Food & Wine

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Tasty avocado gazpacho you need to try

<p>A healthy midday meal with the refreshing taste of avocado.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>For the chilled broth</li> <li>300 g ripe vine tomatoes, quartered</li> <li>150 g plain yoghurt</li> <li>1 tablespoon tomato paste (concentrated purée)</li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon juice sea salt</li> </ul> <p><strong>To serve</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 perfectly ripe avocados, at room temperature</li> <li>¼ sweet yellow or orange capsicum (pepper), cut into small dice</li> <li>3 cm piece cucumber, seeds removed, cut in small dice</li> <li>4 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil freshly ground black pepper finishing salt (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Options</strong></p> <p>Serve with crusty bread.</p> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Whizz all the broth ingredients in a blender or food processor with 60 ml water until smooth. Push it through a sieve, ideally over a pouring jug – or transfer the sieved broth to a pouring jug. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. It needs to chill for at least 1 hour, but it can stay chilled for up to 24 hours if necessary.</p> <p>2. Shortly before serving, get all your remaining ingredients ready, then prepare the avocados. Cut each in half, remove the stone, then use the tip of a knife to score 1 cm chunks, cutting a grid pattern in the flesh of each half without cutting through the skin. Now use a dessertspoon to scoop out the chunks into a bowl. If the avocado needs to stand for more than 10 minutes, dress with a little lime or lemon juice to stop it browning. Otherwise, assemble the gazpacho bowls.</p> <p>3. Using light fingers and a spoon, gently place an elevated mound of avocado pieces in the centre of each bowl. Gently pour a shallow pool of tomato broth around the avocado. Scatter the capsicum and cucumber pieces on the surface of the broth. Use a teaspoon to drizzle droplets of olive oil across the surface. Grind a little pepper in too, and finish with either a pinch of sea salt flakes on the avocado or a special finishing salt, if using. Transport steadily to the table and eat right away.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use a finishing salt here for crunch and flavour – just a pinch or two on the avocado or the broth edge would do the trick. Here are three of my favourites, which would be ideal with the flavours here:</li> <li>Smoked salt flakes – light brown and assertively smoky flakes.</li> <li>Hawaiian black lava salt – jet-black mini crystals.</li> <li>Hibiscus salt – fine crystals blended with crushed pink hibiscus petals, giving a citrus flavour and a pink pigment that releases in contact with liquid.</li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/avocado-gazpacho.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></em></p> <p> </p>

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Delicious fish tacos with Calypso mango and jalapeno salsa

<p>The mixed flavours of mango and jalapenos will create a delectable combination for your tastebuds - and you can cook these tacos in only around half an hour!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 large avocado, mashed</li> <li>2 tbs sour cream</li> <li>½ lime, juiced</li> <li>600g thick white fish fillets (such as ling)</li> <li>2 tbs fajita seasoning</li> <li>1 tbs plain flour</li> <li>vegetable oil, for cooking</li> <li>3 cups finely shredded green cabbage</li> <li>8 mini flour tortillas warmed to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Mango and jalapeno salsa</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 Calypso mangoes</li> <li>2 tbs sliced jalapenos, drained, chopped</li> <li>2 tbs coriander leaves, finely chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. To make salsa, cut the cheeks from the mangoes. Using a large spoon remove the mango fruit from the cheeks and cut into 1cm cubes. Combine with remaining salsa ingredients.</p> <p>2. Combine avocado, sour cream and 1 tbs lime juice. Season. Cut fish into 3cm wide pieces. Combine seasoning and flour in a shallow dish.</p> <p>3. Heat enough oil to cover base of a large, non-stick frying pan over a medium-high heat. Dip half the fish in flour mixture, shaking off excess. Add to hot oil. Cook, turning occasionally, for 2-3 minutes, or until fish is cooked. Remove to a plate. Repeat with remaining fish and flour mixture.</p> <p>4. To serve, spread tortillas with avocado. Top with cabbage, fish and mango salsa.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Any thick white fish fillets is suitable for this recipe like blue eyed or barramundi.</p> <p>Recipe courtesy of <a href="https://www.perfection.com.au/">Perfection Fresh.</a></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/fish-tacos-with-calypso-mango-and-jalapeno-salsa.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Delicious roast tomato and capsicum soup with crispy chorizo and fresh basil

<p>Packed with flavour you’ll be making this soup again and again, it’s perfect for the whole family and really cheap to make.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 large capsicums</li> <li>6 large vine ripened mixed tomatoes (yellow, purple, red etc)</li> <li>1 punnet cherry tomates</li> <li>2 garlic cloves</li> <li>2 celery stalks</li> <li>1 red onion</li> <li>1 tbs tomato puree</li> <li>120g chorizo sausage (cut into cubes)</li> <li>½ bunch basil</li> <li>1 tin kidney beans</li> <li>Olive oil</li> <li>Salt and pepper</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Cut the top off your capsicums and scoop out the seeds then place upside down onto an oven proof tray lined with greaseproof paper. Slice the large tomatoes into ¼s and place on the tray with the whole cherry tomatoes. Slice your red onion into ¼s and add them to the tray.</p> <p>2. Drizzle with olive oil and season well with salt and pepper and make sure all the veg is coated. Roast in the oven at 220°C for 15-20 mins until they start to colour and the skin from the capsicum blisters. Once cooked remove and leave to one side.</p> <p>3. In a pan slowly fry the chopped garlic and sliced celery. Remove the thin skin from the chorizo and dice then add ½ of the sausage and some finely chopped basil stalks to the pan. Cook for 2-3 mins until golden brown.</p> <p>4. Next add the tomato puree to the chorizo and cook for another 2 mins, add a little water so the tomato puree doesn’t burn.</p> <p>5. Once the capsicum has cooled, carefully remove the skin then roughly chop. Add the capsicum, roasted tomato and onion to a large thick bottomed pan along with the chorizo mix in the pan.</p> <p>6. Add 1 litre of boiling chicken stock to the pan and bring back to the boil. Whilst the soup is coming to the boil fry off the other half of the diced chorizo until really crispy then tip onto some kitchen roll to remove some of the grease.</p> <p>7. As soon as the soup starts to boil remove from the heat. Blend until smooth and adjust the seasoning, careful not to add too much salt. Add ½ bunch of basil leaves and blend once more.</p> <p>8. Finally mix in a tin of drained kidney beans into the soup and serve. Top with crispy chorizo.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Double the batch and freeze it until you need a quick dinner one evening. Remember this has meat in it so make sure to remove from the freezer the night before and heat until piping hot before serving.</p> <p>Recipe courtesy of Richard Kerrigan, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/rkthebeachlife/">The Beach Life</a>, Qualified Chef and Personal Trainer.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/roast-tomato-and-capsicum-soup-with-crispy-chorizo-and-fresh-basil.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Simply delicious coconut and banana custard

<p>Simple to make, sublime and smooth to taste, without the dairy products and refined sugar that most custard desserts contain.</p> <p>You can sprinkle a few cubes of peeled mango, sliced strawberries or blueberries over each custard before serving, and a small teaspoon of maple syrup to make it look pretty.</p> <p>A sprinkling of cinnamon over the top adds to the flavour. Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>8 small custards</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p>2 cups coconut cream<span> </span></p> <p>¼ cup coconut nectar, or maple or rice syrup</p> <p>1 large banana</p> <p>1 tablespoon pure vanilla essence (vanilla extract)</p> <p>1 teaspoon agar-agar powder</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the mixture to a small saucepan and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, stirring, for 4–5 minutes until it thickens slightly.</p> <p>2. Transfer the mixture to small moulds and allow to set in the refrigerator for a few hours.</p> <p><strong>Tips: </strong></p> <p>Agar-agar is a seaweed-based gelling agent used as a vegetarian replacement for gelatin. As a rule of thumb, to thicken 1 cup of liquid, use 1 teaspoon of agar-agar powder, 1 tablespoon of agar-agar flaked or ½ an agar-agar bar. Using the powder yields more consistent results.</p> <p>Substitute gelatin with the same amount of agar-agar powder. The solution you are trying to thicken with the agar-agar powder needs to be heated to boiling point and then allowed to simmer for about 5 minutes.</p> <p><em>Recipe extracted from Feed Your Brain: The Cookbook by Delia McCabe (RRP $34.99).</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/coconut-and-banana-custards.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Mouth-watering kingfish & ocean trout ceviche

<p>If you're cooking for a fancier audience, try this delicious seafood combination.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p>200g Hiramasa kingfish fillets</p> <p>200g Petuna ocean trout fillets</p> <p>50ml apple cider vinegar</p> <p>75ml fresh lime juice</p> <p>30g sea salt</p> <p>50g sugar</p> <p>10 cherry tomatoes, sliced</p> <p>3 pickled turmeric onions (pickled onions, fresh turmeric, turmeric powder and green chilli)</p> <p>Black sesame seeds and baby coriander for garnish</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Slice the fish fillets into your desired shape. Cubes or sashimi-style will work.</p> <p>2. Combine the vinegar, sugar, salt and lime juice (check the mixture for taste, as some apple cider vinegars can be sweeter than others) and spoon over cut fish. Leave for 10 minutes to quickly cure.</p> <p>3. For the onions (this is the cheat version): take a standard jar of pickled onions and add 1 knob of fresh grated turmeric, 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder and 2 sliced green chillies and add to the pickling liquor from inside the jar, then spoon over onions. Leave for 10-15 minutes and you're good to go.</p> <p>4. Combine the rest of the ingredients and season with the same juice that has been curing the fish.</p> <p>5. Place the fish on top of the salad/onions and garnish with sesame seeds and coriander.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/hiramasa-kingfish-petuna-ocean-trout-ceviche.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Light and fluffy buttermilk pancakes

<p>These pancakes are thick and wonderfully light and fluffy. They can be left plain, but adding fruit, such as sliced banana, makes them more exciting, and more nutritious, too. Here they are served with cinnamon–spiced yogurt and a drizzle of honey. Serve straight from the pan.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul class="no-bullet"> <li>¾ cup (110 g) self–raising white flour</li> <li>¾ cup (110 g) self–raising wholemeal flourpinch of salt</li> <li>2 tablespoons caster sugar</li> <li>2 large eggs, separated</li> <li>300 ml buttermilk</li> <li>1 large banana, thinly sliced</li> <li>1½ teaspoons sunflower oil</li> <li>⅓ cup (90 g) Greek–style yogurt</li> <li>¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon</li> <li>1½ tablespoons honey</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>Sift the white and wholemeal flours and the salt into a large bowl, and tip in the bran left in the sieve.</li> <li>Stir in the sugar.</li> <li>Mix the egg yolks with the buttermilk and 1 tablespoon cold water.</li> <li>Gradually beat into the flour mixture to make a very thick batter.</li> <li>Whisk the egg whites in a separate bowl until light and fluffy.</li> <li>Fold into the batter, then fold in the banana.</li> <li>Heat a large, heavy–based, non–stick frying pan over a moderate heat, then lightly grease with a little of the oil.</li> <li>Spoon large, heaped spoonfuls of the batter onto the hot pan, spacing them well apart.</li> <li>You'll probably be able to cook 3 or 4 at a time, depending on the size of the pan.</li> <li>Cook for 1–2 minutes, or until golden and firm on the underside and bubbles appear on the surface.</li> <li>Flip the pancakes over using a large palette knife, and cook on the other side for 1–2 minutes.</li> <li>Remove from the pan and keep warm while cooking the rest of the pancakes, lightly greasing the pan with more oil between each batch.</li> <li>Mix the yogurt with the cinnamon.</li> <li>Place 2 warm pancakes on each serving plate, add 1 tablespoon of spiced yogurt and drizzle over 1 teaspoon honey.</li> <li>Serve immediately.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/buttermilk-pancakes"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Good news for Coles shoppers!

<p>Coles, the supermarket giant, has given new life to a much-loved Aussie brand, which will expand the range of Coles-branded food by 1.8 million cans – thanks to a huge new deal with SPC. </p> <p>SPC had its value slashed from $147 million down to virtually nothing, after owners Coca-Cola Amatil couldn’t secure a buyer for the manufacturing facilities in Shepparton, Victoria.</p> <p>However, SPC managing director, Reg Weine, could not be more thrilled about the new business deal with Coles. He told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/coles-new-supply-deal-offers-lifeline-and-greater-range-for-beloved-canned-fruit-brand/news-story/15b34823880a26cdb50b2895dac293df" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>:</p> <p>“It is great to see Coles continue to support local businesses and growers.”</p> <p>“The Coles brand volume will improve our factory utilisation and will also provide our growers with an additional outlet for their quality fruit.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826002/fruit-salad.jpeg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/123b9389bda54070b68458978a125328" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>SPC Fruit Salad</em></p> <p>The news will ease anxieties of local growers in the area, like John Paulos. This is due to the new range of locally farmed peaches, pears and apricots that will be sold via Coles.</p> <p>“Each peach tree represents a seven-year commitment until they are producing fruit, and it’s even longer for pears — you plant pears for your heirs — so to have a commitment from Coles for this fruit makes life so much easier,” he said.</p> <p>“It takes a while to get a tree cropping and there’s not really any fresh market demand for the fruit, as these varieties are especially grown for canning.</p> <p>“So, to be able to maintain these trees and not have to think about replanting new varieties is very important to us.”</p> <p>Head of Coles Brand, Mark Field, said that the chain is proud to expand its range of Australian-grown fruit.</p> <p>“We know our customers want top quality food, and equally they want to know that they are helping to support Australian farmers and Australian jobs,” he said in a statement.</p>

Food & Wine

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Scrumptious corn fritters

<p>In this recipe, crisp, juicy corn kernels are added to a thick batter flavoured with chilli and fresh coriander, and then pan-fried in big spoonfuls. Piled on a bed of watercress and drizzled with a minted spring onion and yogurt sauce, the fritters make a quick, easy meal.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul> <li>1 cup (150g) plain flour</li> <li>1/2 teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>150 ml low-fat milk</li> <li>2 large eggs, lightly beaten</li> <li>3/4 cup (400g) frozen corn kernels, thawed and drained</li> <li>3 spring onions, finely chopped</li> <li>1 fat fresh red chilli, seeded and finely chopped</li> <li>3 heaped tablespoons chopped fresh coriander leaves</li> <li>salt and pepper</li> <li>1 tablespoon sunflower oi</li> <li>l100 g watercress, trimmed</li> </ul> <p><strong>Yogurt sauce</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 1/4 cups (310g) Greek-style yogurt</li> <li>4 spring onions, finely chopped</li> <li>2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint</li> <li>grated zest and juice of 1 lime</li> <li>salt</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>First make the yogurt sauce. Put the yogurt into a serving bowl and stir in the spring onions, mint, lime zest and a pinch of salt. </li> <li>Cover and chill while you make the fritters (keep the lime juice for use later).</li> <li>Sift the flour and baking powder into a bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the milk and eggs. </li> <li>Using a wooden spoon, mix together the milk and eggs, then gradually draw in the flour from around the edges. </li> <li>Beat with the spoon to make a smooth, thick batter. </li> <li>Alternatively, the batter can be made in a food processor: put the milk and egg in the container first, spoon the flour and baking powder on top, and process for a few seconds to blend.</li> <li>Add the corn kernels, spring onions, chilli and coriander to the batter, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Mix well.</li> <li>Heat a large, heavy frying pan, then brush with a little of the oil. </li> <li>Drop large spoonfuls of the fritter batter onto the pan – make about 4 fritters at a time – and cook over a moderate heat for 2 minutes, or until golden and firm on the underside.</li> <li>Turn the fritters over using a palette knife, and cook on the other side for about 2 minutes, or until golden. </li> <li>Remove the fritters from the pan and drain on paper towel. </li> <li>Keep warm while cooking the rest of the fritters in the same way, adding more oil to the pan as necessary.</li> <li>Arrange the watercress on 4 plates and sprinkle with the lime juice. </li> <li>Arrange the corn fritters on top and serve hot, with the yogurt sauce to be drizzled over.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/corn-fritters"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

Food & Wine

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Zesty tomato salad

<p>Seek out the most delicious tomatoes available, preferably sun–ripened on the vine, and you will be rewarded with an incomparable flavour. Lemon, fresh coriander and mint add freshness and zest to the tomatoes in this tangy salad, which can easily be varied with other fresh herbs and flavourings.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul class="no-bullet"> <li>500 g ripe tomatoes, sliced</li> <li>pinch of caster sugar, or to taste</li> <li>1 lemon</li> <li>3 spring onions, thinly sliced</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh coriander</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint</li> <li>sprigs of fresh mint to garnish</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>Place the tomatoes in a large shallow dish and sprinkle with the sugar.</li> <li>Cut the lemon in half lengthwise.</li> <li>Set one half aside, then cut the other half lengthwise into 4 wedges.</li> <li>Holding the wedges firmly together on a board, skin side up, thinly slice them across, including the peel.</li> <li>Discard the pips.</li> <li>Arrange the pieces of thinly sliced lemon over the top of the tomatoes, then sprinkle with the spring onions, coriander and mint.</li> <li>Squeeze the juice from the remaining lemon half and sprinkle it over the salad.</li> <li>Serve immediately or cover and chill until ready to serve.</li> <li>Garnish with sprigs of mint just before serving.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/zesty-tomato-salad"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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Tasty venison shepherd's pie

<p>Like all good, simple fare, this pie’s deliciousness is all thanks to the sum of its parts – <br />a base of tasty soffritto, good-quality meat minced by hand and a light, fluffy potato topping. You could speed it up by skipping the long slow soffritto step and just sweating the onion, carrot and celery for 10 minutes or until soft and translucent. And you could also just buy pre-minced meat. The end result will still be lovely.</p> <p>I am of course biased because we produce venison here on our farm, but truly this is the most wonderful of meats. Lean, full of delicate flavour and so easy to cook, please do try it whenever you get the opportunity. Here, venison brings an extra level of luxury to this simple, wonderful pie, but you could also stick with tradition and make this with minced lamb, or even minced beef (which is known as a cottage pie).</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 6–8</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>3 brown onions, diced</li> <li>2 carrots, peeled and diced</li> <li>2 celery stalks</li> <li>1/4 cup (60 ml) olive oil</li> <li>700 g (1 lb 9 oz) venison topside or rump</li> <li>150 g (51/2 oz) butter</li> <li>1 Tbsp thyme leaves</li> <li>400 ml (14 fl oz) beef stock</li> <li>1 Tbsp cornflour</li> <li>2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce</li> <li>2 Tbsp tomato paste (concentrated purée)</li> <li>1 kg (2 lb 4 oz) floury potatoes</li> <li>1/4 cup (60 ml) milk</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>First start the soffritto. Combine the onion, carrot, celery and olive oil <br />in a saucepan over low heat. Cook for 2 hours, stirring every now and then, until the mixture is a thick, dark-brown paste.</li> <li>Meanwhile, cut the venison into small, pea-sized pieces. Doing this by hand takes about 10 minutes, but you could ask your butcher or use a food processor or mincer if you have one.</li> <li>Melt 20 g (3/4 oz) of the butter in a large heavy-based saucepan over medium–high heat. Add the venison and thyme and cook, stirring often, until the venison is browned all over. Whisk together the beef stock and cornflour and add to the venison with the soffritto, Worcestershire sauce and tomato paste. Stir well, bring to a simmer and cook over low heat for 40 minutes. Season to taste.</li> <li>While the meat is cooking, peel and cut the potatoes into small cubes. Place in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Cook over high heat until the potato is completely tender when pierced with a fork. Drain and mash with 50 g (13/4 oz) of the butter and the milk.</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Transfer the meat mixture to an ovenproof dish and top with the mashed potato (I sometimes add it in clumps, which seems to help it crunch up during baking). Dot the top with the remaining butter and bake for 45 minutes or until the potato <br />is golden and the meat is bubbling. Serve with a simple green salad.</li> </ol> <p><strong>A note on the soffritto</strong></p> <p>Soffritto is a recipe base, usually of carrot, celery and onion cooked long and slow in olive oil, versions of which play a big part in Italian, French, Spanish and South American cooking. Although it is cooked for 2 hours in this recipe, most of that time is completely hands off and the result is an intense flavour bomb that will bring goodness to any soup, casserole, braise or pasta sauce you use it in. Make a double batch and freeze it in ice-cube trays for easy flavour access.</p> <p><em>Images and Text from A Basket by the Door by Sophie Hansen, Murdoch Books RRP $39.99.</em></p>

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Simple tasty cauliflower with crispy crumbs

<p>The crispy golden topping in this simple side dish is usually made by frying the breadcrumbs in a generous quantity of butter. This version uses a modest portion of olive oil and fresh herbs to flavour a topping that tastes good with all steamed or boiled vegetables.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul class="no-bullet"> <li>1 cauliflower, trimmed and broken into florets</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1¼ cups (100 g) fresh breadcrumbs</li> <li>salt and pepper</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon</li> <li>2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat–leaf parsley</li> <li>sprigs of fresh herbs to serve (optional)</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>Prepare a saucepan of boiling water with a steamer on top.</li> <li>Steam the cauliflower for about 15 minutes or until tender but not soft.</li> <li>Meanwhile, heat the oil in a non–stick frying pan or saucepan.</li> <li>Add the breadcrumbs and stir well to coat the crumbs as evenly as possible with oil.</li> <li>Cook over a moderate heat, stirring often, for about 10 minutes or until the crumbs are well browned and crisp.</li> <li>As the crumbs cook, the oil will seep out of those that absorbed it initially, allowing the rest to become evenly crisp.</li> <li>Transfer the cauliflower to a warm serving dish.</li> <li>Season the crumbs to taste and mix in the thyme, tarragon and parsley.</li> <li>Sprinkle the crumb mixture over the cauliflower.</li> <li>Garnish with sprigs of herbs, if using, and serve.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/cauliflower-with-crispy-crumbs"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Delightful oven-roasted chicken curry

<p>This grounding, warming curry is a meal in itself, with the split peas adding sustenance to keep you feeling full. I make it fairly mild so that everyone can enjoy it, then add a good sprinkle of fresh or dried chilli to mine at the table, along with a dollop of yoghurt. I think cooking this in the oven rather than on the stovetop produces a far richer, thicker curry, but you could take the stovetop option. Just keep the temperature low and the lid slightly off. The spice paste is worth having on hand in the fridge – simply rub it over chicken or lamb before barbecuing or use it as a marinade.</p> <p><strong><u>Serves:</u></strong> 6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 Tbsp coconut oil</li> <li>2 brown onions, diced</li> <li>700 g (1 lb 9 oz) skinless chicken thigh fillets, cut into 3 cm (11/4 inch) pieces</li> <li>1/2 cup (130 g) Greek-style yoghurt, plus extra to serve</li> <li>2 Tbsp tomato paste (concentrated purée)</li> <li>680 g (1 lb 8 oz) jar tomato passata</li> <li>3 cups (750 ml) chicken stock</li> <li>1 cup (205 g) chana dahl (split yellow lentils), soaked in cold water for at least 1 hour</li> <li>2 handfuls English spinach</li> <li>Toasted slivered almonds, to serve</li> <li>Steamed rice, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Spice paste</strong></p> <ul> <li>5 green cardamom pods</li> <li>2 cloves</li> <li>1 cinnamon stick</li> <li>4 black peppercorns</li> <li>4 garlic cloves, peeled</li> <li>1 thumb-sized piece ginger, <br />roughly chopped</li> <li>1 thumb-sized piece turmeric, roughly chopped, or 1 tsp ground turmeric</li> <li>1 Tbsp ground cumin</li> <li>1 tsp ground coriander</li> <li>A good pinch of chilli flakes, <br />or to taste</li> <li>2 Tbsp coconut oil</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>For the spice paste, combine the cardamom pods, cloves, cinnamon stick and peppercorns in a dry frying pan and toast for a few minutes or until fragrant. Transfer to a food processor, spice grinder or mortar and pestle and bash/blitz until well ground. Add the garlic, ginger, turmeric, cumin, coriander, chilli and coconut oil and bash/blitz again until combined.</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 130°C (250°F). Heat the coconut oil in a large ovenproof saucepan or flameproof casserole dish over medium heat. Cook the onion for 7–10 minutes or until soft and translucent. Add the spice paste and cook, stirring constantly, for a few minutes. Bump <br />up the heat to high, add the chicken and cook for 3–4 minutes to seal.</li> <li>Add 1 tablespoon of the yoghurt, stirring well so all the flavours mix together and the yoghurt dries somewhat, then repeat with another tablespoon of yoghurt and another until it’s all incorporated. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for another minute.</li> <li>Add the passata and stir until the chicken is well coated in the spiced yoghurt mixture. Cook for 5 minutes, then pour in the stock and chana dahl and stir well. Transfer to the oven and cook for 3 hours, stirring every now and then so it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan.</li> <li>Stir in the spinach and serve the curry with slivered almonds, yoghurt and steamed rice.</li> </ol> <p><em>Images and Text from A Basket by the Door by Sophie Hansen, Murdoch Books RRP $39.99.</em></p>

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Crunchy vegetable chips with peanut dip

<p>Oven–baked chips are not only healthier than those that are fried - their flavour is fresher too. Here, thin slices of beetroot and potato are baked to make dippers for a spicy Southeast Asian dip. If possible, slice the vegetables with a mandolin to ensure they are all an even thickness.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul class="no-bullet"> <li>2 teaspoons sunflower oil</li> <li>1 large red Asian shallot, finely chopped</li> <li>1 clove garlic, crushed</li> <li>½ teaspoon ground cumin</li> <li>½ teaspoon ground coriander</li> <li>¼ cup (60 g) crunchy peanut butter</li> <li>1 tablespoon light soy sauce</li> <li>1 tablespoon honey</li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon juice</li> <li>2 potatoes, about 350 g in total, scrubbed</li> <li>3 beetroot, about 350 g in total, scrubbed</li> <li>2 tablespoons sunflower oil</li> <li>½ teaspoon sea salt flakes</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>To make the dip, heat the oil in a small saucepan over a moderate heat, add the shallot and garlic, and fry, stirring frequently, for 3–4 minutes, or until the shallot is soft and golden brown.</li> <li>Stir in the cumin and coriander, and cook for a further few seconds, then add the peanut butter, soy sauce, honey and 4 tablespoons water.</li> <li>Stir over a gentle heat until the ingredients are smoothly combined.</li> <li>Remove from the heat and mix in the lemon juice.</li> <li>Spoon into a small bowl, cover and set aside in a cool place while preparing the chips.</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 220°C.</li> <li>Cut the potatoes and beetroot into very thin slices, about 3 mm, preferably using a mandolin.</li> <li>Alternatively, use the fine slicing blade in a food processor, or slice as thinly and evenly as possible with a sharp knife.</li> <li>Put the potato and beetroot slices in 2 separate large bowls and add 1 tablespoon oil to each bowl.</li> <li>Toss the vegetable slices until they are all coated lightly with oil, then spread them out, making sure they are in a single layer, on 3 large non–stick baking trays (or on ordinary baking trays lined with baking paper).</li> <li>Sprinkle the slices evenly with the sea salt flakes.</li> <li>Bake for 35 minutes, turning the vegetables over frequently and swapping round the position of the baking trays each time you turn the vegetables, until the potatoes are crisp and golden and the beetroot is firm but still slightly moist.</li> <li>Keep a close eye on the chips towards the end of their baking time, to be sure they do not burn, removing them as soon as they are ready.</li> <li>Transfer to a wire rack.</li> <li>To serve, place the bowl of dip on a large serving platter and pile the cooled chips around it.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/vegetable-chips-with-peanut-dip"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Dot Yeatman's fluffy sponge cake

<p>The best sponge ever! Fluffy, light and just so delicious – big thanks to Dot Yeatman and the team at the Manildra flour mill in central western New South Wales for this recipe.</p> <p>This cake is bound to cheer and please.</p> <p>Make it for your favourite birthday person, a work afternoon tea, or to enter in your local show. I’ve doubled Dot’s recipe to make a nice tall layer cake, but if you’d prefer something a little smaller or just one layer, then halve away.</p> <p><strong><u>Makes:</u></strong> One 20 cm (8 inch) cake</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <ul> <li>8 eggs, separated</li> <li>11/2 cups (330 g) caster sugar</li> <li>2/3 cup (100 g) self-raising flour</li> <li>1 cup (125 g) cornflour</li> <li>1 cup (250 ml) Lemon and passionfruit curd</li> <li>300 ml (101/2 fl oz) single (pure) cream, whipped</li> <li>250 g (9 oz) strawberries, sliced</li> <li>4 passionfruit</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Grease and line two 20 cm (8 inch) spring-form cake tins with baking paper.</li> <li>Whisk the egg whites to a stiff froth. Gradually add the sugar and beat until thick and smooth. Whisk <br />in the egg yolks, one at a time. Sift the flours together three times. Fold into the egg and sugar mixture with an upward and over movement (do not stir).</li> <li>Pour half the batter into each cake tin and bake for 20–25 minutes or until the cakes are just firm to touch. Set aside for 5 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool.</li> <li>Spread the lemon curd over one cake and top with some of the whipped cream, then top with <br />the second cake. Decorate with the remaining cream, strawberries and passionfruit pulp.</li> </ol> <p><em>Images and Text from A Basket by the Door by Sophie Hansen, Murdoch Books RRP $39.99.</em></p>

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Cadbury responds to "hateful" accusations surrounding "war on Easter"

<p>For years, Cadbury has been at the receiving end of abuse from customers who believed that the chocolate brand is carrying out a “war on Easter”.</p> <p>People have flooded the company’s social media pages with criticisms and incorrect accusations that it has foregone using the word “Easter” on its line of seasonal items.</p> <p>“We don’t know where [the rumours] started. It’s been twisted in so many ways,” Lainie Kirk, external affairs manager for the company, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/true-stories/cadbury-creates-togetherness-symbol-in-response-to-hatefuelled-easter-trolling/news-story/b451adb642845e9e6cb24aec489e82f0" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>. “For years we’ve been ignoring these xenophobic hateful comments.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">At this time of year please spare a thought for the Cadbury social media team. <a href="https://t.co/rEvEy6s9Rg">pic.twitter.com/rEvEy6s9Rg</a></p> — Jamie Ross (@JamieRoss7) <a href="https://twitter.com/JamieRoss7/status/978688257889366016?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 27, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">social media managers for Cadbury in Australia are having a hell of a time convincing people that a fake news meme about it removing the word "Easter" from Easter eggs isn't true <a href="https://t.co/U6BFmcC055">pic.twitter.com/U6BFmcC055</a></p> — Elle Hunt (@mlle_elle) <a href="https://twitter.com/mlle_elle/status/963054608452112384?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 12, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In response to the “hateful” online comments, Cadbury has introduced a new symbol to promote “racial respect and cultural inclusivity”.</p> <p>The new symbol, titled "For All", was co-created with eight designers from different cultural backgrounds.</p> <p>“For several months, Cadbury has been working on an initiative to develop a symbol that stands for racial respect and cultural inclusivity. A visual tool to use as a response to racism and hate online, starting with the divisive comments we regularly receive on social media,” the company said in a statement on Tuesday.</p> <p>It also revealed that the Christchurch terror attacks, which took place during the creation process, served to strengthen the resolve of the team. </p> <p>“Our group, including designers from New Zealand and of Muslim background, reinforced that this act of hatred and division only cemented the need to stay true to the task,” it said.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FCadburyDairyMilkAustralia%2Fposts%2F2408613075830068&amp;width=500" width="500" height="715" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“Every single day, Cadbury’s Australian social media pages are flooded with hateful messages and comments that have nothing to do with chocolate and everything to do with racist sentiment,” said Paul Chatfield, director of marketing, chocolate at Cadbury’s parent company Mondelēz International.</p> <p>“As an iconic brand in Australia, we reach a significant number of Australians with our messages, and with this voice believe we have a responsibility to lead by example, which has been the impetus for the creation of this symbol.”</p>

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Maggie Beer's fresh raspberry cake

<p>One of Australia's most loved foodies, Maggie Beer, shares her recipe for a delicious raspberry cake.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 2/3 cup plain flour</li> <li>1 tsp baking powder</li> <li>½ tsp sea salt</li> <li>¼ tsp baking soda</li> <li>1 cup unsalted butter</li> <li>1 ¾ cup sugar</li> <li>1 tsp pure vanilla extract</li> <li>4 eggs</li> <li>½ cup buttermilk</li> <li>2 cup fresh raspberries</li> </ul> <p><strong>Syrup</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 cup Sangiovese Verjuice</li> <li>¼ cup sugar</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 180C. Prepare a 20cm cake pan with vegetable-oil cooking spray and parchment paper.</li> <li>Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda in a large bowl and set aside.</li> <li>Put the butter and the sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat until light and fluffy. Add the vanilla extract. Beat in the eggs one at a time, incorporating each egg completely before adding the next. Incorporate the dry ingredients and the buttermilk, alternating between each, in two additions. Fold in the raspberries and pour into the prepared cake pan. Bake for 30 – 40 minutes.</li> <li>To make the syrup, combine the Sangiovese Verjuice and ¼ cup of sugar and heat to boiling point in a small sauce pan. Continue to simmer until the syrup is reduced to a consistency that coats the back of a spoon. Take off the heat and cool slightly before spooning over the top of the whole cake or drizzle over individual pieces of cake once they have been cut. Serve with thick cream.</li> </ol> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/maggie-beer-fresh-raspberry-cake.aspx"><em>Wyza</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Decadent blackberry, yogurt and pistachio cake

<p>Make the best of the fresh blackberry season with this delicious, zesty cake.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>1/3 cup (45g) pistachios</li> <li>250g butter, softened</li> <li>1 lemon, finely zested</li> <li>1 cup (220g) caster sugar</li> <li>3 eggs</li> <li>2 ½ cups (375g) self-raising flour</li> <li>½ cup (40g) shredded coconut</li> <li>1 cup (250g) Greek style yogurt</li> <li>200g blackberries</li> <li>2 tablespoons brown sugar</li> <li>2 tablespoons pistachios, roughly chopped</li> <li>Extra blackberries, to serve</li> <li>Double cream, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Grease a deep 22cm round cake tin, line base with baking paper.</li> <li>Place pistachios in a food processor and pulse until ground, set aside. Place butter, zest and sugar in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer until pale and fluffy. Add eggs one by one, beating well in between additions. If mixture splits slightly, add a little of the flour to recombine.</li> <li>Using a wooden spoon, stir in the ground pistachio, flour, coconut and yogurt. Fold through ½ the berries. Spoon mixture into prepared pan, spread evenly with a plastic spatula.</li> <li>Scatter remaining berries, sugar and pistachios on top. Bake uncovered for about 50–60 minutes or until golden and firm to touch and a skewer inserted in the centre comes out clean. Stand for 5 minutes in tin then transfer to a cooling rack.</li> <li>Serve cake warm or at room temperature with double cream and extra fresh blackberries.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe from Fresh Aussie Raspberries and Blackberries – </em><a href="http://freshberries.com.au/"><em>freshberries.com.au</em></a></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/blackberry-yogurt-and-pistachio-cake.aspx"><em>Wyza</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Supermarket issues hot cross buns recall

<p>A recall has been issued for hot cross buns at an Adelaide supermarket after pieces of a calculator were found in the baked goods.</p> <p>It has been revealed that a small calculator ended up contaminating a batch of hot cross buns at the Pasadena Foodland, with a number of customers having found plastic bits in their food item.</p> <p>Customers have been urged to avoid eating buns that were packed on Sunday, as they may contain a potentially deadly button battery.</p> <p>“The concern with a calculator is that it contains a button battery which, if swallowed, can cause serious injury or even death,” said Chris Lease, SA Health’s Acting Chief Public Health Officer.</p> <p>“We urge anyone who may have purchased the affected hot cross buns check the ‘packed on’ date, not to consume them, and return them to Pasadena Foodland for a full refund.”</p> <p>The supermarket’s general manager Paul Mabarrack said since about 200 of the potentially contaminated bun packets were sold on Sunday and Monday, and “about eight” customers have reported finding pieces of the calculator.</p> <p>“We’re on tenterhooks until we can find [the battery] or until we can be sure that this thing hasn’t resulted in any harm to anybody,” Mabarrack told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-09/calculator-responsible-for-supermarket-recall-of-hot-cross-buns/10985536" target="_blank"><em>ABC</em></a>.</p> <p>He said the bakers, who were responsible of baking the food items onsite, were “very upset” and “shell-shocked” by the incident. “The bakers do use calculators in their daily work to work out quantities of flour and water and those sorts of things, so it's a common tool in the bakery area.”</p> <p>SA Health said while the circumstances surrounding how a calculator ended up in a batch of hot cross bun dough are still being investigated, “there is no evidence of a deliberate act”.</p> <p>According to SA Health, the recall applies to the following products that were produced on April 7:</p> <ul> <li>Choc Chip Hot Cross Buns 6-pack</li> <li>Cranberry and White Choc Hot Cross Buns 6-pack</li> <li>Hot Cross Buns 6-pack</li> <li>Hot Cross Buns Large Loose</li> <li>Hot Cross Buns Fruitless 6-pack</li> <li>Mini Hot Cross Buns 12-pack</li> <li>Mini Choc Chip Hot Cross Buns 12-pack</li> <li>Premium Hot Cross Buns 500g</li> <li>Various weights, 6 or 12 in a pack, packed on 7 April 2019</li> </ul> <p>Have you purchased any of these potentially affected hot cross buns? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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The toughest decision Maggie Beer has ever made: "I have had many tears"

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>She made a cool $10 million after selling her enormous food empire in late February, but Maggie Beer describes the moment as bittersweet, as she struggles to hang up her apron for good.</p> <p>The master of comfort food said she likes to think of the move as a way of passing on the baton to a future generation of cooks.</p> <p>“I have been a workaholic for 40 years,” Maggie tells <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9now.com.au/a-current-affair" target="_blank">A Current Affair</a>.</em></p> <p>“As small business people you need some time in the sun. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve never been one to complain about working hard. But work can take over you and you don’t stop and reflect.”</p> <p>She’s been in the business for decades, and after working close to 70 hours per week, the 74-year-old made a promise to her husband that she will eventually slow down.</p> <p>“Oh, gosh. It’s the biggest decision of my life. I mean, it’s like letting your child go,” said Maggie.</p> <p>“I always promised Colin by the time I’m 75 and I’m sort of 9 months away from that, that I would start to slow down.”</p> <p>Starting her company from the ground up in 1979, Maggie and her husband Colin began the expanding empire on their pheasant farm – now a major tourist hot spot located in South Australia’s Barossa Valley.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">For Maggie Beer – It’s the toughest decision she’s ever made.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9ACA?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9ACA</a> | WATCH: <a href="https://t.co/ynXnBCHcRm">https://t.co/ynXnBCHcRm</a> <a href="https://t.co/eCYj7tSMUa">pic.twitter.com/eCYj7tSMUa</a></p> — A Current Affair (@ACurrentAffair9) <a href="https://twitter.com/ACurrentAffair9/status/1115183532287111168?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 April 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“I am proud of what we have done. And it’s not I, it’s Colin and I,” she said.</p> <p>“The culture is so strong. It’s not going to dissipate. And having such a strong management team, that makes me feel as good as it possibly could.”</p> <p>And now that the queen of home cooking has parted ways with her beloved business, it creates more time on her hands, which she intends to fill with her love of music.</p> <p>“I sing because I love it, and I have a choir, and there is 17 of us, and we have the most amazing woman, Charmaine Jones, who leads it. But we sing for joy.”</p> <p>“I have never been bored in my life and I guess I’m in a very lucky position in that I still get asked to do really great things that can use my creativity, and excitement for food, that I can balance it. And I’m going to balance it. I’m determined.”</p> <p>She also plans on working with aged care institutions to help provide affordable, fresh and healthy food for all residents.</p> <p>“De-institutionalising food is what I’m trying to do, and the royal commission, in effect, I think is right at the right time for us to show what’s possible.</p> <p>“You have to get them to the point where they can see the difference it makes to have food that smells like real food. Food that you are going, it’s going to delight somebody, it’s going to make them feel good. I feel you can change the culture through food,” Maggie says.</p> <p>But despite her willingness to let go, she hasn’t taken the decision lightly.</p> <p>“I have had many tears about letting go,” says Maggie.</p> <p>“I’m most proud of the Barossa, the Barossa gave me so much. Coming to live as a Sydney girl, here in the Barossa, surrounded by this beautiful landscape, this fantastic climate that we can grow almost everything that I’m interested in cooking,” she said.</p> <p>“I think we’ve left a stamp.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div></div>

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Consumers in shock: Iconic Aussie brand shunned by Woolworths

<p>Woolworths has removed the much-loved brand of Uncle Tobys from its shelves amid rumours of a prince increase that the supermarket giant wasn’t willing to pay.</p> <p>In a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nestle.com.au/media/newsandfeatures/breakfast-cereal-price-increases" target="_blank">media release</a> from <em>Nestle</em>, who own Uncle Tobys, the price increase is due to the drought affecting their farmers in Victoria.</p> <p>However, experts have warned that fresh food including fruit and vegetables could be next.</p> <p>The National Retail Association chief executive Dominique Lamb has suggested similar cost pressures and explained to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://7plus.com.au/weekend-sunrise" target="_blank">Weekend Sunrise</a></em> that suppliers are under a huge amount of pressure as costs continue to rise.</p> <p>“We know a lot of businesses are finding it difficult with increases in utilities prices.</p> <p>“Also with the cost of labour ... all businesses are going through these things so I think we will see this continue from time to time.”</p> <p>Ms Lamb also explained her thoughts as to what will happen to the fresh food market.</p> <p>“I think it will happen ... but hopefully everyone can maintain their relationships, because as consumers we will all suffer.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7825665/uncle-tobys.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/617e0760d1e3484693479389e45a0ca4" /></p> <p>“It is the consumer who bears the difficulties around this where they can't get their product if there are big price hikes.”</p> <p>Nestle spokeswoman Margaret Stuart confirmed that the supplier had encountered issues with Woolworths. Stuart told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6894909/Uncle-Tobys-beloved-oat-brands-disappear-Woolworths-shelves.html" target="_blank">The Daily Mail</a></em>:</p> <p>“We have a supply issue with Woolworths which we’re both working hard to resolve to make sure that our breakfast cereal products are available again there soon.”</p> <p>Stuart also mentioned that the supply issue hasn’t impacted Coles.</p> <p>“We can confirm that Uncle Tobys and Nestlé breakfast cereals are available at Coles.”</p> <p>Have you noticed this cereal disappearing from Woolworths? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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