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This is what happens to your body when you drink tea every day

<p><strong>Time for tea</strong></p> <p>If you’re sipping a cup of tea while reading this, you’re supporting just about every organ in your body. Unsweetened tea is rich in antioxidants, which prevent chronic diseases and help repair cells in the body. “Tea comes from the Camellia sinensis plant, which contains antioxidants known as catechins, most importantly epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG),” says Anthony Kouri, MD, an orthopedic surgeon. “These eliminate free radicals in the body and reduce inflammation.”</p> <p>So pinkies up; it’s time to learn about the amazing benefits (and just a few risks) of drinking tea.</p> <p><strong>Your risk of certain cancers goes down</strong></p> <p>The antioxidants and compounds found in tea have been linked to a lower risk of certain cancers. “Beneficial effects have been found in skin, prostate, lung, and breast cancers,” says Uma Naidoo, MD, Director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and Faculty at Harvard Medical School. “Different types of tea impact different cancers.”</p> <p><strong>Your skin will be healthier</strong></p> <p>Drinking black tea regularly can significantly reduce your risk of skin cancer. Interestingly, how you prepare it makes a difference. “Hot black tea is helpful for squamous carcinoma of the skin,” says Dr. Naidoo. Hot tea has been found to be more beneficial than the iced alternative and brewing time matters.</p> <p><strong>Your risk of diabetes decreases</strong></p> <p>Drinking black tea every day can lower your risk of type 2 diabetes by helping to control your blood sugar after meals. According to a study in the <em>Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition</em>, black tea can lower your blood sugar after eating foods containing sucrose.</p> <p><strong>Your teeth will be stronger</strong></p> <p>While sipping tea throughout the day could slightly stain your teeth, it may be worth it. According to a study in the <em>Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology</em>, green tea has an antibacterial effect that could reduce cavity-forming bacteria in your mouth. Drinking green tea every day could also make cavities less severe.</p> <p><strong>Your heart will thank you</strong></p> <p>Tea’s anti-inflammatory properties can keep your blood vessels relaxed and clear, putting less stress on your heart. “Catechins reduce inflammation and thus inhibit plaque formation in vital arteries,” says Dr. Kouri. Dr. Naidoo recommends drinking three cups of black tea per day to achieve the heart benefits.</p> <p><strong>Your risk of Alzheimer’s disease could decrease</strong></p> <p>The thought of you or a loved one being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease is frightening. It’s important to know the early warning signs and do what you can to prevent it. “Green tea can help you develop resistance against stress, and potentially Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Naidoo. “The polyphenols protect cells from damage.”</p> <p><strong>Your sleep could improve</strong></p> <p>If you spend your nights tossing and turning, try winding down with a cup of tea before bed. “East-Asian medicinal tea can improve insomnia,” says Dr. Naidoo. According to a study in Integrative Medicine Research, drinking tea can help improve sleep and quality of life in those with mild-to-moderate insomnia.</p> <p><strong>Your attention span may improve</strong></p> <p>The caffeine in tea can improve your attention and alertness. “Theanine is an amino acid that is virtually unique to tea (apart from the fungus Bay bolete),” explains Dr. Naidoo. “It may also improve attention by relaxing the brain, but stimulating it when it is time to focus.” If you ever find yourself having difficulty with focus or concentration, try steeping a warm cup of tea just before it’s time to work.</p> <p><strong>Your metabolism speeds up</strong></p> <p>Ready to speed up your metabolism while sitting at your kitchen bench? “The caffeine in tea helps to improve mental acuity as well as increase metabolism and fat burning (up to 100 calories per day),” says Dr. Kouri. Just be sure you’re not overdoing it in the caffeine department. One cup of green tea contains about 40 milligrams of caffeine, and Dr. Kouri recommends limiting your daily caffeine intake to no more than 300 to 400 milligrams.</p> <p><strong>You may not absorb enough iron</strong></p> <p>The catechins in tea can alter your body’s ability to absorb iron. This means that even if you eat enough high-iron foods, you won’t get the benefits and could become anaemic. “Though most healthy people will not be affected by this, those who have iron deficiency or anaemia should abstain from large amounts of green tea,” recommends Dr. Kouri. This includes children, pregnant women and anyone with a history of kidney disease.</p> <p><strong>You could be at higher risk of bleeding</strong></p> <p>Drinking a large amount of tea every day could put you at risk for bleeding from a minor cut or bump. “It makes you more prone to bruising, explains Michelle Lee, MD, a board-certified plastic surgeon. “I require all my patients to stop drinking tea two to three weeks before surgery.”</p> <p><strong>Your medication may not work</strong></p> <p>While the benefits of tea seem unlimited, talk with your doctor and pharmacist before brewing a pot every day. “Catechins can interfere with some heart and blood pressure medications,” warns Dr. Kouri. “It is important to discuss this with your doctor.”</p> <p><strong>How much tea should I drink?</strong></p> <p>Studies vary on how many cups of tea to drink per day. You want to get the most benefits without overdoing the caffeine. “To get the maximum health benefits from green tea, it is most effective to drink three to five cups of green tea per day,” recommends Dr. Kouri.</p> <p><strong>Which tea is the healthiest?</strong></p> <p>When choosing a tea, make sure it is unsweetened. Even if some flavoured teas contain no calories, they could still have artificial sweeteners and preservatives. Opt for making your own tea as opposed to buying it already prepared. “The more tea leaves are processed, the less effective the catechins become, explains Dr. Kouri. “Green tea is minimally processed and has the greatest health benefits of the available teas.”</p> <p><strong>Pour a cup today</strong></p> <p>While you can always have too much of a good thing, tea is a healthy choice for the vast majority of healthy adults. “In general, those who drink green tea regularly are healthier than those who do not,” says Dr. Kouri. “It is very safe to drink and only has drawbacks when consumed in very large quantities.” So claim those health benefits and get steeping today.</p> <p><em>Written by</em> <em>Carrie Madormo. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/this-is-what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-drink-tea-every-day"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Royal comeback! Duchess Kate returns to work in floral ensemble

<p>After a busy summer filled with family trips to the elusive island of Mustique and family palace Balmoral Castle, Catherine, The Duchess of Cambridge has returned to work in a fitting ensemble. </p> <p>Just days after Prince George, 6, and Princess Charlotte, 4, started school, Duchess Kate has attended a festival in Wisley, Surrey, to celebrate the opening of her third Back to Nature garden. </p> <p>For the special day out, the royal went for a fitting, beautiful floral dress by designer Emilia Wickstead, along with a pair of nude wedges. </p> <p>The 37-year-old blended in well for her first royal engagement back since the summer, and chatted with fellow parents and happy children. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2Pvl1yoYFr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2Pvl1yoYFr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Cambridges 🇬🇧👑🎀 (@thecambridges_family)</a> on Sep 10, 2019 at 2:36pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Duchess Kate also managed to mention a little fact about 16-month-old Prince Louis, where she said he “loves to smell the flowers and he enjoys being out in the garden”. </p> <p>The royal has proven time and time again she has a keen interest in the wellbeing and mental health of children and has spoken out about how spending time outdoors promotes growing kids future health and happiness. </p> <p>She also encouraged families to spend more of their time outdoors in a speech to attendees. </p> <p>"I am not as green-fingered as many of you here," she admitted.</p> <p>"But I was passionate about creating a garden that inspired children and adults alike to get back to nature and reap the positive mental and physical health benefits that it can bring.</p> <p>"The gardens were, I suppose, a manifestation of some of the work I have been focusing on around how best we can support our children in the earliest years."</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Duchess Kate’s floral ensemble. </p>

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How to eat for healthy skin

<p>Many of us spend a small fortune on lotions and creams to keep our skin looking soft, supple and glowing. But is it possible that what we eat has a much greater effect on our skin health? It definitely does, according to Lauren McGuckin, Accredited Practising Dietitian and spokesperson for the Dietitians Association of Australia.</p> <p>McGuckin is a passionate advocate for the benefits of a balanced diet for all aspects of health and vitality. Skin health is no exception. “There is a massive industry that produces and markets all sorts of products that claim to keep our skin looking youthful. Of course these products have their place and many may be effective, but I’m convinced that what we consume has a much bigger impact on the health and appearance of our skin,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Our skin is an organ</strong><br />Just like the heart or the liver, the skin is an organ and is affected directly by what we eat. “We are all increasingly conscious about the importance of diet for our cardiovascular system and other systems and organs within the body. This principle applies to our skin as well. A well balanced diet with plenty of variety is essential for getting the right nutrients into our skin cells and this helps maintain the strength, resilience of our skin”, she advises. “As a general rule, if we feel good on the inside it will show on the outside."</p> <p><strong>Balance and variety</strong><br />Rather than focusing on specific ‘silver bullets’, Lauren counsels that a broad diet is needed to give our skin all it needs. "The balance of foods that we need for overall health is generally what will also benefit our skin. This means taking in a wide variety of fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, lean proteins and good fats, while limiting sugar and saturated fats. If it’s good for our heart then it will generally be good for our skin too."</p> <p><strong>Look for Omega 3 and 6</strong><br />The so called ‘good fats’ that contain Omega 3 and 6 are an essential part of the dietary combination that promotes healthy skin. Lauren explains, “These fatty acids are important for the condition of cell membranes, which help protect cells and aid the passage of nutrients. To obtain a healthy intake of Omega 3 and 6 I would recommend at least two meals per week that contain oily fish, such as salmon or tuna. Also enjoy other Omega rich foods such as nuts, beans, lentils and avocados. Oils and margarines that are made from canola are a good source too”.</p> <p><strong>The key is collagen</strong><br />Collagen is a type of protein in the body that keeps skin strong and elastic. As we age, our collagen production slows and existing collagen can get damaged, so it is important to include foods in our diet that promote collagen production.</p> <p>Lauren cites leafy greens, like cabbage, broccoli and kale as important for collagen. "Apart from those a good rule of thumb is to eat a variety of red, orange and yellow vegetables and fruits."</p> <p>Good examples include:</p> <ul> <li>Red - apples, strawberries, beets, cherries and capsicums</li> <li>Orange – carrots, pumpkins, oranges, peaches and melons</li> <li>Yellow – corn, squash, lemons and capsicums</li> </ul> <p>Many of these foods also contain vitamin A, which is considered to be great for skin health, and Vitamin C, which is essential for synthesising collagen in the body.</p> <p><strong>Antioxidants boost skin health</strong><br />Lauren also noted the importance of antioxidants in diet. “Antioxidants can help slow cell deterioration because they counter the effects of free radicals in the body, which cause poor cell function or cell decay. Antioxidants cannot be manufactured in the body, so they need to be taken in via your diet”. Examples of foods rich in antioxidants are nuts, seeds, vegetables, fish oils, whole grains, as well as many of the foods mentioned earlier in relation to collagen.</p> <p><strong>Hydration helps</strong><br />Lauren also advises on the importance of hydration in maintaining skin condition and appearance. “There is no need to go overboard with water intake, but aim for a healthy six to eight glasses of water per day and increase this if you are doing heavy exercise. It’s also important to limit alcohol intake, as this can cause dehydration. I am not saying you need to avoid it altogether, but keep it moderate,” she adds.</p> <p><strong>Keeping a holistic outlook</strong><br />Lauren stresses that the secret to good skin health really is to keep sufficient balance and variety in diet and combine this with a balance in other aspects of lifestyle. “Balance in a person’s diet is critical to keeping skin as youthful as possible, and balance in other aspects of life is important too. Regular exercise, sufficient sleep, sun protection are all important factors, as well as reducing stress. They all have an impact on how well our skin looks and feels, so it’s vital to make a holistic approach to gain the best results."</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/how-to-eat-well-for-healthy-skin.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a> </em></p>

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Katherine Kelly Lang reveals the beauty secrets behind her ageless appearance

<p>Since she first graced the screens as Brooke Logan on <em>The Bold and Beautiful</em> in 1987, Katherine Kelly Lang has continued to maintain her picture-perfect look throughout the years.</p> <p>Now, the 58-year-old actress has shared the beauty regime that helped her keep her glowing appearance in a new interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7434161/The-Bold-Beautifuls-Katherine-Kelly-Lang-reveals-beauty-secrets.html" target="_blank"><em>FEMAIL</em></a>.</p> <p>Lang said she often swaps out products to maintain their effectiveness. “I love creams so I apply whatever creams I love and am using at the time right after my shower,” she said.</p> <p>“I do like to switch them up because the face gets used to a certain product or a certain line and then it’s not as effective, so you want to switch up regularly by using different kinds of creams.”</p> <p>She said apart from the items from her favourite skincare brand Lancôme, she also uses various organic products.</p> <p>At the end of the day, she cleanses her face the first thing when she gets home. This is often followed up by a scrub or a mask before she applies a range of creams on.</p> <p>“I use an eye cream, then a retinol to keep the cell turnover going, and a Vitamin C cream – Vitamin C creams are really good, I love those,” she said.</p> <p>“I then finish with a cream that gets rid of sun spots and then a hydration cream … I put on the five different creams in that order.”</p> <p>When she’s not out on travel trips, she uses an LED mask for 40 minutes every night. “It’s anti-ageing; it stimulates the collagen and gives you a glow and keeps your skin hydrated,” she said.</p> <p>The soap star has previously spoken up about having <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/katherine-kelly-lang-reveals-her-ageless-beauty-secrets" target="_blank">filler and Botox</a>, but she said she prefers more natural means.</p> <p>Lang also credited diet, exercise and work for her beautiful complexion.</p> <p>“Generally I just follow the rule of thumb of eating lean meats, leafy green vegetables and pressed juices and cut right down on sugar and gluten,” she said.</p> <p>Lang, who described herself as a “vitamin junkie”, said she takes so many every day she couldn’t remember all of them. “I can’t even tell you how much I take! People think I am crazy, honestly.”</p> <p>The American also said intense triathlons and busy work life also helped her stay “young”. She said she beat jet lag by going on a run or bike ride, and has been doing up to 10 shows a week in recent times. “I don’t stop, ever,” she said. “But in the summer we do have four weeks off so that’s good downtime and I have three weeks off over Christmas.”</p>

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“I don’t feel a day over 30”: Kylie Gillies says she has her best body at 52

<p>Channel 7 presenter Kylie Gillies has opened up about her diet and fitness regime that helps her feel a fraction of her age.</p> <p>In a new interview with<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.who.com.au/Kylie-Gillies-feeling-healthier-than-ever" target="_blank"><em>Who</em></a>,<span> </span>the mother of two said she has continued to maintain a “young mindset” at the age of 52.</p> <p>“I’m proud of my age and I’ve never attempted to hide it. But, hand on heart, I have better things to occupy my mind and time,” Gillies said.</p> <p>“Here’s the thing, I don’t walk around stressing over whether I’m about to get another wrinkle … For every extra line or crow’s foot … guess what? It comes with a bonus offer … of extra knowledge, empathy, wisdom.”</p> <p>She said she recently adopted an intense 30-minutes-a-day exercise regimen, sharing that she spent six weeks working out under the guidance of celebrity trainers Chief Brabon and Emilie Brabon-Hames for the magazine’s photoshoot.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2BN0enF9Nv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2BN0enF9Nv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Kylie Gillies (@kyliegillies)</a> on Sep 4, 2019 at 11:11pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, she said the effort was not just to improve her appearance.</p> <p>“This wasn’t about weight loss,” she said. “It was about strength. Getting moving, and doing it with the long-term goal of being more active for longer in my life.”</p> <p>Since taking up the regime, she said she had seen great improvements in her fitness, especially during a skiing trip with her sons Gus, 16 and Archie, 14.</p> <p>“It’s important for your mental health, it’s important for your bones. I think if you approach it with a mindset of ‘I need to do this to keep, you know, one step in front of bad things happening to me’ – I think that’s the best way of thinking of it.”</p> <p>She also revealed her day-to-day diet, from the morning ahead of<span> </span><em>The Morning Show</em><span> </span>to the evening.</p> <p>For breakfast, the TV host would have scrambled eggs or an omelette with capsicum and smoked salmon or ham, paired with an almond milk protein shake.</p> <p>In the noon she would opt for a chicken salad with a side of miso soup, while a dinner would consist a simple stir-fry with konjac rice or grilled protein with vegetables on the side.</p> <p>Throughout the day Gillies would stave off hunger with coffee, cherry tomatoes or a seaweed salad. If the sweets craving struck, she said she would go for low-sugar yoghurt or chocolate-flavoured protein shake. She also drinks two to three litres of water a day.</p> <p>“I don’t feel a day over 30!”</p>

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Is ‘dental tourism’ worth the risk?

<p>Need crowns or an implant or two and heard about the growing trend of ‘dental tourism’?</p> <p><strong>How to have fabulous teeth at any age</strong></p> <p>Well, your answer could be Asia. Specifically, Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur. WYZA® reader Phil Hawkes shares his personal experience.</p> <p>Why should you consider ‘dental tourism’? From my very recent experience, you can afford to have all your dental work done at roughly one-third of the cost, and enjoy a holiday at the same time in Thailand or Malaysia. And still come out ahead, if you fly there with a low-cost carrier like Scoot or Air Asia.</p> <p><strong>Those horror stories</strong></p> <p>Sound too good to be true? In some cases, you’d be absolutely right. It doesn’t work for everyone. We’ve heard horror stories about crowns falling out, implants that are made with human bone [the mind boggles] and choppers that are so bleached that they’re scary.</p> <p>Those outcomes can happen in Australia, too. You can be unlucky with your choice of dentist wherever you are in the world. I’ve had some awful experiences here, and some good ones in places like Poland and England.</p> <p>But to be specific, Kuala Lumpur is at the top of our list for high class dental work.</p> <p><strong>Should you get dental work done overseas?</strong></p> <p>We [and our friends] have found standards in Kuala Lumpur can be better than in Australia, again if you know where to go. We know a woman who was quoted $47,000 in Brisbane for what amounted to, basically an entire new mouth. Implants, crowns, gum repair, the works. After getting the quote, she almost had another medical problem. . . a heart attack.</p> <p>So on a recommendation from a friend, she had the whole lot done in Kuala Lumpur for $17,000, plus the cost of three trips including several days in Penang while waiting, for about $3,000. Total: just over $20,000. And a perfect job.</p> <p>The irony was that the dentist obtained his Masters degree in Brisbane! Also, his clinic had state-of-the-art equipment which she’d never seen in Australia.</p> <p><strong>A not so good experience in bangkok</strong></p> <p>Our recent experience was somewhat different. We rocked up in Bangkok, were met by a driver at the airport, and spirited away to an apartment building owned by a dental clinic. A free night there, and next morning to the clinic. After a long wait, we were “interviewed” by the head of the clinic and after rejecting offers of extra services like “deep cleaning” and “ultra whitening”, we were placed in the tender care of two female dentists who looked about 16 years old.</p> <p>Well, they were pretty competent and did the basics adequately [two crowns for each of us] but the place was a bit chaotic and worse, my wife developed an infection which took days of antibiotics to clear up. Other people we know, who’ve been to the same clinic, had no such problems. So you can be unlucky.</p> <p>The cost in Bangkok was about the same as in Kuala Lumpur and was two crowns for $1,200 including the accommodation and airport transfers.</p> <p><strong>The lesson</strong></p> <p>Do your research carefully and read the testimonials online. Better still, ask your friends who may have had personal experience. Then, book cheap flights and enjoy your holiday for free Compared with paying $1,500 per crown, or more, in Australia minus whatever you can manage to extract from the private health insurer. However, be very careful before making a decision and always ensure you are covered by travel insurance.</p> <p><strong>Be aware</strong></p> <p>The Australian Dental Association warn that getting complex dental treatment overseas can come at a very high cost. Australian dentists are appropriately trained to deal with dental emergencies. Consider this before thinking of going overseas to get your dental work.</p> <p><em>Written by Phil Hawkes. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/is-dental-tourism-worth-the-risk.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p> <p> </p>

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Samantha Armytage fires back at nasty “lies” claiming she threw an on-set tantrum

<p><span>Samantha Armytage has slammed a Triple M radio show for allegedly making false claims saying that she “spat the dummy” while filming a guest appearance on </span><em>The Chase Australia</em><span>.</span></p> <p><span>Armytage was invited to the show alongside her </span><em>Sunrise</em><span> co stars David Koch, Mark Beretta and Edwina Batholomew which aired on Channel 7 on August 21.</span></p> <p><span>This morning, Triple M Sydney breakfast host, Lawrence Mooney claimed that Armytage threw a tantrum on set.</span></p> <p><span>“I heard from people who were in the audience that Sam was being chased and she got caught and she was the first one off,” the comedian said on Triple M’s</span><em><span> </span>Moonman in the Morning</em><span>. “And she cut up rough, she absolutely spat the dummy.”</span></p> <p><span>Armytage was quickly kicked off the program after getting three questions correct and three incorrect, resulting in being caught by The Chaser, Issa Schultz.</span></p> <p><span>“She said, ‘I’ve been humiliated, this is embarrassing! I want another go!’” said Mooney. “The producer said, ‘No, you can’t have another go. The questions are randomly generated, sorry.’</span></p> <p><span>“The story is Sam Armytage refused to leave the floor of </span><em>The Chase</em><span>after being caught in the chase,” he said.</span></p> <p><span>But it didn’t take long for the breakfast show host to debunk their version of events through her Twitter.</span></p> <p><span>“What complete rubbish,” she wrote. “And how irresponsible &amp; mean to repeat such BS. No such thing happened.</span></p> <p><span>“I got out in the first round (&amp; couldn’t wait to get off the bloody set!) I sat in the green room (eating peanuts) til my colleagues finished, then I went out and rejoined them for the end of the show.</span></p> <p><span>“You’re being salacious &amp; silly &amp; looking for viral hits (which I’ll no doubt unfortunately give you). The show was for charity &amp; @SoldierOnAust was v happy with my performance (&amp; for having a go!) So, cease &amp; desist with the BS.”</span></p>

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15 bloggers over 50 making their mark

<p>With millions of bloggers it’s no easy feat finding someone who speaks to you. That’s why we’ve probed and picked our way through the internet to unearth some truly inspiring and relatable bloggers, each proving that age is no barrier.</p> <p>From relatable stories to the downright hilarious, here are 15 bloggers over 50 who are making their mark one blog post at a time. Did your favourite make our list?</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.adelehorin.com.au/">1. Coming of age:</a></u></strong>When former SMH columnist, Adele Horin, announced her retirement in 2012 she certainly had no plans of slowing down. Her popular blog covers some of the most hotly debated issues among baby boomers today. She is currently dealing with difficult health news and is writing about it in her admirable open style. </p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://thatsnotmyage.com/">2. That’s not my age:</a></u></strong>This former magazine fashion editor is out to prove that youth has nothing to do with style. Follow Alyson for her weekly beauty and fashion musings.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.theroamingboomers.com/">3. The roaming boomers:</a></u></strong>When David turned 50, he and his wife sold their business and made plans to move to Arizona. Then the stock market collapse of 2008 wiped away 45% of their life savings. Instead of wallowing, the couple started a travel blog and reinvented themselves along the way.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.curlytraveller.com/">4. Curly traveller:</a></u></strong>Anja is an eccentric, quirky and honest blogger who divides her time between Singapore and the Netherlands. Her love for photography (and life!) is evident with every image.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.greyfoxblog.com/">5. Grey</a><a href="http://www.greyfoxblog.com/">fox blog:</a></u></strong> The Grey Fox, aka David Evans, asks, “how often do you see images of older men in fashion advertisements?” And with this sentiment, David, who has no formal experience in fashion, has set about turning the industry on its head.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.retiredandcrazy.com/">6. Retired and crazy:</a></u></strong>Great grandmother, Ann Cordiner travelled through five continents and 28 countries in two years, writing 146 blog entries along the way. We’re not sure if that makes her crazy or awe-inspiring. </p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.fitbodyfifty.com/">7. Fitbody fifty:</a></u></strong>In 2008, just a few weeks shy of her 48<sup>th</sup> birthday, Kerryn Woods from Melbourne, donned a pair of high heels, a sheen bikini and an extra dab of fake tan to compete in a figure bodybuilding competition. She writes about her weight loss journey and new life as a 50-something personal trainer and food blogger.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://bagsofwool.blogspot.co.uk/">8. Great balls of wool:</a></u></strong>Based in London, Una has been knitting on and off for 50 years and lives for the next wool bargain. She offers free patterns and the occasional giveaway.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://midlifebloggers.com/">9. Beyond midlife bloggers:</a></u></strong>Jane Gassner is a professional writer and editor who set about dedicating a blog to women 60 and beyond.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.betterthanieverexpected.blogspot.com.au/">10. Better than I ever expected:</a></u></strong>Just like the book, this blog, by ‘senior sexpert’ and author, Joan Price, leaves nothing to the imagination on the topic of sex and ageing.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.aboomerslifeafter50.com/">11. A baby boomer woman’s life after 50:</a></u></strong>Widowed at 50 and an empty nester shortly after, Judy’s blog offers a raw, yet optimistic and entertaining account of life after 50.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://juliasplace.org.uk/">12. Julia’s place:</a></u></strong>When Julia first retired from teaching in 2008 she suffered from anxiety, which she says, “was an opportunity for the demons to flood in.” Her rediscovery of cooking and community activities helped put her life back on track.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://elaineambrose.com/blog/">13. Elaine Ambrose:</a></u></strong>This blogger and author (Menopause Sucks; Midlife Cabernet) attracted more than 678,000 web hits on Huffington Post after posting an embarrassing, yet hilarious account about the time she <a href="http://elaineambrose.com/blog/dont-fart-during-an-mri/">‘farted during an MRI’</a>.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.gypsynester.com/">14. Gypsy nester:</a></u></strong>Just a couple of empty nesters having the time of their lives. Yes, really.</p> <p><strong><u><a href="http://www.lavenderandlovage.com/">15. Lavender and lovage:</a></u></strong>Karen is a freelance writer and recipe developer who shares her time between North Yorkshire and South West France. She is currently writing a cookbook based on her research into British food, customs and recipes.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/bloggers-over-50-making-their-mark.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Iconic or imposter? Model transforms to recreate Princess Diana’s most famous looks

<div class="c-message__content c-message__content--feature_sonic_inputs" data-qa="message_content"><span class="c-message__body" data-qa="message-text">Before the world-famous Kardashians or social media influencers creating trends and selling lifestyles simply by looking good - there was Princess Diana.</span></div> <p>The late royal, who passed away in 1997, was renowned not just for her brutal marriage breakdown with Prince Charles but for her incredible fashion sense. </p> <p>From the iconic “revenge dress” to the 90’s athleisure that she effortlessly finessed - Princess Di lead trends and fashion revolutions that are still deeply admired today. </p> <p>Now, model Hailey Bieber, wife of singer Justin Bieber, has gone viral for her ultimate sartorial tribute to the royal in a new editorial for<span> </span>Vogue<span> </span>Paris. </p> <p>The shoot, photographed by Gregory Harris, and styled by Virginie Benarroch, aimed to channel the the royal’s casual elegance by posing her most iconic shots. </p> <p>Bieber recreated the the princess; famous blazered look - a baseball cap, blazer, sweatshirt and light washed jeans tucked into brown cowboy boots. </p> <p>The ensemble made headlines around the world after it was photographed at a polo match in Windsor in 1988. </p> <p>The 22-year-old model showed off the gorgeous images on her instagram account, and praised the late Princess for inspiring her own wardrobe. </p> <p>"[All] credit and inspo to the amazingly beautiful and iconically stylish Princess Diana who I’ve looked to for style inspiration for as long as I can remember," she wrote in her caption. "Thank you for leaving behind such an iconic fashion and style legacy."</p> <p>The reaction to Bieber’s shoot has been mixed, with some labelling it as “tasteless.”</p> <p>“This feels in wildly poor taste considering all of the Diana shots were taken by paparazzi,” one user wrote. </p> <p>“Go a different route if you want to pay tribute.”</p> <p>“Nobody compares to Princess Diana and there’s that,” another added. </p> <p>Another person wrote they thought it was a “strange” idea. </p> <p>“Brave of her to do this photoshoot. I have no problem with Hailey, but I don’t see why anyone would think this is a good idea - they have nothing in common.”</p> <p>However, others took to social media to praise Hailey’s tribute. </p> <p>“I think she looks cute and it's a great way to remember Diana!” one user commented. </p> <p>“Strong princess vibes here,” one comment read. </p> <p>Another added: “This shoot is everything! She looks incredible.”</p> <p>Princess Di pass</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Hailey Bieber’s tribute shots to Princess Diana.</p>

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The ugly history of cosmetic surgery

<p>Reality television shows based on surgical transformations, such as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JIT0uZ3D9E">The Swan</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QrtBodQvDY">Extreme Makeover</a>, were not the first public spectacles to offer women the ability to compete for the chance to be beautiful.</p> <p>In 1924, a competition ad in the New York Daily Mirror asked the affronting question “Who is the homeliest girl in New York?” It promised the unfortunate winner that a plastic surgeon would “make a beauty of her”. Entrants were reassured that they would be spared embarrassment, as the paper’s art department would paint “masks” on their photographs when they were published.</p> <p>Cosmetic surgery instinctively seems like a modern phenomenon. Yet it has a much longer and more complicated history than most people likely imagine. Its origins lie in part in the correction of syphilitic deformities and racialised ideas about “healthy” and acceptable facial features as much as any purely aesthetic ideas about symmetry, for instance.</p> <p>In her study of how beauty is related to social discrimination and bias, sociologist <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=mvdLHlg4es8C&amp;pg=PA158&amp;lpg=PA158&amp;dq=%22aesthetic+surgery%22+taschen&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=J5zqKU4kQS&amp;sig=egPDr97h6p2uCz1-hcTLCXE85DQ&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiukofstYTMAhWF7xQKHdLSCuc4ChDoAQhYMAY#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">Bonnie Berry estimates</a> that 50% of Americans are “unhappy with their looks”. Berry links this prevalence to mass media images. However, people have long been driven to painful, surgical measures to “correct” their facial features and body parts, even prior to the use of anaesthesia and discovery of antiseptic principles.</p> <p>Some of the first recorded surgeries took place in 16th-century Britain and Europe. Tudor “barber-surgeons” treated facial injuries, which as medical historian <a href="http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/faculty/staff/profile/pelling/index.html">Margaret Pelling</a>explains, was crucial in a culture where damaged or ugly faces were seen to reflect a disfigured inner self.</p> <p>With the pain and risks to life inherent in any kind of surgery at this time, cosmetic procedures were usually confined to severe and stigmatised disfigurements, such as the loss of a nose through trauma or epidemic syphilis.</p> <p>The first pedicle flap grafts to fashion new noses were performed in 16th-century Europe. A section of skin would be cut from the forehead, folded down and stitched, or would be harvested from the patient’s arm.</p> <p>A later representation of this procedure in Iconografia d’anatomia published in 1841, as reproduced in Richard Barnett’s <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Crucial_Interventions.html?id=2tH6rQEACAAJ&amp;redir_esc=y">Crucial Interventions</a>, shows the patient with his raised arm still gruesomely attached to his face during the graft’s healing period.</p> <p>As socially crippling as facial disfigurements could be and as desperate as some individuals were to remedy them, purely cosmetic surgery did not become commonplace until operations were not excruciatingly painful and life-threatening.</p> <p>In 1846, what is frequently described as the first “painless” operation was performed by American dentist <a href="http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/williammorton">William Morton</a>, who gave ether to a patient. The ether was administered via inhalation through either a handkerchief or bellows. Both of these were imprecise methods of delivery that could cause an overdose and kill the patient.</p> <p>The removal of the second major impediment to cosmetic surgery occurred in the 1860s. English doctor <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3468637/">Joseph Lister</a>’s model of aseptic, or sterile, surgery was taken up in France, Germany, Austria and Italy, reducing the chance of infection and death.</p> <p>By the 1880s, with the further refinement of anaesthesia, cosmetic surgery became a relatively safe and painless prospect for healthy people who felt unattractive.</p> <p>The Derma-Featural Co advertised its “treatments” for “humped, depressed or … ill-shaped noses”, protruding ears, and wrinkles (“the finger marks of Time”) in the English magazine World of Dress in 1901.</p> <p><a href="http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/31383099">A report from a 1908 court case</a> involving the company shows that they continued to use skin harvested from – and attached to – the arm for rhinoplasties.</p> <p>The report also refers to the non-surgical “paraffin wax” rhinoplasty, in which hot, liquid wax was injected into the nose and then “moulded by the operator into the desired shape”. The wax could potentially migrate to other parts of the face and be disfiguring, or cause “<a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002961042902344">paraffinomas</a>” or wax cancers.</p> <p>Advertisements for the likes of the the Derma-Featural Co were rare in women’s magazines around the turn of the 20th century. But ads were frequently published for bogus devices promising to deliver dramatic face and body changes that might reasonably be expected only from surgical intervention.</p> <p>Various models of chin and forehead straps, such as the patented “Ganesh” brand, were advertised as a means for removing double chins and wrinkles around the eyes.</p> <p>Bust reducers and hip and stomach reducers, such as the J.Z. Hygienic Beauty Belt, also promised non-surgical ways to reshape the body.</p> <p>The frequency of these ads in popular magazines suggests that use of these devices was socially acceptable. In comparison, coloured cosmetics such as rouge and kohl eyeliner were rarely advertised. The ads for “powder and paint” that do exist often emphasised the product’s “natural look” to avoid any negative association between cosmetics and artifice.</p> <p><strong>The racialised origins of cosmetic surgery</strong></p> <p>The most common cosmetic operations requested before the 20th century aimed to correct features such as ears, noses and breasts classified as “ugly” because they weren’t typical for “white” people.</p> <p>At this time, racial science was concerned with “improving” the white race. In the United States, with its growing populations of Jewish and Irish immigrants and African Americans, “pug” noses, large noses and flat noses were signs of racial difference and therefore ugliness.</p> <p><a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Vs09mB9QjTgC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=history+%22cosmetic+surgery%22&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;redir_esc=y#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">Sander L. Gilman</a> suggests that the “primitive” associations of non-white noses arose “because the too-flat nose came to be associated with the inherited syphilitic nose”.</p> <p>American otolaryngologist <a href="http://archfaci.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=479927">John Orlando Roe’</a>s discovery of a method for performing rhinoplasties inside the nose, without leaving a tell-tale external scar, was a crucial development in the 1880s. As is the case today, patients wanted to be able to “pass” (in this case as “white”) and for their surgery to be undetectable.</p> <p>In 2015, <a href="http://www.isaps.org/Media/Default/global-statistics/2015%20ISAPS%20Results.pdf">627,165 American women</a>, or an astonishing one in 250, received breast implants. In the early years of cosmetic surgery, breasts were never made larger.</p> <p>Breasts acted historically as a “<a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Vs09mB9QjTgC&amp;pg=PA223&amp;lpg=PA223&amp;dq=%22breast+functions+as+a+racial+sign%22+gilman&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=m5RZvuCaSK&amp;sig=oqDYnEZP1VfRfVP4rW4HcN7VLpE&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjT4fb4xojMAhXMlxoKHWgQBWQQ6AEIITAB">racial sign</a>”. Small, rounded breasts were viewed as youthful and sexually controlled. Larger, pendulous breasts were regarded as “primitive” and therefore as a deformity.</p> <p>In the age of the flapper, in the early 20th century, breast reductions were common. Not until the 1950s were small breasts transformed into a medical problem and seen to make women unhappy.</p> <p>Shifting views about desirable breasts illustrate how beauty standards change across time and place. Beauty was once considered as God-given, natural or a sign of health or a person’s good character.</p> <p>When beauty began to be understood as located outside of each person and as capable of being changed, more women, in particular, tried to improve their appearance through beauty products, as they now increasingly turn to surgery.</p> <p>As Elizabeth Haiken points out in <a href="https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/content/venus-envy">Venus Envy</a>, 1921 not only marked the first meeting of an American association of plastic surgery specialists, but also the first Miss America pageant in Atlantic City. All of the finalists were white. The winner, 16-year-old Margaret Gorman, was short compared to today’s towering models at five-feet-one-inch (155cm) tall, and her breast measurement was smaller than that of her hips.</p> <p>There is a close link between cosmetic surgical trends and the qualities we value as a culture, as well as shifting ideas about race, health, femininity and ageing.</p> <p>Last year was <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-health/11731223/100-years-of-plastic-surgery.html">celebrated</a> by some within the field as the 100th anniversary of modern cosmetic surgery. New Zealander <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/9396435/Pioneering-plastic-surgery-records-from-First-World-War-published.html">Dr Harold Gillies</a> has been championed for inventing the pedicle flap graft during the first world war to reconstruct the faces of maimed soldiers. Yet, as is well documented, primitive versions of this technique had been in use for centuries.</p> <p>Such an inspiring story obscures the fact that modern cosmetic surgery was really born in the late 19th century and that it owes as much to syphilis and racism as to rebuilding the noses and jaws of war heroes.</p> <p>The surgical fraternity – and it is a brotherhood, as <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1998/07/12/style/plastic-surgeons-why-so-few-women.html?pagewanted=all">more than 90% of cosmetic surgeons are male</a>— conveniently places itself in a history that begins with reconstructing the faces and work prospects of the war wounded.</p> <p>In reality, cosmetic surgeons are instruments of shifting whims about what is attractive. They have helped people to conceal or transform features that might make them stand out as once diseased, ethnically different, “primitive”, too feminine, or too masculine.</p> <p>The sheer risks that people have been willing to run in order to pass as “normal” or even to turn the “misfortune” of ugliness, as the homeliest girl contest put it, into beauty, shows how strongly people internalise ideas about what is beautiful.</p> <p>Looking back at the ugly history of cosmetic surgery should give us the impetus to more fully consider how our own beauty norms are shaped by prejudices including racism and sexism.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Smith. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-the-ugly-history-of-cosmetic-surgery-56500">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Dame Joan Collins is back

<p>Dame Joan Collins, 86, is back in the spotlight after appearing in a major ad for the beauty campaign for makeup brand Charlotte Tilbury.</p> <p>The Hollywood star is seen smiling alongside younger models which advertises the celebrity make-up artist’s brand-new Airbrush Flawless Finish Foundation.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1b89G0gLIb/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1b89G0gLIb/" target="_blank">Darlings, just ONE MORE DAY until the launch of my NEW! AIRBRUSH FLAWLESS FOUNDATION and MAGIC VANISH Colour Correctors. These NEW! products are where MAKEUP MAGIC meets SKINCARE SCIENCE - I can’t wait for you all to experience the FLAWLESS FEELING 💫✨💓🤩💖!! I LOVE this incredible shot from my Airbrush Flawless Foundation campaign. Featuring 60 GORGEOUS men and women, from @joancollinsdbe to @missfamenyc, @mypaleskinblog and @chey_maya!! #FLAWLESSISAFEELING - - #CharlotteTilbury #AirbrushFlawlessFoundation #New #ComingSoon #FoundationLaunch #Makeup #Beauty</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/ctilburymakeup/" target="_blank"> Charlotte Tilbury, MBE</a> (@ctilburymakeup) on Aug 21, 2019 at 11:52am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The foundation itself comes in 44 different shades and after the advertising campaign now has a 17,000 strong waitlist for the shades.</p> <p>The product is highly anticipated amongst the beauty community as it includes the Magic Replexium Serum that claims to reduce the appearance of wrinkles by up to 22 per cent after eight weeks of use.</p> <p>“I have worked with the best laboratories in the world to create my most miraculous skin-creation yet,” says Tilbury, according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dazeddigital.com/beauty/head/article/45714/1/joan-collins-shines-in-new-charlotte-tilbury-foundation-campaign" target="_blank">Dazed</a>.</em></p> <p>“When I wear this foundation, people ask me if I have had work done! Have I been on holiday? No, no, no! It’s Airbrush Flawless Foundation.”</p> <p>Dame Joan Collins has been flawless since appearing on television at the age of nine. Scroll through the gallery to see how she’s aged (or hasn’t!) over the years.</p>

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Revealed: Why we never saw Queen Elizabeth’s baby bump

<p>Not many may notice it, but the public or press have never been treated to pictures of Queen Elizabeth with a ‘baby bump,’ although she gave birth four times. </p> <p>Her Majesty’s pregnancy was never closely photographed - which is a strange notion considering the more recent royal pregnancies, since Princess Diana, have been closely followed. </p> <p>However, their is a reason why Queen Elizabeth kept her growing tummy away from the spotlight and it is mainly due to the taboo nature of pregnancies at the time. </p> <p>As reported by the New York Times, Buckingham Palace released a mysterious statement in 1948, explaining the then 22-year-old Princess Elizabeth had fallen pregnant without either confirming or denying the fact. </p> <p>"Her Royal Highness the Princess Elizabeth will undertake no public engagements after the end of June," the statement read.</p> <p>Five months later, the royal welcomed baby Prince Charles on November 14. </p> <p>Interestingly enough, there were no hospital step photos or “first photos” of the royal baby - instead, Princess Elizabeth remained hidden for a month. </p> <p>Her Majesty was reportedly in labor for 22 hours before having to go under an emergency caesarean at Buckingham Palace. </p> <p>It is widely believed that Prince Philip was not in the room with her as he had been playing squash at the time of his first born’s arrival. </p> <p>The Queen later gave birth to her first and only daughter, Princess Anne in 1950 at Clarence house, then Prince Andrew in 1960 and Prince Edward in 1964 both back at Buckingham palace.</p> <p>Princess Diana was the very first royal to ever give birth at a hospital - one of many traditions she broke while pregnant with her first son, Prince William who was born at the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s hospital. </p> <p>She reportedly told biographer Andrew Morton the stress from press was “unbearable.”</p> <p>It is reported by biographer, Andrew Morton that she told him "I couldn't handle the press pressure any longer, it was becoming unbearable.</p> <p>"It was as if everybody was monitoring every day for me."</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the Queen Elizabeth with her four children.</p>

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Will microdermabrasion or skin needling give you better skin?

<p>Microdermabrasion and skin needling are relatively new fads in skin beauty treatments. While claims of their effectiveness for more serious skin conditions are probably overblown, they may be beneficial for minor, superficial complaints.</p> <p><strong>What is microdermabrasion?</strong></p> <p>Microdermabrasion has gained popularity over the last decade because it’s a simple and cost-effective treatment for the skin with minimal recovery time. It’s important to differentiate microdermabrasion from dermabrasion, which is an invasive procedure that has been used to treat UV damage and skin scarring for decades.</p> <p>Dermabrasion is a traditional skin resurfacing treatment, usually performed under a general anaesthetic. It uses a specialised “sanding” device to strip off deep layers of the skin, leaving an open wound that may take several weeks to heal. This repair results in the formation of new skin and improvement in skin quality. But it <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21824537">carries significant risk</a> of complications such as hypopigmentation (whitening of the skin) and scarring. Dermabrasion isn’t done much anymore, because lasers can do the same job but more carefully and precisely.</p> <p>Microdermabrasion, in contrast, is non-invasive and low risk. It uses a high-pressured stream of fine crystals to “polish” the skin. This is effective in removing superficial layers of dead skin cells, but it doesn’t wear away the deeper layers of the skin. It’s essentially painless and side effects such as mild redness are minimal. It’s safe for most skin types, requires no time off work, and aims to improve skin texture and radiance.</p> <p><strong>Does it work?</strong></p> <p>Despite being one of the most popular cosmetic procedures performed, most physicians believe microdermabrasion has <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20048628">minimal clinical effect</a>. This perception is partly due to the widespread marketing of microdermabrasion for a variety of inappropriate indications such as deep wrinkles and scars. These contour changes require stimulation of deeper skin layers or damage to initiate enough rejuvenation and repair to see any clinical improvement. They will not improve noticeably with a mild and superficial mechanical treatment such as microdermabrasion.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20048628">However, there is some evidence</a> that microdermabrasion can stimulate the production of collagen, the protein that gives our skin strength and elasticity. This may help “fill in” superficial contour changes such as fine wrinkles and mild scarring. It can also improve the absorption of active skin care ingredients such as vitamin A or antioxidant creams by removing the outer barrier layer of the skin. It’s most useful in achieving a minor improvement in the textural irregularities and pigment changes that occur from sun damage.</p> <p><strong>What is microneedling?</strong></p> <p>Microneedling is a relatively new but popular cosmetic procedure used for skin regeneration and treatment of various skin conditions such as scarring, wrinkles and stretch marks. It’s considerably cheaper than other rejuvenating procedures such as resurfacing lasers, and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28796657">has been found</a> to be reasonably effective at promoting collagen.</p> <p>The procedure involves the use of an automated pen or roller device studded with microneedles as small as 0.1mm in diameter. It creates numerous micro-punctures through the skin with minimal damage to the upper epidermal layer, but microscopic injury to the deeper dermal layer. The injury and minor bleeding trigger a “wound-healing” cascade in the skin. This results in increased collagen and elastin (elastic fibers) production and some degree of repair.</p> <p>Microneedling is usually performed using a topical anaesthetic cream to ease discomfort, and may take 10-20 minutes depending on the size of area being treated. The skin should ideally be pre-treated with appropriate skin care products that can boost skin regeneration, such as retinoid (vitamin A) creams, and antioxidants including vitamin C. Following the procedure, patients can expect some pinpoint bleeding that settles quickly, as well as redness and some minor discomfort. They may experience some mild swelling and persistent redness for a few days.</p> <p>Fortunately, complications are uncommon. Skin infections, reactivation of herpes simplex (cold sores), inflamed pigmentation and aggravation of skin diseases <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28796657">have been reported</a>. Raised scarring <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28491962">has also been reported</a>, but is rare. The superficial needle holes close rapidly (in around 15 minutes), which means getting a skin infection is highly unlikely.</p> <p><strong>Does it work?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28796657">Studies have shown</a> significant improvement in the appearance of wrinkles and scars following microneedling, due to collagen and elastic fibre production that help the skin become more “filled out”. The tiny injuries to the dermal (deeper) layer of the skin cause an inflammatory cascade, triggering proliferation of cells in the dermis (upper layer) and subsequent new skin formation.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21617430">Researchers have demonstrated</a> increased collagen and elastin thickness in skin biopsies after microneedling, and this improvement is usually evident within three to four weeks. Further changes can be seen for some months.</p> <p>Although definite improvement is usually seen, it may be subtle and slow. The efficacy and results <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29072375">may be enhanced using combination treatments</a> such as microneedling with chemical peels or platelet-rich plasma (<a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-whats-actually-in-our-blood-75066">components found in blood</a> that enhance healing). In most studied cases, people required multiple treatments over a long period of time to achieve good results.</p> <p>Generally speaking, the more aggressive a procedure is, the fewer the number of treatments required to achieve the desired result. But this also means more healing time. Choosing the right option can be a complicated process, and depends on the nature and severity of the patient’s problem, coexisting complaints, skin type and desired outcome, as well as budget and lifestyle factors.</p> <p>Some clinicians may promote a procedure due to availability and experience, but the cumulative cost and ability to achieve the desired result should be carefully considered in all cases before embarking on treatment.</p> <p><em>Written by Cara McDonald. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/will-microdermabrasion-or-skin-needling-give-me-better-skin-86619"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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From sleeping beauty to the frog prince – why we shouldn’t ban fairytales

<p>Recently, an English mother, Sarah Hall, prompted <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcthree/item/348b95fd-81d6-46d4-827e-73c727b8ceb6">worldwide media coverage</a> in response to her suggestion that Sleeping Beauty should be removed from the school curriculum for young children because of the “inappropriate sexual message” it sends about consent.</p> <p>It’s not the only time fairytales have come under scrutiny recently. They are increasingly being <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/fairy-tales-children-stop-reading-parents-body-image-gender-roles-women-girls-sexism-a8067641.html">targeted</a> for “banning” within schools or avoidance by parents because of their perceived sexism, passive princesses, and reinforcement of marriage as girls’ ultimate goal. But can fairy tales actually be harmful as their critics believe?</p> <p>Fairy tales were once told – and then written – by adults for adult audiences. Early versions of many tales were often bawdy, salacious and replete with sexual innuendo. Since the Grimm Brothers removed these elements to reconfigure the fairy tale for children in the early 19th century, fairy tales have been seen as ideal, imaginative stories for young people. Almost all of us know the most popular stories from childhood reading or Disney films.</p> <p>Tradition is not reason enough to continue a cultural practice that has become outmoded. Nevertheless, there are a range of reasons why these calls to restrict children from reading fairy tales such as Sleeping Beauty are misguided.</p> <p><strong>Children’s literature needn’t model ‘ideal’ behaviour</strong></p> <p>Initially, most children’s literature was didactic and preoccupied with instructing children in correct morals and drilling them with information.</p> <p>Adult readers today would struggle to find any pleasure in children’s literature prior to 1850, let alone today’s kids. In order to provide “delight” as well as “instruction”, children’s books represent a range of behaviour, including, in the case of fairy tales, the attempted murder of children, and punishments such as feet being severed and birds pecking out human eyes.</p> <p>Charles Perrault was the French author who added the famous motifs of the glass slipper and pumpkin coach to the Cinderella tale. In his version of Sleeping Beauty, after the Princess and the Prince marry in secret and have two children, the Prince’s mother is entirely unimpressed. Unsurprisingly within a fairy tale, the Prince’s mother is descended from ogres and she demands that the two children be killed and eaten for dinner by the whole family, with the macabre detail that the boy is to be served with Sauce Robert.</p> <p>As in Snow White, in which the Huntsman refuses to kill the heroine and substitutes an animal heart for that of Snow White’s, no actual harm comes to the princess or her children but not before the ogress has prepared a tub full of vipers in a typical last-ditch attempt at villainy.</p> <p>When we consider the norms of evil and violence in fairy tales – most of which are usually punished – it is bizarre to imagine every detail serving as a behavioural model for children. If we insisted that every character in children’s literature behaved precisely as we wish to teach children to behave then we would likely be presenting bland stories that no child would actually read.</p> <p><strong>Considering plot points in context</strong></p> <p>If we focus on one plot point, like the kiss in Sleeping Beauty, we can overlook the overall narrative context.</p> <p>Within <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0410.html#perrault">the tale</a>, it becomes legend that the sleeping spell that has been cast on the Princess will only be broken after one-hundred years by the kiss of a king’s son. The narrative premise includes a premonition about how the magic will unfold and demands the resolution of the prince’s kiss to “save” the princess who must wait to be returned to consciousness.</p> <p>While we might critique the emphasis on romance and passivity from a feminist perspective, the idea that the tale is promoting the equivalent of a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steubenville_High_School_rape_case">Steubenville scenario</a> in which an unconscious young woman is sexually assaulted ignores the magical logic of the fantasy world.</p> <p>By that measure, we might see Prince Charming as a maniacal stalker as he demands all women in the kingdom try on the glass slipper in order to track down the attractive girl who failed to slip him her address before running off from the ball.</p> <p>In Sleeping Beauty, it is significant that the Prince is told about the Princess being doomed to sleep until she is awakened by a king’s son. The Prince recognises that he is one of few people who can end the curse and resolves to tackle the brambles and thorns that surround the castle in which she is trapped in slumber.</p> <p>Significantly, in the Grimms’ version, <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/grimm050.html">Little Brier-Rose</a>, numerous young men try to push themselves through the thorny hedge and die miserably in the attempt. However the hedge turns into flowers for the Prince and allows him through. Only the right man, with the right motivations, and the one who can release the Princess from the curse – is permitted through.</p> <p>Rather than being a parallel to a kiss taken without consent, the Sleeping Beauty kiss is akin to a paramedic giving mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to an unconscious person who would most usually want to be revived.</p> <p><strong>Many versions of every fairy tale</strong></p> <p>The version of Sleeping Beauty targeted in the UK is part of the <a href="https://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/for-home/find-a-book/read-with-biff-chip-and-kipper/">“Biff, Chip and Kipper”</a>series designed to teach children to read. These books aim to educate children in the mechanics of reading and, as such, some of the literary nuance, symbolism, and visual artistry present in many fairy tales and picture books based upon them are no doubt lacking.</p> <p>It is important to recall that there is no definitive version of a fairy tale. Calls for “bans” of a particular tale ignore variations between, say, Perrault’s Sleeping Beauty complete with cannibalistic, viper-wielding ogress and the Grimms’ less violent adaptation.</p> <p>Rather than eschewing fairy tales entirely, parents and educators would be better placed to look to quality adaptations and retellings by outstanding children’s authors, such as Neil Gaiman’s <a href="https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-sleeper-and-the-spindle-9781408859643/">The Sleeper and the Spindle</a>, which merges Snow White and Sleeping Beauty.</p> <p>In this tale, the Queen sets out on a journey armed with a sword to save the Princess and is the one who rescues her through a kiss.</p> <p>There is even a picture book version called <a href="http://www.simonandschuster.com.au/books/Sleeping-Bobby/Mary-Pope-Osborne/9780689876684">Sleeping Bobby</a>in which the gender roles are entirely reversed. Numerous parodies such as John Scieszka’s <a href="https://www.penguin.co.uk/ladybird/books/39078/the-frog-prince-continued/">The Frog Prince Continued</a>, in which the Princess’s married life with the frog is far from “happily ever after”, can also be a way for older readers to begin to question and play with the conventional gender expectations of some fairy tales.</p> <p><strong>Reweaving old stories into new</strong></p> <p>Fairy tales have been undergoing a continuous process of being rewoven into new stories for hundreds of years.</p> <p>Just as many old tales have fallen out of favour and are no longer known, so too might some contemporary favourites eventually stop being told to children, potentially replaced by reworked versions or entirely new stories.</p> <p>This storytelling method of old wine being poured into new bottles has a rich tradition and does not require our intervention. After all, the people who ban books in stories are always the villains, not the heroes.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Smith. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/from-sleeping-beauty-to-the-frog-prince-why-we-shouldnt-ban-fairytales-88317"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Why "strong is the new skinny" isn’t as empowering as it sounds

<p>Women have long been subject to <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1176/appi.ap.30.3.257">powerful social pressures</a> to look a certain way. The “<a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eat.20039">feminine ideal</a>” – a svelte female figure – has dominated film, television and magazine culture.</p> <p>The result is a narrow idea of what feminine beauty should look like and an associated crisis in <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1471-6402.2006.00292.x?casa_token=xI9aCl5G8K0AAAAA%3A-DFk1ElCpn9HEMrrkmsfRO2f5t_EZLfixIS5DOvv4YLu0IKd90pWiQU4tlcY8vVjvPVJ8Njwb7Mxcg">body satisfaction</a>.</p> <p>In recent years an “<a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1740144510000070">athletic ideal</a>” – characterised by muscle tone and power – has emerged as an alternative conception of beauty. Female bodies on the track are as appealing as those on the catwalk.</p> <p>This might be considered a good thing – a broader definition of beauty is more inclusive. More accepted body types, more body satisfaction, right?</p> <p>From the perspective of former athletes, it’s a little more complicated than that.</p> <p>Athletes are a useful population to explore in terms of the relationship between “athletic” and “feminine” ideals – they are exposed to both more than most women.</p> <p>A <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fspy0000111">recent study</a> of 218 former athletes showed they found body image a difficult terrain to navigate. Gymnasts and swimmers, retired for between two and six years, were asked to identify what body changes they noticed, how they felt about them and how they coped.</p> <p>Some former athletes embraced a new, less muscular body that emerged due to the retirement-induced reduction in training load.</p> <p>Chelsea, a 26-year-old retired swimmer, commented:</p> <p>Lost most of the heavier muscle I gained while training in college about six months after I stopped swimming. Due to the loss, I dropped about 15–20 pounds… I was surprised at how baggy my clothes felt and was pleasantly surprised that I could fit in smaller sizes. I didn’t feel as bulky or broad-shouldered.</p> <p>With bulk and brawn confined to her former life, Chelsea rejoices in her increased sense of femininity. This suggests traditional conventions of feminine beauty remain the preference even for former athletes who often take pride in their physical strength and muscularity.</p> <p>So, perhaps statements such as “<a href="http://www.womensfitness.com.au/editorial/strong-new-skinny/">strong is the new skinny</a>” are overplayed and the feminine ideal remains powerful and difficult to resist.</p> <p>Another finding was that the athletic ideal may be the alternative ideal, but it’s not necessarily a healthier ideal or one that will lead to a more positive body image.</p> <p>Retired swimmer Abbey, 26, illustrated this point when she stated:</p> <p>It took me a long time to realise that my body would never be what it was when I was an athlete… I still think back and use that image as a gauge to how I could look, but also know that my life does not revolve around working out 20-plus hours a week or needing to be in top shape to be successful. I still want to be as lean and as strong as I used to be.</p> <p>Although Abbey remains committed to an athletic ideal, she is unable to fulfil it now she is no longer an athlete. Accepting this is a difficult process and she still pines for her former body.</p> <p>An athletic ideal may not exclusively focus on thinness but it still demands stringent diets and training regimes and it has been linked to <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1471015315300386">disordered eating and exercise behaviours</a>.</p> <p>Ideals, by definition, aren’t healthy because they demand the unachievable: perfection.</p> <p>Some athletes were torn between the athletic ideal and the feminine ideal, identifying with both and attempting to walk a tightrope between a sporty look and a feminine one.</p> <p>For example, former swimmer Simone, 26, reflected:</p> <p>My weight is pretty much the same as when I was swimming, but I am significantly less muscular. I’m glad I am not as muscular as I was when I was swimming and that my shoulders shrunk to a size that would fit into clothes, but I would like to be a little more muscular/toned than I am now.</p> <p>And 25-year-old Carrie, a retired gymnast, echoed the “toned but not too toned” mantra:</p> <p>I am less muscular and my butt has gotten a little saggy. I feel OK because I am still thin and feel energetic, but I would like to be more toned but not as bulky (muscular) as I was when I was competing in my sport.</p> <p>Carrie and Simone desired athletic tone but not at the expense of conventional femininity. At the same time, they sought the thin ideal but not at the expense of an athletic look.</p> <p>The athletic and feminine ideal represent two contradictory masters; to serve one is to reject the other. Finding the middle ground necessary to appease both is an almost impossible task.</p> <p>It is naïve to view the athletic ideal as simply providing women with a different or new way to love their bodies; it might also provide a new way to hate them. The more ideals there are, the more ways there are to fall short.</p> <p>Strong isn’t the new skinny quite yet. And, if it were, it would be nothing to brag about.</p> <p><em>Written by Anthony Papathomas. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/strong-is-the-new-skinny-isnt-as-empowering-as-it-sounds-107703"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Aussie gem! Princess Mary’s week in pictures

<p>Mary, Crown Princess of Denmark was a sight to behold when she opened the Odense Flower Festival in Denmark on Thursday. </p> <p>The Aussie-born royal had a special flower named after as she greeted fans and for the “city’s most beautiful event.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1Mbr5Rl8_X/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1Mbr5Rl8_X/" target="_blank">A post shared by Fanpage of CPMary (@crownprincess_mary_ofdenmark)</a> on Aug 15, 2019 at 11:13am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The theme for this year’s festival was<span> </span><em>On a time travel: That brings a focus on time. </em></p> <p>First started in 1999, the Odense Flower Festival hosts a series of gorgeous flower creations for the Danish to indulge in. </p> <p>Princess Mary appeared in an flora-inspired frock, featuring wild flowers which was created by Rotate Birger Christensen. </p> <p>The pink hydrangea is known as the<span> </span><em>Princess of Passion<span> </span></em>and was named after the 47-year-old royal to mark the 20th anniversary of the event. </p> <p>The festival is Denmark's largest and attracts more than 230,000 visitors each year.</p> <p>Princess Mary has been patron of the Flower Festival since 2012, and jumped back into action for its anniversary after a memorable summer holiday with her husband, Frederik, Crown Prince of Denmark along with their four children, Prince Christian, 13, Princess Isabella, 12 and twins, Princess josephine and Prince Vincent, 8. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Mary’s action-packed summer.</p>

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