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8 things you probably didn’t know about Barbie

<p><strong>1. Her fame is global, but she’s a small town girl</strong></p> <p>According to brand lore, Barbara “Barbie” Millicent Roberts was officially born on March 9, 1959, in the fictional town of Willows, Wisconsin.</p> <p><strong>2. She’s just one of seven kids</strong></p> <p>Over the years, her siblings for sale have included: Skipper, Stacie, Chelsea, Krissy, Tutti and Todd.</p> <p><strong>3. Barbie digs younger men</strong></p> <p>Her longtime BF Ken is two years younger than Barbie, debuting in toy stores in 1961.</p> <p><strong>4. She has had more than 150 careers</strong></p> <p>Including paleontologist, Canadian Mountie, McDonald’s cashier, Desert Storm medic, business executive, secretary, Catwoman, and, regrettably, rapper.</p> <p><strong>5. She’s been to space three times</strong></p> <p>Astronaut Barbie debuted in space in 1965 (four years before the moon landing), then returned in 1986 and 1994.</p> <p><strong>6. Her house is a zoo</strong></p> <p>Barbie has owned more than 40 pets, including 21 dogs, 14 horses, three ponies, six cats, a parrot, a chimpanzee, a panda, a lion cub, a giraffe, and a zebra.</p> <p><strong>7. She’s got friends in the fashion industry</strong></p> <p>Gucci, Versace, Vera Wang, Dolce &amp; Gabbana, and Givenchy have all contributed designs to Barbie’s wardrobe.</p> <p><strong>8. Her wardrobe is house-sized</strong></p> <p>Barbie has had more than one billion outfits (with shoes to match) designed for her.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/entertainment/8-Things-You-Probably-Didnt-Know-About-Barbie"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The story of the supermodel

<p>Women, fashion, and glamour are synonymous in the modern era – but in the mid to late 1980s this association intensified into one distinct cultural icon: the supermodel.</p> <p>While highly professional models with identifiable looks and personalities had existed since the 1950s, (Christian Dior’s favourite was called <a href="https://www.magnumphotos.com/C.aspx?VP3=SearchResult&amp;ALID=2TYRYD7Y6O43">Lucky</a>) and celebrity models since the 1960s (think <a href="http://www.twiggylawson.co.uk/">Twiggy</a>), the 1980s version literally superseded their predecessors in stature, stardom, and – most importantly – earning capacity.</p> <p>The supermodels were an elite and exclusive group. Key figures included Americans <a href="http://www.cindy.com/bio">Cindy Crawford</a> and <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/spy/biographies/christy-turlington-biography">Christy Turlington</a>, Brit <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/person/naomi-campbell">Naomi Campbell</a>, Canadian-born <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/spy/biographies/linda-evangelista-biography">Linda Evangelista</a>and <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/spy/biographies/claudia-schiffer-biography">Claudia Schiffer</a> from Germany.</p> <p>This grouping is not definitive and the term was applied to other high profile models of this generation including Australia’s own <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/person/elle-macpherson">Elle “The Body” Macpherson</a> and later notably English model <a href="http://www.vogue.co.uk/person/kate-moss">Kate Moss</a>. A list of very specific characteristics secured the pedigree of the original supermodels.</p> <p>First, self evidently, perhaps were their physical attributes. While each supermodel had a distinct “look” (Linda’s old world glamour versus Cindy’s girl-next-door) all of them had bodies of Amazonian proportions. Strong and lean as opposed to slim and diminutive they embodied a powerful, intense and indeed mythical vision of female beauty.</p> <p>Second, as at home on the catwalk as they were in editorials, a supermodel was a supermodel simply by virtue of her market value. Witness Linda’s quip to journalist Jonathan Van Meter: “We don’t wake up for less than $10,000 a day.”</p> <p>Finally real supermodels managed to transcend the world of fashion that had borne them and registered simply as celebrities with all that entailed, including dating movie stars, hosting TV shows, and becoming fodder for gossip magazines.</p> <p>The precise cultural circumstances that saw the celebrity cachet of models arise are difficult to discern but it is clear that a number of factors aligned.</p> <p>Big name celebrity designers such as Versace and Karl Lagerfeld became the figureheads for global conglomerate fashion, the worlds of entertainment and fashion merged through internationalised media networks, and, in Paris, <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/10196149/John-Casablancas.html">John Casablancas</a> of Elite Model Management championed a new brasher version of the modelling agency.</p> <p>One of Casablancas’ key strategies entailed marketing his “girls” as a group. This ploy dovetailed nicely with a genre of fashion photography that had been developed in the 1950s – the large cast fashion shoot.</p> <p>Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s high-end fashion photographers including <a href="http://www.peterlindbergh.com/biography/">Peter Lindbergh</a>, <a href="http://www.vogue.com/voguepedia/Steven_Meisel">Steven Meisel</a>and <a href="http://www.herbritts.com/about/">Herb Ritts</a> developed compelling editorial spreads that featured groupings of supermodels lined up next to each other wearing variations on a theme. In these somewhat disarming images each model seems to trump the beauty of the next resulting in a giddying excess of glamour.</p> <p>The supermodels faced the 1990s optimistically appearing en masse on the covers of the world’s most influential fashion magazines and attracting lucrative make-up endorsements. But meanwhile the fashion clock was ticking. Not only was grunge replacing glamour as the fashionable ideal the whole image of the supermodel with her perfect beauty was attracting critique from various quarters.</p> <p>Despite the fact these women were without exception naturally beautiful they became emblematic of an idea of falseness and artifice often associated with fashion. Moreover the fact that they traded on their appearance, and made previously unheard of amounts of money for merely “being beautiful” was frequently interpreted as morally corrupt.</p> <p>Finally and most ironically, as the “reality” of their lives was exposed through increased media exposure (failed marriages, bungled career moves, and the like) their very humanity seemed to work against them.</p> <p>The real treachery however came from within the industry.</p> <p>In the March 1996 edition of US Vogue, an article entitled “Supermodels, the Sequel” was busy promoting four new younger “faces” who were keen to distance themselves from their slightly more experienced counterparts.</p> <p>While all the interviewees agreed that the supermodels had played an important role in the industry (from which they now profited) none of them wanted to be associated with prima donna behaviour or vacuous self promotion. Aligning themselves instead with notions of reality and groundedness, there was a sense they wouldn’t let the market value of their beauty go to their heads.</p> <p>For me perhaps the clearest sign that the reign of the supermodel was well and truly over was when <a href="http://www.thebodyshop.com/services/aboutus_anita-roddick.aspx">Anita Roddick</a>, founder of The Body Shop, launched the highly successful “<a href="http://www.printmag.com/editors-picks/the-body-shops-honest-ad-campaign/">honest advertising</a>” campaign in 1998 with the byline: “There are 3 billion women who don’t look like supermodels and only 8 who do.”</p> <p>While the campaign won widespread support and turned Broddick’s fortunes around, I find it unfortunate that its logic comes at the cost of ostensibly pitching eight of the world’s successful and beautiful women against the rest.</p> <p><em>Written by Kathleen Horton. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/the-story-of-the-supermodel-26388"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Duchess Kate’s touching tribute to Princess Diana in beautiful outfit

<p>Although it’s been nearly 22 years since Princess Diana’s passing, her sons and daughters-in-law are doing everything they can to make sure her legacy lives on.</p> <p>When the Duchess of Cambridge visited Bletchley Park on Tuesday, she turned heads in her £1,750 ($3,200 AUD) blue and white polka dot dress that was designed by Alessandra Rich.</p> <p>However, what slipped under the radar was that the Duchess’ dress was a very close resemblance to a dress that was worn by Princess Diana in 1985. She wore the outfit for a photo shoot at Kensington Palace.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bxc_EXBltPP/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bxc_EXBltPP/" target="_blank">Today The Duchess of Cambridge visited @bletchleyparkuk, the home of British codebreaking — which played a major role in secret intelligence gathering during the Second World War, producing secret information which had a direct and profound influence on the outcome of the war. The Duchess joined joined schoolchildren for an immersive workshop (using a real Enigma Machine used during the Second World War), which saw them take on the role of codebreakers in June 1944, intercepting and deciphering German communications in order to understand their order of battle and decide whether the Operation Fortitude deception plans have been successful. She also met Bletchley Veterans Elizabeth Diacon, Georgina Rose, Audrey Mather and Rena Stewart, who all worked to feed crucial information to Allied forces in the critical months, weeks and days leading up to D-Day during #WW2. The Duchess’s own Grandmother and Great Aunt, Valerie and Mary Glassborow, both worked at Bletchley during the War — and have become the latest additions to Bletchley’s Codebreakers’ Wall of Honour. Bletchley’s new exhibition ‘D-Day: Interception, Intelligence, Invasion’, based on newly declassified material, shows how the intelligence effort coordinated at the site helped specifically in the success of the D-Day landings at Normandy, part of their work to bring together the past and the present, with a nod to the future.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kensingtonroyal/" target="_blank"> Kensington Palace</a> (@kensingtonroyal) on May 14, 2019 at 11:24am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Naturally, eagle eyed royal fans spotted the similarities and were thrilled with the tribute.</p> <p>“Diana and Kate in almost the same dress,” one fan account mentioned.</p> <p>“Diana and Kate in almost the same dress. Good taste goes never out of style!”</p> <p>“I absolutely love all the ‘subtle’ tributes to Princess Diana,” another said. “She was beautiful, kind and loved by many.”</p> <p>“Kate is all class… just like Diana!” one other added.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7826959/diana.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/80770911606347b18fd7ca085614c036" /></p> <p>Diana wore the dress nearly 34 years ago, and the dress that is worn by the Duchess of Cambridge is clearly a favourite of hers as she wore the same style for Prince Charles’ official 70th birthday portraits last year.</p>

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Counting the cost of fast fashion

<p>There’s a polyester <a href="http://www.thefashionspot.com/style-trends/news/168021-trend-spotlight-the-high-low-or-mullet-skirt">mullet skirt</a> gracing a derrière near you. It’s short at the front, long at the back, and it’s also known as the hi-lo skirt. Like fads that preceded it, the mullet skirt has a short fashion life, and although it will remain potentially wearable for years, it’s likely to soon be heading to the charity shop or to landfill.</p> <p>The mullet skirt may not last more than a couple of months as a fad, but the fast-fashion trend has shown considerably more longevity. With Spanish brand <a href="http://www.zara.com/">Zara</a> compressing lead times to as little as 13 days, and the UK’s <a href="http://www.topshop.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/TopCategoriesDisplay?storeId=12556&amp;catalogId=33057">Topshop</a> releasing 300 new styles a week, fashion trends are being captured and sold far quicker than ever before.</p> <p>In Australia, although Zara and Topshop only arrived in 2011, many local retailers have been following an accelerated fashion cycle since the early 2000s. <a href="http://www.valleygirl.com.au/">Valleygirl</a> releases 65 new styles per week, Supre has daily deliveries, and the mid-market Witchery boasts 400 new styles per month.</p> <p>Fast fashion has enabled a democratic engagement with the luxury of constant novelty, once only the domain of the very wealthy. Now high fashion trends are instantly accessible online, and the physical garments are for sale at prices which have never been lower.</p> <p>However, the garment’s price tag does not acknowledge the environmental and social cost of overconsumption.</p> <p>In the UK, some 30 kilograms of textile products, per person, per year go to landfill. What isn’t sent to landfill goes to charity. A single Smith Family sorting centre in New South Wales sorts 10000 tonnes of donated clothing each year. Much of this will be sent to developing countries, a trade that can be disruptive to local textile industries.</p> <p>The two most popular fibres for fashion apparel - cotton and polyester - each have considerable ecological impacts in production. Conventional cotton alone accounts for one quarter of global pesticide use, linked to poisonings and air and groundwater contamination. In addition, cotton requires a global average of 11,000 litres of water per kilogram, to produce.</p> <p>With a world population of seven billion, and a projected nine billion by 2050, food security and water security will become increasingly pressing policy concerns. The volatility of cotton prices in 2010/11 is possibly a foretaste of this, with cotton prices rising to their highest level in the history of the New York Stock Exchange.</p> <p>Australian fast-fashion retailers face additional short-term challenges. In 2011, bricks-and-mortar retail was at its lowest ebb in Australia since 1962, and across the fast fashion market, clothing was reduced up to 70%. Local labels are affected by the rising fibre prices (not only cotton but polyester of cotton quality) and rising Chinese manufacturing costs. The forthcoming carbon price may also lead to rises in the cost of freight and raw materials. In addition, a greater number of consumers are choosing to buy clothing online from cheaper overseas e-tailers.</p> <p>Australian designers and retailers can adapt to these challenges through examining the garment life cycle to identify points of intervention. For example, more efficient use of resources would see disposable faddish items such as the mullet skirt collected at end-of-life for closed-loop recycling, in which its polyester can become feedstock for new textiles. (See Kate Fletcher and Matchilda Tham’s <a href="http://www.katefletcher.com/lifetimes/index.html">Lifetimes</a> project, or Patagonia’s <a href="http://www.patagonia.com/us/common-threads">Common Threads</a> program.)</p> <p>Crucially, fast fashion is not merely fast material throughput of garments, but a sophisticated global image and information system which, to some degree, is weightless. As fashion is intangible, it is not necessarily tethered to the purchase of new clothing. An example is <a href="http://theuniformproject.com/">The Uniform Project</a>, in which blogger Sheena Matheiken wore the same dress for a year, styled in 365 different ways. With this perspective, a fast-fashion company’s role may evolve into that of a service provider, not simply a retailer. These services may include styling advice, alterations, clothing libraries or collection of the garment at end-of-life.</p> <p>In Australia, <a href="http://www.supre.com.au/Home.aspx?element=1&amp;category=1">Supre</a> and <a href="http://www.sportsgirl.com.au/">Sportsgirl</a> have followed the lead of Topshop and <a href="http://www.americanapparel.net/">American Apparel</a>in offering a small selection of vintage clothing alongside their new stock.</p> <p>There is no contradiction in fast-fashion retailers selling second-hand clothing, as the speed of trends mean that styles come in and out of fashion so frequently that some version of “vintage” style is always in style. Within the context of fast fashion as <a href="http://nplusonemag.com/the-accidental-bricoleurs">‘post-brand’</a>, second-hand styles simply become additional grist for the mill, as consumers will mix and remix the product (of whatever provenance) in their personal, restless search for novelty and individuality.</p> <p>Fast-fashion principles also drive the success of online marketplaces such as eBay, in which second-hand clothing can be circulated again and again, revalourised by individual consumers. Similarly, the Salvos charity stores in Australia and Oxfam in the UK, now sell second-hand fashion online, grouped into ‘lookbooks’, complete with fashion shoots.</p> <p>While the Rococo excess of a new frock a week may be unsustainable, a different fast fashion - one that relies less on overconsumption of new garments and more on the inventive reuse of existing materials - can emerge.</p> <p><em>Written by Alice Payne. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/counting-the-cost-of-fast-fashion-5297"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Fashion queen: Princess Mary pretty in pink

<p>Princess Mary never steps a foot out of line when it comes to fashion, and she’s proven yet again that she’s by far the most well-dressed royal.</p> <p>As a patron of Global Fashion Agenda, the royal attended a dinner in Frederik VIII’s Palace, as they celebrated sustainable fashion players in connection with the Copenhagen Fashion Summit.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxdOEFggzmq/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxdOEFggzmq/" target="_blank">Her til aften var H.K.H. Kronprinsessen som protektor for Global Fashion Agenda vært ved en middag i Frederik VIII’s Palæ for aktører indenfor bæredygtig mode i forbindelse med Copenhagen Fashion Summit. Inden middagen blev Kronprinsessen fotograferet sammen med formand for Global Fashion Agenda Niels Eskildsen samt CEO for Global Fashion Agenda Eva Kruse. 📸 Jesper Sunesen / ALLER FOTO &amp; VIDEO</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on May 14, 2019 at 1:35pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Princess Mary opted for a subtle pink dress – one that she has previously worn before – cinching the waist with a metallic belt and accessorising with chandelier earrings.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BmOPTbkgoVN/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BmOPTbkgoVN/" target="_blank">Nyudklækkede designere fra de danske designskoler viste her til eftermiddag kreationer frem under deres fælles show Future of Fashion. Her var temaet blandt andet innovation og teknologi, og til stede var H.K.H. Kronprinsessen, der efter showet uddelte tre priser til særligt talentfulde kandidater. Hendes Kongelige Højhed besøgte også CIFF-messen, der er en del af denne uges Copenhagen Fashion Week, og hvor mere end 2.000 modebrands bliver præsenteret. 📸 Mads Claus Rasmussen, Ritzau Scanpix ©️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Aug 8, 2018 at 8:12am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 47-year-old left her brunette locks wavy and kept her makeup natural and rosy to compliment the outfit.</p> <p>The asymmetrical hemline gave the dress a flowy feel, perfect for the spring season Denmark is currently facing.</p>

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How camp was the Met Gala? Not very

<p>The Met Gala is an annual fundraising event for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute where fashion and celebrity often collide. It always manages to raise eyebrows and this years’ theme, “Camp: Notes on Fashion,” has generated much debate. A <a href="https://junkee.com/met-gala-camp-runway/204314">common question</a> many fashionistas and cultural critics are asking of each outfit is “ …but is it camp?”</p> <p>This kind of overly analytical and far too serious commentary on a sensibility that is supposed to mock such things is intriguing but not surprising given how the concept of camp has evolved.</p> <p>In 1964, author Susan Sontag penned perhaps her most influential essay, <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36436100-notes-on-camp">Notes on Camp</a>. It was one of the first attempts to try to pin down camp’s qualities and parameters. It’s clear why she chose to write some notes rather than a formal essay; because camp is a sensibility or a way of perceiving the world, it is quite difficult to treat systematically. In fact, Sontag would say that it often defies the very idea of systematisation.</p> <p>For Sontag, camp is “the love of the exaggerated, the ‘off,’ of things-being-what-they-are-not”, and though it is not merely visual, it has often been expressed in the visual styles of décor, architecture, cinema and fashion.</p> <p>Certain aspects of Art Nouveau, old Flash Gordon comics, women’s clothes of the 1920s like feather boas and fringed garments, celebrity dandies and “sissies” like Oscar Wilde and Paul Lynde, “overwrought” performances by classic Hollywood actresses such as Bette Davis and Judy Garland and so on. Key to camp is a sense of affectation, of style over substance. But equally important is the way one looks at those things, how one appreciates affectation.</p> <p><strong>Missing the point</strong></p> <p>Many of the gowns and costumes at this year’s Met Gala attempt to capture the essence of camp, and in trying to do so miss the point of camp entirely. There is nothing discernibly camp about Jared Leto carrying around a replica of his own head. Quirky and strange? Maybe. But nowhere near camp.</p> <p>Another interesting example was Celine Dion, who wore a glittering tribute to Judy Garland and the Ziegfield Follies, designed by Oscar de la Renta. While inspired by camp figures, it is not the outfit here that is camp but rather the person wearing it. Dion is arguably a contemporary camp icon, and she would be camp regardless of what she wore. This is because her celebrity image owes more to her overly emotional songs and the way in which she performs them, her goofy persona, and the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkIPaxBsWy4">heightened emotion of some of her public statements</a>.</p> <p>People with a camp appreciation of Celine Dion enjoy her ironically, finding the style of her public personality thoroughly entertaining. Such appreciators would probably also love the fact that she apparently <a href="https://www.vulture.com/2019/05/celine-dion-thought-met-gala-theme-literally-about-camping.html">initially thought</a> the theme for this year’s gala was “camping.” In nature. Bless her.</p> <p>Other guests such as Billy Porter approached the camp sensibility much more accurately by incorporating outrageous pomp and performance to their attendances.</p> <p>Porter came dressed like some kind of Egyptian goddess, carried in on a litter by six nubile, shirtless men. While this adds a certain spectacle, it was, like every other guest’s appearance, a designed, rehearsed happening.</p> <p>For Sontag and many thinkers who came after her, there really are two ways of “doing” camp. One is the “naïve camp” and the other is “conscious camp.” Naïve camp is the Judy Garland kind of camp. Garland did not intend to be a gay icon, but she became one because her earnest, overwrought performances invited a large portion of queer people to view her as a camp figure.</p> <p>Gay men in particular appreciated the affectations in her performances, in a similar way to how drag queens are appreciated in the queer community. They are not appreciated for how well they perform but for how much they perform, for how much extra they put into their lip-synched song and dance.</p> <p>“Conscious camp” is what was on display at the Met Gala this year. Take Lady Gaga’s “Russian doll” of dresses, each layer referencing old Hollywood glamour to an over the top degree. An oversized version of Marilyn Monroe’s dress in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is removed and beneath it is a sleeker black, femme fatale number, followed by another reveal of a more realistically proportioned pink dress. Gaga is well-versed in queer and pop cultural aesthetics, and there was a fun narrative here, but its barrage of old Hollywood references don’t necessarily make it camp.</p> <p>Contrast this with Amber Valletta’s rather simple, but effective costume: she looks like she is wearing a giant, green loofa, and in most of the photos looks to be taking herself way too seriously. That’s the sort of camp Sontag might enjoy.</p> <p>The best kind of camp is the kind that doesn’t know it is camp. Which is just another way of saying you can’t really design and wear your way into the camp sensibility.</p> <p><em>Written by Matthew Sini. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/how-camp-was-the-met-gala-not-very-116742"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Vogue editor votes Camilla as the “best dressed royal” over Kate and Meghan

<p>Duchess Kate and Duchess Meghan are well known for their fashion looks and creating shopping frenzies for clothing items they are seen wearing.</p> <p>However, one British fashion stylish and editor at<span> </span><em>Vogue</em><span> </span>believes the Duchess of Cornwall’s style is the one to look out for.</p> <p><em>Secrets of the Royal Dressmaker </em>is a show that premiered in the UK last night and it claimed the<span> </span><em>Vogue</em><span> </span>editor Edward Enninful is apparently a big fan of Camilla’s clothing.</p> <p>Although Prince William and Prince Harry’s wives can boast an upward of $300,000 in fashion sales per year, Enninful wants to secure Camilla as his next royal magazine cover star.</p> <p>In April 2016, the Duchess of Cambridge was British<span> </span><em>Vogue</em>’s centenary cover star, so if her mother-in-law was to be on the next cover, she would be following in her daughter-in-law’s footsteps.</p> <p>Princess Diana also graced the cover a number of times before she died in 1997, as well as Princess Margaret and Lady Helen Taylor – the Duke and Duchess of Kent’s daughter.</p> <p>Royal correspondent Emily Andrews said the royal member is admired by Enninful for her fashion taste.</p> <p>“Edward Enninful, who's the new editor of<span> </span><em>Vogue</em>, adores Camilla, he thinks she's the best-dressed royal,” she explained.</p> <p>“He thinks she's gorgeous and he wants to put her on the cover of<span> </span><em>Vogue</em>.”</p> <p>The Duchess of Cambridge stole the spotlight for the<span> </span><em>Vogue</em><span> </span>cover of June 2016 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of British<span> </span><em>Vogue</em>.</p> <p>Duchess Kate followed the footsteps of Princess Diana who was on the magazine cover a total number of four times.</p> <p>Much like her young daughter-in-law, Camilla enjoys a “classic plain” look over a glamorous frock, says Royal author Claudia Joseph.</p> <p>“Camilla, like Kate, is much happier in jeans and wellies playing with her grandchildren and dogs than she is in posh frocks,” she said.</p> <p>“She wears quite traditional clothing, elegant, tailored, not showing too much flesh.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess of Cornwall’s fashion looks throughout the years.  </p>

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Duchess Meghan shares baby announcement with Princess Diana in most heartfelt way

<p>After two months away from the public eye, the Duchess of Sussex has finally re-emerged for a special public announcement and a very new addition to the family!</p> <p>Motherhood has proven to suit the royal as she appeared in front of cameras in the same chapel she married Prince Harry in almost one year prior, looking stunning with a new motherly glow.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex introduced their first child together, Archie, to a small crowd at St. George’s chapel early this morning.</p> <p>The Duchess went for a regal, sophisticated look by wearing a white sleeveless tuxedo midi dress, by British designer Grace Wakes Bonner.</p> <p>The frock featured stunning details including gold buttons and a bow. The Duchess paired the outfit with a classic pair of nude pumps by Manolo Blahnik and an elegant Jen Meyer turquoise necklace.</p> <p>The royal went for loose curls to welcome her child to the public and went for a natural makeup look to show off her radiant skin.</p> <p>Her outfit was reminiscent of a famous frock worn by her mother-in-law, the late Princess Diana.</p> <p>The heartfelt twinning moment can be seen when Princess Di wore a similar blazer dress with navy blue lapels and gold detailing back in 1987.</p> <p>The two royal ladies have shown they’re quite alike when it comes to fashion, proving they share the same eye.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex welcomed their adorable newborn to the world on Monday, May 6.</p> <p>The pair announced the arrival via a social media post on their new Instagram account @sussexroyal with the caption: “The Duchess and baby are both healthy and well, and the couple thank members of the public for their shared excitement and support during this very special time in their lives.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNPb_9B0fn/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNPb_9B0fn/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on May 8, 2019 at 8:39am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Duchess Meghan has had a number of enviable pregnancy outfits, often donning designer outfits from head to toe.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess Meghan and Princess Diana’s twinning moment in similar outfits.</p>

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Uh-oh! Woman is shamed for wearing a white lace dress to a wedding

<p>It’s a rule as old as time, and one that everyone knows they need to stick to – don’t wear white to a wedding.</p> <p>But it seems not everyone likes to play by the rules, as one woman decided that showing up to a friend’s wedding in a floor-length white gown was a good idea.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook, the offender asked for style advice for what hair and makeup will go best with the lace dress, and the response wasn’t as positive as she had hoped.</p> <p>“Ladies, can I get some hair and makeup suggestions for this dress? I'm attending a destination wedding next week. P.S… my hair is brown, and I have straight bangs. Tyia,” she wrote alongside the photo of her wearing the bridal-looking outfit.</p> <p>To no one’s surprise, the post was screenshotted and then shared in a group called “That’s it, I’m wedding shaming” for people to slam the guest for her choice of attire.</p> <p>"HELL NO. If she attends a wedding in that, she better expect to be immediately escorted out,” wrote one commenter.</p> <p>“Why is it so hard for people to just not wear white for a few hours,” wrote another.</p> <p>Another suggested: “Omg she would be getting thrown in the sea on that destination wedding.”</p> <p>One person refused to give her the benefit of the doubt, saying, “She knows exactly what she’s doing.”</p> <p>“This is exactly the kind of outfit someone would wear who was trying to stop a wedding.”</p>

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“Looking good!”: Johanna Griggs shocks fans with stunning transformation

<p>Sunday night’s episode of<span> </span><em>House Rules</em><span> </span>revealed the first home makeover for Victorian dance teachers Pete and Courtney.</p> <p>But despite the insane transformation, all eyes were hooked onto something else – or someone else.</p> <p>Viewers at home took to Twitter to share their excitement over Johanna Griggs’ new look, with one user saying: “@JohGriggs7 outfit reveal is almost more exciting than the house reveal.”</p> <p>“Woah! You are looking sooooo amazing @JohGriggs7 beautiful,” wrote another.</p> <p>“Oh, dear God, Griggsy’s looking good. That colour is amazing on her [sic],” a user tweeted about her dress.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxEAX5UgmUX/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxEAX5UgmUX/" target="_blank">Tonight’s Outfit Details for our first Whole House Reveal for Pete And Courtney from 7pm on 7.... Khaki Dress: Ginger and Smart (always a fave). Earrings: Emma Thomas Art. Shoes: Diana Ferrari Styling by: Rosie Trindall. Hair and Make Up by: Lisa Soames (I put in a pic of the detail of the hair do as it was a work of art in itself) I’m still Overseas but I hope you enjoy tonight’s show. I can’t wait to read your reactions on what our amazing teams have done! #houserules #wholehousereveal #peteandcourtneyau</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/johgriggs7/" target="_blank"> Johanna Griggs</a> (@johgriggs7) on May 4, 2019 at 6:34pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 45-year-old opted for a khaki midi dress, featuring a plunging neckline by Australian designer, Ginger &amp; Smart.</p> <p>She paired the chic silhouette with a pair of black Diana Ferrari heels and marble effect earrings by Emma Thomas.</p> <p>Her hair was kept tousled and messy, with several strands pulled out to frame her face.</p> <p>The former athlete kept her makeup simple and refined, with defined brows, a nude lip and multiple coats of mascara.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxEDWvWgEcw/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxEDWvWgEcw/" target="_blank">And with thanks to @emmathomasart Here are some close ups of her beautiful earrings I’m lucky enough to wear on tonight’s House Rules whole House Reveal. She doesn’t mass produce any of her creations which feel so light when you are wearing them. #emmathomasart #earrings #houserules #wholehousereveal #peteandcourtney</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/johgriggs7/" target="_blank"> Johanna Griggs</a> (@johgriggs7) on May 4, 2019 at 7:00pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The transformation comes after the host was regularly seen gravitating towards more conservative looks such as blouses and trousers.</p> <p>While fans of the show loved Griggs’ makeover, the same couldn’t be said about the home, as many criticised the overall look.</p> <p>But not everything was doom and gloom, as some viewers praised the teams for their tiling and marble fixtures in bathrooms.</p>

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Can you spot what's wrong with this shirt?

<p>Slogans and logos are quite tricky to design – as the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/domestic-travel/obscene-slogan-promoting-nt-sparks-outrage/" target="_blank">NT tourism campaign</a> shows, with a slight oversight, the intended message can truly be lost in translation.</p> <p>And another business has fallen victim to this blunder, as its uniform has gone viral on the Internet for its questionable-looking slogan.</p> <p>A picture that has made rounds on social media platform Reddit showed a worker’s shirt with the slogan “click. pick. delivered.” – which appeared to be the tagline of delivery start-up Runnr.</p> <p>However, due to the font and letter spacing, many observers find that the text could be read as “d**k. pick. delivered.”.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826462/dpdfull.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2a5bfe013aa54be28dff21ec53b31fa6" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: <a href="https://old.reddit.com/r/keming/comments/biihjw/nice/">u/sovietmetalhead, Reddit</a></em></p> <p>In one of the posts featuring the picture, a user wrote, “Imagine having to wear this for your job.”</p> <p>“Is it a lewd photo delivering service?” another commented.</p> <p>One quipped, “Dress for the job you want, not for the job you have”, while another chimed in, “I refuse to believe that this was not at least partially intentional.”</p>

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Lisa Wilkinson steals the show in eye-catching frock

<p><em>The Project<span> </span></em>co-host Lisa Wilkinson posed for cameras last night in a stunning monochrome ensemble while enjoying a special night out in Brisbane.</p> <p>The 59-year-old television star attended the Fantauzzo hotel launch and was definitely a sight for sore eyes in a black-and-white striped asymmetrical dress, paired with nude stilettos, drop earrings and simple jewellery.</p> <p>The youthful looking TV presenter opted for a natural makeup look with her signature hairstyle – a soft blow-wave.</p> <p>The exclusive event meant Wilkinson brushed shoulders with other well-known Australian stars, including singer Natalie Bassingthwaite and actress Asher Keddie.</p> <p>Bassingthwaite channelled rocker chic in an all-black outfit with sequinned pants and a Chanel messenger bag, paired with clear stilettos.</p> <p>Asher wore a black-and-white polka dot dress with a sharp white blazer and strappy black stilettos and minimal makeup.</p> <p>The new Art Series Hotel is Brisbane’s latest launch, with over $100 million going into the structure.</p> <p>Featured in the hotel is the works of one of Australia’s most well-respected and celebrated portrait painters, Vincent Fantauzzo.</p> <p>Fantauzzo is married to Logie-award winning actress Asher Keddie and is a winner of the Archibald People’s Choice Award.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see some of the best fashion looks from the night.</p>

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Queen of style: Duchess Kate steps out ever so gracious in green

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge has returned to her royal duties after the Easter holidays as she opened a new school for excluded children in north London.</p> <p>The 37-year-old royal appeared glowing and smiling for her first public duty since the short break when she arrived at the Pears Family School, which is part of the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families’ new north London headquarters.</p> <p>The duchess looked simply stunning in a custom-made forest green Emilia Wickstead dress, a AUD$919 Mulberry purse and an elegant pair of Gianvito Rossi heels costing the royal a heft AUD$1000.</p> <p>The flattering A-line frock paired with the nude pumps made the royal look graceful and stunning as she chatted with youngsters at the event.</p> <p><em>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess of Cambridge’s stunning look.</em></p> <p><span>Duchess Kate appeared to be happy and in high spirits as she laughed along with a fellow speaker at the event – </span><span>an advocate for the centre, Amy Herring.</span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7826399/kate6.jpg" alt="The Duchess of Cambridge and fellow speaker Amy Herring laughing." data-udi="umb://media/3b932017f7ab4e639a9cdc87b7e45238" /></span></p> <p>The royal listened intently as Leo, a 13-year-old boy who was to attend the school, told her how he was overwhelmed with anger and loneliness and “was always robbing and stealing, because I didn’t care about my feelings, I wasn’t able to move on, because I was still healing.”</p> <p>Leo’s mother, Sharon, died tragically at the age of 33 after she was bitten by a horsefly that had crawled up her nose and caused a severe brain infection.</p> <p>“I was nine when my mum died, and I wasn't doing fine, I felt angry and alone, and felt I had nowhere to go, Now I am 13 and I'm living fine, trying to get back to school so I can live my life, I've had good and bad times at TFS [The Family School], I've put some stuff to the test,” he told the Duchess.</p> <p>The royal also spent time conversing with donors, supporters, architects and young children from the charity.</p> <p>In a touching speech, the Duchess honoured the organisation for their work.</p> <p>“The ambition for the new Kantor Centre of Excellence is hugely inspiring. The bringing together of research, education, practice and policy, all in one place, will take Anna Freud Centre's mission to the next level,” she said.</p> <p>“It is testament to what can be achieved when people work together to realise a shared vision.”</p> <p>Ending the speech, the royal said: “Our pasts should not determine our futures.”</p> <p>The charity was founded as a clinic in 1952 by Anna Freud, the daughter of Sigmund Freud, who created psychoanalysis.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess of Cambridge’s stunning look.</p>

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Perfect for every body: The $20 Best & Less jeans women are in a frenzy over

<p>A pair of bargain jeans have sent the internet into a frenzy, after some women claim that they rival their luxury pairs – and they only cost $20! </p> <p>The Women’s Soft Touch Jeans from Best &amp; Less are available in sizes 8 to 16 and come in three different shades: blue, black and grey.</p> <p>According to the discount department store, they’re the “most flexible women’s jeans ever” and that statement seems to be correct.</p> <p>“Absolutely passed the ‘bend and stretch’ test. Great slim fit, love the style, super comfy, black black black! Might go back for another pair,” said one shopper.</p> <p>The popular jeans have been made from a satin weave construction that allows the wearer to stretch and remain comfortable.</p> <p>The jeans come in a slim leg style and feature a mid-rise waist with a zip enclosure.</p> <p><span>Australian media personality Shelly Horton revealed on a TV morning show that she’s a fan of the affordable clothing item, and she’s joined by a number of customers who share the same sentiments.</span></p> <p>Taking to Instagram, avid fans have praised the denim skinny jeans for their flattering fit.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwnp9Czg5f0/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwnp9Czg5f0/" target="_blank">“Most comfortable jeans I’ve owned by far” - Emma, Customer Service. Here’s just a few of our @bestandless team who love our new #SoftTouchDenim. Shop in store and online #bestandless⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ ⁣⠀ #bestandlessdenim #womensfashion⁣⠀</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bestandless/" target="_blank"> Best&amp;Less</a> (@bestandless) on Apr 23, 2019 at 6:20pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Seriously ladies, if you buy nothing else to update your autumn/winter wardrobe, at least buy yourself a pair of these babies!!” said one blogger.</p> <p>“They put the rest of my expensive jeans to shame. They are super soft and suuuuuper stretchy (squeezed my generous butt into a size 10!!)”</p> <p>One woman also spoke about the “love” she has for the jeans, saying they were “dreamy soft”.</p> <p>“Just bought these and they are the BEST jeans I’ve owned in years,” commented one woman.</p>

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4 daily habits that might be ageing you prematurely

<p><strong>1. Bingeing on your favourite shows</strong></p> <p>Calling all House of Cards fans – your love for TV marathons may chip away at your brain. According to a study published in a 2016 issue of Neurology, a lack of physical activity during middle age has been linked to a smaller mind later in life. “We found a direct correlation in our study between poor fitness and brain volume decades later, which indicates accelerated brain ageing,” said study author Nicole Spartano, PhD, with Boston University School of Medicine in Boston. Similar research recently published in JAMA Psychiatry discovered that large amounts of television viewing and low physical activity in early adulthood were associated with a decline in cognitive function during midlife.</p> <p><strong>2. Depriving yourself of sleep</strong></p> <p>Beauty sleep is a real thing, according to science. Physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center gathered 60 women between the ages of 30 and 49; half of the volunteers fell into the “poor quality sleep” category. The ladies who snagged less slumber showed increased signs of skin ageing, including fine lines, uneven pigmentation, slackening of skin, and reduced elasticity. “Our study is the first to conclusively demonstrate that inadequate sleep is correlated with reduced skin health and accelerated skin ageing,” said lead study investigator Elma Baron, MD, associate professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.</p> <p><strong>3. Being too inactive day and night</strong></p> <p>In Australia’s largest ongoing study of healthy ageing, researchers analysed the lifestyle behaviours of more than 230,000 participants. They concluded that sleeping too much (more than nine hours per night), sitting too much (more than seven hours a day) and not working out enough (less than 150 minutes a week) can quadruple someone’s risk of dying prematurely. “Our study shows that we should really be taking these behaviours together as seriously as we do other risk factors such as levels of drinking and unhealthy eating patterns,” said lead author Dr. Melody Ding, senior research fellow at the School of Public Health from the University of Sydney.</p> <p><strong>4. Thinking ‘old’ thoughts</strong></p> <p>“The number one thing that can age someone – and the studies support this – is feeling old,” says Robi Ludwig, PsyD, author of Your Best Age is Now. “When we feel younger, we’re more hopeful, we have more productive workouts and we’re more in touch with the possibilities life has to offer, which makes us more optimistic.” In fact, a 2016 study in Health Psychology concluded that people who feel older than their actual age are more than likely to be hospitalised. “The younger we can feel, the better it is for us,” adds Ludwig.</p> <p><em>Written by Amy Capetta and Ashley Lewis. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/15-daily-habits-might-be-ageing-you-prematurely"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Queen of style! Princess Mary’s 7 days of fabulous fashion

<p>Contrary to popular belief, being a royal isn’t easy. Just ask Princess Mary, who has had one royal engagement after another this past week. Thankfully, that means we can ogle at her fabulous style and chic aesthetic.</p> <p>Whether that was <a rel="noopener" href="/lifestyle/beauty-style/princess-mary-steps-out-in-stunning-style-with-queen-margrethe-for-royal-engagement" target="_blank">visiting Copenhagen Zoo</a> with her mother-in-law Queen Margrethe, or stepping out for the <a rel="noopener" href="/lifestyle/beauty-style/royal-style-watch-princess-mary-steals-the-show-with-stunning-look" target="_blank">opening of a special new museum exhibition</a>, the Crown Princess seems to always be on the go.</p> <p>Another major milestone the Danish royal family celebrated this week was the <a rel="noopener" href="/news/news/look-at-them-now-princess-marys-kids-are-so-grown-up" target="_blank">79th birthday of Queen Margrethe</a>, where the head of the monarch was joined by her son and Mary’s husband Crown Prince Frederik and his entire family including the couple’s four children.</p> <p>Earlier in the week, the 47-year-old revisited Copenhagen Zoo with her youngest children –twins Prince Vincent and Princess Josephine – so they could take a look at the brand new panda enclosure. </p> <p>The 8-year-olds could barely contain their excitement as they looked over at the bears, which were gifted to the zoo by the Chinese Government as a symbol of friendship between the two countries.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to take a look at Princess Mary's week of style.</p> <p>Do you have a favourite outfit? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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Who says you can’t be over 60 and fashionable?

<p>If I had a dollar for every 60 plus woman who complains that fashion doesn’t cater to them, I’d be retired in the Caribbean by now.</p> <p>Women over 60 tend to fall in to two main categories when it comes to fashion: they are either the proverbial ‘mutton dressed up as lamb’ or women who dress much older than their years.</p> <p>The irony is that there is some great fashion out there for women over 60, it’s all about being brave and knowing where to look.</p> <p>58-year-old Sydneysider and empty-nester, Maria Manissian, laments that she cannot seem to find the right style (or size) of clothes to make her feel sexy and confident any more.</p> <p>“I have always really loved fashion, but I am constantly disappointed by the style of clothes and the stores marketed to women my age,” she says.</p> <p>Suzy Black, an Australian Personal Shopper and Stylist who gives wardrobe make-overs recently appeared in an article in The Sydney Morning Herald addressing the issue.</p> <p>Suzy believes the common mistake mature women make is dressing frumpily and not accentuating the right areas.</p> <p>"Women my age are used to being second best. For years they've put their family first so they fade away and let themselves become invisible when this is the time to re-invent yourself. I'm here to help them get their mojo back," she told <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/fashion/australias-trinny-bringing-style-back-to-the-50-set-20130506-2j32l.html#ixzz32VnjZCYZ"><em>SMH</em></a>.</p> <p>Suzy advocates shopping in chain stores such as Supre, Country Road and Zara and even sharing your wardrobe with your daughters. You not only look better, but it won’t hurt the hip pocket.</p> <p>Below are some handy tips you should keep in mind if you decide to overhaul that wardrobe:</p> <ul> <li>If you really lack confidence in choosing the right clothes, invest in a personal stylist, it could be worth every penny! (Even chain stores like <a href="http://m.myer.com.au/mobile/latest-news/myer-personal-shopping-service.html">Myer </a>and <a href="http://www.davidjones.com.au/Store-Services/Fashion/Personal-Shopping-Service">DJs</a> offer this service affordably.)</li> <li>Make sure you are wearing the right undergarments: bras need to be properly fitted to uplift and support (avoid sagging breasts) and underwear needs to be seamless; Shapewear like <a href="http://www.spanx.com/">Spanx </a>might be something you also need to invest in to avoid the visible panty line</li> <li>Go to the large chain stores before leaping in and spending a fortune in a boutique specifically marketed to 60-somethings.</li> <li>Avoid the two main pitfalls: dressing either too young or too old for your age. For example, either wearing very short skirts and dresses, overly tight tops and stiletto heels, or wearing loose baggy pants and oversized t-shirts or frumpy long shapeless dresses.</li> <li>Sometimes style needs to win out over comfort.  For example, opt for nice tailored pants rather than elasticised waisted pants.</li> <li>Black can be slimming, very stylish and chic, especially when accessorized with a splash of colour.</li> <li>Use accessories to your full advantage.  For example, a chunky colourful necklace or scarf can do wonders for a plain outfit.</li> <li>Invest in attractive, good quality, yet comfortable shoes. Go for a mid-height heel, black or tan knee-length fashionable boots in winter or cute ballet flats if you can’t wear heels.</li> <li>Dress up, rather than down for a special occasion – too many 60-plus women feel it’s ‘all too much of a bother’. Make the effort and you will feel better about yourself.</li> <li>Jeans are a 60-plus woman’s best friend. Update them regularly, they can be extremely flattering at any age. (Tip: darker jeans are more dressy and slimming)</li> <li>Track pants and Ugg boots in public are never acceptable.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/who-says-you-can%E2%80%99t-be-50-plus-and-fashionable.aspx"><em>Wyza</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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