Beauty & Style

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Nail salon workers suffer chemical exposures that can be like working at a garage or a refinery

<p>Anyone who has walked past a nail salon is familiar with the noxious odors that emanate from acrylic nails, polishes and removers. Customers getting manicures and pedicures endure the smell temporarily, but manicurists who inhale these evaporating chemicals for hours expose themselves to health risks.</p> <p>The smells come from volatile organic compounds, or VOCs – compounds that <a href="https://toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/chemicals-and-contaminants/volatile-organic-compounds-vocs">easily become vapors or gases</a>. These substances have been <a href="https://www.epa.gov/indoor-air-quality-iaq/volatile-organic-compounds-impact-indoor-air-quality#Health_Effects">linked to health problems</a> ranging from headaches and respiratory irritation to reproductive complications and cancer. In a normal room-temperature environment, VOCs evaporate and humans breathe them in.</p> <p>Our research team, along with colleagues at Colorado State University, recently investigated <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.03.086">chemical exposures in six Colorado nail salons</a> and found that employees spent their days exposed to high levels of VOCs. Participating technicians, who had worked in salons for up to 19 years, reported suffering headaches and skin and eye irritation.</p> <p>We measured levels of benzene and formaldehyde in the salons, and determined that exposure to these known human carcinogens was increasing the workers’ lifetime cancer risks above one in one million – the level that <a href="https://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/iwachap10.pdf">many U.S. agencies consider acceptable</a> in regulating exposure to harmful substances.</p> <p>Nail salon workers in New York City rally for safer working conditions.</p> <p><strong>Identifying health hazards</strong></p> <p>A 2015 <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/nyregion/at-nail-salons-in-nyc-manicurists-are-underpaid-and-unprotected.html">New York Times exposé</a> highlighted underpayment and poor working conditions in New York nail salons. However, it failed to address chemical exposures that salon workers experience daily.</p> <p>Several research groups have sought to <a href="https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2010.300099">characterize</a> and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/09603123.2012.755152">quantify</a> VOC exposures <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-018-1353-0">in the nail salon environment</a>, using standard measurement techniques and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903-007-9084-4">self-reported health surveys</a>. Their research shows that nail salon workers are exposed to higher levels of VOCs than they would typically be expected to encounter in most homes, occupations or urban environments. As a result, these workers frequently experience work-related health symptoms.</p> <p>Our study measured 10 VOCs, including the carcinogens <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.03.086">benzene and formaldehyde</a>. We found that VOC levels in the six salons where we monitored regularly exceeded common threshold levels for <a href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iris_drafts/atoz.cfm?list_type=alpha">odor and inhalation risk</a>. In some cases this posed a significant risk of cancer over a 20-year exposure period.</p> <p>Twenty workers answered questionnaires about their personal health. Among them, 70% reported some form of short-term health symptom related to their employment, while 40% reported multiple related symptoms.</p> <p>We worked closely with salon owners to enlist volunteer nail technicians to participate. Having owners’ support was instrumental, since it allowed salon workers to accurately report on their health and working conditions without fear of reprisal.            </p> <p>Workers have participated in making groundbreaking policy change such as passing the SF <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HealthyNailSalon?src=hash">#HealthyNailSalon</a> Program Ordinance <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/EFCSRchat?src=hash">#EFCSRchat</a></p> <p><strong>Like working at an oil refinery</strong></p> <p>Many people view cosmetology as a relatively safe profession, but it isn’t. We found that exposures to aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes – collectively referred to as BTEX – resembled those previously reported in studies of <a href="https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Ambient-Air-Quality-Monitoring-in-Terms-of-Volatile-Singh-Ramteke/7089e7068ccb85bca9d05f36598e2b5fb92ae910">oil refinery workers</a> and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/10807031003670071">auto garage technicians</a>.</p> <p>Our results aren’t unique. A 2018 Iranian study found similar concentrations of benzene, ethylbenzene, and xylene in <a href="https://doi.org/10.1186/s12995-018-0213-x">Tehran beauty salons</a>. Another study conducted that year in Michigan found concentrations of toluene at <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-018-1353-0">over 100 parts per billion</a>, which is roughly 30 times higher than <a href="https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2016-09/documents/toluene.pdf">reported urban outdoor levels</a>.</p> <p>Regulation of this kind of workplace exposure has not kept pace with science. Many U.S. occupational safety and health exposure limits have not been updated <a href="https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2014/12/01/Can-OSHA-Update-the-PELs.aspx">for nearly 50 years</a>. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, readily acknowledges that many of its permissible exposure limits are “<a href="https://www.osha.gov/dsg/annotated-pels/">outdated and inadequate</a> for ensuring protection of worker health.”</p> <p>OSHA offers only guidance and recommendations for businesses, effectively shifting the burden of worker protection onto private industry. This is especially problematic in the nail salon industry, where over 90% of salons are small businesses that <a href="https://www.labor.ucla.edu/publication/nail-files/">employ fewer than 5 people</a> and do not have safety personnel on staff.</p> <p>Inadequate cosmetic product regulations and labeling requirements make it hard to know which products are actually safe. A 2012 study by the California Environmental Protection Agency found that 10 out of 12 nail products labeled “toluene free” still contained <a href="https://dtsc.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/31/2018/04/DTSC-Summary-of-Data-Findings-from-Testing-a-Limited-Number-of-Nail-Products-April-2012.pdf">up to 17% toluene</a>. Products labeled free of the so-called “toxic three” ingredients – dibutyl phthalate or DBP, toluene and formaldehyde – actually contained <a href="https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/nailsalons/chemicalhazards.html#resources">greater concentrations of DBP</a>, an endocrine-disrupting compound, than products that made no claims at all.</p> <p><strong>Solving the problem</strong></p> <p>Owners often work in nail salons, so they generally support efforts to improve air quality inside their businesses. Those who we interviewed typically had some understanding of the problem and wanted to fix it, but didn’t always know how.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-05/documents/nailsalonguide.pdf">U.S. Environmental Protection Agency</a>, the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/99-112/pdfs/99-112.pdf?id=10.26616/NIOSHPUB99112">National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health</a> and <a href="https://www.osha.gov/Publications/3542nail-salon-workers-guide.pdf">OSHA</a> all publish healthy nail salon guides. Yet owners in our study had never heard of them – perhaps because the guides are only published in English, while many nail salon workers are Asian and Latino immigrants with limited English language skills.</p> <p>Several grassroots community organizations have published guides to improving salons’ air quality in both <a href="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5783e9b9be6594e480435ffe/t/58f447f903596ebd7ca8f6f3/1492404219566/Nail-Salon-Booklet-FINAL-Vietnamese-March-26-2014-adjusted-for-color-copier-and-single-pages.pdf">Vietnamese</a> and <a href="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5783e9b9be6594e480435ffe/t/58f447e386e6c023e6aff51c/1492404197241/Chinese-FINAL-Version-2-2012.pdf">Chinese</a>. These references discuss ventilation and use of personal protective equipment, which are paramount for mitigating chemical exposures in the workplace.</p> <p>Small changes, such as running ventilation continuously, wearing <a href="http://safety-zone.com/products/nitrile-gloves/">nitrile gloves</a>and utilizing proper <a href="https://www.firstaidglobal.com/product-page/carbon-filter-masks-n95-with-exhalation-valve">charcoal face masks</a>, can significantly reduce worker exposure. Results from <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.106499">our most recent study</a> also suggest that placing large activated carbon sinks in salons could effectively remove VOCs from the air. We are currently experimenting with embedding these chemical-absorbing materials into <a href="https://cen.acs.org/environment/pollution/Environmental-engineer-Lupita-Montoya-scrutinizes/97/i32">pieces of art</a> that can hang on salon walls.</p> <p>Another priority is conveying information to larger audiences and advocating for more safety training in cosmetology certification programs. Education and training are particularly important for ethnic minority groups.</p> <p>Many workplace standards enforced by OSHA, such as those regulating exposure to toxic and hazardous substances, <a href="https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/nailsalons/standards.html">apply to nail salons</a>. However, cosmetic manufacturers are <a href="https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmetics-laws-regulations/fda-authority-over-cosmetics-how-cosmetics-are-not-fda-approved-are-fda-regulated#Who_is_responsible">not required</a> to obtain federal approval for products or ingredients before they go on the market, or to file product information with the agency.</p> <p>In contrast, California passed a bill in 2018 that will require manufacturers to <a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB2775">provide ingredient labels</a> on any professional cosmetic products manufactured after July 1, 2020 and sold in the state. The campaign for this common-sense reform was largely led by advocacy groups like the <a href="https://cahealthynailsalons.org/">California Healthy Nail Salon Collaborative</a>. Practical steps like this can improve conditions for workers who receive little attention but are exposed to serious health risks on the job every day.</p> <p><em>Written by Lupita D. Montoya and Aaron Lamplugh. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/nail-salon-workers-suffer-chemical-exposures-that-can-be-like-working-at-a-garage-or-a-refinery-118152"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Beauty & Style

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Slim and skinny: how access to TV is changing beauty ideals in rural Nicaragua

<p>Think about the last time you watched a film or picked up a magazine. Chances are the majority of models and actresses were young, beautiful and slim – or even underweight.</p> <p>Research shows that in films and TV programmes heavier characters are more likely to be lower status, the target of jokes and are less likely to be <a href="https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/276547">lead or romantic characters</a>. This sends a very clear message: that thinness is normal and desirable.</p> <p>For many young people, this emphasis on extreme thinness in women seems normal. But it’s actually relatively new and seems to have arisen in parallel with the growing cultural dominance of mass media – films, television and magazines. Models, for instance, became <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.2466/pr0.1980.47.2.483">thinner across the latter half of the 20th century</a>, and are now <a href="https://onlinedoctor.superdrug.com/evolution-miss-universe/">considerably slimmer</a> than depictions of female beauty in preceding eras. Just as in the past when the development of shape-altering garments <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0123284">changed ideas about body shape</a>, the mass media now seems to have changed ideas about body size.</p> <p>Current body ideals in Western Europe and North America are also significantly slimmer than in other cultural groups, such as <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1090513899000070">Tanzanian hunter-gatherers</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1090513806000584">black South Africans</a> or <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1740144507000769">rural Malaysians</a>. And it’s been argued this large gap between the ideal female figure and most women’s own bodies is a key factor in the endemic levels of body dissatisfaction and eating disorders in countries such as <a href="https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jscp.2009.28.1.9">the UK</a>.</p> <p>Body dissatisfaction and <a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/wk/yco/2016/00000029/00000006/art00006">rates of disordered eating are increasing globally</a>, and the <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11013-004-1067-5">spread of mass media may be one reason why</a>. But it’s a challenge to link increasing media access with changing body ideals – because as populations gain more access to media, they also change in other ways. They may become more urbanised, wealthier and have better access to nutrition – all of which can lead to <a href="http://www.mysmu.edu/faculty/normanli/Swamietal2010.pdf">differences in body ideals</a>.</p> <p><strong>The Nicaragua project</strong></p> <p>This is why we have spent three years running a <a href="http://www.dur.ac.uk/l.g.boothroyd/NEBP/">research project</a> in an area of rural Nicaragua – where access to mass media is often unrelated to urbanisation or nutrition.</p> <p>The government in Nicaragua has been increasing electrification of the rural Caribbean coast. This has led to a region where very similar neighbouring villages differ in whether or not the residents have access to mains electricity – and whether they can run televisions. There are no magazines in this region. And at the time of our research, very few residents had access to smart phones, making television viewing a good measure of total media access.</p> <p>We recruited 300 participants from seven villages around the region. Some villages had regular electricity supplies, others did not. Because the region is very ethnically diverse, we also balanced our sample across four main ethnic groups. Generally among our participants, those of Mestizo ethnicity – who have the highest levels of European heritage – tend to prefer slimmer figures than those of more indigenous or Afro-Caribbean heritage, such as the Miskitu, Garifuna and Creoles.</p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1037/pspi0000224">Our research found</a> that above and beyond ethnicity, those who watched more television preferred slimmer bodies. Specifically, our analysis suggested that people who watched approximately three hours of TV a week preferred a body one full point slimmer on the <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-weight/bmi-calculator/">Body Mass Index</a> than someone who didn’t watch TV. On a woman of average height, that’s about a difference of three kilos. We also found the more people watched TV, the slimmer their preferred female body size became. This was true for both men and women.</p> <p><strong>Changing ideals</strong></p> <p>Over the three years, we also collected data from a small village without electricity. For a short period of time, one house in this village had a small TV powered by a solar panel. Residents were also able to watch TV for short periods of time if they travelled to other communities. We found that over the three years, villagers tended to favour thinner figures when they had been able to watch more TV, suggesting that real-time change may be happening in these communities.</p> <p>When we showed residents of two villages without TV images of typical or plus size media models, their preferences shifted in the immediate aftermath of viewing these images towards thinner figures. Again this was true for both men and women.</p> <p>By studying one population in depth, and by also having previously ruled out evidence for <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08653-z">impacts of nutrition in this population</a>, we have been able to give the strongest evidence to date that visual media really does change people’s perception of the ideal female body.</p> <p>Our findings also support the argument that increasing global rates of body dissatisfaction and eating disorders are driven at least in part <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11013-004-1067-5">by the expansion of globalised mass media</a>.</p> <p>Of course, television is in many respects a valuable and important source of information. Our participants considered that besides entertainment, television gave them a vital link to the rest of Nicaragua, to political news, and lifesaving services such as storm warnings. But while it’s important that such benefits be maximised, threats to women’s body image must be minimised.</p> <p>Body positive education can help here, and this is something <a href="http://community.dur.ac.uk/l.g.boothroyd/NEBP/wellcome_body.html">we are working on with local groups</a>. But ultimately, media producers and commissioners must do a better job of diversifying their content to reflect a range of sizes and body types.</p> <p><em>Written by Lynda Boothroyd. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/slim-and-skinny-how-access-to-tv-is-changing-beauty-ideals-in-rural-nicaragua-128717">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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What exactly does our skin do?

<p>Our skin is a big deal – literally. It’s the largest organ in the body and one of the most complicated. It has many roles in the maintenance of life and health, but also has many potential problems, with more than <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28259441">3,000 possible skin disorders</a>.</p> <p>Not only does the skin hold everything in, it also plays a crucial role in providing an airtight, watertight and flexible barrier between the outside world and the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843412/">highly regulated systems within the body</a>. It also helps with temperature regulation, immune defence, vitamin production, and sensation.</p> <p>The skin is unique in many ways, but no other organ demands so much attention and concern in both states of disease and health. There is a huge focus on skin health, with fierce competition to have glowing, clearer, healthier, younger and fresher skin. And this focus can cause secondary problems with self-esteem and mental health.</p> <p>So, what exactly is our skin meant to do and how does it impact our life?</p> <p><strong>The structure of the skin</strong></p> <p>The skin is divided into three layers known as the epidermis, dermis and subcutis. These layers are well defined but together they allow the skin to function effectively.</p> <p>The epidermis is the outermost, cellular layer of the skin which varies in thickness depending on the body site. On average it’s <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10354068">less than half a millimetre thick</a>. The epidermis resembles a “brick wall” of cells known as keratinocytes, which are bound tightly together and act to prevent free movement of moisture, pathogens and chemicals into or out of the body.</p> <p>Keratinocytes replicate from the basal layer and work their way up to the outer surface (known as the stratum corneum) over a period of about 28 days. Once they reach the surface the tight bonds between them break apart and they are shed.</p> <p>Other than keratinocytes, pigment-producing cells known as melanocytes and immune cells known as Langerhans cells also exist within the epidermis. Melanocytes inhabit the basement membrane, at the base of the epidermis and produce a pigment known as melanin both innately (giving the skin its natural colour), and in response to ultraviolet light (UV) exposure (giving the skin a sun tan).</p> <p>The melanin is a brown pigment that is taken up into the overlying keratinocytes. This pigment will then absorb UV light (from the sun) when it hits the skin, thereby protecting the basal calls underneath from UV damage.</p> <p>The epidermal cells also develop hair follicles, sweat glands and sebaceous (oil) glands which extend down into the layer below known as the dermis. The small ducts from each of these glands open onto the skin surface. Sweat and sebum (oil) provide an antibacterial and protective barrier on the skin.</p> <p>The dermis lies beneath the epidermis and is <a href="https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1294744-overview">20-30 times thicker</a>. It’s made up of a dense layer of fibrous (collagen) and elastic (elastin) tissue. The dermis gives the skin its integrity, strength and elasticity; and houses blood vessels, glands and hair follicles, as well as nerves and their receptors.</p> <p>Beneath the dermis lies the subcutis (also known as the hypodermis), a specialised layer of adipose (fat) and fibrous tissue. The thickness of this layer varies dramatically depending on the site and a person’s body shape and weight. It cushions the body from external trauma, insulates from the cold and stores energy (fat).</p> <p><strong>The function of the skin</strong></p> <p>The extraordinary array of functions performed by healthy skin is still coming to light. The basic day-to-day functions include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005273606002410">Working as a barrier</a> – protecting against water loss as well as physical and chemical injury, and bugs</li> <li>Helping us fight off bugs, allergens, toxins and carcinogens via the parts of our immune system that exist in our skin</li> <li><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24692134">Regulating our temperature</a> by dilating and constricting our blood vessels near the skin surface, controlling the transfer of heat out of the body. Temperature is also regulated by evaporative cooling due to sweat production and by the insulating effect of erect hairs on the skin surface. Heat loss is also affected by the insulating layer of subcutaneous fat</li> <li>Protecting us from UV radiation by <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22404235">producing melanin</a></li> <li>Giving us the sense of touch _ providing interaction with physical surroundings, allowing all fine and gross motor activities and allowing pleasurable and sexual stimulation</li> <li>The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK278935/">production of Vitamin D</a>, which helps <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356951/">prevent many diseases</a> including osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, obesity and neurological diseases</li> <li>Wound healing</li> <li>Beauty and physical attraction – the quality and condition of the skin greatly contributes to the perception of health, wellness, youth and beauty.</li> </ul> <p><strong>What is normal skin and how can you optimise it?</strong></p> <p>Normal healthy skin has many important roles and thus should be treated with care and respect. Many people only start focusing on the skin once there is an abnormality or at least a perceived problem.</p> <p>Common concerns include dryness, sensitivity, oiliness, congestion, wrinkles, sun damage and signs of ageing. Although these states are all within the spectrum of normal functional skin, they may be considered problematic if severe or undesirable.</p> <p>Normal, healthy skin that is not exposed to excessive physical or environmental insults may not require any specific care or protection, but for those who want to optimise or improve their skin, some basic steps can make a big difference.</p> <p>The key to skin care is consistency and routine, and it can take time to appreciate the changes. A basic regime of daily protection from excessive UV radiation, protection from excessive irritation and drying (by avoiding drying soaps, excess water or irritating chemicals) and aiding of the skin’s barrier properties (using a moisturising protective layer) will result in noticeable improvement in almost all skin.</p> <p>Switching and changing products and routines is usually counterproductive and will prevent you from seeing expected improvement in time. It’s worth looking after your skin, as you’ll wear it every day for the rest of your life.</p> <p><em>Written by Cara McDonald. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-skin-is-a-very-important-and-our-largest-organ-what-does-it-do-91515">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Rhonda Burchmore reveals Richard Wilkins’ interest in Hollywood actress

<p>Richard “Dickie” Wilkins was reportedly “sniffing around” for the affections of a big Hollywood star while she was filming a movie in Australia, it has been revealed on<span> </span><em>I’m A Celebrity</em>.</p> <p>Aussie entertainer Rhonda Burchmore told campmates that she became good friends with model Brooke Shield’s during her time in Sydney for a filming of a movie.</p> <p>While Burchmore didn’t reveal the title on the movie, Shields work on the 1994 film<span> </span><em>The Seventh Floor</em><span> </span>in the bustling city.</p> <p>“When I was doing a show called<span> </span><em>Hot Shoe Shuffle</em><span> </span>in Sydney I got a knock on my stage door saying ‘Brooke Shields is at the door’,” said Burchmore.</p> <p>“She came back to find out where I got my jeans from and (asked) would I go shopping with her, because we’re the same height.</p> <p>“So Brooke and I, we became really close when she was in Australia.”</p> <p>The 59-year-old then revealed that the two spent time together on a daily basis, and one night, Shields received a call from the late Michael Jackson.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B631DlFDw2O/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B631DlFDw2O/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by ✨ᴍɪᴄʜᴀᴇʟ ᴊᴀᴄᴋsᴏɴ✨ (@thrillerwall)</a> on Jan 3, 2020 at 1:18pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“We were out one night and she got a phone call and she went ‘oh no’, and her face … it was Michael Jackson,” said Burchmore.</p> <p>“Because Michael tried to date her, and he wanted to marry her. Michael wanted an arranged marriage.”</p> <p>TV host Tom Williams then chimed in, saying that Australian men “must have been going crazy for her”.</p> <p>Burchmore then dropped Dickie’s name.</p> <p>“Well Richard Wilkins … he was, as soon as he knew that I was (close) with Brooke he was sniffing around”.</p> <p>At the time, gossip columnists reported that the pair went on a few dates, before Shields began dating US tennis star Andre Agassi.</p>

Beauty & Style

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How to donate to Australian bushfire relief: give money, watch for scams and think long term

<p>The devastation of the Australian bushfires has generated an <a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/bushfire-relief-how-you-can-help-those-in-need/news-story/a0476ac3538b8c373f281ea6be204421">outpouring of generosity</a> amongst Australians.</p> <p>We have been giving directly to charities such as the Red Cross, the Salvation Army and others working on the ground to support survivors. Many of us have contributed to appeals such as <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/aussies-rally-around-celeste-barbers-staggering-fire-fundraiser/news-story/b7481dce04dade93f3719bc0acac9e59">Celeste Barber’s</a>, which, at the time of writing, has raised A$42 million for the NSW Rural Fire Service.</p> <p>Wealthy Australians, like the <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/packers-crown-donate-extra-4-million-for-bushfire-relief-efforts-20200106-p53pcm.html">Packer</a>, <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/billionaire-philanthropists-donate-1m-to-bushfire-emergency-response-20191227-p53n4b.html">Gandel</a> and <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/heartbreaking-kylie-minogue-s-family-donates-500-000-to-bushfire-appeal-20200107-p53pdc.html">Minogue</a> families, have also made large commitments, as have many businesses.</p> <p>The fact that so many of us have been reaching into our pockets during this difficult time is not surprising. Australia is the fourth most generous nation in the world, according to the most recent edition of the <a href="https://www.cafonline.org/about-us/publications/2019-publications/caf-world-giving-index-10th-edition">World Giving Index</a> and emergency relief is a <a href="https://www.communitybusinesspartnership.gov.au/about/research-projects/giving-australia-2016/">common cause</a> to which we give.</p> <p>But it’s worth thinking carefully about how to give, to ensure you’re not wasting your contribution or inadvertently making things worse.</p> <p><strong>Watch out for scammers</strong></p> <p>One thing to be mindful of during times like these, is that unfortunately some people may seek to prey on the generosity of others. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has <a href="https://www.accc.gov.au/update/bushfires-and-scams">issued a warning </a>about fundraising scams associated with the bushfires.</p> <p>If you aren’t sure about an organisation that you’ve been approached by, you can always check whether they’re a registered charity using the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission’s online <a href="https://www.acnc.gov.au/charity">register</a>.</p> <p>It lists all charities registered in Australia, and details their operations, finance and governance.</p> <p><strong>Money usually trumps everything else</strong></p> <p>Generally, it’s best to give money. The organisations you give it to can then decide how to use it best.</p> <p>We may be tempted to give goods like blankets or clothes, but organisations often get overwhelmed by donations of goods.</p> <p>The idea of donating while also clearing out unused items at home may seem tempting but many organisations don’t have the resources to sort through donations. Often, the goods donated just aren’t fit for use.</p> <p>I know it’s tough to watch this all unfold &amp; feel helpless. I know a lot of people want to get stuck in &amp; lend a hand. But it's important to remember that the emergency relief effort is being run by experienced organisations – &amp; they don't have space to sort or store donations.</p> <p><a href="https://dhs.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/1893/management-of-donated-goods.pdf">Research</a> by the federal and South Australian governments examined this problem, saying of the 2009 Victorian bushfires:</p> <p>The report highlighted how this is a consistent problem during disasters, leading to the development of the <a href="https://dhs.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/1894/national-guidelines-for-managing-donated-goods.pdf">National Guidelines for Managing Donated Goods</a>. These guidelines reinforce the point that donating money is the preferred way to help out during a disaster.</p> <p>If specific requests are made for <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/radio/northcoast/programs/breakfast/koalas-need-you-to-help-make-them-mittens-and-give-them-blankets/11714410">certain goods</a>, however, then you can respond by donating accordingly. The charity <a href="http://www.givit.org.au/disasters">Givit</a> acts as a broker that facilitates the donations of goods that meet the needs of charities and those they are seeking to help.</p> <p>Always make sure that what you donate is of reasonable quality. It’s important not to use donation appeals an excuse to clean out items that probably should go in the rubbish or recycling bin.</p> <p><strong>Donations after the bushfires are also important</strong></p> <p>We’re facing a long and hot summer, with the prospect of ongoing bushfires. At some stage, they will subside and with them the appeals for donations will also end.</p> <p>But it’s important to remember that even once the immediate crisis has passed, rebuilding after a disaster takes a long time and requires considerable resources.</p> <p>Governments play an important part but there is also a role for philanthropy both large and small. For example, the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal has a <a href="https://www.frrr.org.au/cb_pages/supporting_bushfire-affected_communities.php">Disaster Resilience and Recovery Fund</a> which makes grants to local not-for-profit groups for community-led projects that address the most pressing needs that emerge 12-18 months after a disaster.</p> <p><strong>The bigger picture</strong></p> <p>Supporting the immediate response and rebuilding efforts is vital, but it’s also important to consider how as a nation we collectively address the factors which are increasing bushfire risk.</p> <p>Climate change is <a href="https://theconversation.com/climate-change-is-bringing-a-new-world-of-bushfires-123261">increasing the risk</a> that we will see more frequent and intense bushfires.</p> <p>Charities provide vital support to those in need during times of crisis. But they also have an <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1037969X1504000312">important advocacy role</a> putting pressure on governments and businesses to change policies and practices.</p> <p>There are many environmental charities doing exactly this, to push Australia toward a more comprehensive response to climate change.</p> <p>So it’s also worth thinking about how your donation can help support the policy change needed to address climate change and to mitigate the risks associated with it – including more bushfires.</p> <p><em>Written by Krystian Seibert. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-donate-to-australian-bushfire-relief-give-money-watch-for-scams-and-think-long-term-129445">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Harry and Meg are back! Royal couple open up about holiday abroad

<p><span>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were welcomed back to work with open arms and cheers as they returned from their extended holiday in Vancouver, Canada</span><br /><br /><span>The couple hit the ground running with a day of public and private engagements, including a trip to Canada House as a way to thank Canadians for their “hospitality and support” that the family received while visiting Vancouver Island.</span><br /><br /><span>Before arriving at Canada House though, both Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan made a private visit to see the Hubb Community Kitchen in west London as the Duchess wanted to check in with the women there.</span><br /><br /><span>The royals first formed a formidable bond with them when she first visited the kitchen, which was set up in the aftermath of the devastating Grenfell Tower fire, secretly before her wedding to Prince Harry.</span><br /><br /><span>A crowd had gathered by 3 p.m. at Trafalgar Square to welcome the royal couple.</span><br /><br /><span>Staff from the High Commission were also outside the building.</span><br /><br /><span>Duchess Meghan went on to describe her holiday in Vancouver with Prince Harry and baby Archie as “beautiful.”</span><br /><br /><span>Consular assistant Sumira Osmin, from Ontario, said about Harry and Meghan: “They are just beautiful, and just their aura, and they’re always so positive...They’re very caring.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex saw a special exhibition in the Canada Gallery by female Indigenous Canadian artist Skawennatti.</span><br /><br /><span>The Canadian High Commissioner to the U.K., Janice Charette, told T&amp;C it was “an exhibit which spans both the history and tradition as well as the future which is a very unique approach and very creative.”</span><br /><br /><span>The High Commissioner said the royal couple’s visit was a “chance to catch up, hear a bit about their visit to Canada and their holidays in Canada, and their impressions.”</span><br /><br /><span>She added that she discussed with them “what they see in terms of their priorities for the next year”.</span><br /><br /><span>“There’s a lot of areas where they have interests which are also priorities for Canada.”</span><br /><br /><span>Charette said she thought there “will be some opportunities for us to think about Canada House and the Sussexes doing some interesting work together,” and mentioned topics including gender equality and gender empowerment, homelessness, mental health and youth engagement,</span><br /><br /><span>She also mentioned the couple’s down time over their break.</span><br /><br /><span>“The fact that they were able to go to Canada to enjoy the holiday season with friends and family and basically to have privacy and be undisturbed and to be able to enjoy peace and tranquility and the beautiful country, I couldn’t be happier,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>The Sussexes are expected to make further announcements about upcoming engagements shortly.</span><br /><br /><span>This year the royal couple will be focusing on their foundation Sussex.</span></p> <p><span>Scroll through the gallery to see the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on their first day back at work. </span></p>

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4½ myths about sunscreen and why they’re wrong

<p>Many Australians are <a href="https://www.cancer.org.au/news/media-releases/almost-half-of-australians-confused-about-sunscreen.html">reluctant to use sunscreen</a>, even though it’s an important element in preventing the skin cancers that affect about <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.5694/j.1326-5377.2006.tb00086.x">two in three of us</a> at some time in our lives.</p> <p>The Cancer Council <a href="https://www.cancer.org.au/news/media-releases/almost-half-of-australians-confused-about-sunscreen.html">says</a> myths about sunscreens contribute to this reluctance.</p> <p>Here are 4½ sunscreen myths and what the evidence really says. Confused about the ½? Well, it’s a myth most of the time, but sometimes it’s true.</p> <p><strong>Myth #1. It’s bad for my bones</strong></p> <p>Many Australians are concerned using sunscreen might lead to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17641980">vitamin D deficiency</a>. The idea is that sunscreen would block the UV light the skin needs to make vitamin D, critical for bone health.</p> <p>However, you need <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190962205045962?via%3Dihub">far less UV than you think</a> to make the vitamin D you need: only one-third of the UV that causes a sunburn, and less than you need to tan.</p> <p>Tests on humans going about their daily business generally show <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30945275">no vitamin D differences</a> between people who use sunscreen and those who don’t.</p> <p><strong>Myth #2. Its ingredients are toxic</strong></p> <p>If you google “toxic sunscreen”, you get more than <a href="https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&amp;q=toxic+sunscreen">eight million results</a>. So people are clearly worried if it’s safe.</p> <p>However, there’s little evidence of harm compared to the large benefits of sunscreens, which are <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/sunscreens">highly regulated in Australia</a>.</p> <p>There <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15191542?dopt=Abstract">is evidence</a> large amounts of some sunscreen components can act as <a href="https://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/endocrine/index.cfm">hormone disruptors</a>. But the amounts needed far outstrip the amount sunscreen users are actually exposed to.</p> <p>Some people have also been alarmed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) <a href="https://www.fda.gov/drugs/news-events-human-drugs/spotlight-cder-science-new-fda-study-shines-light-sunscreen-absorption">announcing further testing</a> of the sunscreen ingredients avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule. This was after a <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2733085">study</a> showed their concentrations could reach over 0.5 nanograms/mL in the blood.</p> <p>This experiment involved people thickly applying sunscreen to parts of the body not covered by a swimsuit, four times a day for four days in a row. In other words, this is the maximum amount you might apply on a beach holiday, and considerably more than you would wear on a day-to-day basis (unless you work in your budgie smugglers).</p> <p>However, there’s no evidence these concentrations are harmful and the further testing is just a precaution.</p> <p>The FDA recommends people <a href="https://www.fda.gov/drugs/news-events-human-drugs/spotlight-cder-science-new-fda-study-shines-light-sunscreen-absorption">continue using sunscreen</a>. If you still feel uneasy, you can stick to zinc oxide and titanium dioxide sunscreens, which the FDA says are “<a href="https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/02/26/2019-03019/sunscreen-drug-products-for-over-the-counter-human-use">generally recognised as safe and effective</a>”.</p> <p><strong>How about nanoparticles?</strong></p> <p>That leads us to another common concern: nano-sized zinc oxide or titanium dioxide in sunscreens. <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/community-qa/sunscreens-information-consumers">Nanoparticle forms</a> of these UV filters are designed to make them invisible on the skin while still keeping UV rays out.</p> <p><a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/literature-review-safety-titanium-dioxide-and-zinc-oxide-nanoparticles-sunscreens">Human studies</a> show they either do not penetrate or minimally penetrate the stratum corneum. This is the upper-most layer of the skin, where the cells are already dead and tightly packed together to protect the living cells below. This suggests absorption and movement through the body, hence toxicity, is highly unlikely.</p> <p><strong>Myth #3. It’s pointless. I already have skin cancer in my family</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3835091/">Genetics and family history</a> do play a role in many melanomas in Australia. For instance, mutations in genes such as CDKN2A substantially increase a person’s <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368081/">melanoma risk</a>.</p> <p>However, sun exposure increases melanoma risk on top of any existing genetic risk. So whatever your baseline risk, everyone can take steps to lower the additional risks that come with sun exposure.</p> <p><strong>Myth #4. I’m already middle-aged. It’s too late</strong></p> <p>It’s true that sunburns in childhood seem to have a disproportionate effect on the risk of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11227927">melanomas</a> and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11684447">basal cell carcinomas</a>. But <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjd.15324">squamous cell carcinomas</a> are more affected by sun exposure over the years.</p> <p>Ongoing sunscreen use also reduces the number new actinic keratoses, a pre-cancerous skin lesion, and reduces the number of existing keratoses <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJM199310143291602?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dwww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov">in Australians over 40 years old</a>.</p> <p>Regular sunscreen use also puts the brakes on <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190962216308805?via%3Dihub">skin ageing</a>, helping to reduce skin thinness, easy bruising and poor healing that older skin can be prone to. And of course, getting burnt feels terrible at any age.</p> <p><strong>Myth #4½. I’m allergic to sunscreen</strong></p> <p>This one’s only half a myth. Many people <a href="https://journals.lww.com/dermatitis/fulltext/2010/07000/True_Photoallergy_to_Sunscreens_Is_Rare_Despite.1.aspx#R4-1">say they have</a> an allergic reaction to sunscreen but only about <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673698121682?via%3Dihub">3%</a> really do.</p> <p>Often, people are just sunburned. They <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hpja.301">thought they were well-protected</a> but simply stayed out in the sun too long, or didn’t reapply sunscreen often enough.</p> <p>Your sunscreen might also be <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/book/export/html/5307">out of date</a>. Sunscreen eventually breaks down and loses its effectiveness, faster if you store it somewhere very hot, like a car.</p> <p>Alternatively, you may have <a href="https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/polymorphic-light-eruption/">polymorphic light eruption</a>, a condition where UV light alters a skin compound, resulting in a rash. This can be itchy or burning, small pink or red bumps, flat, dry red patches, blisters, or even itchy patches with no visible signs.</p> <p>Fortunately, this condition often occurs only on the first exposure during spring or early summer. Keep out of the sun for a few days and the rash should settle by itself.</p> <p>If none of those causes fit the bill, you may indeed have <a href="https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/sunscreen-allergy/">an allergy</a> to some component of your sunscreen (<a href="https://www.dermnetnz.org/topics/allergic-contact-dermatitis/">allergic contact dermatitis</a>), which a dermatologist can confirm.</p> <p><em>Written by Katie Lee and Monika Janda. Republished with permission of <a href="/Many%20Australians%20are%20reluctant%20to%20use%20sunscreen,%20even%20though%20it’s%20an%20important%20element%20in%20preventing%20the%20skin%20cancers%20that%20affect%20about%20two%20in%20three%20of%20us%20at%20some%20time%20in%20our%20lives.">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Stunning at 65! Christie Brinkley kicks off 2020 in incredible red bikini style

<p>Christie Brinkley spent New Year’s Eve in Turks and Caicos with friends and family, kicking off 2020 with a bang.</p> <p>The 65-year-old model and actress flaunted her incredible figure in a red bikini and a sarong, pairing with a cute, raffia bucket hat as she sailed through the “beautiful islands” surrounding Parrot Cay where she attended American fashion designer Donna Karan’s annual New Year’s Eve dinner.</p> <p>She even revealed how she was kickstarting her resolution “to go to places we’ve never been in 2020.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B63YoDanZPz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B63YoDanZPz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I think one of the best ways to start off the new year ( besides a good snorkel adventure ) is with some self care – one of my favorite ways to treat myself and those I love is with an Ultherapy® consultation! I recommend Ultherapy to all my girlfriends and encourage them to go in for consultations. I know firsthand how well it works to boost collagen and elastin for natural-looking results. What better way to jump start your post-holiday energy and start feeling like a new you than with some Ultherapy®?! 💫 #ChristieLovesUltherapy</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/christiebrinkley/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Christie Brinkley</a> (@christiebrinkley) on Jan 3, 2020 at 9:10am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“On the first day of the year we ventured a little further and we found three beautiful islands just around the bend!” she captioned an Instagram post. “May your new year be full of happy beautiful adventures near far and even within your heart and soul!”</p> <p>And despite sailing with her 24-year-old son, commenters couldn’t believe how youthful she looked.</p> <p>“Not the first time I thought you were a teenager,” wrote one person.</p> <p>Another said: “Forever young. Living your best life.”</p> <p>The blonde bombshell shared a number of photos from Donna Karan’s new year bash, as she’s dressed in a long-sleeved white maxi-dress.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6yBL4inFYG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6yBL4inFYG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I can really get down! Getting back up tho 😂 show us how it’s done @thethirdearl 😘❤️🌴🌊🎄⭐️👑🎩🔥💥🌺🍾🥂💃🏼💃🏼🌴</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/christiebrinkley/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Christie Brinkley</a> (@christiebrinkley) on Jan 1, 2020 at 7:32am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Many people called the mother-of-three an “inspiration” and provided well wishes for the new year, which Brinkley rang in while “dancing on tabletops,” according to an earlier post.</p> <p>“I can really get down,” she captioned the video of herself and her 21-year-old daughter, Sailor Brinkley-Cook, dancing the night away.</p> <p>“Stay young as long as you can,” said one user. While another wrote, “I really want to know what your secret it you look amazing.”</p>

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Princess Mary's royal finery at lavish New Year ball

<p>Princess Mary and her husband Crown Prince Frederik have rung in the new year with a lavish ball in Copenhagen.</p> <p>Other Danish royals were in attendance, but the guests of honour were Princess Mary, Crown Prince Frederik, Prince Joachim and his wife Princess Marie.</p> <p>This event is marked on the Danish royal’s calendar, as they wear their finest gowns and jewels for the occasion.</p> <p>Princess Mary’s stunning look for the night was quickly revealed as she stepped out of the car, and it’s one that fans have seen many times before.</p> <p>She wore a claret-coloured velvet gown by Birgit Hallstein, one of her favourite designers. Princess Mary first wore the dress in 2007 and has worn the same gown to previous New Year’s Eve dinners. However, she has changed her look slightly.</p> <p>It was seen on Princess Mary in 2012 and 2014, with the 2014 version having a choker added in the same fabric.</p> <p>The dress was also worn for a set of official portraits in 2015.</p> <p>The stunning jewels have also remained the same, as Crown Princess Mary wears the Danish ruby parure. These jewels have been in the royal family since 1869, but date back to the coronation of Napoleon Bonaparte in France.</p> <p>The jewels are solely used by Princess Mary and include a tiara, earrings, bracelet, hair clips, brooches and a necklace.</p> <p>The length of the earrings and necklace can be adjusted with ease.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Princess Mary wearing the dress over the years.</p>

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Kate Middleton reveals fashion regret on Christmas Day

<p>Every year, the British Royal Family gather at Queen Elizabeth II’s Sandringham Estate in Norfolk for Christmas. They also make a public appearance at St Mary Magdalene Church on Christmas morning.</p> <p>The royal family are expected to wear their Sunday best to the service.</p> <p>However, it appears that not even the royal family are immune to regretting their fashion choices as Duchess Kate confirmed that she wasn’t a fan of this year’s outfit.</p> <p>She wore a long grey Catherine Walker coat with a faux fur collar and cuffs. The outfit was accessorised with a green suede hat, shoes and clutch.</p> <p>The green was chosen specifically to match with her daughter, Princess Charlotte as she made her Christmas Day debut.</p> <p>Fans were on board with the coordinated outfits, but Duchess Kate later admitted to a well-wisher that she wasn’t a fan of the outfit.</p> <p>"Kate was talking to my daughter about clothes and how she was feeling too hot, she said 'I really shouldn't have worn this'," Karen Anvil, who greeted the royal outside the church, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://metro.co.uk/2019/12/26/princess-charlottes-cute-reaction-given-doll-nurse-took-fab-four-photo-11962693/" target="_blank" title="Metro."><em>Metro.</em></a></p> <p>"I'm there talking to Charlotte about dolls and my daughter's talking about fashion with Kate," Karen joked.</p> <p>"It wasn't fake, it was a genuine discussion, it was about a minute, but it was tailored to my daughter, it was like speaking to a friend. They are totally different with the public."</p> <p>Princess Charlotte stole fan’s hearts as she grinned and gave hugs to those who were waiting to meet her. The youngster took her first public engagements in stride.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the Cambridge family on Christmas Day.</p>

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Duchesses Meghan and Kate under pressure to “save the Royal Family”

<p>The pressure is mounting on Duchess Kate and Duchess Meghan to “save the Royal Family” according to royal commentator Katie Nicholl.</p> <p>With Her Majesty turning 95 in 18 months – the same age at which her husband Prince Philip stepped back from his public duties – there are rumours circulating that she may use the milestone to hand over her day-to-day control of the monarchy to Charles.</p> <p>Katie has suggested the Queen’s move towards retirement will “force” the Duchess of Sussex, 38, and the Duchess of Cambridge, 37, to work closely with each other.</p> <p>“I think after a festive break, both Kate and Meghan will know that joint ventures to support the Queen are not only part of their duty, but also good for the public image,” said Katie, speaking to<span> </span><em>Closer</em><span> </span>magazine.</p> <p>“[Kate] knows the pressure is on her and Meghan to save the royal family, to an extent.”</p> <p>With Prince Andrew being forced to step down from his royal duties, the commentator believed that his charities may be passed on to other members of the family, which could result in the Cambridge’s and Sussex’s to put on a “united front.”</p> <p>“The Queen turns 94 this year and there’s a plan in place to relieve her of her pressures, which is why she’s calling on the four to step up,” explained Katie.</p> <p>“Although the Cambridges and Sussexes have their own charities, I think the Queen’s move towards retirement will force them to work closely with each other.”</p>

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Gracious in defeat: Miss Nigeria’s priceless reaction to losing Miss World

<p>Miss Nigeria may not have won the Miss World 2019 competition, but she did win over the hearts of everyone watching around the world, thanks to the way she handled her defeat.</p> <p>Miss Nigeria, whose name is Nyekachi Douglas, made it to the top three in the global competition alongside Miss Jamaica, known as Toni-Ann Singh, and Miss Brazil, whose name is Elis Coelho.</p> <p>The three women held each other as a show of support, and when Singh was declared the winner, Douglas immediately expressed joy for her friend as she marched around with excitement and a jaw-dropping expression.</p> <p>Douglas spun around, and shouted “Yeah, girl!” at Singh. The three women then embraced as Singh appeared to be in a state of shock.</p> <p>Those watching at home were humbled by what they witnessed, and took to Twitter to commend Miss Nigeria.</p> <p>“Miss Nigeria’s reaction to Miss Jamaica winning #MissWorld2019 is the only energy I’m accepting around me!” wrote one user.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Absolutely amazing in all my years of watching never seen another queen this excited about someone else's win. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MissNigeria?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#MissNigeria</a> you are simply the best. <a href="https://t.co/KwqstlFCGf">https://t.co/KwqstlFCGf</a></p> — Tє̲̣̣̣̥mptє̲̣̣̣̥d (@millibrown1) <a href="https://twitter.com/millibrown1/status/1206256623871840262?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">15 December 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">May Your friends be excited about your success just like Miss Nigeria 😍 <a href="https://t.co/RQ8LXjBn12">pic.twitter.com/RQ8LXjBn12</a></p> — Herbert Daniel Gomagallah (@HerbertGDaniel) <a href="https://twitter.com/HerbertGDaniel/status/1205987363974983683?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">14 December 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“Miss Nigeria Universe and Miss Nigeria World are EXACTLY the friends every woman needs in their corner,” tweeted another.</p> <p>Others called Douglas an “angel” for her “genuine” selfless act.</p>

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Throwback! Duchess Meghan’s high school photo reveals how little royal has aged

<p>A photo of Duchess Meghan before she entered the royal family has been making the rounds on social media.</p> <p>The snap shows 16-year-old Meghan posing with her then-boyfriend Luis Segura for what appears to be a school dance at Immaculate Heart High School.</p> <p>For the 1997 dance, she opted for a black halter neck dress, choker, and elegant up-do.</p> <p>The photograph seems to have been taken around the holiday period as the couple are standing in front of a Christmas tree.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B551DffB3d2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B551DffB3d2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">16 year old Meghan Markle posing with her first boyfriend Luis Segura at a high school Christmas dance in 1997 🎄🎁❄️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/velvetcoke/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Velvey 👼🏻</a> (@velvetcoke) on Dec 10, 2019 at 11:26am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The caption reads: “16 year old Meghan Markle [poses] with her first boyfriend Luis Segura at a high school Christmas dance in 1997”.</p> <p>The post has garnered over 63,000 likes – and many users are taken aback at how little the Duchess appears to have aged.</p> <p>One person wrote: “She still looks the same, good genes.”</p> <p>Another commented: “She hasn’t changed.”</p> <p>A third wrote: “Princess Meghan was a gorgeous teenager.”</p> <p>And a fourth said: “You could have told me that was taken last year and I’d wholeheartedly believe you.”</p>

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Duchess Meghan’s friend warned to take down all “damaging photos” of royal

<p>Duchess Meghan’s friend that she’d made before she hit international fame and married into the royal family, has been ordered by Buckingham Palace to delete any photos of the Duchess that she is using to promote her business.</p> <p>California-based jewellery designer Jennifer Meyer, 42, has reportedly breached a nondisclosure agreement by posting pictures of the Duchess of Sussex wearing her jewellery, as reporting by<span> </span>The Mirror.</p> <p>The two allegedly became good friends while Duchess Meghan was still starring in American legal drama<span> </span>Suits, and has reportedly boasted that she “can’t get enough” of her royal friend wearing her necklaces, rings and earrings.</p> <p>An insider source told the Mirror: “Jennifer Meyer has been told to remove the images and in no uncertain terms how damaging this could be for Meghan and the royal family.”</p> <p>The official Instagram account for Jennifer Meyer Jewellery usually shares images of the Duchess wearing her designs immediately after she has been photographed in them and links to where customers could shop the pieces online.</p> <p>Up until Tuesday, the designer had a designated section of her website where shoppers could browse for the pieces the royal had worn – however this has now been completely wiped from the site.</p> <p>The Duchess of Sussex has worn a number of her designer-friend’s pieces, including in a highly publicised introduction of her and Prince Harry’s son to the world.</p> <p>The tiny tot met with Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa.</p> <p>The royal was also spotted wearing as piece by Ms Meyer when she cheered on Serena Williams at the US Open.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see some of the images that Jennifer Meyer may have posted of the Duchess of Sussex on her site.<span> </span></p> <p> </p>

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Queen Elizabeth’s first televised Christmas greeting

<p>For many of us, the Queen’s televised message has been part and parcel of our Christmas tradition.</p> <p>When she ascended the throne 1952, Her Majesty took on the monarch tradition of delivering a Christmas speech to the public through the radio, following in the footsteps of her grandfather King George V and her father King George VI.</p> <p>Five years later, the Queen made her television debut after she accepted the BBC’s request to read her Christmas message live from the Sandringham Estate. Since then, the monarch has continued to appear on television screens across the UK and the Commonwealth nations every year to send her wishes. The only exception was <a href="https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/tradition/a12474983/queens-first-christmas-message-broadcast-televised/">1969</a>, when the Queen opted to write her message instead of broadcasting it.</p> <p>This week, the royal family shared on Instagram a throwback to the Queen’s first televised message, 62 years on.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B50bNX7HR7h/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B50bNX7HR7h/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Royal Family (@theroyalfamily)</a> on Dec 8, 2019 at 9:10am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Twenty-five years ago, my grandfather broadcast the first of these Christmas messages,” the then-31-years-old Queen said in the clip.</p> <p>“Today is another landmark, because television has made it possible for many of you to see me in your homes on Christmas Day.</p> <p>“My own family often gather around to watch television, as they are at this moment, and that is how I imagine you now.</p> <p>“I very much hope this new medium will make my message more personal and direct. It’s inevitable that I should seem a rather remote figure to many of you … but now, at least for a few minutes, I welcome you to the peace of my own home.”</p>

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“I really don’t care what people think of me”: Sam Armytage slams haters

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Samantha Armytage has opened up about the moment that she realised she no longer cared about what people thought of her in her new column for<span> </span><em>Stellar</em>.</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>Sunrise</em><span> </span>co-host explained the specific moment that she decided that she would no longer worry about what people thought of her.</p> <p>It was over a Christmas tree.</p> <p>She explained that she was “mercilessly mocked” for putting her tree up in November and realised that if people complained about her – a complete stranger – getting into the festive spirit early, they were going to complain regardless.</p> <p>“Girls are becoming boys and boys are becoming girls. And we’ve got no water and we can’t afford electricity,” the 43-year-old wrote.</p> <p>“Children don’t know how to play anymore and no-one can sleep because we’re all so stressed from reading banal stuff on social media all night.</p> <p>“Everything is topsy-turvy right now. So I asked myself, ‘What sort of person in this cray-cray world could possibly judge me for putting up the Christmas tree a month early?’”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4iT4POn5On/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4iT4POn5On/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Thx for having us @whomagazine 🤩 #whosexiest2019 x (with added thx to BRILLIANT photographer @jasonierace &amp; @monikabunic &amp; @natshehatastyling 😘) &amp; to Elvis for looking so bored...🤣🐎.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sam_armytage/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Samantha Armytage ⭐️</a> (@sam_armytage) on Nov 6, 2019 at 11:42am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Armytage made a point to not let judgements impact her this year and let her "freak flag fly".</p> <p>“You see, I’ve discovered the meaning of life and I’m now on the verge of greatness. Because I really don’t care what people think of me anymore,” she concluded.</p> <p>This isn’t the first time that she’s called out people online, especially after people were body-shaming her after her 10kg weight loss.</p> <p>“Do you know what? My weight is already scrutinised," Armytage told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/health/body/samantha-armytage-weight-watchers-55909" target="_blank"><em>The Australian Women’s Weekly.</em><span> </span><br /></a></p> <p>"I understand there will be more scrutiny that comes with this … but the paparazzi are always already trying to take pictures where there is a fat roll showing.”</p> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Princess Diana’s former chef reveals what the royal was like in the kitchen

<p>Former royal chef to the Princess of Wales opened up on working for the royal when she lived inside the walls of Kensington Palace.</p> <p>When speaking to Yahoo UK, Carolyn Robb revealed Princess Diana preferred to “have things a little more informal”.</p> <p>“It was nice for Diana to have things a little more informal,” admitted Carolyn, who was employed by Prince Charles during his marriage to his first wife at Kensington Palace.</p> <p>She continued to work for the Prince of Wales after the couple’s separation, and eventual divorce.</p> <p>Princess Diana would on occasion ask her to leave food for her in the fridge rather than serve her a freshly cooked meal. This usually happened when she was home alone, and the palace kitchen was always a “gathering place,” according to Carolyn.</p> <p>Royal expert Omid Scobie, who conducted the interview, said the Duchess of Cambridge also goes out of her way to make sure the kitchen is as equally welcoming.</p> <p>“I remember having a conversation with the Duchess of Cambridge about how important it was the kitchen would be the heart of their home,” Omid said in the interview.</p> <p> “That sounds exactly what it was like when you were working at Kensington Palace, too.”</p> <p>Carolyn agreed by adding: “The kitchen was the gathering place - so everybody popped in and out,”</p> <p>“There were always other people in the kitchen, usually protection officers drinking cups of tea or chauffeurs but it had very much a family feel to it. </p> <p>“And certainly there were occasions, particularly if Princess Diana was at home on her own in the evenings, she’d say: ‘just leave a plate of food in the fridge for me.’”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Princess Diana through the years.</p>

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Princess Beatrice cancels engagement party amidst father’s PR scandal

<p>As a result of the controversy surrounding her father Prince Andrew, Princess Beatrice has reportedly postponed her engagement party next week. </p> <p>The 31-year-old Royal was due to celebrate her impending marriage to Edorado Mapelli Mozzi on December 18 at London hotspot , the Chiltern Firehouse.</p> <p>However, due to the public nature of the venue and her father’s controversial scandal he has embroiled himself and the royal family into, there are chances she may have to rethink her choice of location. </p> <p>While it remains unclear whether a new date or venue has already been set, a source told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em>, “Bea has had to change the date of her engagement party at the Chiltern Firehouse because of fears there will be too many photographers outside – looking for him [Prince Andrew].”</p> <p>The royal and her fiancé, who had been a close friend to the Princess for over 11 years, began dating in 2018 before they got engaged in September. </p> <p>The announcement came just 11 months after her father walked her younger sister, Princess Eugenie, down the aisle at her royal wedding at St George’s Chapel, Windsor.</p> <p>Since then, the Duke of York, who is the second eldest son to the Queen, has become embroiled in multiple scandals since his friendship with Epstein game to the light. </p> <p>Jeffrey Epstein was a financer who killed himself in a US prison while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. </p> <p>One woman came forward claiming she was told to have sex with Andrew when she was 17 after Epstein introduced the two. </p> <p>The Duke of York sat down for an interview with<span> </span><em>BBC<span> </span></em>which took a disastrous turn. </p> <p>The broadcast worsened the backlash against the royal, although his intention was to fiercely clear up any allegations of wrongdoing against him. </p> <p>Since then, Prince Andrew has withdrawn from public duties and his eldest daughter is believed to be scaling back her wedding plans in result. </p> <p>“It will be more low key,” a source said to the<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/index.html" target="_blank"><span> </span><em>Daily Mail </em></a>of the princess’ upcoming wedding, “Bea and Edo are happy for their wedding to get less attention.” </p> <p>While her younger sister Princess Eugenie got all the bells and whistles for her wedding in 2018 to Jack Brooksbank, it is reported Beatrice may choose to tie the knot in her mother’s back garden. </p> <p>“I will not be surprised if she has a rather quiet wedding, out of the public eye, with a few photos, no live coverage.”</p>

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