Woolworths spokesman told news.com.au that while their personal shoppers work hard they’re also understandably human and make mistakes.</p> <p>“We know it’s frustrating when our substitutes are wrong and we apologise to the customer for missing the mark on this occasion,” they said.</p> <p>“Our team of personal shoppers work hard to pick perfect orders for our customers, but they’re human and don’t get it right every time.</p> <p>“We’re happy to offer refunds when we get it wrong and will contact the customer to offer one.”</p> <p>Many viewers found the video hilarious, posting comments about their own experiences.</p> <p>“We ordered 5kg of potatoes and got a single potato in a plastic bag,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“I ordered So Good soy vanilla ice cream and they replaced it with cookies and cream,” one comment read.</p> <p>“I’m allergic to gluten and dairy.”</p> <p>“You did it wrong, you’re supposed to put the bread inside of the remote,” another joked. “But yeah I always get random things.”</p>

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The naked truth about Naked Wines

<p>Behind every bottle of wine is a talented winemaker. But do you know who they are? </p> <p>If you buy your wine at a typical bottle shop, you won’t. They’re an invisible part of a big wine company (or supermarket – you’d be surprised how many wine brands are owned by Woolies and Coles) with someone else's name on the label.</p> <p>In 2012, Naked Wines set out to change that by backing talented independent Aussie and Kiwi winemakers to make their own wine exclusively for their customers. </p> <p>That way, the winemakers get upfront funding and spend less time selling and more time making their best wine. And Naked’s customers get super quality wines that cost much less than traditional retail.</p> <p><strong>Why ‘Naked’?</strong> </p> <p>It’s nothing to do with a lack of clothes! The company’s called Naked because everything except the wine is stripped back – you’re not paying for hidden costs that drive the prices up like distribution and advertising. You get exactly what you pay for (amazing quality wine) while having the satisfaction that you’re supporting local independent winemakers!</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838545/o60embednaked-wines-editorial-51-72dpi.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e9afb5b058e948fd9291dbdc7b63e517" /></p> <p><strong>Who are the Naked winemakers?</strong></p> <p>They’re some of the best in Australia and New Zealand. Talented folk who’ve worked for famous labels like Yalumba, Penfolds, Wolf Blass and Vasse Felix and now work for themselves. Naked Wines give them the freedom to make their own wines their way and have fun along the way.</p> <p><strong>Is this a wine club?</strong></p> <p>Naked Wines is not a wine club – it’s a thriving wine community!</p> <p>The website is a lively hub for not only buying wine, but posting and reading millions of Naked wine reviews, connecting with each other and ‘chatting’ with the winemakers themselves. </p> <p>You can buy whatever wines you want there, when you want, and they’ll be delivered to your door with a refund for any you try and don’t like.</p> <p>Anyone can buy wines at <a href="http://nakedwines.com.au">nakedwines.com.au</a>, but their Angel members get the best deal. In return for a small monthly credit to their Naked Wines account to use against their future orders, Angels get the red carpet treatment like up to 40% off the retail price, exclusive access to wines you can’t buy anywhere else, free samples with certain purchases, and delivery discounts. </p> <p>That’s why there are over 100,000 of them!</p> <p><strong>What now?</strong></p> <p>Naked Wines gives wine drinkers a simple way to enjoy fantastic Australian and New Zealand wines at amazing prices and support independent winemakers into the bargain. If that sounds something you’d like to be part of, claim a voucher for $100 off your first case of Naked Wines <a href="https://www.nakedwines.com.au/abv6q320">here.</a></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with </em><a href="http://nakedwines.com.au/"><em>Naked Wines</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p> </p>

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“Check your receipts”: Unlikely glitch leads to free meat for happy shopper

<p>A Coles customer has confirmed customers should check their receipts before leaving the store.</p> <p>Shopper Wendi from a popular Facebook group has revealed how she scored a large pack of porterhouse steak for free after taking a closer look at her docket.</p> <p>The original posted said that when she picked up the meat from the display, she noticed that it had been marked down from $34 to $28 a kilo.</p> <p>However, when the steak was scanned at the register, Wendi was charged the full price instead of a reduced price.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838502/coles-meat-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5a474424fc49449f8f496fed41611a32" /></p> <p>After paying for her item, Wendi checked her docket and realised the mistake.</p> <p>She was able to get the product for free due to Cole’s “Promise on Price Scanning”.</p> <p>The Coles policy states that “If a single item scans at a higher price than the advertised or ticketed shelf price for that item, we will give you that item FREE.”</p> <p>Wendi said it pays to be careful when it comes to receipts.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838501/coles-meat-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fc89914bd3fb41cfb2796e50803a9027" /></p> <p>“Check your dockets, folks,” she wrote on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/2111126989104914" target="_blank">Markdown Madness Australia</a> page.</p> <p>Other shoppers went on to echo Wendi’s words of advice.</p> <p>“Just yesterday I got English muffins from a bin that said $2.50 and when I got home I see I was charged $5! So annoying,” said one.</p> <p>Added wrote: “Yep always check dockets, it’s crazy how many times you get over charged. At least one item each shop seems to get scanned wrong.”</p>

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