Food & Wine

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Coles addresses Christmas food shortage fears

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Supermarket giant Coles has reassured customers that there will be no food shortages around the festive season.</p> <p>As there's only 99 days until Christmas, supermarket bosses held crucial talks with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews to ensure that the hard lockdown won't lead to food shortages around the nation.</p> <p>Coles' Chief Operating Officer Matthew Swindells told <em>Today</em> that the company is prepared for the Christmas boom.</p> <p>"(There's) lots of work still to do, we are not through it all yet, but things are looking very promising," Swindells told <em>Today.</em></p> <p>"We are all very much aligned and playing as a team to make sure we can do two things; The first is keep our customers and team members safe. The second is maintain food supply through to the community. </p> <p>"We just need to plan for that and continue to work together."</p> <p>The company's current concern is making sure food comes down the right supply channels.</p> <p>Lockdown and coronavirus has complicated things as Coles starts preparing for the festive season six months in advance.</p> <p>"It's a big logistics challenge. The team are up for it, they do a great job every year," he said.</p> <p>"There is a large amount of fresh food, as you can imagine, we all like turkey, hams, we want them as fresh as possible, we want the best food in front of our families. </p> <p>"Whilst this will be a different Christmas, a COVID-safe Christmas, I think everyone is really looking forward to celebrating."</p> <p>Swindells has urged customers to use online shopping and click-to-collect methods to ensure that they don't miss out on the items they need.</p> <p>"Don't leave it to the last minute," he said.</p> <p>"Try and pick quieter times to do shopping, maybe don't pick Saturday or Sunday afternoon.</p> <p>"There is a way in which we can all work together and make sure we get through this and all celebrate Christmas in a COVID safe way."</p> </div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Lyndey Milan’s simple chocolate fudge cake

<p>Time to prepare <em>65 mins</em> |Serves <em>8</em></p> <p>Ready to discover the best chocolate cake ever?</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>150g butter</li> <li>¾ cup (165 g) brown sugar an</li> <li>150g dark chocolate</li> <li>1/3 cup condensed milk</li> <li>½ cup sour cream</li> <li>2 eggs</li> <li>¾ cup (110g) self-raising flour</li> </ul> <p><strong>To serve</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 tablespoons dark cocoa powder</li> <li>2 x 125g punnets fresh raspberries</li> <li>Melted white chocolate for drizzling</li> <li>Thick cream (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat oven to 170°C (150°C fan-forced). Place a 23cm (aprox) round silicone dish (<u><a href="https://gifts.com.au/brands/lyndey-milan">from the Lyndey Milan range</a></u>) on a baking tray. Or lightly grease a 23cm round cake tin and line base with baking paper.</p> <p>2. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan and add sugar, chocolate and condensed milk. Cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the mixture thickens slightly and the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and cool slightly.</p> <p>3. Whisk together sour cream and eggs in a large mixing bowl. Add cooled chocolate mixture and flour and mix well. Pour into dish and bake for 45 - 55 minutes or until cooked. Stand in dish for 10 minutes before turning onto a wire rack to cool.</p> <p>4. To serve, place cake on serving plate, sieve cocoa over the top of the cake. Add the raspberries and drizzle with the melted white chocolate. Serve with thick cream if desired.</p> <p><em>Recipe provided by <a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fsearch.ep%3Fauthor%3DLyndey%2520Milan">Lyndey Milan</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lyndey-milans-simple-chocolate-fudge-cake.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Furious ALDI shoppers call for buying limits

<p>An ALDI shopper’s behaviour has sparked a furious response on social media after he was caught trying to sell five of the prized $149 air fryers at almost twice the price - just four days after the Special Buys favourite sold out nationwide.</p> <p>The man’s ad for five ALDI 16L Multifunction Air Fryers was shared on the Facebook group ALDI Australia Buy, Swap &amp; Sell on Sunday, priced at $279.</p> <p>"Brand new in box un open, 5 available [sic]," the ad description reads.</p> <p>A screenshot of the ad was later posted to the Facebook group ALDI Mums, with many ALDI fans dubbing the man as a “jerk” and a “price gouger”.</p> <p>"Appalling. Should be illegal!" one commentator wrote.</p> <p>"What a jerk," another agreed, with a third asking: "What is wrong with people!"</p> <p>Many called for the German supermarket to apply customer limits to prevent this from happening. </p> <p>"Aldi should limit per customer each!" one wrote.</p> <p>"Special electronic buys should be restricted to one per customer. It's a no brainer."</p> <p>Another shopper thought two seemed fair: "Aldi should just have a 2 per person limit on special buys."</p> <p>But some disagreed and said the man did nothing wrong.</p> <p>"He's paid for it. He has the right to do whatever he wants with it. If someone is silly enough to pay that much for it then nothing to get worked up about."</p> <p>ALDI have previously said they’re not in the practice of restricting the volume of items sold to customers.</p>

Food & Wine

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Sweet and tangy lemon and blueberry cheesecake

<p>Time to prepare 1 hr 10 mins |Serves 10</p> <p><strong>Lemon and blueberry cheesecake</strong></p> <p>Bringing together sweet blueberries and tangy lemons, this simple cheesecake is light but luscious. It’s the perfect end to a lazy summer meal!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>Melted butter, extra, to grease</li> <li>375g cream cheese, at room temperature, cubed (see Tips)</li> <li>3 eggs, at room temperature</li> <li>185g (3/4 cup) sour cream</li> <li>125ml (1/2 cup) thin (pouring) cream</li> <li>165g (3/4 cup) caster (superfine) sugar</li> <li>1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest</li> <li>2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice</li> <li>200g fresh or frozen blueberries (see Tips)</li> <li>Icing (confectioners’) sugar, to dust</li> </ul> <p><strong>Biscuit base</strong></p> <ul> <li>100g plain sweet biscuits</li> <li>60g butter, melted</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line the base of a 20cm spring-form cake tin with baking paper. Brush the side of the tin with a little melted butter to grease.</p> <p>2. To make the Biscuit base, process the biscuits in a food processor until finely crushed. Add the butter and process until well combined. Sprinkle the mixture over the base of the tin and use the back of a metal spoon or the base of a glass to press down to cover evenly. Put the tin on a baking tray and place in the fridge.</p> <p>3. Clean the food processor bowl and process the cream cheese until smooth. Add the eggs and process until smooth. Add the sour cream, thin cream, sugar, lemon zest and juice and process until well combined and smooth, scraping down the side and base of the bowl when necessary. Pour into the tin over the base. Scatter the blueberries over the top.</p> <p>4. Bake for 1 hour 10 minutes or until the cheesecake is just set but the centre trembles slightly when the tin is shaken gently. Turn off the oven, use a wooden spoon to keep the oven door ajar and leave the cheesecake in the oven for 1 hour (this helps prevent the cheesecake from cracking). Transfer the cheesecake, still in the tin, to the fridge and chill for at least 3 hours or until well chilled. Dust with icing sugar and serve.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Having the cream cheese at room temperature means it will easily become smooth and creamy in the food processor. If you use it straight from the fridge it will take longer and you’ll need to scrape the side and base of the food processor frequently so that no lumps are left after processing.</p> <p>If using frozen blueberries, use them straight from the freezer – do not thaw.</p> <p><strong>Variations</strong></p> <p><strong>Orange &amp; Raspberry Cheesecake</strong> – Replace the lemon zest and juice with orange zest and juice. Replace the blueberries with fresh or frozen raspberries.</p> <p><strong>Blueberry &amp; White Chocolate Cheesecake</strong> – Replace the lemon zest and juice with 1 1/2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract or essence. Melt 180g good-quality white chocolate and cool to room temperature. Add to the bowl of the food processor just before transferring the mixture to the tin and process until just combined.</p> <p><strong>Individual Lemon &amp; Blueberry Cheesecakes</strong> – Line a 12-hole 80ml (1/3 cup) capacity muffin tin with paper cases. Divide the biscuit base, cream cheese mixture and blueberries evenly among the cases. Bake at 160°C for 30 minutes. Cool as per the recipe, then chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour before removing the paper cases and serving.</p> <p>Recipes and images from Bake Class by Anneka Manning ($39.99, Murdoch Books).</p> <p><em>Republished with permission <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemon-and-blueberry-cheesecake.aspx">of Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Pear upside-down cake

<p>One thing I love about social media is its ability to bring people together who share similar passions. I met Jess of <a href="https://www.instagram.com/jess_mycleantreats/">@jess_mycleantreats</a> on Instagram and after scrolling through her feed of healthy desserts I was dying to try them for myself.</p> <p>Jess doesn't follow any particular diet, she just loves food and prefers to make healthier choices. She particularly loves desserts, so much so that she says "I may have spent the previous year heaping 3 teaspoons of Nutella into my mouth every night before I went to sleep (and also heaping on 3 kilos while I was at it)." So she decided to start experimenting with creating her own healthier treats using natural ingredients. She shares her creations on her blog, My Clean Treats, and says "if you pair these treats with a healthy lifestyle of fresh meals and regular exercise, I’d say you’re on the right track." Agree!</p> <p>I tried out Jess's Pear &amp; Date Upside-Down Cake and it was delicious. Her original recipe included chopped dates, which would be really tasty but I left them out to make a Pear Upside-Down Cake (because I can't eat a lot of dates). I also used brown rice flour instead of wholewheat or spelt to keep the cake gluten-free and it worked out nicely! The recipe for my adapted version is below and you can check out Jess's original recipe here. I loved the mixture of pear and cinnamon.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>4 pears</li> <li>6 x 20ml tablespoons coconut oil, melted</li> <li>1/2 cup rice malt syrup</li> <li>3 large free-range eggs</li> <li>1 tsp vanilla bean paste or pure vanilla extract</li> <li>1 2/3 cup brown rice flour</li> <li>2 tsp (gluten-free) baking powder</li> <li>1 tsp cinnamon powder</li> <li>1 cup unsweetened almond milk</li> <li>Extra cinnamon powder for dusting</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Peel and core the pears and cut them into halves. Poach the pear halves in simmering water for about 30-40 minutes or until soft. Set aside to cool.</p> <p>2. While the pears are poaching, preheat your oven to 170°C (fan-forced) and line the base and sides of a 20cm circular cake tin with baking paper.*</p> <p>3. Drizzle 3 tablespoons of melted coconut oil over the base of the tin, then arrange the pear halves cut-side down to cover the base.</p> <p>4. Using an electric mixer, beat the remaining 3 tablespoons of melted coconut oil, rice malt syrup and vanilla together until creamy. Add one egg at a time to the mixture, beating until well combined.</p> <p>5. Sift the flour, cinnamon and baking powder over the liquid mixture, then gently fold everything together. Add the almond milk and beat lightly to combine.</p> <p>6. Pour the mixture over the pears, then bake in the preheated oven for 1 hour - 1 hour 20 minutes (mine took 1 hour). Allow to cool. To serve, flip onto a plate and dust over some extra cinnamon. Store in an airtight container in the fridge.</p> <p>Serves 8.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>* I used a springform cake tin, which meant that the coconut oil dripped through the tiny gaps in the base while in the oven causing a bit of a mess. So I ended up wrapping the tin in two layers of foil to stop the dripping. I'd recommend doing this from the start or using a normal cake tin (without a removable base).</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pear-upside-down-cake-ld.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Honey, whisky and saffron cheesecake

<p>An indulgent twist on a timeless classic, impress your guests tonight!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>500g mascarpone</li> <li>A few saffron strands, steeped in 1 tablespoon boiling water for at least 1 hour</li> <li>160g caster sugar</li> <li>1 tablespoon leatherwood honey, warmed</li> <li>4 eggs</li> <li>50ml whisky</li> </ul> <p><strong>Sweet shortcrust pastry</strong></p> <ul> <li>190g plain flour</li> <li>90g cold unsalted butter, cut into 1cm cubes</li> <li>1 tablespoon caster sugar</li> <li>1 egg yolk</li> <li>2 tablespoons cold water</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. To make the pastry, rub the flour, butter and sugar between your fingertips until it resembles breadcrumbs. Alternatively, you can use a food processor to do this. Add the egg yolk and water, and mix until the dough comes together to form a ball. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to rest.<br /><br />2. Mix the mascarpone, saffron water, sugar, honey, eggs and whisky together in a large bowl. Set aside.<br /><br />3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the pastry to about 4mm thick. Line a well-greased 23cm springform tin with baking paper and carefully place the pastry in the tin. Trim the edge of any excess pastry and return to the fridge to chill.</p> <p>4. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line the pastry base with baking paper and weights, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the weights and baking paper and bake the tart shell for a further 10 minutes.</p> <p>5. Pour the filling into the tart shell and bake for a further 30 minutes, or until set and golden on top. Allow to cool before serving.</p> <p>Serves 8.</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from <a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmilk-made-nick-haddow%2Fprod9781743791356.html">Milk. Made.</a> by Nick Haddow published by Hardie Grant Books RRP $55 and is available in stores nationally. Image © Alan Benson.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/honey-whisky-and-saffron-cheesecake.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Mum embarrassed by ALDI alcohol policy

<p>A mum has sparked a fierce debate on social media after she shared her “embarrassing” experience at her local ALDI.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em>, the woman said she never expected to rile up so many people after she shared her experience of being almost refused service when she tried to buy a bottle of wine in front of her kids.</p> <p>Taking to the ALDI Fan Facebook page, the mum said she was with her teenagers doing a quick shop when the manager came over as she tried to purchase a bottle of red.</p> <p>“While waiting in line I grabbed a bottle of alcohol to purchase, [and] the cashier said she needed to check with her manager if she could sell the alcohol as I had two children in uniform,” the post read.</p> <p>“She called the manager and was told that it was at the cashier discretion if she could sell it to me!’</p> <p>The mum told<span> </span><em>Yahoo</em><span> </span>that despite being allowed to buy the wine, she was mortified by the incident which took place in front of everyone in the store.</p> <p>“My kids were embarrassed, I was embarrassed,” she says. “I had people looking at me like I’m a sh** mother.”</p> <p>She says she doesn’t blame the cashier, but if ALDI has a policy in place then they should advertise it.</p> <p>In a statement, the retailer said their employees have the right to refuse service if they have concerns the person buying the items is a “risk”.</p> <p>“The sale of alcohol can be refused if a minor has handled alcohol that could be potentially purchased by an adult for the minor’s consumption,” a spokesperson says. “This also extends to a minor accompanying an adult purchasing alcohol, even if the minor has not physically touched an alcoholic product.”</p> <p>“It is the store’s responsibility to refuse any customer who presents a risk and ultimately it is at the discretion of the person serving to decline the sale should they have any doubts or concerns.”</p> <p>They also pointed to the hefty fines as a reason they take the rules so seriously.</p> <p>“There are severe consequences for breaching laws and policies set in place by the Australian government involving the sale of alcohol,” they say. As such ALDI faces heavy penalties should we sell alcohol to any customer who supplies to a person under the age of 18.”</p> <p>The post, which now has over 10,000 comments, have defended the cashier, saying she was just doing her job.</p> <p>“Anyone complaining needs to realise these people need to abide by RSA laws,” one woman wrote on the post.</p> <p>RSA laws in NSW do not restrict the sale of alcohol to an adult who has children with them, but the law does mandate that any person selling alcohol can refuse service if they think the buyer is buying the alcohol on behalf of a minor.</p> <p>But some believe the assumption she was providing alcohol to her children was farfetched.</p> <p>“I find this hilarious!” one wrote. “If you were buying for kids you wouldn’t bring them in with you, people are so stupid!!”</p> <p>“I get they’re doing their job but I defo understand the frustration of the original poster,” another wrote.</p> <p>It seems others have run into the same at other venues.</p> <p>“I was with my mum and they said they couldn’t sell it because I was with her,” one minor wrote.</p> <p>“Yup had this happen to me a few times,” another agreed.</p> <p>Others pointed out that workers get fined $11,000 for selling alcohol to a minor, so it shouldn’t be taken too personally.</p> <p>“She gets fined by authorities personally so don’t be offended,” one advised. “I get it. No Aldi job is worth a fine.”</p>

Food & Wine

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Unforgettable waste-reducing cooking tips

<p>Reduce, reuse, recycle: these expert tips will help you find new ways to cut waste in the kitchen.</p> <p><strong>Regrow veggies</strong></p> <p>Strange but true: spring onions will regrow from their white ends. Just put them in a glass of water and let them get some sunlight. You can snip the green ends every few days for practically endless seasoning.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Say "cheese" to milk</strong></p> <p>If it’s can be hard to finish your milk before it expires, but don’t wait for it to curdle. Instead, set some aside and make cottage cheese.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Reuse your daily grind</strong></p> <p>Used coffee grounds can keep ants away. Plus, they can get rid of odours, stimulate your potted plants, and more, which makes them worth holding onto.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Put peels out for pests</strong></p> <p>Orange peels can actually be put to good use, especially if it’s summer. Insects such as mosquitoes and ants will stay away if you grind the up, and they can get rid of musty smells.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Bake bruised fruit</strong></p> <p>Overripe, very dark bananas make for flavourful banana bread. Instead of throwing them out, bake them into a great dessert. Reducing and recycling your food can even save you money.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Give stale snacks some bite</strong></p> <p>There’s no need to toss old chips. Stale snacks can be crisped up in the microwave – just put them on a microwave-safe plate and nuke on full power for 10 seconds.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Crisp up your crusts</strong></p> <p>You can make leftover pizza crust crispy again, but don’t use the microwave. Instead, put your slices on a skillet for 4-5 minutes on medium heat – make a rounded lid out of aluminium foil to make sure the toppings get toasty, too.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Cool down with an ice ‘pop’</strong></p> <p>Flat soft-drinks aren’t so great to drink, but they can make for a tasty treat with a little patience. Pour some in an ice cube tray, stick toothpicks in each space, and enjoy your treats after they freeze.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Rethink yesterday's loaf</strong></p> <p>Don’t waste old, dry bread. As long as it won’t chip a tooth, you can chop it up, sauté it with spices, and make croutons for salads or soup.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Liquor? Now, thicker</strong></p> <p>You can kick up the quality of vodka with a simple water filter. It won’t completely transform what you have in the cabinet, but filtering can make less expensive brands taste better.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Look twice at rice</strong></p> <p>Think before pitching rice if it’s been sitting in your cupboard for a few months. It can be used to dry electronics if you get them wet – just put the device in a bowl of the dry grains for 24 hours.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Banish sponge bacteria</strong></p> <p>Your old sponge might look like it belongs in the bin, but two minutes in the microwave will kill as much as 99.9 per cent of the bacteria on it, making it good as new. Be sure to get it wet first.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Celery care 101</strong></p> <p>Celery is all about crispness, so when it starts to go soft, you may as well throw it out. Right? Not necessarily. Try this first: put limp stalks in a bowl of cold water with a few slices of raw potato. After an hour or so in this starchy bath, the stalks may deliver the crunch you expect.</p> <p>And while even crisp celery may turn brown, you can stop browning before it starts. Before storing the stalks in the fridge, soak them for 30 minutes in 1 litre cold water mixed with 1 teaspoon lemon juice – a trick that will also crisp celery just before it’s served.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Get the most out of a lemon</strong></p> <p>When a recipe calls for a few drops of lemon, don’t slice the lemon and squeeze. Simply puncture the rind with a toothpick and gently squeeze out the small amount of juice you need. Then cover the hole with a piece of tape and store the lemon in the fridge for later use. Waste not, want not!</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Oiled eggs</strong></p> <p>Prolong the life of fresh eggs by dipping a paper towel into vegetable oil and rubbing the shells before storing the eggs in the fridge. The oil will keep the eggs fresh for an additional three to four weeks.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>A surplus of spuds?</strong></p> <p>If you find you’ve peeled too many potatoes for a potato salad or casserole, don’t toss the uncooked extras. Put them in a bowl, cover with cold water, and add a few drops of vinegar. Now they will keep in the fridge for three to four days.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Brown-bag your lettuce</strong></p> <p>Lettuce will keep longer if you transfer it from a plastic bag to a roomier paper bag before storing it in the refrigerator. Lettuce likes a little air, but don’t think that calls for removing the limp and discoloured outermost leaves; they may not be pretty, but these leaves help keep the inner leaves crisper.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Last stop? Compost</strong></p> <p>When all else fails, composting your old fruits and veggies can help optimise the fertilizer you use for your garden. If you’re going to toss them anyway, put them to good use.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by </em><strong><em>Damon Beres</em></strong><em>. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/unforgettable-waste-reducing-cooking-tips?pages=1"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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How I mastered baking a yeast bread from scratch after years of failure

<p>My introduction to baking started with the home-kitchen classic that cracks open the oven door for so many – chocolate chip cookies. It was the 1970s, and most of the mums in our largely Catholic neighbourhood were busy raising big families. For the girls in my house, that meant our mother made sure we knew our way around the kitchen. At the flour-dusted table, Mum taught eight-year-old me how to make the cookies perfectly chewy with a crispy exterior. (The big secret: Always chill your dough.)</p> <p>We crafted them by the dozen, measuring ingredients from yellow Tupperware containers and mixing everything in my mum’s aqua Butter­print Pyrex bowl, part of a set she’d received as a wedding gift in 1963. Friends who grew up in “fresh fruit is dessert” households could not get enough when they visited. And if they happened to come over when the cookie jar was empty, they were not shy about sharing their disappointment.</p> <p>So from a young age, I was crystal clear on the power of a baked-to-perfection cookie to make people happy. Baking cookies – then brownies, cakes and pies – became my hobby and a tasty form of social currency. First I used my skills with butter and sugar to impress a series of teenage boyfriends. In time, the fresh goodies were left on doorsteps to welcome new neighbours and set out in the break room for co-workers. Baking was my superpower.</p> <p>A few years ago, I became the content director for Taste of Home, Reader’s Digest’s sister magazine and website that celebrates the treasured recipes of home cooks. I’d never been more excited for a new job, but privately I worried that my baking chops wouldn’t measure up. Why? I had a secret as dark as an oven with a burned-out light bulb: While I had baked sweets my whole life, I’d never made a yeast bread from scratch.</p> <p>Mum couldn’t help me with this one. For her, store-bought frozen dough was her go-to when she needed “from scratch” bread. I understand why: Bread dough provides so many opportunities to fail. Cookies are forgiving. You can be a little off in your measurements, and, trust me, those cookies still disappear from the office break room. Not the case with yeast breads. Most recipes recommend weighing ingredients carefully, down to the gram.</p> <p>Then there’s the yeast. Yeast is fussy, the Goldilocks of ingredients. Mix it in water too cool and it won’t activate; too hot, and it dies. Yes, yeast is a living, one-celled member of the fungus family. Because it is alive, I could, of course, kill it – and unfortunately rather easily.</p> <p>And don’t forget that other potential failure point: the kneading. Too little kneading and the bread will be flat. But don’t overdo it! Knead it too much, and the loaf will be tough and chewy.</p> <p>Still, this was no time for excuses. I was a baker, now one with Taste of Home attached to my name. I may have been intimidated by bread, but it was time. I wanted in.</p> <p>Getting started, I found Instagram to be a friend. A basic no-knead bread was the one I was seeing online overlaid with dreamy filters. People described it as easy, and to be honest, the thought of removing even one intimidating variable – kneading – was enough to get me to buy two kilograms of bread flour and dive in.</p> <p>I gathered everything I’d need (“be prepared” is the first rule of any baking), including my mum’s trusty Pyrex. It had seen me through my first days as a baker, so I was counting on it to work its magic. I had an easy Taste of Home recipe all set on my iPad. I mixed the flour, salt, and yeast and made sure the water temperature was just right – 38 to 46 degrees – before pouring it in.</p> <p>And then it happened – or didn’t happen. I followed the instructions to the letter, but my dough didn’t rise. Somehow, impossibly, it looked smaller. Sludgy, gooey, wet with a few bubbles. Sad.</p> <p>The Pyrex bowl didn’t save me, so I had to figure out how to do it myself. Frantically googling “bread dough didn’t rise” yielded a likely answer – the room was too cold. But I found some solutions too. I put the disappointing dough in the oven with the light on, a trick that provides just a bit of gentle heat, to let it try again.</p> <p>Three hours later, after I’d resisted the urge to keep checking on it like a nervous mum with a newborn, a puffy dough filled the bowl. I hadn’t killed it; it was just … sleeping. A quick fold, a second rise, and then my bread went into my Dutch oven and off to bake.</p> <p>Thirty minutes later, I took it out. Sure, it was slightly misshapen, but in my eyes, it was golden-brown, crusty perfection, right down to the yeasty-sweet hit of steam coming from its top.</p> <p>Naturally, the first thing I did was grab my phone and hop on Instagram, positioning my beautiful bread just so in a shining stream of daylight on a wooden cutting board. No one needed to know it was my first yeast bread ever – or how close it came to getting scraped into the garbage can. The online reactions started almost immediately – heart emojis and comments like “This looks DELISH!” from my friends.</p> <p>They couldn’t taste it, but virtual sharing yields its own rewards.</p> <p>Finally I cut into that lovely brown crust and doled out slices to my husband and kids. Those slices led to seconds, then thirds, each piece slathered with softened butter and a little sprinkle of salt. I made my family perhaps happier with slices of warm, buttered homemade bread than I had with all the sweets combined. They were used to the cookies and brownies; this was something totally new and equally delicious. Soon enough, I was left with a butter-smeared knife, a few lonely crumbs on the cutting board, and, of course, my post on Instagram as the only evidence of its existence.</p> <p>At last, I was a bread baker – despite yeast’s best attempts to intimidate me on this first try. No more feeling inferior or afraid. Now I make bread and homemade pizza crust regularly. Yeast and I have such a good relationship that I’m done buying the little packs – I buy it in large enough quantities to fill its own Tupperware container. And I have enough confidence to start thinking (and stressing!) about my next difficult baking challenge: homemade croissants.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Tips from my trial and error</strong></p> <p>Read the whole recipe before you start.</p> <p>We’ve all gotten halfway through a recipe only to find we don’t have any buttermilk. Plus, a quick read can help you prepare for what’s ahead, particularly if there are any techniques with which you’re not familiar.</p> <p><strong>1. Use butter at the right temperature</strong></p> <p>Most cake and cookie recipes call for softened butter, which is the right consistency for creaming with sugar. Biscuit and pie pastry recipes call for ice-cold butter in order to create the flakiest layers. If your butter isn’t the correct temperature, your bakes won’t mix up the way they should.</p> <p><strong>2. Weigh all your ingredients</strong></p> <p>When it comes to baking, it’s always preferable to measure your ingredients by weight rather than volume. This ensures you get exactly the right proportions. It may not be critical for something simple like a pan of brownies, but it’s important with fussier baked items, such as macarons.</p> <p><strong>3. Chill cookie dough</strong></p> <p>We know how tempting it is to get your cookies in the oven the second you’re done mixing up your dough. However, chilling the dough can help develop flavours and prevent cookies from spreading too much. Do not skip this step!</p> <p><strong>4. Coat mix-ins with flour</strong></p> <p>When a recipe calls for add-ins (dried fruits, chocolate chips, and/or nuts), you’ll often see instructions to toss them in a bit of flour before adding to the batter. You might think that’s a waste – after all, there’s flour in the batter. But coating these heavy mix-ins helps prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the pan. The extra step gives you even distribution and a prettier result.</p> <p><strong>5. Cool cakes completely before icing</strong></p> <p>Always let your cakes, cupcakes, and cookies cool completely before icing them. If they are too warm, the icing will slide right off the top of your cake or melt and soak in. Cooling racks speed up the process. If you don’t have one, take the cover off your ironing board and use the board as a cooling rack.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by </em><em>Jeanne Sidner</em><em>. This article first appeared on<a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/how-i-mastered-baking-a-yeast-bread-from-scratch-after-years-of-failure"> </a></em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/how-i-mastered-baking-a-yeast-bread-from-scratch-after-years-of-failure"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/how-i-mastered-baking-a-yeast-bread-from-scratch-after-years-of-failure">.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Rare look into Queen Elizabeth’s royal kitchen

<p>The Queen and Prince Philip’s kitchen inside Buckingham Palace has served as been at the helm of the world’s biggest royal events of all time.</p> <p>The chef’s kitchen has catered from everything to royal weddings to birthday and not many few photographs have been shown over time.</p> <p>The few images that have been released show baker Sophie Cabot preparing the wedding cake for Princess Eugenie of York and Jack Brooksbank’s nuptials in October 2018.</p> <p>Other photographs show that the expansive kitchen is perfect for cooking on a mass scale and is equipped with all the bits and bobs.</p> <p>The kitchen also seems to be perfected with stainless-steel splash back panels behind each sink, as well as shelves positioned above, where endless amounts of ingredients and kitchenware is stored.</p> <p>Copper saucepans that date back as far as King George IV's reign are stacked on racks in the kitchens, with sizes to suit every purpose.</p> <p>Buckingham Palace has been used as the monarch's royal residence since Queen Victoria decided to renovate the previously vacant property in 1837.</p> <p>The former Queen extended the property and added on touches that are still standing today.</p> <p>This includes the famous balcony at the front, where royal family members often gather for occasions such as Trooping the Colour.</p> <p>Inside, there is a total of 775 rooms, including 19 state rooms, 52 royal and guest bedrooms, 92 offices, 78 bathrooms and 188 bedrooms for household staff. </p> <p>See the kitchen here. </p>

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"Best markdown of all time": Coles shopper's epic boast

<p><span>A Coles shopper has shared her incredible purchase for just 10c that she picked up from her local store.</span><br /><br /><span>Jumping onto Facebook, the Melbourne customer revealed that she scored two $23 Australian Hot Roast Porks for just 10 cents each.</span><br /><br /><span>She says she spotted the bargain at a store in West Melbourne.</span><br /><br /><span>“I was there just before closing and I was waiting in the line to pay for other items as she marked them down,” she wrote on the Markdown Addicts Australia page.</span><br /><br /><span>“From far [away] I thought they were marked down to $10 and I was like sweet, I’ll grab one.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837667/cen-pork.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c654028e7a604070bb563be0236bfb81" /><br /><br /><span>“Then bam, they where 10c each so grabbed them both. One of my best scores.”</span><br /><br /><span>Some remarked that the low price was concerning.</span><br /><br /><span>However the shopper said there was nothing wrong with the roasts, and offered a very valid reason for the amazing markdown.</span><br /><br /><span>“They were reduced to that price because in Melbourne our supermarkets close at 7.30 pm at the moment,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>Added another shopper: “I wouldn’t be worried at all.”</span><br /><br /><span>Many bargain hunters agreed it was an awesome buy.</span><br /><br /><span>“The greatest yet,” said one.</span><br /><br /><span>“No one can out bargain you, I am so jealous right now,” added another.</span></p>

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Coles slashes prices on 190 everyday buys

<p>Coles is celebrating the anniversary of its Down Down campaign by slashing prices and offering major savings on an extra 190 everyday buys in their stores around Australia.</p> <p>It’s been 10 years since Coles created its Down Down program, where they commit to long-term price reductions on some of their most popular products.</p> <p>Some of the most cost efficient, long-running Down Down offers include Quilton 20-pack toilet paper for $10, Moro Olive Oil 1L for $12, Fab Laundry Powder 2kg for $7 and Bega Peanut Butter 780g for $6.50.</p> <p>And now the supermarket has reduced nearly 200 more popular buys for customers to celebrate the milestone.</p> <p>These cut backs include:</p> <ul> <li>Uncle Toby’s Cheeries cereal 570g - down from $6.50 to $5</li> <li>Oreo Biscuits 370g - down from $4.50 to $3.50</li> <li>Coca-Cola Soft Drink 8pk 8x200ml - down from $8.50 to $6</li> <li>Coon Dairy Cheese Slices 750g - down from $12 to $10</li> <li>Coles Free Range Pork Leg Roast - reduced from $14 to $12</li> </ul> <p>Down Down is Coles commitment to keep a price reduced for at least three months, sometimes longer.</p> <p>“It is more important than ever that we are providing customers with great value every time they shop,” Coles Chief Marketing Officer Lisa Ronson said.</p> <p>“Down Down and the Big Red Hand have been an important way for Coles to provide our customers with trusted value they can rely on. The campaign changed the face of retail by keeping the cost of groceries for Australians down.</p> <p>“As we celebrate its tenth anniversary, we remain committed to lowering the cost of living during what has been a very challenging time for so many.”</p>

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Easy peasy chocolate cake

<p>Here's a no-fuss, yet impressive, cake for a special occasion. Serve with a generous dollop of cream or a spoonful of good ice-cream.</p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F/Gas 4).</li> <li>Lightly grease and flour a 4-cup (1 litre) capacity heart-shaped cake tin or silicone mould.</li> <li>Sift 185 g plain (all-purpose) flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 3/4 cup (145 g) caster (superfine) sugar and 1/4 cup (30 g) unsweetened cocoa powder into a medium bowl and mix until well combined.</li> <li>Add 125 g melted butter, 2 eggs, 3/4 cup (180 ml) milk and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, and whisk until smooth.</li> <li>Pour into prepared cake tin or mould.</li> <li>Bake for 1 hour, or until cooked – a skewer inserted in the centre will come out clean.</li> <li>Cool cake in tin on wire rack for 10 minutes, then turn out to finish cooling. If in a mould, cool completely in the mould before turning out.</li> <li>Cover with buttercream (see below).</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p><strong>Chocolate buttercream</strong></p> <ol> <li>Beat 125g softened unsalted butter until light and creamy.</li> <li>Gradually beat in 1 cup (125 g) icing sugar and continue beating until the mixture is light and fluffy.</li> <li>Add 125g melted and slightly cooled dark chocolate and beat until combined.</li> <li>Spread over cake and allow to set.<br /><br /><br /></li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/easy-peasy-chocolate-cake"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p> </p>

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URGENT RECALL: Popular milk brands recalled across the country over contamination fears

<p><span>Popular almond milk brands have recalled their products over contamination concerns.</span><br /><br /><span>MILKLAB Almond Milk and Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Chocolate Almond Milk are urging anyone who purchased some of their products to return it due to “a potential microbial contamination”.</span><br /><br /><span>“This recall includes an earlier recall by RIO Coffee of MILKLAB Almond Milk with a Best Before date of 6 AUG 2021 in SA - this recall has been removed from the website,” the recall explained.</span><br /><br /><span>“MILKLAB Almond Milk has been available for sale nationally in various coffee shops and food service outlets.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837630/recall.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aaed1290a85742d4970b12da5e838f6d" /><br /><br /><span>The best before dates on the MILKLAB product are the 18 June, 01 July, 20 July, 29 July and 6 August in 2021.</span><br /><br /><span>“Blue Diamond Almond Breeze Chocolate Almond Milk has been available for sale in NSW (Coles and Woolworths), QLD (Coles and Woolworths), SA (Coles), TAS (Coles), VIC (Coles and Woolworths) and WA (Coles and Woolworths),” the recall also stated.</span><br /><br /><span>For the Blue Diamond product, the best before date is 27 April 2021.</span><br /><br /><span>Both the mills are 1L products and have been recalled due to “potential microbial contamination (bacteria pseudomonas)“.</span><br /><br /><span>“Food products with microbial contamination may cause illness if consumed,” FSANZ said on their website.</span><br /><br /><span>“Any consumers concerned about their health should seek medical advice and should return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund.”</span></p>

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Grandma shows off 24-year-old McDonald’s burger that “never rotted or decayed”

<p>While it may seem like the sensible idea to throw food away after several weeks, months, or even years – one woman has proven just how far she went with her McDonald’s hamburger and French fries.</p> <p>A Tiktok user recently took to social media to share her grandmother’s decades-old possession that she keeps hiding away in a shoe box in her closet.</p> <p>Aly Sherb showed her grandma pulling open the 24-year-old wrapper to reveal a slightly old looking hamburger that she purchased in 1996.</p> <p>She starts off the video by showing the bag’s advertisement for US Nascar races in 1996.</p> <p>She then takes out the fries, which she says look like they could have fallen into a seat “a month or so ago” and says that they “never rotted or decayed.”</p> <blockquote style="max-width: 605px; min-width: 325px;" class="tiktok-embed" data-video-id="6865455379787173126"><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/@aly.sherb" target="_blank" title="@aly.sherb">@aly.sherb</a> <p>Make this go viral, y’all <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/grandparentsoftiktok" target="_blank" title="grandparentsoftiktok">##grandparentsoftiktok</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/mcdonalds" target="_blank" title="mcdonalds">##mcdonalds</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/fyp" target="_blank" title="fyp">##fyp</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/decadechallenge" target="_blank" title="decadechallenge">##decadechallenge</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/foryou" target="_blank" title="foryou">##foryou</a> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/happymeal" target="_blank" title="happymeal">##happymeal</a></p> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/music/original-sound-6865455385554406150" target="_blank" title="♬ original sound - aly.sherb">♬ original sound - aly.sherb</a></blockquote> <p>The woman then shows the burger that she purchased in its original wrapping, then pulls out the burger.</p> <p>The bun and burger appear to never have rotted or decayed either.</p> <p>The video finishes with her saying, “24-year-old hamburger, not sure what would happen if you ate it though.”</p> <p>Anne Christensen, director of Field Brand Reputation for McDonald’s, told Fox News: “In the right environment, our burgers, like most other foods, could decompose. But, in order to decompose, you need certain conditions — specifically moisture.”</p> <p>“Without sufficient moisture – either in the food itself or the environment – bacteria and mold may not grow and therefore, decomposition is unlikely.</p> <p>“So if food is or becomes dry enough, it is unlikely to grow mold or bacteria or decompose. Food prepared at home that is left to dehydrate could see similar results. Similarly, this particular burger is likely dried out and dehydrated, and by no means the same as the day it was purchased.”</p>

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The crazy pizza toppings that are actually delicious

<p>Sure, you've been eating your pizza with extra cheese, pepperoni, and mushrooms for years, but that's child's play compared to the craziest new pizza toppings out there.</p> <p>Try not to cringe when there is pineapple on a pizza. There’s a ton of other wild stuff happening out there more concerning.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Corn</strong></p> <p>Does corn pizza seem totally crazy to you?</p> <p>You’re probably more used to veggie pizza toppings like sun dried tomatoes or olives, but some fresh roasted sweet corn is actually delicious on a classic pizza thanks to its delicately sweet flavour.</p> <p>If you want add a little zest to your corn, try adding some chilli flakes to give your pizza a sweet heat.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Crab meat</strong></p> <p>Remember that old adage that seafood and cheese never go together by Italian culinary tradition?</p> <p>Apparently, American pizza experts are throwing that to the wind, because trend-setting pizza chains in New York are topping their famous pizzas with real lump crab meat and people are loving it.</p> <p>Crab meat is loaded with zinc, so you can tell yourself a slice isn’t the worst decision you could make today.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Sriracha</strong></p> <p>People are going crazy for Sriracha sauce-topped pies thanks to the gentle heat of this popular pepper-infused topping and low calorie content.</p> <p>Asian and Italian flavours may not seem like a natural fit, but one bite of a fresh pizza drizzled in spicy Sriracha sauce will make you question what other weirdly wonderful flavour combos you’ve been missing out on.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Kale</strong></p> <p>If you’re not the type to order a salad on your pizza, think again—kale is delicious when cooked.</p> <p>It’s one of the best pizza toppings for veggie lovers thanks to high vitamin C and fibre content.</p> <p>Kale-topped pizzas are currently trending in veggie-friendly areas like Los Angeles, where a popular local joint, Pitfire Pizza, tops their pizzas with black kale, field mushrooms, cheddar, chilies, and garlic. Yum!</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Hummus</strong></p> <p>Hummus sounds like a seriously crazy pizza topping, doesn’t it? It should, but the truth is it’s gaining steam in the health-conscious food blogger seen, and even US brands like Sabra have created limited-time pizza-flavoured hummus lines because surprisingly, the flavours pair really well together.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Cashew cheese</strong></p> <p>It turns out cashew cheese is the vegan cheese of choice for foodies these days, and some pizza shops are going to great lengths to satisfy their vegan and dairy-free customers’ pizza cravings.</p> <p>Matthew Kenney, a vegan chef and expert who teaches workshops on going vegan at Turnberry Isle Miami, has been leading the cashew cheese pizza movement in New York and Florida.</p> <p>Try not to cringe when there is pineapple on a pizza. There’s a ton of other wild stuff happening out there more concerning.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Nectarines</strong></p> <p>Nectarines, peaches, and other stone fruit have a tangy-sweet flavour that is similar in some ways to the flavour profile of BBQ sauce.</p> <p>If you’re the type who likes a good BBQ-themed pizza, you need to try one topped with nectarine slices and an especially sharp or bold cheese.</p> <p>Milo &amp; Olive, a popular pizzeria in the US state of California, has been serving up a salty-meets-sweet nectarine and bacon pizza that’s topped with Fontina, thyme, balsamic glaze, and deliciously ripe stone fruit.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Spicy mac and cheese</strong></p> <p>Mac and cheese is already great, and adding spice is always the next level of excitement, but if you haven’t tried adding fresh jalapeños and gooey mac and cheese to your pizza, have you even really lived?</p> <p>Vinnie’s, a popular local pizza spot in Brooklyn, has lines out the door for their magical, new-age comfort food slices.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Eggs</strong></p> <p>Cooked, runny, semi-solid—you name it. Eggs are one of the best weird pizza toppings to be found in both the United States and Italy, the birthplace of pizza.</p> <p>Eggs are healthy, too, so adding a few to your pizza gives you an excuse to have a slice for a responsible brunch.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Entire Mexican dishes</strong></p> <p>Why add just a little Mexican seasoning to your pizza when you can throw an entire plate of chilaquiles right on top of your favourite simple pizza.</p> <p>This recipe was the brainchild of Chef Martin Gonzalez in San Diego, California, and includes crunchy tortilla chips, warm green tomatillo sauce, red onion, and queso añejo (a Mexican cheese that is very similar to Parmesan) and crema fresca.</p> <p>There’s no reason this can’t be recreated at home, and you’ll be a hero for combining the world’s most addictive flavours.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Avocado</strong></p> <p>Your favourite, trendiest salad addition is also great on pizza. Avocado’s creamy texture is actually similar to that of some soft cheeses, and the mildly nutty flavour pairs well with everything from tomatoes to garlic.</p> <p>Avocado is one of the best pizza toppings you never expected because it can easily be combined with all the other weird toppings too, like corn, crab, and even Sriracha.</p> <p>Plus, avocados are a brain food, so you can feel good about loading your plate up.</p> <p> </p> <p class="p1"> </p> <p class="p2"><em>Written by Bryce Grubern. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/11-crazy-pizza-toppings-are-actually-delicious"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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Jamie Oliver confirms the correct way to abbreviate "spaghetti bolognese"

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver has finally settled the debate on how to properly abbreviate "spaghetti bolognese".</p> <p>He confirmed it on the Wednesday night's episode of <em>The Project</em>.</p> <p>Host Waleed Aly decided to pitch the debate to the chef as he appeared on the show via a live link from his London home.</p> <p>Aly confirmed that he referred to the popular pasta dish as "spag bol" whereas his co-host Peter Helliar used the term "spag bog".</p> <p>Jamie Oliver couldn't contain his giggles as he admitted that "bog" is a term used in Britain used to describe a toilet in England.</p> <p>Jamie joked: "In the UK, a bog is a toilet! If he [Peter] really wants to call it a spaghetti toilet... I mean, I'm not a marketeer, but the marketing on the 'spaghetti toilet' is probably not a great idea!"</p> <p>He was on the show to promote his new cooking book <em>7 Ways</em>, which aims to give people new ideas for ingredients they often purchase.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEB2OvLo_m5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEB2OvLo_m5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Lovely lot my NEW book #Jamies7Ways is out on THURSDAY!!! Link in my bio to order your copy.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/jamieoliver/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Jamie Oliver</a> (@jamieoliver) on Aug 18, 2020 at 4:24am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Jamie has also been broadcasting his <em>Channel 4</em> show <em>Keep Cooking and Carry On</em> from his home during the pandemic to give viewers an idea on what to cook while staying safe from coronavirus.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Coles launches new recipe hub for the budget conscious

<p>Aussies are showing a growing appetite for affordable and easy dinners at home as they aim to stay healthy and save cash.</p> <p>With the pandemic causing nationwide lockdowns, Coles is lending a helping hand to home cooks so they can create delicious meals with the click of a button.</p> <p>The supermarket giant’s new online platform coles&amp;co - which starts next week - is designed to inspire families with great value specials and exclusive content.</p> <p>Coles chief marketing officer Lisa Ronson said Australians are choosing to cook from home more than ever and in the process they want to try out new things while getting great value.</p> <p>“Coles&amp;co is about boosting what we have to offer customers,” she said. “We want to provide great value and useful food and drink solutions in the most personalised, timely and relevant ways.</p> <p>“We are thrilled to launch coles&amp;co and create a really compelling platform to engage with our customers on what is happening in the food and drink industry — whether that be in our stores, on the farm with local food producers or with our own brand development chefs in our Coles kitchens.”</p> <p>The website will be led by former Qantas head of wine Lisa Hudson who has been appointed as the website editor.</p> <p>Ms Hudson will ensure customers have useful information that’s easily accessible so they can feed their families on a budget.</p> <p>“I’m passionate about delivering an exceptional customer experience and celebrating everything that our food and wine industry has to offer,” she said.</p> <p>“Coles&amp;co is a really exciting platform to highlight the amazing work of Australian chefs and local food and beverage producers.</p> <p>“To be in a position to inform Australians about how they can live healthier and happier lives is a real privilege.”</p> <p><span>The website will bring together the best content from Coles’ customer channels, partners </span>and ambassadors, including Coles magazine, What’s for Dinner Live, Curtis Stone and the AFL, as well as creating new content featuring local suppliers and food trends to inspire customers.</p>

Food & Wine