International Travel

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5 clever packing hacks: How to travel light

<p>Travelling light with carry-on comes with a lot of benefits – apart from saving money on luggage allowance, you could also skip the long wait at baggage claim and move from one destination to another more easily.</p> <p>Most airlines will allow you to bring up to 7kg on board – and with the right tricks, 7kg is all you need. Here are some of the things you can do to cut down your carry-on weight.</p> <p><strong>1. Invest in a lightweight luggage</strong></p> <p>With the right luggage, you can cut 2-3kg right off the bat. A wheeled suitcase can be a convenient option, but weekender bags also work. Keep in mind that most airlines will have size limits for carry-on luggage. While the dimensions may vary, in general they need to fit under the seat or in the overhead lockers.</p> <p><strong>2. Go digital</strong></p> <p>In today’s world, there’s little need to bring bundles of paperwork to the airport. Digitise your travel documents by using apps or saving them to your phone, a cloud drive or a USB stick. This not only helps save space and weight, but also eliminates any worries about losing important docs on the go.</p> <p>You can also swap heavy paperbacks for an e-Book reader device – or better yet, have the e-Books ready on your tablet or smartphone.</p> <p><strong>3. Wear your heaviest items</strong></p> <p>For light travelling, it is best to opt for a small number of versatile clothing items to pack. However, if you need to bring a heavy coat or a pair of boots, you can wear them to the airport to minimise the carry-on weight. </p> <p><strong>4. Minimise toiletries</strong></p> <p>Depending on your destination, you might not need to bring basics such as shampoo and body wash. Still, you can bring your personal toiletries without going over the airline’s liquid limits by going for the mini travel-sized version of the products. If your favourite brand does not offer this, you can decant them into smaller containers, which you can purchase in pharmacies.</p> <p><strong>5. Get a travel scale</strong></p> <p>Avoid the surprise of being charged excess baggage fees at the airport by weighing your bags with a luggage scale before check-ins. With portable, compact size and affordable price – some of the scales on the market cost as low as $9 – there’s no reason not to get one.</p> <p>Do you have any other hacks to keep your luggage light and breezy? Share them in the comments.</p>

International Travel

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Say goodbye to airport boredom with these global Wi-Fi passwords

<p><span>One of the many downsides of flying is having to get to the airport hours before you actually board the plane.</span><br /><br /><span>You can try to pass the time by playing cards, reading, or exploring the airport, but that gets old pretty fast.</span><br /><br /><span>Something that makes time go a little quicker, browsing through social media or catching up on your TV shows.</span><br /><br /><span>The only problem is that most airports give you a time limit for how long you can stay on the Wi-Fi or make you pay for it.</span><br /><br /><span>Anil Polat, blogger, computer engineer, and avid traveler, understands everyone’s struggle with airport boredom.</span><br /><br /><span>After a lot of research, he created a map with Wi-Fi passwords from hundreds of airports around the world.</span><br /><br /><span>Polat’s blog is all about teaching others to travel smarter. This map certainly does that.</span><br /><iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1Z1dI8hoBZSJNWFx2xr_MMxSxSxY" width="640" height="480"></iframe><br /><span>You can zoom in a different areas and click on the location of the airport you’re at. It will give you the name of the free, secure Wi-Fi network, or the name and password of a protected network.</span><br /><br /><span>You can contribute to this map too, because it’s constantly getting updated.</span><br /><br /><span>Polat encourages his readers to add any new network information that they find out to his map.</span><br /><br /><a rel="noopener" href="https://foxnomad.com/2016/04/26/map-wireless-passwords-airports-lounges-around-world-updated-regularly/" target="_blank">You can contact him to add more</a><span>.</span></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Morgan Cutolo</span>. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/say-goodbye-airport-boredom-these-global-wi-fi-passwords">Reader’s Digest</a></em></span><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><span><em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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Seniors tips for long haul flights

<p class="">Travel has no age limits. But a few simple considerations will make it easier as your years advance. </p> <p class=""><strong>Plan well</strong></p> <p class="">The more you plan before you go the less you will have to do as you travel. Consider speaking to travel agents about your needs. They can help you find accommodation that is accessible and advise you on the fitness requirements for tours. </p> <p class=""><strong>Consider a cruise</strong></p> <p class="">Cruises are travel made easy. You unpack once and visit multiple destinations. Days at sea allow you to enjoy all the activities and entertainment on board. Cruises are also a great option for multi-generational holidays as everyone can find something they want to do. </p> <p class=""><strong>Consider a tour</strong></p> <p class="">Tours are a great option for anyone, but especially for seniors. The tour company looks after all the organisation – they book the accommodation, the transport and sometimes the flights. All you have to do is relax and enjoy the view. Tour guides also get fast tracked into attractions so you won’t have to spend hours waiting in lines. </p> <p class=""><strong>Choose the right airline</strong></p> <p class="">Pick your airline carefully. Avoid smaller regional airlines, particularly at airports, as you may have to walk up and down stairs to board the flight. Larger airlines also cater well for seniors. You can book you assistance to walk to and from the gate, wheelchairs or help with getting into your seat. </p> <p class=""><strong>Get travel insurance</strong></p> <p class="">We can’t stress this one enough. Travel insurance is a wise purchase. You can’t predict what will happen as you travel, so be prepared. Check the details of the policy and ensure it covers your health conditions as well as emergencies. </p> <p class=""><strong>Keep active during your flight</strong></p> <p class="">Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) is a serious concern for anyone over 50 travelling long distance, particularly those with heart disease or circulatory problems. The risk of DVT is increases by sitting still for long periods at a time. Do arm, leg and foot exercises on board, get up and walk the aisles when possible and wear compression stockings to increase the blood flow to your lower legs. </p> <p class=""><strong>Keep hydrated</strong></p> <p class="">Make sure you keep drinking water on board the flight. The low humidly on board can be dehydrating. Avoid alcohol and caffeine as they dehydrate you faster. Bring some moisturiser for your hands and face to keep your skin feeling fresh. </p> <p class=""><strong>Pack spare glasses</strong></p> <p class="">If you lose or break a pair while overseas, you will be glad you did. </p> <p class=""><strong>Keep prescription medication in your carry-on</strong></p> <p class="">Make sure you have all the medication you need with you. Do not put it in your check-in bag – just in case that bag gets lost. It’s also a good idea to keep a list of all the medication you are taking with you and to keep a list online or with a family member. </p> <p class=""><strong>Scan your travel documents</strong></p> <p class="">Keep a copy of your passport and your travel documents, including your travel insurance policy safely online. Scan them in and upload them just in case you loose them. Carry a copy with you and keep it separate from your main luggage and leave another copy with a family member or friend at home. </p> <p class=""><strong>Schedule in rest days</strong></p> <p class="">Slow down. Enjoy your time. There’s no need to rush. A schedule that is too packed will add to your fatigue. </p> <p class=""><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/seniors-tips-for-long-haul-flights/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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What will your country do for you? Aussies in trouble overseas

<p>The passport all Australians carry overseas is not just an entry or exit permit in and out of countries. It represents our nationality and our rights when abroad, as well as the rights and duties the government has towards its citizens overseas.</p> <p><strong>Breaking the law</strong></p> <p>Of course, Australian nationality is not a shield. Every Australian is still bound by the laws of the country she or he visits.</p> <p>If the laws of that country are broken then the offender has to face the consequences of their actions under those laws.</p> <p>Nationality does afford one core protection in this situation, and that is the right to contact your <a href="http://www.dfat.gov.au/embassies.html">consulate</a> and seek <a href="http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/consular_charter/index.html">consular assistance</a>.</p> <p>If an Australian is arrested or detained, then the government will provide a range of services. These are set out in a handy information pack on the <a href="/smartraveller.gov.au">smartraveller.gov.au</a> website.</p> <p><strong>Help when you need it</strong></p> <p>Consular assistance is available for all manner of incidents when Australians are travelling overseas.</p> <p>For lost or stolen passports, victims of crime, or illness requiring medical assistance —consular assistance can be the bridge between an Australian and the foreign country.</p> <p>Consular assistance can also provide information about the facilities available and relevant procedures in that country.</p> <p>A right to consular assistance may not seem like strong protection, but it has been known to be the difference between life and death.</p> <p>Take the case of Angel Francisco Breard, a Paraguayan national arrested in the United States for a capital offence and never informed of his right to contact his consulate.</p> <p>Rather than plea bargain, Breard chose to confess on the stand because in Paraguay it helps to throw yourself on the mercy of the court.</p> <p>In the United States, it ensured he was convicted and ultimately executed.</p> <p>Paraguay challenged the United States’s violation of consular rights before the <a href="http://www.icj-cij.org/homepage/index.php">International Court of Justice</a>.</p> <p>Paraguay argued that if such assistance had been available then Paraguayan consular officials could have explained how the US criminal justice system operates.</p> <p>An early guilty plea may have resulted in a life sentence rather than a death sentence.</p> <p><strong>A strain on resources</strong></p> <p>A difficulty to bear in mind for Australian travellers overseas is that increasing demands of Australian travellers have strained available government resources.</p> <p>Australia does not maintain consulate offices in every country. When Australian, <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/national/life-on-a-knife-edge-on-foreign-soil-20110728-1i2dd.html">Jock Palfreeman</a> was arrested on charges of murder with hooliganism in Bulgaria, it was <a href="http://www.paulfletcher.com.au/index.php/speeches-a-parliament/parliament-questions-in-writing/280-mr-jock-palfreeman">reported</a> that Australian officials had to travel from Greece to meet with him.</p> <p>When former Australian Army soldier, <a href="http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/aussie-robert-langdon-facing-death-in-kabul/story-e6frg6nf-1225823771967">Robert Langdon</a> was being held in Afghanistan on murder charges, Australian officials asked for him to be moved to a different prison as the first one was in an area too dangerous for consular officials to visit.</p> <p>If Australia does not maintain consular offices in a particular country, then it may be the case that such services will instead be provided by a Canadian embassy.</p> <p><strong>Will I be evacuated?</strong></p> <p>Assistance from the government becomes all the more important when Australians overseas find themselves caught in a natural disaster, or a war zone, or areas of civil unrest.</p> <p>Australian consulates become a vital link between families at home and Australians caught up in these disasters or conflicts overseas.</p> <p>In these extreme situations, the Australian government may provide assistance to evacuate its nationals.</p> <p>The Australian government chartered flights from Lebanon during the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Lebanon_War">2006 war with Israel</a>, evacuating around <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2006-07-20/up-to-6000-australians-to-be-evacuated/1806726">6,000 people</a> at a reported cost of approximately AUD $25m.</p> <p>Government evacuations are not necessarily a free ticket home, however. The United States has charged its nationals for flights specially arranged to take them out of war zones.</p> <p><strong>Under no obligation</strong></p> <p>A key point to remember here is that the Australian government is not required to provide any particular assistance to its nationals.</p> <p>The assistance set forth under the <a href="http://untreaty.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/9_2_1963.pdf">Vienna Convention on Consular Relations</a> is ultimately quite limited.</p> <p>Australia may have a bilateral treaty elaborating on consular relations, but these are rights that fall to the government and that the government may choose to exercise or not exercise in any given situation.</p> <p>This state-centric focus is entrenched in the right of diplomatic protection.</p> <p>Under international law, diplomatic protection refers to the right of a state to take up the claim of one of its nationals and assert that right against another state.</p> <p>So Australia could exercise a right of diplomatic protection on behalf of the ringleaders of the "Bali Nine", Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, who <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-07-30/values-fresh-hope-for-bali-nine-duo/2817432">have exhausted their appeals against their death sentences</a> in Indonesia.</p> <p>Australia could take the view that Chan and Sukumaram’s right to life has been violated because of the imposition of the death penalty for drug-trafficking, an offence that is not serious enough to attract the death penalty.</p> <p>Yet what steps Australia decides to take for its nationals is a decision for the government.</p> <p><strong>A government decision</strong></p> <p>The right of diplomatic protection rests with the state and not with the individual. An individual cannot compel his or her government to take up their claim against another state.</p> <p>There is some precedent to suggest that a government must at least consider whether it will exercise the right of diplomatic protection.</p> <p>This argument was made by lawyers for <a href="http://www.theage.com.au/multimedia/hicks/main.html">David Hicks</a> during his detention in Guantanamo Bay. Of course, considering whether to act is not the same as acting.</p> <p>Ultimately, what consular assistance is provided is a decision for the government.</p> <p>Nationality carries rights, but they are not necessarily rights that can be enforced against your own government.</p> <p>Australians overseas should make no mistake that they are the ones most responsible for their safety.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/3156/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/natalie-klein-4068">Natalie Klein</a>, Professor &amp; Dean of Macquarie Law School, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></span>. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://theconversation.com/what-will-your-country-do-for-you-aussies-in-trouble-overseas-3156">The Conversation</a></span>.</em></p>

International Travel

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Photo of toddler and passenger at airport goes viral and will melt your heart

<p>It seems like a normal, everyday scenario but a father who has posted a picture of his daughter playing on an iPad has gone viral, garnering over 405,000 reactions and 21,000 comments.</p> <p>Kevin Armentrout was inspired by an experience he and his daughter shared with a kind stranger at an airport – so much so he posted it to Facebook.</p> <p>He wrote: “Last night, while waiting to board our plane, @_carterjean_ was being her usual inquisitive self wanting to meet and say 'hi' to everyone she could, until she walked up on this man. He reached out and asked if she wanted to sit with him.” </p> <p>The father says that from there on, the two strangers bonded over cartoons and snacks.</p> <p>Continuing on Armentrout explained: “He pulled out his tablet and showed her how to draw with it, they watched cartoons together, and she offered him snacks. This wasn’t a short little exchange, this was 45 minutes.”</p> <p>The father took a heartwarming image of the two friends who were both intently staring at the iPad screen.</p> <p>Armentrout then gave an inspiring message, somewhat explaining why he decided to upload the image to social media of his daughter, Carter Jean, and the man who has been identified as Joseph Pat Wright.</p> <p>“Watching them in that moment, I couldn’t help but think, different genders, different races, different generations, and the best of friends. This is the world I want for her,” Armentrout added.</p> <p>“In a country that is continuously fed that it’s so deeply divided by beliefs, I want her life to be filled with moments like this...</p> <p>“Not liberal or conservative republican or democrat, socialist or capitalist, just HUMAN.”</p> <p>Carter Jean’s dad even thanked Wright for his gesture of kindness writing: “Joseph from @samsungus in Oklahoma, if this should happen to find you. Thank you for showing my daughter what kindness and compassion looks like. Continue to shine your light in the world. #HateIsLearned”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FKevinArmentroutOfficial%2Fposts%2F653618321722379%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="709" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The comments reached up to 21,000 – the post even reaching Wright’s family members who shared their thoughts.</p> <p>Linda Taylor, Wright’s sister-in-law, said she was not surprised by his kindness.</p> <p>“He’s a true blessing and your little girl is an angel herself. She’ll have a friend forever in him.”</p> <p>Users on Facebook even took to Wright’s page to thank him for his friendliness.</p> <p>One user who commented they were from Australia wrote: “I just read about your lovely interaction with the little girl at the airport. You are a wonderful person and exactly what this world needs. Have a great day!” Another commended Mr Wright saying, “The world needs more kind people like you!”</p>

International Travel

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Best places to view the stars in New Zealand

<p class="">Who doesn’t love a night staring at the stars? </p> <p class="">For some of the best astro-views on the planet – you should consider New Zealand. <span>New Zealand is home to the only island granted dark sky sanctuary status – the north’s Great Barrier Island. Head to the south and you could catch a glimpse of the </span><span>Aurora Australis. </span></p> <p class=""><span>The night sky is woven into the culture of the New Zealand Maori people. Matariki, the rise of the Pleiades constellation, signals the start of the Maori New Year. </span></p> <p class="">Here are some of the best places to view the stars in New Zealand. </p> <p><strong>Great Barrier Island (Aotea)</strong></p> <p class="">Great Barrier Island (yes island, not reef) is an<span> International </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.darksky.org/idsp/sanctuaries/" target="_blank">Dark Sky Sanctuary</a><span>. It’s </span><span>one of only four places in the world (and the only island) to be granted sanctuary</span><span> status.</span><span> </span><span></span></p> <p class=""><span>A dark sky sanctuary is defined as public or private land that has “an exceptional or distinguished quality of starry nights”.</span></p> <p class="">Great Barrier Island the largest of the Hauraki Gulf islands north east of Auckland. It’s <span>isolated, has a small resident population and is free from the electricity</span><span> grid. What this means for travellers is less light pollution and more protected stargazing. At night the Milky Way spans the sky and the Magellanic Clouds, not visible in the Northern Hemisphere, are easily seen.</span></p> <p class=""><span>For the roughly 1000 residents, a dark night sky has become a way of life and you’ll find yourself slowing down and appreciating life on any visit here. But star gazing isn’t the only thing you can do. </span><span>Aotea is also a boating paradise, a popular destination for diving, fishing, surfing, mountain bike riding and hiking.</span></p> <p><strong>Aoraki Mackenzie</strong></p> <p class="">Another top spot to search for shooting stars is Aoraki Mackenzie, in the middle of the South Island. Aoraki Mackenzie is a designated International Dark Sky Reserve. The difference between names is that a sanctuary is usually in a remote place with little threat to its night skies. It includes Aoraki Mt Cook National Park, and the villages of Lake Tekapo, Twizel and Mt Cook.</p> <p class="">Aoraki Mackenzie isn’t remote – but it is still a prime place to admire the constellations. It is the largest dark sky reserve in the world. </p> <p class="">Spend one night doing a classic guided tour to the observatory to learn about the stars. And then the next just soaking up the view while relaxing in the<span> </span>hot pools at Tekapo Springs.</p> <p class="">Or for something really special, check out SkyScape Lodge, an architecturally designed, glass-roofed accommodation building on a 6000-acre high country station about 12 kilometres from Twizel. </p> <p><strong>Lake Tekapo</strong></p> <p>Lake Tekapo is home to New Zealand’s premier scientific astronomy observatory, Mt John Observatory. The observatory site was chosen in 1963 for the clarity and darkness of the night sky after three years of site testing.</p> <p class="">About three hours drive south-west of Christchurch in the Mackenzie Basin, Earth and Sky Tours at Mt John Observatory offers a range of astro-tours. On a clear night several telescopes are set up outside. If you bring your DSLR camera, the observatory’s astro-photographers may capture the night sky for you. </p> <p class="">If the sky is cloudy, don’t worry. Mount John also offers a fascinating behind the scenes tour of what life is like for an astronomer. It offers the chance to see the research equipment that is usually off limits to the general public and to learn about the research conducted at Mt John. </p> <p class="">In the day time, the views at Lake Tekapo are just as stunning. The remarkable turquoise colour lake is framed by snow-capped mountains. Lake Tekapo gets its intense milky-turquoise colour from the fine rock-flour (ground by glaciers) which is suspended in the water. </p> <p><strong>Stewart Island</strong></p> <p>Head south if you want to see the Southern Lights, also known as Aurora Australis. The aurora occurs when <span>electrically charged solar particles collide with gases such as oxygen and nitrogen</span><span> in the Earth’s atmosphere</span><span>, causing those gases to emit light. The most common colour is a yellow-green, but the aurora can also be pink or purple. </span><span></span></p> <p><span>Despite the name, you don’t have to be in Australia to see them. The auroras happen in ovals around the earth’s two magnetic poles. The further south you go, the more likely you are to see the Aurora Australis. </span></p> <p>The furthest south you can go in New Zealand is Stewart Island. Up to 80 per cent of the island is made up of the Rakiura National Park – meaning there’s little light polution and a great chance for star-gazing. </p> <p class="">Auroras can happen at any time, but they are more common in the winter months. </p> <p class=""><span>The website </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.aurora-service.net/aurora-forecast/" target="_blank">Aurora Service offers hourly aurora forecasts</a><span>, using real time solar wind data from Nasa’s Ace Spacecraft. The aurora strength is measured in Kp. Kp ranges between zero and nine. Zero is the weakest and nine is the strongest. Anything Kp5 or above is considered a geomagnetic storm and a good chance of an aurora occuring.</span></p> <p class="">Dunedin in New Zealand is one of the best larger cities to catch the colourful night-time display. Queenstown has also been known to have incredible southern lights displays. And Lake Tekapo (see above) is also known for spectacular displays.<span></span></p> <p class=""><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/dark-parks-the-best-places-in-new-zealand-to-view-the-stars/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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5 epic train trips you need to try

<p>Travel by train is a great way to really experience the countryside. These are the top five train trips in the world.</p> <p><strong>The Original Trans-Siberian Express</strong></p> <p>Spanning 9288km of track, this is perhaps the most famous of rail journeys and the longest passenger train route in the world.</p> <p>With an average speed of just 77km/h, the trip from Moscow to Vladivostok isn’t for those on a tight schedule – you’ll need to set aside a minimum 146 hours, 8 minutes (six and a bit days), and most journeys include stopovers.</p> <p>But for that investment, you’ll cross multiple time zones and witness the breadth of Russia’s majestic terrain, from verdant woodlands, through mountains and desert, to grassy steppe. While itineraries vary, most journeys break at Irkutsk, one of the largest cities in Siberia, with ornately decorated 19th-century buildings, just 70km from World Heritage-listed Lake Baikal.</p> <p><strong>The Canadian</strong></p> <p>The trip from Toronto to Vancouver is a sleepy 83 hours long – but considering you’ll be winding through the steep and snow-capped Rocky Mountains and Canadian Shield forests, the pace suits anyone looking for relaxation, rest and peaceful views.</p> <p>Huge glass windows make the most of the scenery as the train wends its way across 4466km of Canada’s diverse landscape.</p> <p><strong>The Blue Train</strong></p> <p>South Africa’s famous Blue Train spans 1600km of track linking Pretoria with Cape Town.</p> <p>More like a hotel on rails than a train, there are lounge carriages where passengers can mingle in comfort and some suites contain full-sized baths. High-tech additions like the driver’s eye camera view meet classic decor and a butler service.</p> <p>The journey takes 27 hours from start to finish and crosses some of the most diverse and picturesque scenery on the African continent. Don’t expect to feel the rush of wind through your hair though, as its average speed is just 57km/h.</p> <p><strong>The Indian Pacific</strong></p> <p>Departing from Sydney, it takes about 70 hours for the Indian Pacific to traverse the Australian continent on its way to Perth.</p> <p>Stopping at the mining town of Broken Hill, Adelaide, and Kalgoorlie you’ll cover 4352km at an average speed of 85km/h. At that rate, you’ll catch the full glory of the sun setting across the horizon on the longest stretch of straight rail track in the world.</p> <p>Travel in spring for the best of Western Australia’s wildflowers.</p> <p><strong>Jinghu High-Speed Rail</strong></p> <p>For those who like their train travel to evoke the future rather than the past, China is calling. The showcase of China’s modern rail fleet was launched in 2012 and shaves 20 hours off the 1303km trip from Beijing to Shanghai, delivering passengers to their destination in five super-fast hours. It is currently the fastest long-distance passenger train in the world, reaching speeds of 300km/h.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/top-5-train-trips/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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Choosing the best travel insurance

<p>Experts are often quoted as saying, "If you can’t afford travel insurance, you can’t afford to travel." But what if you can’t get travel insurance — do you just take the risk? We look at the issues and the options.</p> <p>A lot can go wrong when you travel: some things can be annoying — like items pilfered from your bag, some can be wildly disruptive — like a lost passport, and some can be catastrophic — like a major medical event that puts you in hospital.</p> <p>When you’re young, the medical part of travel insurance is most likely to come into play in the event of an accident, but the most likely claim is for something lost or stolen.</p> <p>However, when you are older, you need to be covered in case you have a significant medical event overseas. Insurance companies will tell you of paying out half a million dollars for clients hospitalised in North America — I have friends who had to re-mortgage their home after one of them ended up in a US hospital for a week without insurance.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Age limits</strong><br />Some travel insurance companies simply opt out of covering older Australians. The cut-off age may be 59, 74, or any age between 30 and 100. You need to do a lot of homework to pick the right travel insurance policy, so select one that you can continue to renew for a few years.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Credit card, annual or single-trip?</strong><br />As is often the case, the best place to get independent advice on travel insurance is<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.choice.com.au/" target="_blank"><span>Choice</span></a>. The consumer advocacy group has examined the most common pitfalls of travel insurance and analysed specific policies in all categories. It also rates how good each company is with claims and how suitable their policy is for seniors, but its coverage is not comprehensive.</p> <p>The time to take out a travel insurance policy is either before you book a trip, or at the time of booking. That way, you’ll be covered if you break a leg walking out of the travel agency and can’t take your holiday. However, the insurance policies offered by travel agents are unlikely to be the cheapest or the best — and while you have your head full of transfer times in Singapore, it may not be the best time to study the fine print of an insurance policy.</p> <p>An alternative is to take out and rely on the travel insurance policy that may be attached to your credit card. Choice found many of these could be recommended, but remember to check if you have to pay for all of your travel or just your airfares to receive this coverage — and whether your spouse and dependants are covered, too.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Annual policy</strong><br />If you travel a few times a year, including within Australia, it’s a good idea to consider taking out an annual policy. You can do that as an individual, a couple, or a family (generally including dependants up to 25 years of age). Once you have the policy, there’s one less thing to worry about when planning each holiday.</p> <p>However, there are a couple of things to consider — besides the issues that apply for every policy. First, annual policies may have a lower age cut-off than one-off policies, so check when making your shortlist. Second, there’s likely to be a maximum number of days of coverage for each overseas holiday — typically between 30 and 60 days.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Medical expenses and evacuation</strong><br />Ensure that the policy covers unlimited costs for medical expenses and evacuation. You simply don’t know how much it may cost to keep you alive. A doctor friend once had to call on an executive jet to lift a patient out of the Himalayas, and I’ve had to sign a form on a beach in Antarctica saying I’ll pay the $US 45,000 for the medical evacuation flight if the insurance company didn’t (fortunately, it did).</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Pre-existing conditions</strong><br />Dreaded pre-existing conditions. Have you got high cholesterol, a lung complaint, arteries that are obstructed (even to a minor extent), or other ailments that may come with age? If so, expect that many insurance companies simply won’t cover you and those that do will charge a significantly higher premium.</p> <p>One option is to roll the dice and accept that you won’t be covered if you have a medical event overseas related to that condition. But what’s the point of buying travel insurance if it doesn’t cover the most likely event?</p> <p>The terms of the policies are really conservative, too. If a doctor has ever diagnosed you with high cholesterol (that’s over 5.5 mmol/L), then that’s what you have. It would be foolish to not ask your doctor how healthy your heart is but once you get the answer, you have to report it to your insurance company. Indeed, if you find out anything adverse even halfway through an annual policy, the insurance company may require you to report it.</p> <p>If you do have to seek travel insurance when you have a pre-existing condition, you are likely to encounter one of three scenarios. The most desirable is that it’s a pre-existing condition that the insurance company automatically accepts. However, you may have to fill out a questionnaire that the insurance company will judge you on, or you may be required to undertake a medical examination.</p> <p>If you have a medical condition that’s likely to concern an insurance company, you may want to start thinking about what travel insurance you need well before booking your trip.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Reciprocal healthcare</strong><br />Australia has an agreement with the following countries to provide subsidised treatment for essential services to anyone with Medicare: Belgium, Finland, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, NZ, Norway, Ireland, Slovenia, Sweden, and the UK.</p> <p>You may think you don’t need travel insurance if you’re only visiting those countries, but that is not the case. The agreement doesn’t cover you if your luggage is stolen or if you get sick in transit, nor does it cover an expensive repatriation flight to get you back to a hospital in Australia.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Parents at home</strong><br />Many of us have aging parents. Check the conditions of your policy to ensure you’re covered if there’s a medical emergency at home that you need to rush back to.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Rental car excess</strong><br />If you rent a vehicle overseas, it’s likely you’ll be asked to pay a high daily fee to reduce the excess on the vehicle’s insurance. So, you may get the car for $40 per day and then pay $35 per day to cover the excess. One way around this is to rent the car through an Australian company like Driveaway Holidays, who has a more reasonable excess of $10 per day. Or you may find that your travel insurance covers the excess (most do) and you can pay a little more to cover an even more exorbitant excess fee.</p> <p>A note of caution is necessary here. In Canada, I’ve been told by one of the major rental car companies that they provide absolutely no insurance on the vehicle — so if you don’t pay their ridiculous rate, the car has no insurance.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Activities and the rest</strong><br />If you are going to be doing any activities on your holiday, check they are covered. This is particularly true for motorcycling, climbing, or scuba diving. And if you’ll be engaged in any snow sports, expect to pay an additional premium.</p> <p>There are a lot of other events that may be covered by your travel insurance that may turn out to be useful. However, if you are covered for medical, disruptions, and baggage, you can travel with some sense of security. See you at the airport.</p> <p>What’s your experience with travel insurance? Or have you ever needed it and not had it?</p> <p><em>Written by <span>David McGonigal</span>. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/choosing-the-best-travel-insurance.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>. </em></p>

International Travel

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The greatest road trips on Earth

<p>Many Australians love driving holidays. Indeed, cars are our most popular form of travel. So<span> </span><em>Lonely Planet'</em>s<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/epic-drives-of-the-world-lonely-planet/prod9781786578648.html" target="_blank"><span><em>Epic Drives of the World</em></span></a>, recently released this month, is really preaching to the converted.</p> <p>If you are a motoring enthusiast, have plans for driving holidays overseas or simply have an interest in the world’s wildest corners, this book is worth seeking out. Likewise, I’m sure it’ll be a popular Fathers’ Day or Christmas present.</p> <p>The folk at<span> </span><em>Lonely Planet</em><span> </span>know a thing or two about world travel. Indeed, the collective knowledge across all its titles reveals the world in almost microscopic detail. So when the publisher turns its attention to a particular form of travel the results can be rewarding.</p> <p>There are 50 drives that are covered in detail within this book. Here are a select few to get you started on the ultimate self-drive adventure.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Australia</strong><br />Of course, if you want to know how well a book covers a topic, you look to see how it covers the drives within Australia. There are six of these from the obvious ones, like the<span> </span><span>Great Ocean Road</span> and Alice Springs to Darwin – to the more obscure; like the Captain Cook Highway from Cairns to Mossman or the Gibb River Road across the Kimberley.</p> <p>The other options for the Gibb River Road aren’t for the faint hearted. Take your pick from the Canning Stock Route, the Gunbarrel Highway or the Simpson Desert.</p> <p>For some more creative desert variations outside of Australia, take a look at Namibia’s Skeleton Coast, Chile’s Atacama Desert or a drive out of Muscat, Oman?</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">The World</strong><br />Ever thought of driving along Norway’s convoluted west coast? It’s both challenging and rewarding as the road swoops and soars from one fiord to the next – there are points when you have to take a ferry to continue. Other options given are the little-known Monastery Route in Moldova and a drive in northern Greece.</p> <p>Recently, there’s been a lot of interest in Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way that follows a trail through history and some really spectacular scenery. And, of course, there’s the legendary craic where Irish hospitality ensures you’ll always leave as a friend.</p> <p>For a wild and wonderful island circuit head for Iceland. While the drive can be challenging, often having to travel over lava beds, this young and growing island has geysers, icefields and waterfalls.</p> <p>Bhutan may seem a remote and aloof Himalayan Shangri-la where merely visiting is special enough. So why not go the extra step and take the very scenic drive from Thimpu, the capital, to Gangtey? I’ve been told that the longest straight stretch of road in this Himalayan kingdom is less than 200 metres.</p> <p>Alternatively, how about the drive down the Manali Road from the Indian region of Leh, which is often called Little Tibet? Once this route was used purely for military purposes but now there’s a ski resort near Manali.</p> <p>In the south of France, the Cote d’Azur has the Three Corniches drive. Not only are there wonderful views over the Mediterranean and Monaco, but this is also the first road in the world to be tarred by John McAdam around 1820.</p> <p>In Germany, the Black Forest Highway traverses the most spectacular part of the country. While the road is great you need to stop where you can and go for a walk to make the most of this region.</p> <p>Or hop across the Mediterranean where the drive south from Marrakesh to Taroudant on the edge of the Sahara in Morocco takes you across the high Atlas Mountains.</p> <p>These are just a taste of the road trips detailed in<span> </span><em>Epic Drives of the World</em>. I finished it concluding that I may need to extend my bucket list, considerably.</p> <p>Where have your favourite road trips been?</p> <p><em>Written by <span>David McGonigal</span>. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/the-greatest-road-trips-on-earth.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

International Travel

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How to travel to your next destination like a VIP

<p>Travel is an important part of self-care. Studies have shown that going on trips bring a lot of benefits: it refreshes your senses, improves your health and wellbeing, and increases your happiness. So why not make your travel the best experience it can be?</p> <p>Travelling like a VIP is not as complicated as you might think. Here are a few things you can do to create a splendid and unforgettable travel experience.</p> <p><strong>Get a local’s perspective</strong></p> <p>You might have taken the standard holiday tour, where you’re simply whisked from one popular destination to another according to a rigid schedule. While this type of tour gets you to most attractions, the experience is often limited to picture taking and rushed sightseeing.</p> <p>Globus offers a richer, more authentic kind of adventure. The trips are specially designed to include <span><a href="https://goo.gl/h878Kq">up close and personal experiences</a></span>, where you can get culturally immersed and learn more local knowledge and secrets.</p> <p>The choices range from staying overnight at an authentic French château, meeting an Iditarod champion and their sled dogs in Alaska, living with an Andean family in rural Peru, and more. Whatever your destination is, you can be sure to get more than ‘just seeing it’.</p> <p>The tour directors and local guides are handpicked from the region through which you are travelling, so you know you’re in the right hands. They will go beyond scratching the surface to help you discover what truly makes each destination unique. Should you have any questions about the area, they will provide their vast insider knowledge and help you make the most out of your free time.</p> <p><strong>Go for the special access</strong></p> <p>To provide the most seamless, enjoyable experiences, Globus has prepared special VIP access for most of the tour trips. This means you will be at the front and centre of more sights and excursions, as well as special behind-the-scenes experiences to allow you to take in all the customs and flavours of each stop. With VIP access, you won’t have to wait in long lines to enjoy what every destination has to offer. Why spend time queuing up when you can spend time basking in the views of Michelangelo’s masterpiece ceiling paintings or the Baroque stuccos in <span><a href="https://goo.gl/MN1Mfe">St. Peter’s Basilica</a></span>? Even better, you can document the whole journey with the <span><a href="https://goo.gl/ojU4i4">GlobusGO</a></span> app, a digital combination of travel guide and journal. Taking trip notes, snapping pictures and sharing your experiences to friends and family are made easy with the app, which works without WiFi or cellular data.</p> <p><img style="width: 476.723px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7823034/vatican_city_109357367_ss.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/64fbbe1187c3439ca4ee8fe5bb7174db" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Fountain of St Peter's Square, Vatican City</em></p> <p><strong>Don’t settle for less</strong></p> <p>Details and logistics are some of the holiday matters that VIPs would not deal with – so neither should you. Globus has it all prepared from the sunrise to the day’s end. Getting from A to B in style will not be an issue with a deluxe motorcoach, equipped with free Wi-Fi and extra leg room for the ultimate relaxation. After a long day of travelling, you will be welcomed to a comfortable first-class hotel room.</p> <p style="position: relative; overflow: hidden; padding-top: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/amHNlWMXNTA" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" style="width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; border: 0;" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>With 91 years of experience, Globus understands that travel goes beyond just being there. With a range of carefully <span><a href="https://goo.gl/h878Kq">curated experiences</a></span> across Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas, discover a trip to remember.</p> <p>For more information on Globus, <span><a href="https://goo.gl/BbwWHL">view the brochures here</a></span>.</p> <p><em>This is sponsored content brought to you in conjunction with <span><a href="https://goo.gl/dc2pcp">Globus</a></span>.</em></p>

International Travel

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Why you should revisit Queenstown

<p>The ‘adventure capital’ Queenstown is reinventing itself as New Zealand’s sophisticated travel destination.</p> <p>Very few arrivals are as dramatic as flying into Queenstown from Australia. After a three-hour flight from Sydney the featureless ocean gives way to the western rampart of the alps of the South Island and the deep fiord of Milford Sound. Minutes later the aircraft flies along Lake Wakatipu, circles snow-capped peaks and drops into Queenstown airport. Friendly New Zealand immigration procedures (as long as you aren’t carrying honey or fruit) and prompt baggage delivery follow then you’re in the self-proclaimed Adventure Capital of the World.</p> <p>If you are related to an adrenaline-seeking teen, you probably have already heard about the delights of snowboarding the Remarkables, jet boating the Shotover and bungee jumping off Kewara Bridge. But if, like us, your days of lining up for an hour for a Fergburger before tandem skydiving are behind you, you’ll be gratified to know Queenstown has matured over the past decade into a travel destination of much broader appeal to a wider age range and level of urbanity.</p> <p>Mark Rose, the general manager of the Rees Hotel that overlooks the lake, credits at least some of the newfound sophistication of the city to Australian visitors. “You simply arrived with greater food expectations and demanded that they be met,” he says. “We have long great wines and now we offer a dining experience to match them.”</p> <p><span>The Rees Hotel</span><span> </span>certainly adds to the upmarket ‘nothing-is-too-much-trouble’ atmosphere. Bags disappear only to reappear in our room that features a wall of windows overlooking the mountains, lake and the golf course on the other side of Frankton Arm. </p> <p>While only a few minutes’ drive from town, the Rees offers a beautiful half-hour lakeside walk past Queenstown Gardens to the quaint, yet bustling, town. The region may have a population of less than 30,000 residents but at peak summer and winter season they can be outnumbered three to one with about two million visitors a year.</p> <p><strong>Stargazing</strong></p> <p>Queenstown’s clear air and mountain location is well suited to stargazing. And it’s easy to do at the top of the<span> </span><span>Skyline Gondola</span>. While just about every visitor will take the gondola for a bird’s-eye view of the city only the canny will do it at sunset and stay for the stargazing. Fortunately, there’s a restaurant at the top with a very extensive buffet and wonderful views over the town and lake to watch the last lights over the mountains as the stars come out.</p> <p>After meeting the astronomer guides, a short walk from the top station complex leaves the city lights behind and the sky comes to life. Under expert tutelage the heavens start to make sense. Then you have a chance to examine them in detail through several high-powered telescopes. Whether viewing beautiful constellations, craters on the moon or the rings of Saturn it’s a powerful experience.</p> <p><strong>Exploring</strong></p> <p>In winter, Queenstown is a dormitory for the surrounding ski fields. In the warmth of summer the options are greatly extended. Yes, you can jet boat while recalling that it was invented in NZ in 1954 by Sir William Hamilton – who later took one up the Ganges with Sir Edmund Hillary. Or, you can take a leisurely cruise on Lake Wakatipu aboard the TSS Earnshaw steam ship.</p> <p>There are several nearby golf courses to select from and even more fishing options. Queenstown’s climate, particularly in spring and autumn, is perfect for hiking or biking and the combination of lakes and mountains ensure you’re never without a view.</p> <p>For an even more dramatic panorama take to the sky in a hot-air balloon, a helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft. A local flight is thrilling enough but it’s not far beyond Glenorchy into Milford Sound. There’s the chance to take a thrilling flight in an overpowered warbird, too. Of course, in New Zealand where helicopters are regarded as mere extensions to your legs, you can opt for a tour of local wineries by helicopter.</p> <p>You won’t be in Queenstown long before you learn that the surrounds were the real stars in many scenes of<span> </span><em>The Hobbit</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>Lord of the Rings</em>. A location tour will be able to give more specific information than you could ever glean on your own. Inevitably, you can combine that with a<span> </span><span>helicopter flight in a Heli-Hobbit tour</span>.</p> <p><strong>Self-drive</strong></p> <p>Exploring the area in a rental vehicle is the perfect way to do it at your own pace. The hardest decision will be what direction to head first. Along the eastern side of the lake to a village simply called Paradise and beyond to Glenorchy takes you through Hobbit country and it’s just as spectacular in natural 3D.</p> <p>It’s hard to go past heading north to the quaint old gold rush town of<span> </span><span>Arrowtown</span><span> </span>where wandering around the shops, down to the river or into a café is all within range of a leisurely stroll. From Queenstown you drive out past the bungy jumping at Kawaru Gorge and Skippers Canyon. Here, too, is the<span> </span><span>Cardrona Hotel</span><span> </span>with a beautiful mountain backdrop that harks back to an earlier era.</p> <p>After a great mountain pass drive you arrive in Wanaka that, like Queenstown, is also on a lake and boasts excellent local skiing in winter. While many see the two towns as competitors they really complement each other. Wanaka is the more tranquil alternative to Queenstown. Queenstown is the more vibrant city, with a lot more going on.</p> <p><strong>Wineries</strong></p> <p>The South Otago region boasts more than 200 wineries and there’s much more to it than just pinot noir and sauvignon blanc, though they do dominate. While you are spoiled for choice – and many have restaurants attached –<span> </span><span>Rippon</span><span> </span>just outside Wanaka is certainly different. It is a biodynamic vineyard that is fertiliser- and fungicide-free and uses natural fermentation.</p> <p>To explore the wineries you can self-drive, take an escorted tour, or one of a range of heli-wine tours.</p> <p><strong>Dining</strong></p> <p>At dinner in downtown Queenstown in the beautiful stone-and-timber Sasso Italian restaurant I marvelled at how far service, hospitality and cuisine has come in such a short time in Queenstown. It seems not long ago that dining in Queenstown was mainly about consuming enough carbs to get through the next day’s activities. Now we found a sophisticated, distinctly New Zealand menu with an Italian flavour presented with real appreciation of the pleasure food can bring.</p> <p>On our last night in Queenstown we joined Mark Rose at dinner at the True South restaurant in<span> </span><span>the Rees Hotel</span>. Besides running the most urbane hotel in Queenstown, Mark’s advice on wineries suggested his wine choices would be something special. They were.</p> <p>Looking out over the still waters of the lake while sipping a local Surveyor Thompson pinot noir, he outlined his philosophy of hospitality. It was to build on the natural setting that lured us here by extending the natural warmth of NZ congeniality, a building that blends with its surrounds and, especially, providing fine food and wine. True South’s menu lists the names and websites of its suppliers from Cardrona lamb to Gibbston Valley cheese. It also boasts that “Sourcing high quality suppliers south of Christchurch, buying local not only assures freshness and quality control, it reduces food miles and encourages sustainable practices.”</p> <p>The<span> </span><span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.queenstownnz.co.nz/" target="_blank">Queenstown website</a></span><span> </span>is a great place to discover all there is to do – for all ages – in this increasingly impressive little town.</p> <p>Have you been to Queenstown? Join the conversation below.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>David McGonigal</span>. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/why-you-should-re-visit-queenstown.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

International Travel

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5 reasons why New Zealand rocks

<p>New Zealand is a geological wonderland featuring a range of fascinating formations – some as old as time, some more recent arrivals.</p> <p>Smooth round spheres or squished pancake stones, New Zealand boasts all manner of rocky curiosities that make visitors scratch their heads. What are they? How did they form? Here’s a brief guide to some of the country’s most interesting and otherworldly arrangements.</p> <p><strong>Dinosaur Eggs, Kaikōura</strong></p> <p>The 2016 Kaikōura earthquake unearthed a cluster of previously unseen stones. The size of beach balls, these newest kids on the geological block have been dubbed “dinosaur eggs”. Part of the uplifted seabed at Gooch’s Beach, the boulders are concretions – distinctive masses of mineral material that have embedded themselves in sedimentary rock. Some are cracked in two while others are perfect spheres. One thing is certain: they were not apparent before the mighty November shake. The question on all the locals’ lips is will these stony orbs give New Zealand’s famous Moeraki Boulders a run for their money?</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips</strong></p> <p>Kaikōura is about 200km north of Christchurch and 155km south of Picton on the South Island. Most visitors come for the town’s famous seafood (Kaikōura means 'eat crayfish') and to spot whales, dolphins, seals and shorebirds. The Southern Alps meet the ocean here, and the region is welcoming year-round. Gooch’s Beach, a stony bay popular among surfers, is a short distance from the Kaikōura Esplanade.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Split Apple Rock, Tasman Bay</strong></p> <p>Created via a process known as ice wedging, this whopping nugget of granite is shaped a little bit like an apple that’s been cut in half – hence the name. Historically, Māori people explained the oddity with a tale that involved two mighty gods fighting over who owned the rock. To settle the matter, they chopped it in half. Resting on a boulder pile that seemingly floats on the sea about 50m off the beach between Kaiteriteri and Marahau, this wonder (called Tokangawhā in Māori) is accessible by foot or kayak and, when the tide is out, you can even wade over and peer directly into its core.</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips</strong></p> <p>Tasman Bay, near Nelson at the top of the South Island, is a tourist hotspot – the gateway to Abel Tasman National Park and home to all manner of hikes, cycling adventures and wildlife. Visit any time, though the cooler months between April and October mean less people and more peace.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Pancake Rocks, West Coast</strong></p> <p>Punakaiki’s layered Pancake Rocks were formed 30 million years ago from the penetration of marine creatures and plants into submerged limestone by extreme water pressure. Over time, seismic activity lifted the limestone above the seabed, and acid rain, wind and waves further sculpted the striated stone. When the tide is high and the sea is rough, some of the rocks become gushing blowholes. Make time for the Pancake Rocks and Blowholes Walk, which takes about 30 minutes.</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips</strong></p> <p>Punakaiki is located between Greymouth and Westport on the west coast of the South Island. The road between the two towns was rated one of the world’s top 10 coastal drives by Lonely Planet. If you’re not in a hurry, spend a night at Punakaiki Beach Camp, where the stargazing is out of this world. There are also walks, glow worms and the Pancake Rocks Cafe, which serves delicious food – yes, even pancakes.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Cathedral Cove, Coromandel Peninsula</strong></p> <p>Known to Māori people as Te Whanganui-a-Hei, this stunning natural formation near Hahei Beach on the Coromandel Peninsula is accessed via a relatively easy 2.5km walk. The cove features dramatic coastal scenery and an archway that frames a giant sea stack (which stars in countless photos). With towering white cliffs that burst out of the earth during an eruption some 8 million years ago, Cathedral Cove is named for its photogenic triangle-shaped cave. From the car park, the walk takes about 90 minutes return, though you’ll want to spend the better part of the day here.</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips</strong></p> <p>Hahei is a roughly two-hour drive east of Auckland. Besides hiking in Cathedral Cove, visitors can snorkel at the magnificent marine reserve off Gemstone Bay, kayak, take a boat tour or soak at heavenly Hot Water Beach. Take food and drinks with you, or try one of the delightful cafes at Hahei when you’re tuckered out.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Elephant Rocks, North Otago</strong></p> <p>Discovered on a private farm in North Otago, 5km from Duntroon, these sizable limestone rocks – some 10m wide – squat in the green grass like animals. If you didn’t have your glasses on, you’d be forgiven for mistaking them for elephants. At least if you squint. Access is via an easy five-minute walk, whereupon visitors wonder how these permanent pieces found their way into this paddock. It’s also refreshing that the farmer hasn’t chosen to charge admission so long as visitors respect the rocks and the stock.</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips</strong></p> <p>A 40-minute drive from historic Oamaru on the South Island (today also known as the steampunk capital of New Zealand), tiny Duntroon is home to Vanished World, a facility that shares the magic of the area’s fossilised charms. The Māori rock drawings Takiroa are also in the region, as is the Alps 2 Ocean cycleway, which passes Elephant Rocks.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/5-reasons-why-new-zealand-rocks/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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The top 10 travel bucket list adventures

<p>Sailing to Antarctica, cruising the Galapagos Islands and travelling along the Trans-Siberian Railway are the top three trips every traveller must take in their lifetime, according to US-based Flight Network’s World’s Best Once-In-A-Lifetime Journeys 2018 list.</p> <p><a href="https://www.flightnetwork.com/blog/worlds-best-journeys/">The 50 destination list</a>, compiled by the <a href="https://www.flightnetwork.com.au/">Flight Network</a> and more than 500 representatives from various travel industries, includes three entries from Australia – driving the Great Ocean Road (19), hiking the Blue Mountains (42) and driving the Australian Outback (28). Read on for the top 10</p> <p><strong>1. Expedition to Antarctica</strong></p> <p>You can catch ships bound for Antarctica from Ushuaia, Argentina. If you choose to take that route you will need to fly into Buenos Aires, then take a connecting flight to Ushuaia’s Malvinas Argentinas International Airport.</p> <p><strong>2. Cruise the Galapagos Islands</strong></p> <p>You will need to do some serious legwork to get to the Galapagos Island. They are located in the eastern Pacific Ocean, some 973 km off the coast of South America.</p> <p><strong>3. Travel the Trans-Siberian Railway</strong></p> <p>The Trans-Siberian Railway is the world’s longest train journey at 9,300km and offers a classic, 7-day trip starting from Moscow and ending in the port city of Vladivostok.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs4mcxXDHd7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs4mcxXDHd7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Marek Jasiński (@jasinski.marek)</a> on Jan 20, 2019 at 9:11pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>4. Trek to Machu Picchu</strong></p> <p>To travel to Machu Picchu you will need to land in the Alejandro Velasco Astete International Airport in Cusco, Peru.</p> <p><strong>5. Drive the Pacific Coast Highway</strong></p> <p>The 951-kilometre highway is a legendary drive that takes roughly 15 hours to complete.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bsk6LuDA17A/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bsk6LuDA17A/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jade ✈️🌎 (@jade_woodall)</a> on Jan 13, 2019 at 5:38am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>6. Drive Iceland’s Ring Road</strong></p> <p>The 1,332 km drive starts in Keflavik, and weaves around the entire island taking in glaciers, waterfalls and an ice tunnel.</p> <p><strong>7. Cruise to Alaska</strong></p> <p>This cruise through Alaska was named the number one cruise in the world. With Vancouver, British Columbia a handy departure point for Alaska, it’s pretty easy to get to.</p> <p><strong>8. Camino de Santiago</strong></p> <p>Begin the trek by flying into Biarritz Pays Basque Airport – a 52 km drive from St. Pied de Port, France, which marks the starting point of the Camino Francés.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs08Vi2F2ip/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs08Vi2F2ip/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by 🔝 Best pictures of Greece 🔝 (@greece_united)</a> on Jan 19, 2019 at 11:05am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>9. Sail the Greek Islands</strong></p> <p>Why stop at one island when you can take your time and see them all? Hire a sailboat and cruise through the Greek Islands at your leisure.</p> <p><strong>10. Drive the Dalmatian Coast of Croatia</strong></p> <p>The Dalmatian Coast is located 23 km southeast from Dubrovnik in the town of Cilipi.</p> <p>To view the list of all 50 destinations, <a href="https://www.flightnetwork.com/blog/worlds-best-journeys/">click here</a>. </p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/aussie-travel-destinations-make-top-50-travel-bucket-list">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>. </em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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10 things you didn't know about the Philippines

<p>The Philippines has more than 7641 lush tropical islands surrounded by turquoise water. For years, this incredible destination has gone under the radar. But Australian travellers are starting to take note.</p> <p>It’s an incredible destination that is perfect for Australians’ considering their love of adventure, travel and passion for discovering unexplored destinations,” Norjamin Delos Reyes, Tourism Attaché at Philippine Department of Tourism Australia and New Zealand says.</p> <p>“Our lush, tropical backdrops, stunning sunsets, and dreamy tropical beaches make the Philippines one of the most exotic holiday destinations.</p> <p>“As a destination, it is still relatively undiscovered and offers unparalleled value, so there’s no better time to get to know our tropical archipelago, world-renowned for its abundance of beauty, wildlife and bio-diversity.”</p> <p>Here are 10 things you may not know about the Philippines according to Norjamin:</p> <p><strong>1. The Philippines officially has 7641 islands.</strong> The number increased in 2018 when more islands were officially recognised and counted.</p> <p><strong>2. We are a county of smiling, highly skilled, English-speaking people.</strong> Don’t be shy about approaching a Filipino and starting a conversation. We’re not just fun, we’re officially friendly too. Forbes.com ranked the Philippines as the friendliest country in Asia and the eighth friendliest place in the world.</p> <p><strong>3. The Philippines is officially home to the ‘Best Islands in the World’,</strong> with the stunning destination’s islands consistently recognised in the highly acclaimed Conde Nast Traveller’s Readers’ Choice. In October 2018, the awards were categorised into regions, with the Philippines scooping the top three best islands in Asia: Siargo, Boracay and Palawan were listed respectively.</p> <p><strong>4. The Philippines was also named ‘Asia’s Leading Beach Destination 2018</strong>’ at the prestigious World Travel Awards.</p> <p><strong>5. The Philippines offers excellent value for money</strong>, with a bottle of beer only $1.</p> <p><strong>6. The town of Vigan in the province of Ilocos Sur</strong> was officially inaugurated as one of the Seven Wonder Cities of the World in May 2015.</p> <p><strong>7. The Philippines is the heart of marine biodiversity.</strong> The Philippines archipelago is located within the Coral Triangle and has 76 per cent of the world’s coral species, six of the world’s seven marine turtle species and at least 2,228 reef fish species.</p> <p><strong>8. The ‘It’s more fun in the Philippines’ marketing campaign,</strong> stemmed from a single question asked to the Department of Tourism ‘why would a tourist want to come to the Philippines?’</p> <p><strong>9. Puerto Princesa Subterranean River is a UNESCO World Heritage Site</strong> and one of the new Seven Wonders of Nature.</p> <p><strong>10. The Philippines was named in honour of King Philip II of Spain.</strong> Spanish explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos, during his expedition in 1542, named the islands of Leyte and Samar Felipinas after the then Prince of Asturias. Eventually, the name Las Islas Filipinas would be used to cover all the island of the archipelago.</p> <p>Did you know these facts? Have you ever been to the Philippines? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Editorial Staff.<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/philippines-facts/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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Top spot for Australians to retire in 2019

<p>Picture a more tanned version of yourself, with a slightly wider smile. Perched on a motorbike, riding from beach to beach through an endless summer. Fuelled by pad thai and panang gai, the magical sunsets guide your sunny poolside days into lazy luxurious evenings.</p> <p>As much as we want to escape the sunburnt, expatriate retiree look, it’s inevitable. There’s no better place to embrace it than in Thailand.</p> <p>After a year of deliberation, the International Living Australia Global Retirement Rankings are complete. And it’s not hard to guess which country tops the list.</p> <p><strong>Thailand – the country of smiles </strong></p> <p>Whether you’re after spiritual development, tropical island bliss or just a really good massaman, Thailand has something for you.</p> <p>This Southeast Asian gem has a population of just under 70 million people and is known for its magical island clusters such as the Phi Phi Islands, and its culture rich capital Bangkok.</p> <p>It’s always been popular holiday location. But Thailand’s recent growth as a retirement destination has named it as the International Living Australia Global Retirement number one for 2019.</p> <p>Infinity pools and crystal-clear beaches wrap around Thailand’s coastline. Limestone cliffs and mountainous jungle retreats are abundant. Luxury is an everyday feat in this glorious country. With some of the most beautiful resorts in the world and year-round good weather, there’s a reason it tops the list.</p> <p>Not to mention – its ridiculously cheap. Treat yourself to a five-star meal or a rose petal massage. Or just do it every day. In Thailand, living in comfort is easy. What better solution to remove the financial stress of retiring.</p> <p>Most people from Thailand speak English, and they are among the friendliest in the world. It is estimated that there are currently 4-5 million expats living in Thailand, and it’s only a 7-hour flight from Australia. It’s authentic mix of Western comfort and traditional Southeast Asian culture means you’ll never feel too far from home. About 100,000 of Thailand’s expats are on retirement visas, and they’ve got the right idea.</p> <p>It’s also not difficult to travel, with the super affordable and accessible transport around the country. Bangkok to Phuket or Chiang Mai; hopping on a first-class train is more convenient than ever. It also makes it that much easier to visit some of Thailand’s spectacular neighbours; Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Singapore and Malaysia.</p> <p>Living in style isn’t difficult with Thailand’s world class shopping, where silks and knock-off designers cost next to nothing. Or you could adopt the Buddhist attitudes and reject materialism and desire.</p> <p>Even if you aren’t religious, it’s hard not to adapt to the peaceful spiritual climate in Thailand. The promotion of simplicity and health encourages a very serene way of life. Happiness is a priority in this tropical country, and it’s all about living in the moment.</p> <p>For the more adventurous, the diving industry is growing rapidly and hosts some of the most spectacular locations. Mountain and jungle exploration is plentiful, with Thailand hosting some of the most extraordinary wildlife. Spot wild gibbons and wash an elephant or visit the tigers at the Huai Kha Khaeng conservation.</p> <p>Whether it’s the tropical weather, a longing for personal spiritual development, the pink lotus lakes or the cheap pad thai, Thailand probably has what you’ve been searching for. It’s time to embark on the adventures you’ve been waiting your whole life for.</p> <p><em>Written by Jemma Newlyn. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/top-spot-australians-retire-2019/">MyDiscoveries</a>. </em></p>

International Travel

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Can you spot the bizarre item on this in-flight menu?

<p>British Airways has shocked a passenger aboard a flight with a bizarre warning.</p> <p>Michael L. Brown was perusing over the in-flight menu when he noticed an unconventional message written in fine print.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">You've got to be kidding me. From the British Airways in-flight menu from London to Chicago. <a href="https://t.co/lfecoXAllk">pic.twitter.com/lfecoXAllk</a></p> — Dr. Michael L. Brown (@DrMichaelLBrown) <a href="https://twitter.com/DrMichaelLBrown/status/1071727461510103041?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 9, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>It’s common for meals to come with words of caution, whether it be allergens or raw food. But one thing that many don’t come across is a warning for bullet fragments.</p> <p>The menu featured a dish called “Home Counties venison stew” and the text written below said: “Due to the nature of the product, there is a very small risk of bullet fragments that could be found in this meal.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 408px; height: 307px;" src="/media/7822453/capture.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/411f90063e2d4fc09855a97c4b51dbda" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: <a href="https://twitter.com/DrMichaelLBrown">Twitter @DrMichaelLBrown</a></em></p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/">The Sun</a></em>, Mr Brown said, “I travelled first class from Mumbai to Heathrow, and this item definitely wasn’t on the menu.</p> <p>“On my second flight from Heathrow to Chicago I noticed this item on the menu.”</p> <p>When Mr Brown raised his concerns with staff members, they were surprised and amused by the warning.</p> <p>“The two flight attendants I spoke with had never seen or noticed this before but got a good laugh out of it,” he said.</p> <p>“One joked with me that this warning could be so all Americans on board couldn’t sue them. I told them he could well be right.”</p> <p>But despite Mr Brown’s surprise, many users on Twitter claimed that the warning is fairly common.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">If we buy wild rabbit from Argentina here in Germany you´ll find everytime the information, that there is a small risk of bullet fragments.</p> — Darius Tremel (@Musicmaker2011) <a href="https://twitter.com/Musicmaker2011/status/1073145855895592960?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 13, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Venison is deer. Maybe they source their deer from local butcher shops/hunters? We live in MS. My husband is a military man of 15 years from Ok. That’s not weird to me 🤷🏻‍♀️</p> — Sis Latta (@cryslatta) <a href="https://twitter.com/cryslatta/status/1071774460942913536?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 9, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Pretty normal if you’ve ever hunted birds, although it’s not bullets, it’s shotgun beads 😁</p> — Randy Turnbow (@BigRedCurlyGuy) <a href="https://twitter.com/BigRedCurlyGuy/status/1071889826977218560?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 9, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Usually phrased as buckshot on menus here in the UK and certainly not unusual to see it called out. However, it is a note-worthy inclusion for an in-flight menu, I certainly can't recall it on <a href="https://twitter.com/British_Airways?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@British_Airways</a> before.</p> — Benn Glazier (@bennglazier) <a href="https://twitter.com/bennglazier/status/1072836775880601600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 12, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“These warnings are there as a precaution, and are common practice,” a spokesperson for British Airways told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/can-spot-bizarre-item-flight-menu-030319516.html" target="_blank"><em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em></a>.</p> <p>“We source the best British ingredients for our inflight menu and this is no exception.”</p>

International Travel

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This country now has the world’s most powerful passport

<p>Last year, Singapore was the most powerful passport in world. However, it is now tied in second place with Germany after the United Arab Emirates climbed the ladder this year to be the world’s most powerful passport, as reported by the <span><em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/travel/news/article.cfm?c_id=7&amp;objectid=12170816">New Zealand Herald</a></em></span>.</p> <p>The Middle Eastern state added four new countries to its easy entry destinations, bringing their total to 167 countries.</p> <p>Australia’s passport is in 7<sup>th</sup> place beside Malaysia, Slovenia, Poland, Lithuania, Slovakia and Latvia.</p> <p>Australians are free to travel to 109 countries visa-free and get automatic entry visas on arrival from 52 nations.</p> <p>New Zealand travellers are 6<sup>th</sup> on the list and can enjoy visa-free travel to 112 countries and obtain automatic entry visas in 50 countries upon arrival.</p> <p>Holders of Iceland and Maltese passports can enter 162 countries without a prearranged visa.</p> <p>The reason that the United Arab Emirates has surprised many people is due to the fact that last year the nation wasn’t even listed in the top 10 on the travel list.</p> <p>Dubai’s leader welcomed the news through a tweet stating, “Congratulations to the UAE and it’s people and big thanks to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation’s teams.”</p> <p>The least powerful passports include Iraq and Afghanistan which grant visa-free access to only 32 and 29 countries.</p> <p><strong>Passport power ranks:</strong></p> <ol> <li>United Arab Emirates</li> <li>Singapore, Germany</li> <li>Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Luxembourg, France, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Norway, South Korea and USA</li> <li>Belgium, Austria, Japan, Greece, Portugal, Switzerland, Ireland and Canada and United Kingdom</li> <li>Czech Republic and Hungary</li> <li>Malta, Iceland, New Zealand</li> <li>Malaysia, Slovenia, Poland, Lithuania, Slovakia, Latvia and Australia</li> <li>Estonia</li> <li>Romania and Bulgaria</li> <li>Cyprus and Liechtenstein</li> </ol> <p> </p>

International Travel