Food & Wine

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UK bakery under fire over using “illegal” sprinkles

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A bakery in the north of England has come under fire after using sprinkles that are illegal in the UK. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Richie Myers, owner of Get Baked in Leeds, was infuriated when an unknown customer reported him to trading standards over the use of the confectionery. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the UK, the sprinkles</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> contain an additive known as Erythrosine, which is not banned in the UK but is reserved solely for use </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">in processed cherries, according to the International Association of Colour Manufacturers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">West Yorkshire Trading Standards confirmed to the </span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-58896391"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> it has taken action to ensure the usage of the sprinkles is stopped.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Richie dubbed the issue “Sprinklegate”, and shared a recount of the issue to Facebook, which has garnered worldwide attention. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The baker who is “passionate about sprinkles” called out the customer that reported him, saying he “hopes they fail”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844935/get-baked-fb1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/300d0a19e7034e87bc56d943c1ab3ca8" /></p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook - Get Baked</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As an investigation began into the elusive sprinkles, Richie said this hurt his small business, as they were a key ingredient in many sweet treats. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told the BBC that it had been a “horrendous ordeal” and that he had “genuinely lost sleep” over it. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Richie provided an update on “sprinklegate”, he said he had no choice but to stop using the sprinkles and was trying to think of a suitable replacement. </span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844936/get-baked-fb2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1821d891cbed49eaba6d0cb5d3ae8a6c" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Facebook - Get Baked</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite having to change their famous recipe, Richie and the Get Backed team have kept their signature sense of humour through the whole “sprinklegate” ordeal.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVD0_wdMlpb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVD0_wdMlpb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by GET BAKED® (@getbakeduk)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By posting their hilarious updates online, Richie said he has been presented with “opportunities he could only have ever dreamed of”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a recent Instagram post, Richie addressed the person who reported them to the trading standards, saying, “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I honestly cannot thank you enough. You have inadvertently flung us forward 5 years and saved me a f** load in marketing budget, not that I ever have a marketing budget, but you’ve still done a sensational deed.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I owe you a pint.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @getbakeduk</span></em></p>

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Does wine make the heart flutter?

<div class="copy"> <p>A new study looks at wine intake and reduced heart risk but don't toast the conclusions yet!</p> <p>A few wines a week may slightly decrease risk of irregular heart flutters, according to a <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacep.2021.05.013" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Clinical Electrophysiology – </em>but the jury is still well and truly out on whether wine is good for your health, and responsible drinking is still required.</p> <p>A recent study, involving the University of Adelaide and Flinders University, analysed how small quantities of alcohol affect the risk of arterial fibrillation (AF) – rapid heartbeat that can lead to heart complications. the team found that found that, while drinking larger volumes of alcohol always has negative outcomes, the lowest risk of AF occurred in people who consumed less than seven glasses of wine a week, even compared to people who drank none.</p> <p>“AF can result in a range of symptoms including palpations, breathlessness, fatigue, dizziness and difficulty exercising,” says lead author Samuel Tu of the University of Adelaide and Royal Adelaide Hospital.</p> <p>“In the 1970’s, we found that binge drinking was associated with developing AF – the so called “Holiday Heart” syndrome, noted when patients would present to emergency departments in the hours or days following festive holidays where lots of drinking was involved. </p> <p>“What wasn’t very well known prior to our study was whether lower levels of alcohol consumption are associated with developing AF. Some studies have suggested that any consumption of alcohol (for example, 1 drink/day) is associated with an increased risk of developing AF.</p> <p>“Others however have suggested otherwise – that low amounts of alcohol consumption may not increase your risk of AF.”</p> <p>This research sought to clarify what the threshold of “low amounts of alcohol” was.</p> <p>To do this, the team studied 400,000 middle-aged, predominantly Caucasian individuals from the UK Biobank, with collected data from over a median 11 years. Researchers assessed how many AFs occurred over that time-period compared to how many drinks their subjects reported having.</p> <p>“We found that those who consumed less than 6 Australian standard drinks of alcohol/week had the lowest risk of developing AF, says Tu.</p> <p>“We also found that beer and cider consumption was associated with a greater risk of AF, compared to red wine and white wine consumption. These results were similar in both women and men.”</p> <p>There was a small dip in risk of AF when among people who consumed between 1 and 6 drinks, but only with wine. While no extra risk was observed for people who drank three measures of spirits a week, there was also no dip.</p> <p>With all alcoholic beverages, the risk of AF began to increase steadily with the amount of drinks consumed, regardless of what type of alcohol it was.</p> <p>Importantly, the paper does not endorse drinking wine or alcohol as a heart health benefit but clarifies how to drink responsibly to avoid AF.</p> <p>“Our findings suggest that responsible consumption of alcohol of up to 6 drinks per week may be safe in terms of minimising your risk of atrial fibrillation,” says Tu.</p> <p>“Notably, this threshold sits below what is currently recommended by the NHRMC for healthy Australians, which is 10 standard drinks per week.</p> <p>“Additionally, for those who currently consume alcohol, drinking red or white wine could potentially be a safer alternative to other types of alcoholic beverages.”</p> <p>Of course, a small decrease in the risk of AF when some alcohol is consumed can easily be interpreted as though wine is good for the health. But caution is required.</p> <p>“People like to positively reinforce their existing viewpoints,” says Simone Pettigrew, Head of Food Policy at the University of New South Wales.</p> <p>“This is partly due to how we process information – new information is tagged to existing knowledge in our brains, so it’s easier to assimilate things that gel with what we already think/know.</p> <p>“This is called a process of developing associative networks. Plus we have selective attention and recall, so we tend to focus on things we are most interested in and that we consider most beneficial to us.”</p> <p>The paper was also accompanied by an editorial by Thomas Dewland and Gregory Marcus, medical doctors from the University of California, that explains that, while the statistical analysis was robust, the results of the paper need to be considered within the context of alcohol research in general.</p> <p>They say that it isn’t uncommon for studies to show a small dip in risks for some health outcomes when only a “few drinks” per week are consumed, but that it depends on the type of alcohol and the health risk in question.</p> <p>They also say it is difficult to draw a line at what “a few drinks” means, because different countries have different standards – for example, the study used the UK standard of a drink (8 grams of alcohol), which is lower than the US standard (14g) and the Australian standard (10g).</p> <p>“What do we tell our patients?” ask Dewlands and Marcus in their editorial. “For secondary AF prevention, the message should be alcohol abstinence, especially if alcohol is a personal trigger for acute AF episodes.</p> <p>“For primary AF prevention, it is possible that continued consumption of some alcohol may be reasonable, but the exact threshold is unclear and is likely a very low amount.”</p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=159754&amp;title=Does+wine+make+the+heart+flutter%3F" alt="" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/wine-decreases-heart-health-risk-still-bad/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/dr-deborah-devis">Deborah Devis</a>. </p> </div>

Food & Wine

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Crimpy, Pizza or Barbecue – which is the best?

<p><em>Image: Shutter Stock</em></p> <p>Arnott’s is not one to shy away from hard truths. At least, that’s a conclusion that can be drawn from their latest announcement.</p> <p>Known for their delectable sweet and savoury treats, a staple as much as Tim Tams in Aussie childhoods is Shapes – the snack that comes in many flavour variations.</p> <p>The biscuit manufacturer, however, has declared one flavour the ultimate supreme: Chicken Crimpy.</p> <p>Although there exists discourse and debate online surrounding what flavour of Shapes should have the top spot on the picnic blanket, the company’s yearly survey takes no prisoners with its bold results.</p> <p>Coming in a close second are Pizza Shapes, followed by Barbecue Shapes in third place.</p> <p>As for who exactly prefers what oven-baked seasoned delight, the research by Arnott’s indicates the flavour preference mirrors generational divides.</p> <p>Both millennials and those from Gen Z indicate they prefer Pizza Shapes over Chicken Crimpy – 29% of millennials that were surveyed said they loved Pizza shapes and only 20% said Chicken Crimpy were their favourite.</p> <p>Gen Z mirrored millennials somewhat, though the margin of preference was only 6% narrower, meaning only 3% of Gen Z prefer Pizza Shapes to Chicken Crimpy.</p> <p>Arnott’s is nothing if not thorough in its research, having broken down the results on a state-by-state basis.</p> <p>Those residing in NSW and Queensland both agree Chicken Crimpy belongs in the top spot, but those in Victoria prefer Barbecue Shapes overall.</p> <p>Aussies in Canberra, however, threw out a real wild card by choosing Nacho Cheese flavour as an equal favourite alongside Pizza Shapes.</p>

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Customer shocked by exorbitant service fee

<p dir="ltr">One customer was taken by surprise after dining at Salt Bae’s new London restaurant, when they were presented with the bill for $60,000 worth of food as well as a $9000 service fee.</p> <p dir="ltr">Salt Bae, whose real name is Nusret Gökçe, recently opened a new restaurant in the ritzy London neighbourhood of Knightsbridge. Diners at the establishment can expect to spend a pretty penny, including $1500 for a tomahawk steak and $55 for fries, but one diner wasn’t expecting a 15% service fee when they were presented with the bill.</p> <p dir="ltr">In addition to the exxy food and drinks, including $18,000 wine, the bill came with a 15% service charge, working out to £4829.10 on top of the £32,194 bill. That’s a charge of about $8933 on top of a $59,327 meal.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 434.5156889495225px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844861/https___prodstatic9net.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/47ad6063eed94bab9aaef210baf96b52" /></p> <p dir="ltr">The customer shared a photo of the cheque on Snapchat with the caption, “That’s just taking the p*ss”, and the image quickly went viral online, with many wondering how any meal could be worth those kinds of prices.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many critics say Salt Bae is overstepping his markups, which include charging $33 for asparagus and $20 for Red Bull, while others believe the prices, including the service fee, are justified considering the quality of the food and the potential to see Salt Bae do his thing.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUTA32OsX6x/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUTA32OsX6x/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Nusr_et#Saltbae (@nusr_et)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Gökçe originally went viral in 2017 with a video of him sprinkling salt onto a meal getting over 10 million views. He now has almost 40 million followers on Instagram, and his videos of him doing his thing in the kitchen regularly get over 5 million views.</p> <p dir="ltr">With the opening of his London restaurant, Gökçe now owns luxury steakhouses in Miami, New York, Boston, Dallas, and Beverly Hills in the United States; Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates; Ankara, Bodrum, Istanbul and Marmaris in Turkey; and Mykonos, Doha, London and Jeddah.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Laurent Koffel/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images</em></p>

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Junk food linked to gut inflammation

<div class="copy"> <p>Studies show how a diet high in fat and sugar impairs immune cell function.</p> <p>The impact of diet on health is really a no-brainer – even leading to calls for GPs to prescribe fruit and vegetables before writing out a drug prescription.</p> <p>Now, US researchers report in the journal <em>Cell Host &amp; Microbe</em> that they’ve found a mechanism to explain how obesity caused by an unhealthy junk food diet can induce inflammation in the gut.</p> <p>“Our research showed that long-term consumption of a Western-style diet high in fat and sugar impairs the function of immune cells in the gut in ways that could promote inflammatory bowel disease or increase the risk of intestinal infections,” says lead author Ta-Chiang Liu, from Washington University.</p> <p>This has particular relevance for Crohn’s disease – a debilitating condition that has been increasing worldwide and causes abdominal pain, diarrhoea, anaemia and fatigue.</p> <p>A key feature of the disease is impaired function of Paneth cells, immune cells found in the intestines that help maintain a healthy balance of gut microbes and ward off infectious pathogens.</p> <p>When exploring a database of 400 adults with and without Crohn’s disease, the researchers discovered that higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with progressively more abnormal looking Paneth cells, captured under a microscope.</p> <p>Armed with their discovery, they studied two strains of mice genetically predisposed to obesity and were surprised to find that the animals’ Paneth cells looked normal.</p> <p>To dig deeper, the researchers fed normal mice a diet in which 40% of the calories came from fat or sugar, typical of a Western diet.</p> <p>After two months the mice became obese – and their Paneth cells became abnormal. They also had associated problems such as increased gut permeability, a key feature of chronic inflammation that allows harmful bacteria and toxins to cross the intestinal lining.</p> <p>“Obesity wasn’t the problem per se,” says Lui. “Eating too much of a healthy diet didn’t affect the Paneth cells. It was the high-fat, high-sugar diet that was the problem.”</p> <p>Importantly, switching from junk food back to a standard diet completely reversed the Paneth cell dysfunction.</p> <p>Further experiments revealed that a bile acid molecule known as deoxycholic acid, formed as a by-product of gut bacteria metabolism, increased the activity of immune molecules that inhibit Paneth cell function.</p> <p>Liu and colleagues are now comparing the individual impact of fat and sugar on Paneth cells.</p> <p>Whether the damaged cells respond to a healthy diet in humans remains to be seen, but preliminary evidence suggests diet can alter the balance of gut bacteria and alleviate symptoms of Crohn’s disease.</p> </div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/junk-food-linked-to-gut-inflammation/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/natalie-parletta">Natalie Parletta</a>. </p> </div>

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How a New York pizza chef adopted a classic Aussie ingredient

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After spinning pizzas for more than 40 years, Giovanni Fabiano knows a thing or two about what makes the perfect pizza. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Rosa’s Pizza chef from Brooklyn, NYC, is now venturing into uncharted territory with an experiment to get Aussies talking. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Giovanni has teamed up with Vegemite to encourage more Australians to get creative when it comes to the nation’s iconic flavour. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a recent survey conducted by Vegemite, the majority of Australian respondents (89.4 percent) still associate the spread with toast, with only 17.6 percent using it in cooking.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Giovanni, however, believes the unique flavour could be Australia’s best kept secret. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUgINjEhrF3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUgINjEhrF3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Vegemite (@vegemite)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In New York City, you don’t need to go far to talk to an Aussie. And you don’t need to be talk’n for long before they start prattling on about the stuff,” he said.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Aussies love their Vegemite, but I only ever hear about them eating it on toast. I love it on pizza pie so I decided to try it on my menu, test it out with the crowds and maybe show the Aussies a thing or two.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vegemite marketing manager Jacqui Roth says their venture with Giovanni will help people from all over the world fall in love with Vegemite. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUl92BYL_89/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUl92BYL_89/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Vegemite (@vegemite)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said, “While we love Vegemite on toast and we always will, Vegemite is so much more than just a spread.”</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve loved getting behind Giovanni and his talented team and couldn’t be happier that they’ve put a taste of Australia on their secret menu – until it’s sold out at least!”</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Vegemite / Supplied</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p>

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“A warning”: Supermarkets could CLOSE in Victoria over weekend

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The major supermarket chains have </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/fears-of-panic-buying-erupt-as-supermarkets-reveal-they-will-close/ar-AAOZeIR?li=AAgfYrC" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">warned</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that they could be forced to temporarily close some Victorian stores over the weekend due to COVID-related staff shortages.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With dozens of stores currently listed as exposure sites, hundreds of workers at Coles, Woolworths, and Aldi have been forced to enter isolation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The move by the supermarket giants came as a surprise to Victorian Premier Dan Andrews, who said he was unaware that the chains were considering closures on Thursday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The decision has sparked renewed fears of panic buying in Melbourne, combined with shortages of other products.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There have been pockets of shortages,” Tanya Barden, from the Australian Food and Grocery Council, told </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC News</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I know bread was an issue in Melbourne a couple of weeks ago, but this is really a warning to governments that if we don’t get the settings right now then over the next few months this could become a problem.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Coles spokesman told </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/melbourne/article-10044289/Fears-panic-buying-erupt-supermarkets-reveal-CLOSE-locations-weekend.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Mail Australia</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> on Thursday that the industry had been hard-hit by the pandemic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Coles, together with other supermarket retailers, are engaged with the Victorian government on potential changes to COVID isolation protocols that would help ensure food security for people across the state,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coles also confirmed that several Victorian supermarkets had already reduced trading hours, while distribution centres had been impacted due to team members entering isolation after being identified as casual contacts.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Since the COVID Delta wave began, around 300,000 supermarket team members in Victoria and NSW have been required to isolate as a result of exposure to a positive case,” the spokesman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Thanks to the enhanced hygiene and safety measures we have in place, not one of these team members has subsequently tested positive for COVID.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coles and Woolworths are calling on the Victorian government to adjust its isolation protocols to match those in NSW, where fully-vaccinated essential workers are not required to enter isolation as a result of being a casual contact.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We continue to work hard to maintain food supply and keep stores open, however as case numbers rise this becomes more challenging as more of our team members are required to isolate,” the spokesman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Woolworths spokesperson told </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Mail Australia</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that the chain could close up to five stores over the weekend, after Woolworths Coburg Station closed on Wednesday due to staff shortages.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We have more than 1,000 Victorian team members in isolation right now and it’s putting a strain on our store operations,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A small number of stores have been forced to reduce their trading hours and one has temporarily closed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Making some sensible, risk-based adjustments to contact tracing would go a long way in helping us maintain essential supply and service to the Victorian community.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ll continue to work closely with the Victorian Government on these matters.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Aldi is also seeing disruptions to normal trading as staff members in-store and at distribution centres have also been required to isolate.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With supermarkets being one of the few places to visit during a lockdown, they are often listed as exposure sites. Thankfully, we have not seen evidence of transmission within supermarkets and they remain a safe place to visit, and for our employees to work,” the retailer told </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Mail Australia</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“However, hundreds of our employees across the Aldi network, both in store and in distribution centres, have been required to self-isolate due to being in close or casual contact to positive COVID-19 cases.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are additional concerns that stock may be affected by low numbers of truck drivers, as well as industrial action from the Transport Workers’ Union.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The decision comes as the state recorded 1,143 cases on Friday morning.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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The secret to the Holy Grail of hot chips

<div class="copy"> <p><span>Perfectly golden, crunchy on the outside but fluffy pearly white in the centre, the perfect hot chip is a thing of undeniable beauty.</span></p> <p>The Belgians and Dutch know a thing or two about chips, but we do pretty well too – except for pubs that put the schnitty on top of chips.</p> <p>When that plate hits the table you know you’re in for a disappointing time.</p> <p>A soggy, mushy mess, it’s a waste of everyone’s time and money and quite frankly heads should roll.</p> <p>“Texture plays a very important role in why we accept or reject food,” says <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/people/gie-liem" target="_blank">Gie Liem</a> from <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.deakin.edu.au/exercise-nutrition-sciences/research/centre-for-advanced-sensory-science-cass" target="_blank">Deakin University’s Centre of Advanced Sensory Science</a>.</p> <p>Gie is a legend who decided to investigate the perfect hot chip. Someone had to.</p> <p>“This can be cultural, for example, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/neba-neba" target="_blank">some cultures like slimy food</a>, while in other cultures that might be a sign that the food is off."</p> <p>"But we find that crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside is one of the texture combinations that is universally liked, and this is a key characteristic of good hot chips.”</p> <h3>Crunchy is the Goldilocks of food textures</h3> <p>This preference of crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside went back to <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4163920/" target="_blank">evolutionary factors</a>, ensuring humans were able to identify the right food to eat.</p> <p>“A lot of fruit and vegetables are crunchy on the outside when ready for consumption. When they’re too hard to bite into it means they’re not quite ready to eat and when they’re too soft then that means they’re overripe."</p> <p>"So in that way ‘crunchy’ can be like the Goldilocks of food textures, it tells us something is just right.”</p> <p>However, Gie says all our senses play a part in how we perceive the texture of food.</p> <p>“<a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.livescience.com/60752-human-senses.html" target="_blank">Sight</a> and <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.livescience.com/60752-human-senses.html" target="_blank">taste</a> all play a big part, and so does hearing the crunch. We consume food every day without thinking much about it, but there is a whole lot of science behind what we choose and why,” he says.</p> <h3>The recipe for hot chip success</h3> <p>So, what is a scientist’s perfect chip recipe? You gotta go for fresh fries to get the perfect crunch says Gie.</p> <p>He advocates celebrity chef <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/heston-blumenthals-triple-cooked-chips" target="_blank">Heston Blumenthal’s thrice-cooked method</a>.</p> <p>“People seem to be getting more serious about their chips…use fresh potatoes and take the time to cook them properly.”</p> <p>“That means starting by cooking the cut potatoes in water and then thoroughly drying them out in the fridge. Then fry them first on a low temperature, let them dry out again, then fry them at a high temperature before serving immediately for that super-crunch.”</p> <p>For those who are contending with the crowds at oval tuckshops, Gie recommends keeping an eye out for a fresh batch before swooping in.</p> <p>“It’s best to eat chips as soon as they’re out of the fryer or the moisture on the inside will start to come out and make the chips soggy.”</p> <p>“At sporting events the food outlets will make a lot of chips and they can sit there for a while. So if it looks soggy then it is soggy, use all your senses.”</p> <h3>The fraught question of sauces?</h3> <p>Once you’ve got the crunch right, it’s now all about what you put on top, and that choice might be influenced by where you are.</p> <p>“Sauce seems to be a cultural thing. While tomato sauce is popular here and in the US, vinegar is much more popular in the UK, mayonnaise in France, Belgium and the Netherlands, while it’s curry sauce in Germany, or gravy and curds in Canada."</p> <p>“While some of these seem to align with what we know about taste science – for example vinegar provides something acidic to cut through the fatty fries – they can also be counter-intuitive. Pouring on vinegar is the fastest route to a soggy chip.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p class="p1"><em>This article was published for <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/asc-edits/the-secret-to-the-holy-grail-of-hot-chips/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a>.</em></p> </div>

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“We won’t stand for segregation”: Sydney cafe to support unvaccinated customers

<p dir="ltr">A Sydney café has made the <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/sydney-cafes-bold-move-to-support-unvaccinated-customers-001318307.html" target="_blank">controversial decision</a> to stay open for takeaway only until unvaccinated customers can also dine inside.</p> <p dir="ltr">Anthony Milotic, the owner of Bare Wholefoods, shared an “open letter to the community” via Instagram, stating that he wants “everyone to feel welcome” in his café and “won’t stand for segregation”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Right now the path out is unknown, but we do know one thing. We won’t stand for segregation. We are one, we are family!” Mr Milotic wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I want everyone to feel welcome at all times and I will never put profit before people.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Milotic said he is “choosing love, accepting differences and a community in unity is what we need right now”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT6h1HfldLU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT6h1HfldLU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bare Wholefoods (@bare.wholefoods)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“So we have chosen to continue to operate as takeaway only until everyone is free to dine-in,” he wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We will always value family and hope that you feel the same.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Bare Wholefoods, which has venues on the North Shore and the Northern Beaches, shared the open letter last week to a flood of comments.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though many supported the decision, others argued that treating those who choose not to be vaccinated differently to vaccinated people isn’t segregation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Segregation is a term that is used to describe separation from normal society a group of people that have inherent characteristics such as race or religion or sex. Being non-vaxxed is a decision, not an inherent characteristic,” one user wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You insult all those people that have experienced true segregation for their whole life by suggesting that non-vaxxers are being segregated.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s a couple of weeks at the most until they are free to do their own thing and it’s to protect their own health. Seems like more of a publicity stunt than anything really meaningful.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The post comes as hospitality and retail venues across Greater Sydney will be able to reopen to fully-vaccinated customers in early October when 70 percent of the state is fully vaccinated.</p> <p dir="ltr">The state is expected to hit the milestone around October 11.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though some venues have said they are “open to all”, Bare Wholefoods have stated its continued closure until unvaccinated patrons can also dine in.</p> <p dir="ltr">Other venues have confirmed they will follow the suggestion from the NSW Government to only open to vaccinated customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Berejiklian believes the state will reach 70 and 80 percent vaccination rates in “two to three weeks”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“NSW will be the first state that in all likelihood hits 80 percent double dose, but there will also be a point in time after that where unvaccinated people will be able to participate in activities,” the premier said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So that is the information we are providing this week to make very clear when those key milestones will occur.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: bare.wholefoods / Instagram</em></p>

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Cafe with Peppa Pig on the menu causes outrage

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A cafe in the centre of the Scottish capital of Edinburgh has come under fire for a divisive sign to lure in customers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gordon Street Coffee decorated their chalkboard with a drawing of Peppa Pig next to a bacon sandwich to sell the popular breakfast item. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as the “distasteful” sketch of the popular children’s character, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">the cafe had also included their own rendition of The Magic Roundabout cartoon cow, Ermintrude, to sell beef sandwiches. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the cafe’s light-hearted attempt at advertising tactics, outraged members of the public slammed their ideas and methods.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Angry parents expressed their disappointment online over the sign, as they thought the drawings would traumatise children once they realised their beloved characters were intended as food. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Animal rights organisation PETA led the online outrage, taking to Twitter to say, “Luring kids to meaty meals with cartoons of happy animals isn’t new, but it is dishonest.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Kids naturally love animals, and would be horrified to see gentle pigs' throats slit for a sandwich.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many other parents and vegan activists also slammed the cafe, saying the cafe was “sick, upsetting and dishonest”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One woman wrote on Twitter. “That's going to make a lot of children question food.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I support that but damn this is pretty sick.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another mother agreed, saying, “Even if you are not vegan or vegetarian that could be really upsetting.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My kids would be absolutely traumatised if they saw that sign, it's really not funny.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The outrage comes after a new survey showed that one in five children have no idea that steak, sausages and ham are meat that comes from animals. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Twitter</span></em></p>

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Aldi customer shocked by "babushka" ice cream

<p>A stunned Aldi customer has revealed the strange thing that happened when she was unwrapping one of the store’s ice cream cones.</p> <p>Sharing her unusual find on Facebook, the woman from Victoria said she had settled down for some “me time” when she opened the Chocolate Crowns ice cream box which she purchased from Aldi.</p> <p>But what she unwrapped in the four-pack box from ice cream company Monarc was far from normal.</p> <p>Surprisingly, the ice cream was seemingly double wrapped with a wrapped cone inside another fully wrapped ice cream.</p> <p>“Dear Aldi, what the…. Is that?” she she wrote alongside a picture of her weirdly wrapped ice cream.</p> <p>“I don’t know if the whole box is like that.”</p> <p>Her bonus cone find delighted and perplexed fellow shoppers who were seriously stunned by the unusually wrapped cone.</p> <p>“I don’t understand what I’m looking at?” one baffled person said.</p> <p>“It’s an ice cream babushka?” another asked.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844307/new-project-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/58f5e70d144142be8eae847ca6ab108c" /></p> <p>Image: Facebook</p> <p>“A cone…. In a cone, what’s inside the wrapper,” questioned a third person.</p> <p>Simply put, one Aldi fan called the mishap “Cone-ception” while others thought the strange “bonus cone” find was extremely lucky.</p> <p>“Buy a lotto ticket….that’s some luck!!” one person said.</p> <p>“Probably the best thing I have ever seen,” added another.</p> <p>This isn’t the first time a shopper has spotted a packaging mishap in a supermarket product.</p> <p><strong>Surprising find in tin of tomatoes</strong></p> <p>This isn’t the first time a shopper has spotted a packaging mishap in the supermarket.</p> <p>Melbourne shopper Shell McKenzie told Yahoo News Australia she was shocked when she opened a tin of tomatoes that contained no tomatoes at all.</p> <p>Instead, the sealed tin was full of water.</p> <p>Shell said she had purchased the Woolworths Essentials brand diced Italian tomatoes as part of her online order.</p> <p>“It was delivered to my workplace,” she explained.</p> <p>“My cook opened it and was shocked it was filled with water….we bought others that were fine.”</p> <p>A Woolworths representative quickly responded to Shell’s odd fine on Facebook.</p> <p>“We’re sorry to see you’ve received a can of diced tomatoes filled with water. We can imagine the surprise this would’ve caused when you opened it,” the spokesperson says.</p> <p>“I spoke with them on the phone and they were shocked and offered a refund and a $10 goodwill credit,” she said.</p> <p>“They have no idea how it happened.”</p>

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10 simple rules to cook everything faster

<p><strong>1. Start with heat</strong></p> <p><span>Before doing anything else, turn on the oven, crank up the grill, preheat a frying pan and set water to boil. Appliances, pots, pans and water take time to get hot. Boiling water is always my first move.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Don't dirty an extra dish</strong></p> <p><span>Use kitchen scissors to chop cooked or tender raw vegetables (especially greens) right in the bowl or pan.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Speed up your washing time </strong></p> <p><span>Put all the produce together in a colander and rinse under cold water. (If you have a large amount, wash in batches, putting what’s done on towels.) During downtime while cooking, wash vegetables used toward the end of a recipe. Rinse foods like carrots and cabbage after they’ve been trimmed or peeled.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Chop all at once</strong></p> <p><span>If a recipe calls for minced garlic, minced ginger and/or minced chillies at the same time, consolidate the job with my go-to technique: Peel the garlic and ginger, trim the chillies, and put them all in a pile. Then chop and mince them together using a rocking motion.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Cut before cooking </strong></p> <p>Big, thick pieces of food take longer to cook through than those cut small or sliced thin. I cut chicken cutlets in half so they cook faster; chop veggies accordingly.</p> <p><strong>6. Make use of your grater </strong></p> <p>Making a pureed vegetable soup? Grate your veggies instead of chopping them. If you cut them into chunks, they’ll take 20 minutes or more to soften. But grated, they’re ready in a flash.</p> <p><strong>7. Let your pots do double dut</strong>y</p> <p><span>When you sauté or simmer something moist – such as vegetables, beans, or sauces – lay a different food on top (especially a protein like fish, chicken, or eggs), cover with a lid, and let the steam naturally cook that upper layer. For instance, for a fast eggs Florentine, steam the eggs on top of the spinach rather than poaching them separately.</span></p> <p><strong>8. Use less liquid when braising </strong></p> <p><span>Submerge your braising ingredients in about two centimetres of liquid, cover the pot and cook, turning occasionally, adding a little liquid as necessary.</span></p> <p><strong>9. One sandwich is faster than four </strong></p> <p><span>Cut a baguette in half the long way, assemble one giant sandwich, then cut that into as many pieces as you like. (I’ve seen people do the opposite!)</span></p> <p><strong>10. Cut around the core </strong></p> <p><span>This method is a fast way to prep apples, pears, tomatoes, cabbage, peaches and capsicums: Slice downwards around the core, removing flesh in three or four pieces; then cut flesh into slices or wedges.</span></p> <p><span><em>This article was first published for <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/18-simple-ways-to-cook-everything-faster">Reader's Digest. </a></em></span></p> <p><span><em>Image: Getty </em></span></p>

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Breakfast myths busted: Is cereal really that bad for you?

<p>When it comes to breakfast, cereal more often than not has a bad reputation.</p> <p>Breakfast in general seems to be the meal most Aussies are most likely to skip. With studies showing almost half of choose to ditch breakfast on weekdays.</p> <p>For most, breakfast cereal might be a little way down the list of choices, especially those who are a little more health conscious. If you’ve heard one of the most common and surprising myths around – that breakfast cereal is too sugary and has little to no nutritional value.</p> <p>A first-ever scientific analysis of different types of breakfast cereals and their impact on the health of Australians found positive benefits for body weight and nutrition, regardless of the type of cereal and sugar content.</p> <p>If this surprises you, here molecular nutritionist Dr Emma Beckett shares with <em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em> other breakfast myths that you didn’t know about:</p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> Traditional breakfast foods are bad for you</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Some foods high in carbohydrate, such as wholemeal bread and breakfast cereals contain dietary fibre, which helps us to feel fuller, therefore starting the day off right.</p> <p>Breakfast cereal is a simple and convenient way to start the day and it can often provide more nutrients such as Iron, B-vitamins and fibre, than non-cereal breakfast choices. What’s better, cereal pairs well with other nutrient dense breakfast foods such as Greek yogurt, and nuts, which are a source of protein. Protein is essential in the diet as it is the most filling macronutrient that can help reduce grazing habits throughout the day.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>Processed = bad</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Most food needs to go through some sort of processing for it to even be edible and digestible – processing is a broad term that includes cooking, cutting and packaging.</p> <p>For many foods it is also necessary to undergo some sort of processing in order to preserve the food and prevent wastage, and to make them tasty and practical. </p> <p>From a nutritional perspective, key nutrients like protein aren’t necessarily lost during processing, they can sometimes be retained or made easier to access through processing. Others like B vitamins and iron may be added back if they’re lost, in a process called enrichment. </p> <p>Staple foods, like breakfast cereals and breads are also often fortified with extra nutrients – these foods are chosen because they are affordable, accessible, shelf stable and popular. It is also important to consider to what degree the food item has been processed, with ultra-processed items to be consumed in moderation.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>Cereal is too sugary and has no nutritional value</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Australian data has shown that cereal contributes less than 3 per cent of added sugar in the diet. </p> <p>Many cereals contain whole grains and fibre which many people are not getting enough of. They are full of essential vitamins and minerals that are important for health and wellbeing, and are the number one source of iron in the Aussie diet, especially in children. </p> <p>Cereal contains a range of sugar levels, there are some sweeter ones, but most are moderately sweetened and many sweetened with added fruits which contain natural sugars.</p> <p>For example, half of <em>Kellogg’s</em> 55 cereals contain two or less teaspoons of sugar per bowl. Updating formulations have meant that they have removed over 700 tonnes of sugar and 300 tonnes of salt from Aussie diets – that’s the equivalent to the weight of around seven blue whales!</p> <p>Cereal has been proven to have positive benefits for body weight and nutrition.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>If it isn’t wholegrain it doesn’t contain fibre</p> <p><strong>Truth</strong>: Whilst whole grain foods contain fibre, not all fibre-containing foods contain the whole grain. Fibre is found in the outer part of the grain called the bran. The bran can be removed from the grain and used in foods. Foods made with bran may not always contain whole grain but they do contain plenty of fibre.</p> <p>Two out of three Aussies are not meeting their daily fibre targets. In fact, four out of five Aussies don’t eat enough fibre to protect themselves from chronic disease! An adequate intake of fibre is between 25 and 30 grams a day for most of us. That might sound hard, but getting your daily dose is actually easy if you eat high-fibre options including fibre rich breakfast cereals, whole grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts.</p> <p>Did you know that different whole grains have different levels and types of fibres - for example whole grain brown rice and corn both have naturally less fibre compared to other whole grains such as whole grain wheat and oats, which have higher amounts of fibre.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>It’s expensive to have a healthy diet</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>It can be a misconception that healthy food is far more expensive than unhealthy and takeaway options. </p> <p>According to recently published Australian research based on modelling, it is possible to improve Aussie diets while spending less money on food, choosing low-cost nutritious foods improves diet quality and can reduce a family’s grocery bill by over 25 per cent.</p> <p>There are actually lots of healthy options that are cheap to buy and aren’t going to spoil quickly. Wholemeal bread and breakfast cereals are good for the budget and last for a while. When it comes to buying fruit and vegetables, canned and frozen options are just as healthy as the fresh ones, and you can buy them cheap and store or freeze ahead of time. If you do your research and shop around, healthy eating really doesn’t have to be as expensive or challenging as it might seem. </p> <p><strong> </strong></p>

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Woman’s sweet Bunnings snag goes viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An Aussie cake artist has paid tribute to the iconic Bunnings sausage sandwich in the sweetest way.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hailing from Melbourne, Tigga Maccormack shares elaborate dessert designs with her 510,000 followers on TikTok.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In her latest video, Tigga shows her followers how she made a sweet version of the Bunnings snag, stunning viewers with its realism.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844251/sanga1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e195d8fa7f9b498591d724c2b33c53fa" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Creating the bread from a square vanilla buttercream cake, Tigga showed how she gave the cake its bread shape with glasses and spatulas.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I then sliced off the crust and sliced it in half, then you’ve got two pieces of bread - but it’s cake,” she said in the clip.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Next, Tigga created the snag with a piece of chocolate mud cake that was “kind of squished and rolled into a sausage”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844252/sanga2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9260bd36907548cebca2a973845c2588" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Then I got some brown fondant and I put my ‘sausage’ in the fondant and rolled it up, smoothed it all out,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Then I got my little baby torch and I torched the crap out of it.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Finally, Tigga piled on the toppings, including some sauce and fried onions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Once my snag was done I put it on the cake bread and we actually fried some apple in sugar for our onions,” Tigga said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tigga topped the snag with red buttercream icing disguised as ‘tomato sauce’ and drizzled on top from an old sauce bottle.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844253/sanga3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/98e9a191adbf4cda9859d0c7b9e7da41" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video has been viewed 1.4 million times and received more than 1500 comments, with many unable to believe it wasn’t a real snag.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But why does it look so real? I swear my brain wouldn’t be able to let me eat it. It would be so confused,” one person wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That’s genius,” another said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Others joked that Tigga’s snag wouldn’t meet Bunnings’ safety standards, with the hardware giant introducing a rule that onions had to go underneath the sausage to avoid them falling out of the bread to prevent customers from slipping..</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Onions on the BOTTOM. Have the Bunnings accidents taught you nothing,” one person joked.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p>

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Plant based diets could prevent type 2 diabetes

<p>Eating a diet high in plant foods with little or no red meat has been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the most comprehensive scrutiny of this connection so far.</p> <p>This protective effect is even stronger for diets high in healthier plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts.</p> <p>Diabetes has been called “the fastest growing health crisis of our time”. At the same time, plant-based diets are gaining popularity.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Therefore, the researchers thought it was important to quantify their link with diabetes risk, says first author Frank Qian from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, US – especially given the large variation in these diets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">The analysis, </span>published<span style="font-family: inherit;"> in the </span>Journal of the American Medical Association<span style="font-family: inherit;">, included nine studies with more than 300,000 participants – of whom 23,544 had type 2 diabetes – over two to 28 years of follow-up. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">In the primary evaluation, Qian and co-authors focussed on an overall higher intake of plant-based foods along with little or no animal-based foods. Therefore, this included vegetarian or vegan dietary patterns.</span></p> <p>They found that people with the highest adherence to predominantly plant-based diets had a 23% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with the lowest consumption of plant foods.</p> <p>But these dietary patterns didn’t exclude plant-derived foods that have been linked to higher diabetes risk, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">When narrowing the analysis to four studies that defined a plant-based diet as the healthy whole food options, they found a 30% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.</span></p> <p>While it must be noted that the studies are observational, most, if not all, adjusted for well-known risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), gender, smoking status and family history of diabetes, among other potentially confounding variables.</p> <p>Several factors could explain the associations, the authors say.</p> <p>Plant-based diets typically include healthy plant foods packed with nutrients, polyphenols and fibre, which can improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation and help maintain a healthy weight.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">All of these can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Conversely, eating red and processed meat has been linked to higher risk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Because the studies controlled for BMI, and excess weight and type 2 diabetes are a deadly duo, the authors suggest the associations they found could underestimate the actual degree of protection conferred by the diets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Overall,” says senior author Qi Sun, “these data highlight the importance of adhering to plant-based diets to achieve or maintain good health.” </span></p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=26041&amp;title=Plant-based+diets+could+prevent+type+2+diabetes" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></p> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/plant-based-diets-could-prevent-type-2-diabetes/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/natalie-parletta">Natalie Parletta</a>.</p> </div>

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When is milk chocolate good for you?

<div> <div class="copy"> <p>It’s always gratifying to hear that our guilty pleasures can have health benefits – like dark chocolate being good for your heart, or coffee preventing chronic liver disease, or wine keeping your teeth healthy – but what about milk chocolate?</p> <p>Though it’s higher in fat, sugar and calories than dark chocolate, milk chocolate’s effect on your health depends on when you eat it, according to a new study published in <em>The FASEB Journal</em>.</p> <p>Spanish and US researchers set out to understand how the timing of milk chocolate consumption affects human health.</p> <p>Nineteen participants – all postmenopausal women – were split into groups and asked to eat no chocolate, eat 100 grams of milk chocolate within an hour of waking up, or eat the same amount an hour before going to sleep.</p> <p>During the study, other factors were recorded, including the participants’ weight, physical activity, hunger and cortisol levels, number of calories consumed per day, and glucose metabolism.</p> <p>“One of the surprises was that despite eating close to 550 kilocalories [of chocolate] per day for two weeks, people didn’t gain weight, either when taken in the morning or in the evening,” says co-researcher Frank Scheer, a neuroscientist and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.</p> <p>“The morning group showed more fat oxidation, as opposed to the evening group, which had more carbohydrate oxidation occurring. So the mechanisms appear to be different, but both led to no weight gain in these two cohorts.”</p> <p>In the morning group, fasting glucose levels also went down, along with waist circumference.</p> <p>“Waist circumference is really thought to be primarily related to visceral fat, which has been associated with adverse metabolic effects,” says Scheer.</p> <p>The mechanism behind the loss of waist circumference is unclear. It may be due to the fact that 100 grams of milk chocolate is approximately 30% of a typical daily calorie intake, so participants may have cut down other food intake for the day.</p> <p>This study builds on previous research, which has shown that the timing of chocolate consumption in rats affected their circadian rhythms, preventing their sleep cycles from becoming disrupted during simulated jetlag. Other studies have also suggested that mistiming food intake can lead to obesity and problems controlling glucose.</p> <p>It’s clear that the time at which we eat is important to energy balance and metabolism. But further research is needed, with a larger and more diverse group of participants over a longer period of time, because the findings pose even more questions for the researchers.</p> <p>“Are these findings due to effects that the energy timing has on metabolism?” asks Scheer. “If you eat chocolate in the morning, for example, does the body, by perceiving this kind of excess energy, then dial up energy expenditure or dial down cravings for food? And then, in addition to hedonic mechanisms and energy-balance mechanisms, could it be anything more specific to the content of the micronutrients in chocolate?”</p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=157513&amp;title=When+is+milk+chocolate+good+for+you%3F" alt="" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/when-is-milk-chocolate-good-for-you/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/lauren-fuge">Lauren Fuge</a>. Lauren Fuge is a science journalist at Cosmos. She holds a BSc in physics from the University of Adelaide and a BA in English and creative writing from Flinders University.</p> </div> </div>

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BEYOND shocking: Ugly note left on Aldi shopper's car

<p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p>A woman in regional Victoria returned to her car after a shopping trip at Aldi, only to discover a shocking note left on her windscreen.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook, the Traralgon resident explained that the person who wrote the note must have thought she was flouting lockdown rules based on the dealership stickers on her car.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844117/new-project-11.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1350ca544ad044fea3ec7e1dd9320f46" /></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p> <p>As of Friday, those living in country Victoria no longer have strict stay-at-home restrictions after some rules were lifted.</p> <p>However, Melbourne remains in lockdown and based on that – the person who wrote the rude note presumably believed the Traralgon mum was from the city.</p> <p>“Beside my number plate, it has the name of the dealership my car was purchased from, in Melbourne” she wrote in a post alongside a photo of the note.</p> <p>“I’m assuming that’s why this lovely note was left on my windscreen this evening in the Aldi car park. I cannot believe the insanity and nastiness right now”.</p> <p>Many comments have flooded her post, describing the person behind the note as “disgusting”.</p> <p>“That’s shocking. I’m sorry people are so rude”, one person replied. “OMG that’s horrible. I’m amazed we aren’t getting the same thing. We live here yes but we didn’t buy our car here. There is a lot of craziness at the moment” said another, while a third person added its “So Un-Australia”.</p> <p>But it’s not the first-time regional residents have been at the centre of unwarranted attacks by their own people.</p> <p>Another woman from Inverloch said she was abused in Wongthaggi car park because someone thought she was from the city.</p> <p>“We were confused as to why she would think that from just looking at the car”, the woman said in a Facebook group, according to the Herald Sun. “Our car has a Melbourne dealership sticker on the rear window” as do most cars.</p> <p>Senior Sergeant Peter Watson told the publication that abuse towards others needs to stop.</p> <p>“People shouldn’t assume things, cars can be bought from anywhere” he said.</p>

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Woman driven to tears by ungrateful "Karen" customer

<p><em>Image: TikTok</em></p> <p>A Queensland small business owner has been left in tears after a vegan ‘Karen’ customer sent her a rude email about a free lolly that was included in her order.</p> <p>Carissa Collins, founder of TLC Body, took to TikTok earlier this week sharing her feelings about the email.</p> <p>She has been adding lollies to her packages sent to her customers as a thoughtful gesture.</p> <p>“So once again I’m in a position where I will not be buying from you again because I no longer trust your word” the email read.</p> <p>“I don’t eat lollies – vegan or not – what do you think you are gaining by sending someone a bit of sugary junk in the first place? I’d rather pay less for my product than get something I never asked for or wanted”</p> <p>“If they were vegan I could have at least appreciated the thought”.</p> <p>The email from the customer ended with them saying they would never buy Collins again.</p> <p>In a teary video on TikTok, Collins shared the email, asking “when did it become okay to speak to people like this?”</p> <p>“I literally just received an email from a customer complaining about me giving them a lolly. A bloody lolly in their order”, Collins said in the video.</p> <p>“Honestly, how this email was worded, it was almost as if I had stabbed them or something. What the hell. I am trying to do a nice thing by giving free gifts with orders. If you don’t like a lolly, don’t eat it”.</p> <p>Following her video, Collins received a massive amount of support, with fellow TikTokers commending her for the “lovely gesture”.</p> <p>“This lady is clearly a Karen” one person said.</p> <p>“You don’t want customers like that, it’s a blessing in disguise, don’t let this put you down” another said.</p> <p>In a follow up video she said she has been blown away by support.</p> <p>“All I can say right now is wow these last two days have been crazy”.</p> <p>“I really want you guys to know I appreciate you so much, thank you for your support and kind words”.</p> <p>The young business owner says she will not let the customer get her down and will continue to throw free lollies in to her orders.</p>

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