family & Pets

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5 easy ways to make your garden a great home for your pets

<p>Making your garden pet friendly isn’t as tricky as you think.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Desirable doghouse</strong></li> </ol> <p>Make sure the kennel is large enough for your dog to lie down and sit up comfortably, and small enough for him to keep warm with body heat. Use old towels and blankets for insulation and bedding – they’re easy to wash and keep flea free. Shelter the entrance from wind and raise the floor to prevent dampness.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Fresh repellent</strong></li> </ol> <p>Fed up with a dog repeatedly digging up the same spot in your garden? Keep the dog away by scattering a crumbled cake of toilet freshener over the area – the smell really puts them off.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Fruitful solution</strong></li> </ol> <p>Cats are repelled by the smell of citrus. To deter the local moggies from digging up young plants, poke pieces of citrus rind into the soil of flower and vegetable beds, then dust lightly with soil. Stockpile peel in the freezer for when the fruit is out of season.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Ants can’t swim</strong></li> </ol> <p>If your dog eats its meals in the garden, stop the ants from taking over by placing the food bowl in a dish filled with water.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>No-tip dish</strong></li> </ol> <p>Put water for your dog in a ring-style cake tin – the type that has a hole in the middle – and place it in a shady spot in the garden. To anchor the tin and prevent spills, drive a stake through the hole into the ground below. No amount of pawing will upturn it.</p> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/diy-projects/5-easy-ways-make-your-garden-great-home-your-pets">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

family & Pets

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How to choose the perfect pet for your family

<p>Here are a few steps that you should take before choosing a pet for your family.</p> <p><strong>Talk it over</strong></p> <p>Talk it over with your kids. Find out what your children want from a pet. Stress that animals aren’t toys.</p> <p><strong>Wait</strong></p> <p>Wait a few months to see if the desire was more than just a whim.</p> <p><strong>Set a budget</strong></p> <p>Set a budget. Decide what expenses you can meet.</p> <p><strong>Consider your home</strong></p> <p>Consider your home. A small unit with no access to the outside is usually an unhappy environment for dogs and cats, which, in turn, can be messy and destructive. </p> <p><strong>Consider safety</strong></p> <p>Consider safety. Cats scratch. Dogs bite. Young children can cause injury to fragile creatures.</p> <p><strong>Do extensive homework</strong></p> <p>Do extensive homework. Study animals’ varying needs.</p> <p><strong>Start small</strong></p> <p>Start small. Cats and dogs are demanding of time and money. Lower-maintenance animals can provide a good introduction to caring for a furry friend. Now let’s get into some specifics, beginning with mice…</p> <ul> <li><strong>Mice. </strong>Mice look sweet and are inexpensive, but they require gentle handling and are generally more active at night.</li> <li><strong>Guinea pigs. </strong>Guinea pigs need shelter, hiding places and an exercise area safe from predators. They are lovable and responsive: the more they are handled (gently) from the start, the tamer they become. They are extremely active, will get bored if cooped up and crave company.</li> <li><strong>Rabbits. </strong>Rabbits are cuddly and sociable. They need space and companionship – from humans and other bunnies. They may be kept outdoors with a hutch and an exercise run, or can live indoors and be house trained. Small pets usually have short life spans. Rabbits live 5-10 years; guinea pigs 5-7 years; mice only 2-3 years. For longevity, choose a tortoise – they can live 50-100 years.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-tips/everything-you-need-know-about-choosing-pet-your-kids">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

family & Pets

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Royal schoolgirl! Princess Charlotte’s first day of school is here

<p>Princess Charlotte is growing up way too fast, and has started her first day of “big kigs school”. </p> <p>The five-year-old will have her big brother to keep her company however, just like she did when she walked through the gates of St Thomas’ in Battersea in South London. </p> <p>The whole family, apart from baby Prince Louis, were all there for the little royal’s big day as she waved at cameras and shook the hand of her teacher. </p> <p>Kensington Palace Twitter account posted a gorgeous snap of Princess Char, 5, and Prince George, 6, to their Twitter account, stating “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to share a photograph of Prince George and Princess Charlotte at Kensington Palace this morning. The photo was taken shortly before Their Royal Highnesses left for Thomas’s Battersea.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">It’s the first day of school for Britain’s Princess Charlotte, fourth-in-line to the throne <a href="https://t.co/E8oXcAvVu8">pic.twitter.com/E8oXcAvVu8</a></p> — Reuters Top News (@Reuters) <a href="https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1169721867428671488?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 5, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>It is hard to believe, but just two years ago Prince George, the eldest son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, walked shyly through the school gate with his father. </p> <p>At the time, Duchess Kate had to miss the royal’s first day as she was experiencing severe morning sickness during her pregnancy with 16-month-old Prince Louis. </p> <p>Luckily for little Char, both parents were able to be apart of her first day - and clutched her mother’s hand tightly while fiddling with her ponytail. </p> <p>The Kensington Palace Instagram page also shared the sweet first moments of the 5-year-old meeting one of her school teachers. </p> <p>St Thomas’s in Battersea has 560 students aged from four to 13 and hold the ethos “be kind”.</p> <p>Headmaster Simon O’Malley said the school the royals are attending, emphasised key values such as “kindness, courtesy, confidence, humility and learning to be givers, not takers”.</p> <p>“We hope that our pupils will leave this school with a strong sense of social responsibility, set on a path to become net contributors to society and to flourish as conscientious and caring citizens of the world,” he said.</p> <p>Just as Prince George did, Princess Charlotte will adopt the same last name “Cambridge” upon entering the school system. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see royal’s first day at big kid school.</p>

family & Pets

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Outrage over definitive chocolate bar power rankings

<p>An Aussie father has managed to anger chocolate fans across the nation after posting a photo on social media showing what he believes to be the ideal ranking around chocolates.</p> <p>Bruno Bouchet, whose a Sydney-based managing director and a former Kyle &amp; Jackie O radio show producer included 16 bars in his list.</p> <p>“The 100 per cent correct chocolate bar power rankings,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Don’t bother commenting, this isn’t up for discussion.”</p> <p>There are five tiers which total to 16 chocolate bars in the list.</p> <p>He chose Picnic, Turkish Delight and Chomp as his “God tier”, followed by Snickers, Twix and Curly Wurly in the “Royalty tier”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B18KGTNBXN5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B18KGTNBXN5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">The 100% correct chocolate bar power rankings. Don’t bother commenting, this isn’t up for discussion. #chocolate #chocolateauthority #cadbury #mars #powerrankings #food #picnicbar #turkishdelight #chomp #snickers #twix #kitkat #crunchie #marsbar #aero #twirl #timeout #violetcrumble #milkyway #chokito #bountybar</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/brunobbouchet/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bruno Bouchet</a> (@brunobbouchet) on Sep 3, 2019 at 12:02am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In the hilariously named “Adam Sandler Tier” or the “(take it or leave it tier) was the KitKat, Crunchie and the Mars bar.</p> <p>In the next tier, known as the “pleb tier” included the Twirl, the Time Out and the Aero peppermint chocolate bar.</p> <p>Finally, in the “would rather eat a bucket of cat vomit tier” included the Violet Crumble, the Milky Way, the Chokito and the Bounty.</p> <p>Many are angered by Bouchet’s rankings, as they were annoyed that he didn’t include Cadbury Daily Milk or the Caramello bar as well as excluding the Cherry Ripe and the Flake.</p> <p>Fans weren’t impressed by the Turkish Delight’s strong ranking at the top of the list.</p> <p>"All of the great work you've done with the mighty Picnic has been soiled by that disgusting mess next to it, which I refuse to name," one commenter wrote.</p> <p>"What have you done????????? Kit kats are god tier. Turkish delights go on the bottom. Have you ever noticed that out of a box of favourites that they get left behind?" points out one user.</p> <p>Even Todd McKenney got on board with the banter, saying he was “too angry” for a response.</p> <p>"#violetcrumble was robbed! Who gives a rats arse about Turkish Delight? I'm so furious right now. Please don't reply - too angry," the star wrote.</p> <p>Bouchet spoke to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://kitchen.nine.com.au/latest/sydney-dad-trolls-wife-viral-chocolate-bar-ranking/935f3ba8-6c09-4402-81f0-1051b4acc2d3" target="_blank">Nine Honey</a></em><span> </span>about the divisive chocolate bar rankings.</p> <p>"Yesterday afternoon I was driving back from a few meetings and just knew that Australia had to be told the chocolate bar rankings by an expert that knows exactly what they're talking about," he said.</p> <p>"During my 4-years of university I lived on nothing but black coffee and chocolate bars, so there's no higher authority in the country than me — that's just a fact."</p> <p>The public outrage was surprising to Bouchet.</p> <p>"So far I've had hundreds of comments, but none that have presented a valid point on why my rankings are flawed,” he said.</p> <p>"I was a little surprised at the public response, I didn't realise people were so protective of their favourite chocolate bars. Some people hit back at me as if I were insulting a beloved family member, it's really quite amusing."</p>

family & Pets

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“We’re losing our penguins”: Stricter penalties demanded after a spate of dog attacks

<p><span>Calls have been renewed to increase the penalties for the owners of dogs which injured other animals in Tasmania after a spate of attacks on little penguins.</span></p> <p><span>Last Thursday, an attack in Wynyard saw 42 little penguins being mauled to death, sparking community outrage and an investigation by the Parks and Wildlife Service.</span></p> <p><span>According to the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-04/penguins-numbers-in-tasmania-dip-after-dog-attack-spate/11473906?pfmredir=sm">ABC</a></em>, this is the seventh attack on little penguin colonies in the past year, with the death toll reaching more than 170. </span></p> <p><span>“It just seems that we barely forget about one dog attack and then there’s another one that happens almost straight away,” said Birdlife Tasmania convenor Eric Woehler.</span></p> <p><span>“The Tasmanian community clearly has had enough … [Yet] we don’t see any real response in terms of changes on the ground.”</span></p> <p><span>Wynyard Mayor Robby Walsh said he was devastated by the deaths, and that he could not do much aside from pushing for increased surveillance. </span></p> <p><span>“We need physical patrols from rangers and community groups,” Walsh said. </span></p> <p><span>“Whilst we want to help, we can’t interfere. It falls within the jurisdiction of the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s a serious thing and I think the Parks and Wildlife need to work in some sort of assistance.”</span></p> <p><span>Walsh also ruled out the possibility of installing dog-proof fences. “Once they get a taste of them, they’ll be back... even an elephant fence wouldn’t stop them,” he said.</span></p> <p><span>“We can’t fence off the coast. The responsibility lies with the owners.”</span></p> <p><span>Penguin Rehab and Release president Kathy Grieveson said more solutions, such as clearer exclusionary zones and fines, should be considered to help protect penguin sanctuaries from dogs.</span></p> <p>“Every time we go down to the colony there are dog tracks all through them,” Grieveson told <em><a href="https://www.theadvocate.com.au/story/6357956/pet-owner-crackdown-on-the-cards-following-penguin-attack/">The Advocate</a></em>.  </p> <p>“If it means fining owners then... that seems to be the only thing that people take notice of – if it hits the back pocket.”</p> <p><span>Under the current Dog Control Act, the owner of a dog which attacks a person or an animal to cause minor injuries can be fined up to $650. Serious injuries may attract a fine of up to $2,600.</span></p> <p><span>Woehler said the penalty should be harsher. “Let’s make it about $1,000 as a starting point. We’re talking about $40,000 for what we’ve just seen on the last weekend,” he said. “We’re losing our penguins in Tasmania.”</span></p> <p><span>In June, the Tasmanian Government said it would review and strengthen the laws, with more rangers being deployed to the danger areas.</span></p>

family & Pets

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5 everyday habits of great dog owners

<p>These everyday habits of great dog owners are something to aspire to. How many do you do?</p> <p><strong>1. You pick up more than just poop</strong></p> <p>Picking up your dog’s poop is Good Doggie Care 101 but truly great pet owners will be mindful of any mess their animal makes and clean up after them, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://drruthpetvet.com/" target="_blank">Ruth MacPete</a>, veterinarian and author of Lisette the Vet. This means not only cleaning up poop piles from the neighbour’s lawn but wiping up pee, drool or other liquids in public places; picking up the pieces when your dog shreds a toy; and making amends if your pup chews someone’s shoe, pees on a rug or otherwise makes a mess.</p> <p><strong>2. You do a daily "snout-to-tail" check</strong></p> <div id="page4" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Great pet owners care deeply about their dog’s wellbeing and spend a few minutes each day giving them a once-over, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://sitmeanssit.com/dog-training-mu/fairfield-dog-training/tag/neil-cohen/" target="_blank">Neil Cohen</a>, dog behaviour expert, owner and head trainer at Sit Means Sit. “By touching your dog, from snout to tail (and everywhere in between) you not only teach a dog to accept your touch, should they need it in an emergency, but you also familiarise yourself with their body, enabling you to quickly notice anything that wasn’t there yesterday – like a tick, cut, tumour, etc.,” he explains.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners"><strong>3. You are consistent with the rules</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners"> <p>Great pet owners know that forbidding their dog to eat off the counter one day and then allowing it the next isn’t being kind, it’s just confusing. Dogs thrive with rules, Cohen says. “Maintain regular boundaries, for example, no counter surfing, no nose on the table, no jumping on people,” he says. “Boundaries establish leadership/authority and make your dog more comfortable in your pack.”</p> <p><strong>4. You encourage your dog's natural instincts in a healthy way</strong></p> <p>All dogs are born needing to bite, chew and chase but all too often those instincts get them in trouble in the human world. Great dog owners understand this and give the dog safe ways to express their nature, Benson says. “Give your dogs food puzzles or other games and toys that allow them to practice natural canine behaviours like chewing and ‘hunting’ for their food,” she says.</p> <p><strong>5. You correct your dog with kindness</strong></p> <p>When your dog acts up, you need to bring them back in line. But great dog owners know the difference between correction and punishment, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.kristibenson.com/" target="_blank">Kristi Benson</a>, a certified canine therapy trainer and behaviour expert. They use their voice to reassure, comfort and correct their dog – not scare them, she says. “Good owners will not use yelling, swatting, training collars or other physical punishments as they know they are bad for the dog’s welfare,” she explains. “Modern dog training techniques can help you teach your dog to obey without using harsh punishments.”</p> <p><em>Written by Charlotte Hilton Andersen. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

family & Pets

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Steve Irwin: Remembering The Crocodile Hunter 13 years after his passing

<p>Not many Australian’s have achieved what Steve Irwin has, and that’s being titled a legend in his own right.</p> <p>Today marks the 13th anniversary since the death of the iconic wildlife conservationist, after he was stabbed by a stingray barb while filming an underwater documentary.</p> <p>In 2006, Australia and the world were shocked at the news, after it was announced<span> </span><em>The Crocodile Hunte</em><em>r<span> </span></em>had passed away. His funeral took place at Australia Zoo and was watched by over 300 million people around the globe.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">They say you should live each day to the fullest. Steve actually did. I miss him every day, and I am so proud to see his mission continue. <a href="https://t.co/4NVxbNN9hr">https://t.co/4NVxbNN9hr</a></p> — Terri Irwin (@TerriIrwin) <a href="https://twitter.com/TerriIrwin/status/1169024579592970241?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 September 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The 44-year-old was praised for spreading awareness and information about wild animals.</p> <p>He said of his work: “I consider myself a wildlife warrior. My mission is to save the world’s endangered species.”</p> <p>Irwin constantly encouraged people to mindful of considerate tourism and used his influence to speak out against animal poaching.</p> <p>Sir David Attenborough agreed with those sentiments and added: “He taught them how wonderful and exciting it was, he was a born communicator.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above for Steve Irwin’s most memorable moments.</p>

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Serena Williams’ heartwarming tribute to two-year-old daughter

<p>To celebrate two years since their daughter, Alexis was born, Serena has shared a poignant message to her followers. </p> <p>The tennis star took to instagram to post a snap taken the day she was born, with Alxis Olympia on her chest and her husband looking lovingly at both of them. </p> <p>"The last two years have been my greatest accomplishment,” the photograph was captioned with. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B13pSRjnwv0/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B13pSRjnwv0/" target="_blank">The last 2 years have been my greatest accomplishment</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/serenawilliams/" target="_blank"> Serena Williams</a> (@serenawilliams) on Sep 1, 2019 at 5:59am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The image straight away garnered thousands of happy comments from celebrity friends, family and supporters who took turn gushing over the first-time mother’s loving message. </p> <p>"This photo just made me tear up. So beautiful," wrote model Ashley Graham who is currently waiting on the arrival of her first child.</p> <p>"Love you sis," wrote ex-Pussycat Doll Nicole Scherzinger, before finishing with, "Ps. Who looks that GORGEOUS after just giving birth!?!"</p> <p>While pop artist Ciara simply wrote: "Proud of you mama. God is so good."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B133ieNFtE5/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B133ieNFtE5/" target="_blank">A post shared by Alexis Ohanian Sr. (@alexisohanian)</a> on Sep 1, 2019 at 8:03am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Serena’s husband, co-founder of social news site Reddit, Alexis Ohanian, also shared a warm message for his baby girl’s birthday where he wrote:  “How has it already been two years? Happy cake day @olympiaohanian. </p> <p>“Thank you for being the greatest thing we've ever done. And thank you for teaching me that every parent in the US deserves those first months with their newborn. I'm a better business leader because of it.”</p> <p>Ohanian has been championing for the rights of males to receive paid paternity leave since having his first child. </p> <p>Serean and Alexis have previously shared the frightening moments in anticipation of their firstborn’s birth, with the tennis star admitting she “almost died” due to a series of complications.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Serena and Alexis' special moments with their daughter over the last two years. </p>

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The sentence this stranger uses to lure seven-year-old girl from playground

<p>Parents, family members and carers have been warned to educate their children about stranger danger after an experiment on <em><a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/today/stranger-danger-experiment-today-show-alerts-parents-difference-in-age-group-relations/b7e49c16-38fc-4e45-8297-f97385651c33">Today</a> </em>showed how easily young people can be lured.</p> <p>Seven-year-old Georgia Cooke was at the playground where a strange man approached her.</p> <p>“Excuse me. Have you seen my puppy? Can you come have a look with me?” said Brett Lee, a former Queensland Police officer who posed as a stranger.</p> <p>“Just come give me a hand. Good on you.”</p> <p>According to <em>Today </em>reporter Sarah Stewart, Georgia agreed to follow the man because she did not understand that he might have an ulterior motive.</p> <p>“All she focused on was that lost puppy,” Stewart said.</p> <p>“She wanted to find the dog. She had no concept that Brett was a stranger, someone she didn’t know that could be leading her away from her parents.”</p> <p>While Georgia could be coaxed into leaving the park, her older brother Mitchell gave a different reaction.</p> <p>“No, leave me alone!” the 8-year-old screamed before running away from Lee.</p> <p>Bruce Morcombe, whose son Daniel was abducted from the Sunshine Coast in 2003, said parents need to have a discussion on personal safety with their children and look out for any signs of danger.</p> <p>“The parents need to be observant, they need to trust their instincts and they need to report any time they feel something is a little suspicious or something is not quite right,” Morcombe told <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/national/queensland/crime/the-20minute-video-saving-kids-from-stranger-danger/news-story/58bf5568135eb199dfd44bbfb9b87b08">Sunrise</a></em>.</p> <p>“So recognising personal danger, knowing how to react – so get to a safe place or scream or yell, ‘I need help’, but most importantly and the interesting thing about this particular case is, that child did the right thing.”</p> <p>Last week, security guard Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati was sentenced to two years in jail for kidnapping and indecently assaulting a three-year-old girl at DFO Homebush in Sydney.</p> <p>Al Bayati took the young child from the shopping centre’s playground to the stairwell, where he exposed himself and touched her underwear.</p>

family & Pets

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Keep your home free of animal hair

<div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>A common problem with pet owners is the stray hairs their dogs and cats leave around the house on floors, furniture and clothes. As our pets have become important family members, they’ve moved out of the backyard and into the house. This means hair shedding and cleanliness have become more of a concern. Fortunately, there are ways to reduce the impact, explains veterinarian Dr Katrina Warren.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair"><strong>Look at low-shedding breeds</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair"> <p>All dogs and cats shed hair – some more than others. Choosing a low-shedding breed can make a huge difference. Remember that low-shedding dog breeds require regular clipping, an additional expense to consider. Choosing a smooth or short-coated breed may also reduce the overall volume of shedding.</p> <p><strong>Groom your pet regularly</strong></p> <p>It may sound obvious, but brushing pets regularly will remove loose fur that will otherwise be shed and dropped around the house. Long-haired pets especially should be groomed regularly to keep their coats trim. There are some great de-shedding tools and brushes available that make grooming more effective by reaching through the topcoat to remove loose undercoat hair.</p> <p><strong>Pay attention to couch fabrics</strong></p> <p>Pet hair attaches more to certain furniture fabrics such as wool, velvet and tweed than ones like Ultrasuede and microfibre. Coverings should be selected for their ease of cleaning. Owners of light-coloured pets often choose cream or white slipcovers because they don’t show the hair. Leather or faux leather can also be a good furniture option as it doesn’t hold hair and wipes clean.</p> <p><strong>What flooring is best?</strong></p> <p>Avoid wall-to-wall carpeting as it can quickly entrap pet hair. Tiles and floorboards are more manageable but choose the right colour flooring – dark floorboards will show up light pet hair more than light floorboards.</p> <p><strong>Remove the hair</strong></p> <p>Vacuum regularly to remove hair from your living space and use a sticky roller to remove fur from clothing. If you allow your pets on the furniture, washable slipcovers or throw-rugs can be used to protect furniture and keep it fresh.</p> <p><strong>Pet management</strong></p> <p>Keeping pets off your furniture is the best way to prevent you, your family and visitors being covered in hair. If you’ve got a new puppy or kitten, it’s a good idea to train them to stay off the furniture from the start. Also, consider restricting pets to areas with hard surface flooring.</p> <p><strong>Dr Katrina's tips for the best low-shedding pets</strong></p> <p>These are great choices if you’re looking for a new four-legged friend.</p> <p><strong>Low-shedding</strong><span> </span><strong>Dog Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Bedlington terriers, bichon frise, Maltese dogs, poodles and schnauzers. These breeds all need regular clipping and grooming.</p> <p><strong>Minimal Grooming Dog Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Chinese crested dogs, chihuahuas, whippets, greyhounds and Italian greyhounds. These breeds all shed hair but their fine coats mean less hair and little grooming.</p> <p><strong>Low-shedding Cat Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Devon rex, Cornish rex, Bengal, Russian blue and Siamese.</p> <p> </p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Dr Katrina Warren. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Woman dies after being pecked by a rooster

<p>Australians have been warned of the dangers of varicose veins after a woman died from a rooster pecking.</p> <p>The elderly woman, who was not identified, died after being attacked by an “aggressive rooster” while collecting eggs from a chicken coop on her rural South Australian property.</p> <p>The rooster pecked the woman’s lower left leg, puncturing her varicose veins and leading the wound to bleed out.</p> <p>Roger Byard, professor of pathology at the University of Adelaide who studied the woman’s death, said the case highlighted how “vulnerable” elderly people who have varicose veins are.</p> <p>Varicose veins are enlarged, twisted veins which bulge on the skin surface. They commonly appear in the legs and feet.</p> <p><span>“</span>I’ve had a number of cases where people have just been wandering around in their home and just run into furniture which has caused a small injury,” Byard told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-02/elderly-woman-dies-after-rooster-pecked-varicose-veins/11469394">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p>“They haven’t known what to do and have died from it.”</p> <p>Byard said while rooster attacks were rare, he said the woman’s case showed that small domestic animals can be dangerous. “There have been a couple of cases overseas where children have been pecked by roosters because they have thin skulls and the rooster has actually caused brain damage,” he said.</p> <p>“Older people are also not as good at defending themselves against animal attacks, their balance might not be as good.”</p> <p>The case – which was recently published in the journal of <em>Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology</em> – focused on ways to identify wounds from small animals during an autopsy.</p> <p>Byard said damage to varicose veins can be treated immediately to prevent deaths. “If you knock them, put pressure on the wound, elevate and call for help,” he told <em><a href="https://10daily.com.au/news/australia/a190901yzqfk/woman-killed-by-her-rooster-while-collecting-eggs-20190902">10 daily</a></em>. “Don’t panic.”</p>

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Lifesaving advice that prevented the kidnapping of 4-year-old boy

<p>Children are constantly curious and have the urge to explore. Children can also wander off and get lost from time to time.</p> <p>Almost everyone has experienced the horror of losing sight of a child, although on this family outing, things took a terrifying turn.</p> <p>In June last year a UK woman recalled her actions when her 4-year-old nephew Jake went missing and published them on a now viral blog post.</p> <p>Vicky Hamilton-Ross recounted the events of the day when her sister Lucinda, her nephew Jake and herself attended a beach event in Bournemouth, England.</p> <p>Vicky’s sister Lucinda turned away from her 4-year-old son to pick something up and in less than minutes, Jake had vanished.</p> <p>Army cadets were chaperoning the event and quickly advised Vicky and Lucinda to start yelling descriptions of the boy, what he looked like and what he was wearing.</p> <p>“‘We are looking for a boy. He is four years old, blond and in a red t-shirt. Have you seen him?’ … they repeated this loudly and consistently as they covered areas nearby,” Hamilton-Ross wrote on the blog.</p> <p>After 15 minutes of searching, Jake was found on the beach.</p> <p>Hamilton-Ross explained that by loudly yelling a description, any perpetrator would have been scared off or identified.</p> <p>“It meant the guy couldn’t leave the beach without being spotted, so he just left Jake and walked away,” she explained.</p> <p>It was that advice that saved his life. Once safely reunited with his mother and aunty he told them, “There was a bald man in a white t-shirt, he said he would take me to see a real rocket ship.”</p> <p>Hamilton-Ross further praises the advice she was given.</p> <p>“I would urge every parent to do this immediately, even if you suspect they are just around the corner. What’s the worst that could happen, you are slightly embarrassed because they hadn’t gone anywhere? It’s well worth that risk.”</p>

family & Pets

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How often should you wash your dog?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dog owners either love or hate bath time depending on whether their dog is a fan of water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The question of how often you’ve been washing your dog has probably come up, especially if they tremble at the sight of water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Robert Hilton, a Melbourne-based vet, spoke to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/life/how-often-should-you-wash-your-dog/10697236"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC Life</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how often you should wash your dog. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In general, healthy dogs only need to be bathed if they smell. There's no reason particularly to bath a healthy dog, unless they're dirty," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Feral dogs don’t generally bathe, let alone use shampoo, so many wash their pets weekly as to not dirty up their homes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Or some dogs develop a doggy smell and people want to remove that, or they get dusty or dirty," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some pet owners are even over-washing their dogs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In general, dogs are bathed more often than they need to be," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, if your dog has a skin condition, it’s important that you speak to your vet before bathing your dog once a week.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The danger is dogs with allergic skin disease commonly have a defect in their skin barrier, which manifests as drying of the skin and that contributes to their misery," he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"And using harsh shampoos — harsh being anything that strips any further lipid [fatty protective] layer off the skin or damages it — potentially makes the itch worse."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re concerned about how often you should be brushing your dog, it depends on the season and your dog’s fur.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brushing your dog is good for prevention of painful tangles as well as the removal of shedding fur.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> "It also allows the dog to keep clean areas that it might otherwise struggle to, [such as] the tail and the chest," says Paul McGreevy, a professor of animal behaviour and animal welfare science at the University of Sydney's School of Veterinary Science.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remaining vigilant about brushing is ideal as the weather warms up.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It happens as the days start to get longer, basically from the footy grand final [in late September] onwards," he says .</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It's a seasonal response to summertime."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brushing also has other benefits as teaching your dog to sit still, but this only works if you’re attentive to your dogs’ behaviour.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The best owners are so attentive to the dog's behaviour that they can tell they're grooming an area that the dog really loves being groomed, and that's often the front of the chest and the tail — those hard-to-reach places."</span></p>

family & Pets

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Fans sent into a frenzy as cult Cadbury favourite set to make a return

<p>The limited-edition chocolate that sent fans wild is assumed to be back, after it sold for more than 10 times the original price on eBay.</p> <p>Cadbury’s Caramilk was so loved by fans that one man named Christian Hull launched a petition to make the white chocolate caramel block “a permanent thing”.</p> <p>Now, the beloved treat, which first went on sale 20 years ago, is rumoured to be coming back and people are going mad.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/rumours-are-rife-cadbury-caramilk-chocolate-bar-is-returning/news-story/1e1f865dd4adb09a7a584edb2798305d" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, Jamie from The Grocery Greek, an independent Australian products review group said she heard from a reliable source that the block of chocolate will be reintroduced very soon.</p> <p>“Originally we were advised by one of our contacts within Cadbury and this was also confirmed by a couple of our contacts within the grocery retail sector,” said Jamie.</p> <p>The Grocery Greek first posted the exciting news on Facebook to their 10,000 followers, saying it was returning “later this month”.</p> <p>“It is strongly rumoured that Cadbury is re-releasing its very popular Caramilk later this month … stay tuned! – thanks to ‘S’ for the heads-up,” the post read.</p> <p>And the announcement has people ecstatic, as they took to the comments to share their thoughts.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fgrocerygeekaustralia%2Fposts%2F2345598978855498&amp;width=500" width="500" height="506" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“I bloody hope this is all true,” one said.</p> <p>“When can you confirm this?” another said.</p> <p>“Be prepared to stock up,” someone else remarked.</p> <p>Cadbury released a statement of their own to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/rumours-are-rife-cadbury-caramilk-chocolate-bar-is-returning/news-story/1e1f865dd4adb09a7a584edb2798305d" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, but kept surprisingly quiet on the subject.</p> <p>“While we can’t confirm or deny the return of Cadbury Caramilk, we will say that we are in the business of delighting our consumers with products they love, so stay tuned,” said Paul Chatfield, Director Marketing for Chocolate, Australia and New Zealand.</p>

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“He refuses to get out of bed”: Parents fined $230 for not getting their son to school

<p>NZ parents of a 15-year-old boy have been fined under the Education Act and have been forced to pay $50 each as well as cover court costs of $130.</p> <p>They were fined for their failure to make sure their son attended school.</p> <p>Parents Donna Davey and Shane Dryden, who now live apart, appeared in Dunedin District Court, where they each admitted a charge under the Education Act of failing to ensure their child was enrolled in school.</p> <p>Counsel Jo Turner said that the parents were “at a loss” as to what to do with their sleepy son.</p> <p>"[They] have tried everything they can to get him out of bed," she said, according to the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&amp;objectid=12260002" target="_blank"><em>NZ Herald</em></a>.</p> <p>"He refuses to get up in the morning."</p> <p>The boy who lived with Davey was enrolled at Clinton Primary School until the end of 2017 and was then enrolled at South Otago High School up until May this year.</p> <p>The court heard that during those periods of time, the boy was unenrolled at various times due to long spells of non-attendance.</p> <p>At one point in 2018, the teenager had 38 days of unjustified absence and seven days of justified absence out of 62 school days.</p> <p>This means he was off school nearly three-quarters of the time.</p> <p>With every 20 days of unjustified leave, the boy was removed from the school roll.</p> <p>The Ministry of Education sent his parents a letter threatening criminal charges if the boy did not attend school.</p> <p>"Considerable effort has been made by various state agencies to ensure that the defendants enrol [their son] at school and have him attend school regularly," a summary of facts said.</p> <p>Community Magistrate Simon Heale who overlooked the trial accepted that the parents have made considerable effort to get their child to attend school.</p> <p>"I understand teenagers can be very difficult to coax into compliance," he said.</p> <p>"But it is your obligation, till he reaches the age of 16, to have him at school."</p> <p>"While prosecution for non-enrolment is available, prosecuting parents is absolutely a last resort," deputy secretary of sector enablement and support Katrina Casey said.</p> <p>She also said that it was inappropriate to comment on the decision of the court when media questioned whether a $50 fine would deter other parents.</p> <p>The Minister of Education said the prosecution was the first since 2017 and the fourth since 2014.</p>

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What you should do when your dog gets into a fight at the dog park

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taking your dog to the dog park can be a fun venture, but it’s important to know what to do when something goes wrong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mitch Watson, AKA the Paw Professor, spoke to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-26/what-to-do-if-your-dog-gets-into-a-fight-at-a-dog-park/11141714"><span style="font-weight: 400;">the ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about what you can do if things turn ugly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Watson is a former police dog handler with more than 10 years of experience and has worked with dogs of all ages and breeds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Exercise your dog a little before taking them to the park, as it takes a little energy out them," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"This really helps high-energy dogs."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you're worried because your dog has already had a few fights, use a muzzle on the dog while in the park," he told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/brisbane/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC Radio Brisbane's Rebecca Levingston</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Many people don't like seeing their dog in a park with a muzzle on, but it protects the owners and other dogs."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An interesting point of note is that most of the fights that happen at dog parks is over balls.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"A big reason fights happen, though, is over balls," Mr Watson said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Many people take their dogs to the park to exercise in a legal way without them running off.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"When you're throwing the ball in the park, other dogs can fight over them, creating a barney in the park.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">RSPCA Queensland spokeswoman Alex Hyndman Hill has said that if your dog gets into a fight, you need to take care when separating the dogs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Breaking up a dog fight is always risky, but obviously your instinct will be to protect your dog," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The best way to break up a fight is to grab the back legs of each dog and raise them off the ground — like you would do a wheelbarrow — and walk backwards.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you're the only one present, do this to the dog leading the attack — eventually the other dog will try and get away.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Also, carrying an extra lead can also help if you need to clip a dog and pull it away."</span></p> <p>Dog park etiquette</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As many different breeds and ages of dogs head to the dog park, it’s important to know the basic etiquette at the dog park.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Always bring a leash and monitor your dog constantly for signs of aggression or stress during interactions with other dogs," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Be ready to end the outing if your dog isn't enjoying it or is making it a stressful experience for another dog.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Think about whether it's appropriate for your children to be with you and always supervise them if they are."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Watson said another option could be to change the hours you visited the park.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Go to the parks out of peak hours if possible," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"There are a lot of rescue dogs out there now and high-energy and crowded parks can cause these fights."</span></p>

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“Kids are like dogs:” Pauline Hanson compares raising children to “training pets”

<p>One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has shared some outlandish opinions by comparing raising children to training animals. </p> <p>The politician told<span> </span>The Today Show<span> </span>on Monday there are similarities with disciplining your children and pets. </p> <p>Ms Hanson also said reports suggesting parents should “train” their babies as a dog was not so far off from the truth. </p> <p>“Kids are like dogs... you actually look after them, treat them well, give them that love and care and attention,” she said. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">“Kids are like dogs, if you actually look after them, treat them well, give them that love and care and attention. The problem today is parents aren’t allowed to discipline their kids. We are losing respect, they lose respect for authorities.” <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulineHansonOz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PaulineHansonOz</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9Today?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9Today</a> <a href="https://t.co/DboCmqm5OP">pic.twitter.com/DboCmqm5OP</a></p> — The Today Show (@TheTodayShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheTodayShow/status/1163195148760518656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 18, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The outlandish comments amused the morning show host Georgie Gardner, who said she was reluctant to end the segment. </p> <p>“Pauline, I loathe to interrupt because I'm scared I'm going to get in trouble but we have to go now,” she said. </p> <p>“Its been enlightening and everyone is awake across the country and terrified of you.”</p> <p>A controversial new British television show has caused a stir for it’s hosts, behaviourist Jo-Rosie, sharing her own parenting tips. </p> <p>She said she would be applying the same techniques as she would to train an animal with a three-year-old toddler. </p> <p>Ms Hanson said the “technique” gets results, and would use the same methods on her own children. </p> <p>“I would give them a clip over the ear if they didn't do what they were told. I had to control five of them and they had to do what they were told... and my grandkids get it too,” she shared. </p> <p>Radio host Neil Mitchell, another panelist sitting in on the controversial segment, sat shocked by Hanson’s admission to hitting her children. </p> <p>“You can't hit dogs, let alone children,” he said. </p> <p>The politician argued children need strong discipline. </p> <p>“The problem today is parents aren't allowed to discipline their kids. We are losing respect, they lose respect for authorities,” she said. </p>

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