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Pregnant woman discovers “sickening” find in Coles salad

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Coles shopper has shared the shocking find in a pre-prepared salad she purchased from her local store in Perth.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Aleisha - who is also eight months pregnant - shared her story on Facebook and said she was shocked to discover a dead praying mantis in the ready-to-eat Coles Kitchen Garden Salad Bowl.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In photos the mum-to-be posted, the insect she found in the salad mix appeared to be about the same size as a carrot straw.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Concerningly, Aleisha claimed she was halfway through eating the salad before finding the large insect.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Bought this garden salad … last night and was halfway through eating it when I found a dead praying mantis in it,” Aleisha said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m eight months pregnant and the thought of the bacteria this would have is sickening.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though some users were concerned about eating pre-made salads while pregnant, others directed the conversation back to the main issue.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t see how the comments on whether pre-packaged salad should or should not be eaten while pregnant is even relevant,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Let’s not take away the focus from the bug in the salad that is the problem here,” another commented.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Yuck,” said a third.</span></p> <p><strong>Image Credit: 7NEWS</strong></p>

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This new pasta is whacky but sustainable

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The way we make our pasta is being challenged, with researchers developing a style inspired by flat-packed furniture.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have developed a flat kind of pasta that becomes a more conventional shape as it cooks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This approach could make pasta production more sustainable, with potential savings on packaging, transportation and energy costs, while tasting like the food we all know and love.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By taking advantage of the expanding and softening that occurs when pasta is boiled, the scientists were able to create flat pasta that turns into rigatoni-like tubes, fusilli-like spirals, and long noodles.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ye Tao, one of the researchers involved in the project, tested the flat-pack pasta on a hiking trip and found it didn’t break en route and could be cooked on a portable stove while camping.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The morphed pasta mimicked the mouthfeel, taste and appearance of traditional pasta,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since traditional pasta can be difficult to package and take up a lot of space, the researchers hope their pasta can become a more sustainable option.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We were inspired by flat-packed furniture and how it saved space, made storage easier and reduced the carbon footprint associated with transportation,” said Lining Yao, director of the Morphing Matter Lab at CMU’s School of Computer Science.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We decided to look at how the morphing matter technology we were developing in the lab could create flat-packed pasta that offered similar sustainability outcomes.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers also applied their pasta-making technique, published in the journal </span><a href="https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/7/19/eabf4098"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Science Advances</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, to swelling silicon sheets and believe it could be useful in the world of robotics and biomedicine.</span></p>

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Coles called out over hilariously bungled order

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Coles has been labelled a “total joke” following a blunder in one of their online orders.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a Facebook post, Emma, a customer who opted to only share her first name, shared the mishap after she received an email stating she would receive mandarins in place of two brown onions included in her online order.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though Emma could see the humour in the situation, she could not believe how two radically different items could be considered as appropriate substitutes for each other.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Would I be able to get an explanation of how this substitute is even a remotely equivalent product?” she wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Emma acknowledged product substitutions were a possibility when placing an online order.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I understand that when an item is not available, an equivalent product may be substituted in its place at no extra cost, but I just don’t see how a mandarin could be seen as a suitable substitute for onions,” she posted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Coles employee commented on the post and claimed the customer’s “personal shopper would have done their best to find you the closest product to the one you ordered”, saying they were “sorry to hear” about her “poor experience”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Other commenters shared their doubts that Coles had tried their hardest to find an appropriate substitution and asked “how an onion is close to a citrus fruit”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a plot twist, Emma shared with Yahoo News Australia that when the order arrived, there were the brown onions she ordered and no mandarins.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was fully expecting to have a mandarin in the bags somewhere. But nope, ended up getting what I ordered,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The order arrived shortly after she received the email and made the post about the substitution on Coles’ Facebook page.</span></p>

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Women’s “utterly gross” find inside Freddo Frog

<p>A video that will leave your stomach churning has shown what crawled out of a Cadbury chocolate and its packaging.</p> <p>A woman who purchased a Freddo Frog from Sydney’s Bondi Beach Woolworths a few weeks ago, says it left her feeling disgusted.</p> <p>The pack was still within its 2022 expiry date, however the mum of the woman who purchased the Freddo frog says a live maggot could be soon worming its way throughout the wrapper.</p> <p>There was another across the piece of chocolate.</p> <p>She claimed Cadbury had offered her $25 as compensation "for eating maggots".</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841035/cadbury.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a80a860cfdac48ba998a8f6bb9368814" /></p> <p>"That is bloody gross and I would be traumatised," one person said in an angry comment.</p> <p>"Disgusting — thanks for sharing. $25 is not enough, I agree. Lucky you noticed before opening and eating and getting sick — completely and utterly gross," another took to the comments to write.</p> <p>Other people felt the woman was being overly dramatic, however and argued that $25 was more than fair compensation.</p> <p>"Get over it. Bad shit happens, there's children starving in Africa, and kids with cancer. Put it in the bin and get over it," one person responded.</p> <p>A Cadbury spokesperson said the incident was likely caused by a breed of moth entering the chocolate while being stored.</p> <p>“We’re sorry to hear about their experience. Our dedicated teams work hard to ensure our products are in the best possible condition when they’re enjoyed by our consumers," they told Yahoo News Australia.</p> <p>“Based on the pictures, it looks like Warehouse or Indian Meal Moths have entered the product in storage. These bugs are common around the world and can gain access to a range of different food products including dried fruit, nuts, pasta, and bread without visibly damaging the packaging.</p> <p>“We put in place a range of measures at our distribution centres to minimise the risk of these common bugs entering our packaging, and work closely with stores and transport companies to help them maintain an environment that minimises the risk. However, on this occasion, it looks like the product has been affected in transit or storage.”</p>

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Woolworths accused of “disgusting” Anzac biscuit scandal

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Woolworths has rejected claims it renamed Anzac biscuits after social media outrage caused by a recent recipe in one of its catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Posts appearing on Facebook and Twitter suggested the supermarket giant had succumbed to “cancel culture” by removing the word Anzac from its biscuit recipes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the lead-up to Anzac Day, Woolworths featured a recipe for Golden Oat Biscuits in one of its catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Noticing the striking similarity between the oat biscuits and the traditional Anzac biscuits, one person claimed, “Woolworths in their woke wisdom has changed the name of Anzac biscuits calling them golden oats because it may insult some people.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another shopper claimed the name change was “disgusting and a slap in the face for our Anzacs”, vowing to never shop at the supermarket again.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Clarification came when a spokesperson told Yahoo News Australia the biscuits were not called Anzac Day biscuits out of respect for the strict guidelines set by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The Department of Veterans’ Affairs has strict regulations around the word Anzac and how it can be used on products or in marketing,” they said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We didn’t have the relevant approvals to use the term for this particular recipe placement in the catalogue and wanted to ensure we respected the regulations.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 335.4166666666667px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840941/woolworths-biscuits.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3499d58e56df4033b6242382ddd4640c" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Companies considering using the word Anzac in their products need to be approved by the department first, which Woolworths did not pursue in this instance.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia understands the Golden Oat Biscuits recipe has featured in previous catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The spokesperson reiterated Anzac biscuits were still available to purchase and had been approved for sale, with proceeds helping raise funds for veterans and their families.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia also reached out to the Department of Veterans’ Affairs to clarify on what the approved recipe is and whether Woolworths recipe would have been approved if an application had been submitted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Comparing a 2014 recipe published by the department against the Woolworths recipe, both recipes feature the same ingredients but they use varying measures.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the guidelines, “The use of the word ‘Anzac’ in the commercial production and sale of Anzac biscuits is usually approved, however the biscuits must not substantially deviate from the generally accepted recipe and shape, and must be referred to as ‘Anzac Biscuits’”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The biscuits must avoid any additions such as chocolate chips and must not be called cookies.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><strong>Image credit: Woolworths</strong></p>

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Cadbury releases mega-size of popular chocolate

<p>Just when you thought the Cadbury Caramilk chocolate couldn't get any better, the confectioner decides to release a giant version.</p> <p>The makers of the "golden" treat confirmed to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://news.com.au/" target="_blank">news.com.au</a><span> </span>it now has a 315g block after a shopper spotted it at their local Woolies store last week.</p> <p>“Now comes in big blocks,” the fan simply wrote in a Facebook post, alongside a snap of the huge, new treat.</p> <p>The man's post garnered plenty of attention, attracting hundreds of likes and comments from fellow fans.</p> <p>“Mother of God!” one person wrote.</p> <p>“Oh dear lorrdddyyy,” a second person added.</p> <p>“Dangerous,” said a third, while a fourth wrote, “I’ve already looked – Coles don’t have it yet.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/COFhnFhpDvt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/COFhnFhpDvt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Willy Wonka (@junkfoodoz)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 315g block is currently only available at Woolworths and retails for $6.</p> <p>“The newest block began to hit shelves in early-April and is available at Woolworths,” a Cadbury spokesperson told news.com.au.</p> <p>“Cadbury Caramilk is one of Australia’s most loved chocolates due to the heavenly caramelised white chocolate.”</p> <p>The new size compares to the current 180g family block, which usually costs $5, but is currently on sale for $3.50 at both Woolworths and Coles.</p> <p>The news comes after Cadbury revealed to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://news.com.au/" target="_blank">news.com.au</a><span> </span>it has Caramilk Marble - combining the two popular flavours to form one block.</p> <p>“Cadbury Caramilk and Cadbury Dairy Milk Marble are two of our cult favourites, so combining them both to create a new taste experience is sure to excite chocolate lovers across the country,” Katrina Watson, senior marketing manager for Cadbury, told news.com.au in March.</p>

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ALDI releases insanely affordable family dinner option

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’ve ever been drawn to the convenience of a meal kit - where everything is included and you just have to cook it - this is the news for you.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ALDI, known for their exclusive and own-brand food products that have attracted so many loyal fans, has launched its first series of DIY cooking kits.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So what sets these apart from the dozens of other meal kits? For one thing, you can pick them up during your weekly shop and avoid the online ordering and commitment that comes with subscription-based kits. The second, and most important thing, is the low price, at just $3.99 a kit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though they aren’t as comprehensive as kits such as Hello Fresh, they are still worth it. Unlike the standard sauce with noodles or rice kits already available in supermarkets, these ones include all the veggies you’ll need, already prepped. The one thing you’ll need to pick up yourself are the necessary proteins and carbohydrates.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though the kits require you to purchase your noodles and chicken as well, they still feed a family of four for about $14, or $3.50 per person. Plus, you can easily substitute items for ones you prefer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each kit comes with a QR code that takes you to demonstrations that will walk you through each recipe, saving you from having to worry or plan dinner when you’re out of energy or time.</span></p>

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This Is the Scientific Secret Behind the Perfect Cup of Coffee

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All coffee is not created equal. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coffee quality will change from city to city, roast to roast, and brewing method to brewing method. Purists might tell you to eschew the milk and sugar, but ultimately it’s your bean water and you can do with it what you wish. But when it comes down to the process before the additives, is there a science behind nailing the perfect brew? Yes, </span><a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/science-behind-brewing-great-cup-coffee-180965049/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">according to the Smithsonian</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are a few factors that need to be closely monitored in order to achieve the ideal caffeinated cup. Christopher H. Hendon, a materials chemist, breaks down the nitty gritty scientific details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The variables of temperature, water chemistry, particle size distribution, ratio of water to coffee, time and, perhaps most importantly, the quality of the green coffee all play crucial roles in producing a tasty cup,” he writes, “It’s how we control these variables that allows for that cup to be reproducible.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A trait that plays a key role in making your coffee experience enjoyable is the concentration of coffee constituents, naturally occurring chemicals found in the grounds. The ideal coffee constituent concentration of 1.2-1.5 percent can be achieved through certain brewing methods, specifically “pour-over, Turkish, Arabic, Aeropress, French press, siphon or batch brew.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Water also plays a key role in the whole process and knowing the composition of your tap water makes a difference.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ideal acidity is right in the middle, a good way to glean what a good cup should taste like is to brew a batch with Evian, which has “one of the highest bicarbonate concentrations in bottled waters.” The ground of your coffee also matters, but Hendon details that there are arguments to be made for both coarse (less chance of small particles with negative flavours impacting the taste), and fine (better chance of richer, bolder taste), so it’s best to experiment to find out what you like best.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And finally, freshness is incredibly key. The longer your beans sit on the shelf, the more “volatiles”, gaseous organic molecules that affect flavour, escape. The coffee you buy at a cafe will generally be relatively freshly roasted, and almost never more than four weeks removed from its roast date. So as a rule of thumb, buy fresh and use quickly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The full article really dives into some of the tough physics and chemistry involved in the process, </span><a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/science-behind-brewing-great-cup-coffee-180965049/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">read on here</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. A lot of it comes down to taste, but the three non-negotiable factors that are easily monitored and altered are freshness, water acidity and brewing method.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Sam Benson Smith. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/scientific-secret-behind-perfect-cup-coffee"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p>

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5 things you should never cook in an air fryer

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can air fry almost anything. And why wouldn’t you want to? There’s a reason these appliances have seemingly taken over everyone’s kitchens. Air fryers can imitate the results of deep-frying with some intense hot air and only a fraction of the oil. With this healthier alternative, crispy foods don’t have to be reserved for nights out and special occasions. But, there are foods that just shouldn’t be seen near an air fryer. Before cooking with your air fryer, see which foods won’t work – even though they may be tempting to throw in there.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Battered foods</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unless the food is pre-fried and frozen, you’ll want to avoid placing wet batter in the air fryer. Aside from the obvious mess it will create, wet batter won’t set the way it does when it’s submerged in oil, meaning the food won’t have that crunchy shell. If you’d like to add a little crispiness to your food, coat in flour, egg, and breadcrumbs.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Fresh greens</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Leafy greens, like spinach, will cook unevenly and are very likely to burn due to the air fryer’s high-speed air. When choosing vegetables to cook in the air fryer, make sure they hold some weight, like broccoli or zucchini. Kale chips may also be successful if coated in enough oil to weigh them down. Ultimately, experts say that frozen veggies are the way to go when it comes to air fryers because they retain more moisture from the ice.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Whole roasts</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The apparent issue with whole roasts is whether or not it will even fit properly into an air fryer basket, but even if it does fit, it’s best to just stick to the regular oven. The roast will not cook evenly, with the part closest to the heat source likely to burn by the time the part furthest away is safe to eat. The problem comes down to overcrowding. Since the hot air needs room to appropriately circulate, the most successful method would be to cook the roast in smaller pieces. If cooking a chicken, make sure the skin is facing up as air fryers heat from the top.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To really make the most of your appliance, discover </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/11-mistakes-everyone-makes-with-their-air-fryer"><span style="font-weight: 400;">11 mistakes everyone makes with their air fryer</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Cheese</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Who wouldn’t love to instantly make some fried cheese to snack on? Since the air fryer isn’t truly ‘frying’ the food, placing cheese in it without some sort of coating will just melt the cheese into a puddle and create a mess you don’t want to clean up.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Raw grains</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grains such as rice and pasta can crisp nicely in an air fryer, but they have to be cooked on the stovetop first. Air fryers are intended to dry cooked food, so trying to cook something that needs to be immersed in water to cook properly won’t work. Even with an insert that allows you to place water inside the air fryer, the fan will never get hot enough to boil the water and successfully cook your grains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now discover how to </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/unforgettable-waste-reducing-cooking-tips"><span style="font-weight: 400;">reduce your kitchen waste</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Written by Emma Taubenfeld. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/5-things-you-should-never-cook-in-an-air-fryer">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p>

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5 food safety tips for proper food handling

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In light of recent food poisoning cases around the world – a salmonella outbreak in the US in June that sickened over 100 people was linked to contaminated pre-cut melons and several people in Australia died because of contaminated rockmelons in February – it is more important than ever to get up to speed about the right way to handle food.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Closer to home, Malaysian and Singaporean netizens were shocked by a video that circulated on social media in June this year of staff at a Bangsar, KL, eatery </span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3maABRgv8G4"><span style="font-weight: 400;">washing plates in a dirty puddle</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Contamination can occur at several junctures, such as during the production of the food, the processing of raw materials, and even during the transport and display of the food.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When a food product finally makes it to the kitchen, it is also in danger of cross contamination, which is the transfer of bacteria or viruses through the use of contaminated items such as knives or chopping boards.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Be vigilant and adopt these 5 food safety tips to minimise the risk of food poisoning.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Picking up refrigerated and frozen items last</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the supermarket, pick up your refrigerated and frozen items last, just before you make your way to the checkout counter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Choose chilled items that have been properly packed without any tear in the packaging.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are looking to shed some dollars from your grocery bill, try these </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/Spend-Less-On-Groceries-With-These-19-Tricks-Savvy-Shoppers-Use"><span style="font-weight: 400;">supermarket shopping hacks</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Buy raw meats that have been properly displayed</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Never buy chilled or frozen items that have been displayed at room temperature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you do most of your grocery shopping at the wet market*, this is particularly important. Take note of how the raw seafood and meats are being displayed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Are they in a chiller? Is there sufficient ice packed around the items to ensure they’re stored at a safe temperature?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once you get your meat home, you still have to cook it, however. Try this version of a classic stroganoff that </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/beef-and-mushroom-stroganoff"><span style="font-weight: 400;">stretches a modest portion of meat</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">* For those in Australia and New Zealand, the wet market is an Asian grocery store that sells fresh meat and produce.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Bringing the food home safely</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our hot and humid weather can provide extra challenges when it comes to keeping our food safe.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If your journey home will take longer than 30 minutes, keep your chilled and frozen items in an insulated bag and make use of the free ice that is provided by some supermarkets to keep the items well chilled.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Store the items in the fridge as quickly as possible.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Storing raw foods properly</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Raw foods should be kept separate from cooked foods while in the fridge.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Different types of raw foods (e.g., meat, eggs, vegetables) should also be kept separately from each other to avoid cross contamination.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re not planning to cook the meat in the next three to five days, it’s best to freeze it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Get the most out of your beef buy with these delicious and easy </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/beef-skewers-ginger-dipping-sauce"><span style="font-weight: 400;">beef skewers with ginger dipping sauce</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Avoid buying pre-cut fruits</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re concerned about the cases of contaminated pre-cut fruit, you may want to buy a whole fruit and cut it up yourself at home.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wash the fruit properly by rubbing it with your hands under running water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re cutting it up, use a separate chopping board than the one you use for raw meat.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a race to eat all of your fruit purchases before they all spoil? </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/how-to-preserve-fruit"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Try bottling it as a preserve!</span></a></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/5-food-safety-tips-proper-food-handling"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p>

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Coles shopper's grim warning after item explodes in pantry

<p>A Coles customer has claimed a bottle of pasta sauce exploded in his pantry for "no reason".</p> <p>The shopper took to the Coles Facebook page to suggest the company put a warning on their Mum's Pizza Sauce.</p> <p>"Caution... bottle may explode for NO reason..." the man said.</p> <p>The customer shared proof of the aftermath with a photo of the pasta sauce seen dripping from the pantry's shelves and splattered on the roof and door.</p> <p>A squeeze tube of Coles' Mum's Pizza Sauce is seen sitting among the mess on the top shelf.</p> <p>The shopper explained he never got around to using the product after purchasing it on March 27.</p> <p>"Woke up this morning to a bang in the kitchen and found this in my pantry," he explained.</p> <p>"Definitely WILL NEVER buy this product again... my suggestion to anyone who has this in their pantry... get rid of it."</p> <p>One Facebook user appreciated the heads up and hoped the clean up wasn't too bad.</p> <p>"It looks like a crime scene," they said.</p> <p>"Thanks for the heads up I hope you got your cupboard cleaned up ok, sending you a virtual beer."</p> <p>Coles also responded to the Facebook post and thanked the man for bringing it to their attention.</p> <p>"We pride ourselves on the quality of our products so it's disappointing to hear of your experience," a spokesperson said before asking the shopper to privately message the company so the issue could be followed up.</p> <p>Coles told the man to visit his local store for a full refund or replacement.</p> <p>Speaking to Yahoo News Australia, the company revealed they are in contact with the customer.</p> <p>"Coles takes the quality of all our products seriously," the Coles spokesperson said.</p> <p>"We have spoken to the customer and will follow up with our supplier to investigate the matter."</p> <p>Mum's Pizza Sauce is listed for $3 on the Coles website. The storage instructions online say it should be refrigerated below 5C once opened and be used within five days.</p>

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Cadbury confirms new chocolate block rumour

<p>There has been a rumour swirling around on Facebook for days now about a collaboration that involves two of Cadbury's most popular flavours.</p> <p>And now, it's been confirmed that the rumours were true.</p> <p>So, yes, it's happening. Cadbury is introducing a new chocolate bar combining two cult flavours: Caramilk and Marble.</p> <p>And fans are ecstatic, with one saying, "Just shut up and take my money."</p> <p>The block has a "heavenly blend" of milk chocolate and Caramilk caramelised white chocolate on the outside, and is filled with the delicious hazelnut praline of the Marble chocolate block.</p> <p><img style="width: 360.48064085447265px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840552/screen-shot-2021-04-01-at-12-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/15a36449bb9d40c1898c4bbfaaf8f858" /></p> <p>“Cadbury Caramilk and Cadbury Dairy Milk Marble are two of our cult favourites, so combining them both to create a new taste experience is sure to excite chocolate lovers across the country,” Katrina Watson, senior marketing manager for Cadbury, told news.com.au.</p> <p>“Our chocolate makers have been so excited to work on combining two of our most iconic flavours. We can’t wait to see how Cadbury fans respond when it lands on shelves next month.”</p> <p>Those with a sweet tooth are excited, with people taking to social media to comment on the new release.</p> <p>“Shut the front door,” one person commented.</p> <p>“Gonna need about 25kg of this,” wrote another, while a third joked: “I am now convinced that heaven does exists.”</p> <p>The new block will be available in major supermarkets from April 12 for $5.</p>

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What is THAT doing here? ALDI shopper's intriguing find

<p>An ALDI shopper spotted something very out of place while doing her weekly grocery run.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook to share a photo of the "interesting" find, the woman explained she was shopping at ALDI when she came across the item.</p> <p>The item in question was a pack of Woolworths-brand Cocktail Frankfurts - the woman even circled the Woolies logo.</p> <p>"That's not the packaging I get from ALDI," one person said in the comments.</p> <p>Another person agreed it was "bizarre" seeing a competitor's brand in ALDI and asked if the woman was able to scan them.</p> <p>She said no, the Woolies brand Frankfurts were behind an ALDI variety, she didn't try scanning the Woolies Franks.</p> <p><img style="width: 452.52679938744257px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840534/screen-shot-2021-03-31-at-30918-pm.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a2ab9cd4e88b4b42ac47ca8bdbc9ddd2" /></p> <p>The comments were soon inundated by people questioning how the Woolies Frankfurts ended up in ALDI.</p> <p>Someone suggested it may have been left there as a prank, while others said it's possible someone purchased them from Woolworths and somehow left them at ALDI.</p> <p>"Maybe someone went to Woolies first and did a shop there, dropped that from their bag?" someone suggested.</p> <p>However, people on Facebook posed other theories, suggesting the mix-up could have happened somewhere along the supply chain.</p> <p>"Some food is from the same factories, they package for other companies," one person said.</p> <p>"Occasionally they do get sent the wrong labelling."</p> <p>Others suggested someone packed the Woolies Franks in the wrong box.</p> <p>Both Aldi and Woolworths declined to comment.</p>

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"I really dislike you": Ally Langdon fires up on Karl over hot chillies

<p><span>Ally Langdon certainly got herself into a pickle when she ate one of the world’s hottest chillies live on air during Monday morning’s episode of <em>Today</em>.</span><br /><br /><span>While she and her co-host Karl Stefanovic chatted to chef Jarrod Moore, organiser of the Melbourne chilli eating championship, and Greg Barlow, the 2021 chilli eating champ, Ally tore into a Habenaro pepper.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840400/daily-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94364a3d12ba4f6aa05fd81882027f7d" /><br /><br /><span>Despite being hesitant, she didn’t pass up on the opportunity – especially after Jarrod said Greg managed to eat 18 Carolina Reapers (the world's hottest chilli).</span><br /><br /><span>"I really dislike you," she said, turning to Karl, after her face screwed up in regret.</span></p> <p><span>"Is it a slow build?" she then asked Jarrod who confirmed it was as most of the heat is in the seeds, which she hadn’t completely gotten into.</span><br /><br /><span>"You haven't even got the seeds yet," Karl said.</span><br /><br /><span>Ally took another big bite, which left entertainment Brooke Boney shocked.</span><br /><br /><span>"Oh, Ally!" she said. "What are you doing?"</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840401/daily-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/baed1daea89b4eca84183237d13b476b" /><br /><br /><span>Ally put the pepper down slowly, saying: "OK. Now I'm feeling it.”</span><br /><br /><span>"Do you know what I am worried about? How we are going to get you to the toilet..." Karl said.</span><br /><br /><span>Ally suggested Karl could carry her, which he swiftly refused.</span><br /><br /><span>"Really regretting that second bite," Ally said in pain.</span><br /><br /><span>"I can't stand you Karl.</span><br /><br /><span>"This is horrible...it keeps getting worse!”</span><br /><br /><span>Ally returned to <em>Today</em> in early March, due to a brutal injury that left her on bed rest for weeks.</span></p>

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Woolworths accused of "disrespectful cultural appropriation"

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Supermarket giant Woolworths has been accused of "disrespectful and unnecessary cultural appropriation" after a customer alerted the supermarket to the name of their chicken wings.</p> <p>Twitter user Bonzamaaate asked the supermarket why their packets of chicken wings were called "Boomerang Wings".</p> <p>“Surely ‘chicken wings’ would suffice?” he joked.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hey <a href="https://twitter.com/woolworths?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@woolworths</a>, what’s up with this unnecessary and disrespectful cultural appropriation? Surely “chicken wings” would suffice? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BlackLivesMatter?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BlackLivesMatter</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Respect?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Respect</a> <a href="https://t.co/nfGzkDJ9GL">pic.twitter.com/nfGzkDJ9GL</a></p> — Doesn't suffer fools gladly. (@Bonzamaaate) <a href="https://twitter.com/Bonzamaaate/status/1370554318789615616?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 13, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>The term is commonly used within the Australian poultry industry to describe full chicken wings that haven't been cut or broken into segments, but the supermarket is considering a name change.</p> <p>“While this is a commonly used term to describe this cut of chicken in the poultry industry, we understand and appreciate the customer’s perspective,” the spokesperson said to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/food/woolworths-supermarket-accused-of-disrespectful-cultural-appropriation-over-chicken-pack-c-2374320" target="_blank"><em>7NEWS</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>“Our poultry team is reviewing the feedback and will consider the appropriateness of this labelling into the future.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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The $20 ALDI Easter item that's causing a frenzy

<p>Shoppers are taking to social media to brag about getting their hands on a limited-edition ALDI item.</p> <p>A Hot Cross Bun Gin Liqueur has recently hit the German supermarket's shelves to help celebrate Easter, but people have quickly realised there aren't many bottles around.</p> <p>Which is why, those lucky enough to nab the coveted item are happy to show it off.</p> <p>One woman posted a photo on the Aldi Mums Facebook page, writing: “Yes got one! Engadine, NSW.”</p> <p>Her post quickly attracted hundreds of comments many of which read “jealous” and “jello”.</p> <p>However, others took a more savage approach, instead sharing photos of their hauls after snapping up more than one bottle when finding it in-store.</p> <p>“Asked mum to buy me a bottle … but she has a shopping problem,” one woman wrote in the Australian Gin Appreciation Society Facebook group alongside a photo of four bottles on her bench top.</p> <p>Another shopper in Wagga shared a photo of their two bottles gloriously lined up at home.</p> <p>“For $20 a bottle it’s worth a try,” she said.</p> <p>The posts have attracted many jealous shoppers who are livid they haven't gotten their hands on the gin just yet.</p> <p>“If only we could find one,” one person commented.</p> <p>“I’ve been looking but haven’t got my hands on one yet,” another sighed.</p> <p>“This is so unfair, I’ve looked everywhere,” someone else chipped in.</p>

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