Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Stay younger for longer – why travelling is a must

<p>Seasoned travellers may understand the excitement of landing in a new city or country for the first time, and all the benefits that come from exploring new sights, sounds and tastes. But for those who have yet to embrace travel, the benefits might not be as obvious. For retired Australians, now is the perfect time to get travelling. With your work life behind you, and a new, relaxing chapter ahead, travel has numerous benefits.</p> <p>Make the most of your golden years, and maybe even delay the move to <span><a href="https://www.agedcareprepare.com.au/">aged care</a></span> a little longer with some local, or even international travel. In collaboration with Aged Care Prepare, here are a couple of reasons why travel can help you stay younger for longer.</p> <p><strong>Healthy body</strong></p> <p>We all know that increased physical activity helps keep your body in shape, and your blood pressure low, but regular travel helps your body even further. Studies have shown that by taking a complete break from your everyday environment through regular travel, you can make a positive impact on your risk of heart disease.</p> <p>The well-known <span><a href="https://www.framinghamheartstudy.org/">Framingham Heart Study</a></span><u>,</u> which began in 1948, took 5,209 participants and gathered information about their lifestyle and behaviour. The results of their 20-year study on women aged 45 to 64, found that those who took a holiday at least twice a year had a much lower risk of having a heart attack or heart-related death compared to women who only travelled every six years or so.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the results of a nine-year study on men found that those who took a holiday every year had 20 per cent less chance of a heart-related death than those who did not. These studies took into account previous health issues, as well as wealth, and concluded that travel was the factor that contributed to a decreased risk of heart-related issues.</p> <p>While travelling does increase the amount of daily activities you do, and keeps you in shape in the present, it also contributes to the long-term wellbeing of your heart. This is because it has a positive effect on stress levels. As you take time out from the daily routine, whether it be with family, friends or just your loved one, your body takes a well-deserved break from potentially stressful demands and activities.</p> <p><strong>Healthy mind</strong></p> <p>While travel increases physical activity, so too does it increase mental activity. Research from the <span><a href="https://globalcoalitiononaging.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/destination-healthy-aging-white-paper_final-web-1.pdf">Global Coalition on Aging</a></span> has found that travel provides a level of mental stimulation necessary for prolonged brain health. A walk in the park may lift your spirits, but travelling to an entirely new place, where your brain has to take in and process new sights, smells and cultures, challenges it at a cellular level. Challenging your brain in this way fights off the onset of brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, keeping your brain fitter for longer.</p> <p>Within this research, Dr. Paul D. Nussbaum, a clinical neuropsychologist and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery, states that, “Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behaviour that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.” Novelty is a brain stimulator, the perfect requirement in maintaining and improving cognitive health.</p> <p>Whether it’s a short local holiday to a new part of Australia every six months, or an annual or two-yearly trip to a new country, taking a break from the everyday has far-reaching benefits on your life. While it reduces any current feelings of stress and provides a new, stimulating experience, it also improves long-term heart and brain health.</p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Lisa Wilkinson's best travel tips

<p><a href="http://www.lisawilkinson.com.au/">Lisa Wilkinson</a> shares her favourite travel memories from the Northern Territory and more.</p> <p>After a distinguished career in magazine editing, at just 21 she was the youngest ever magazine editor of a national magazine teen magazine Dolly and four years later she became the editor or Cleo, <a href="http://www.thefordhamcompany.com.au/lisa-wilkinson-awarded-am-for-media-charity-mentoring-work/?utm_source=rss&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=lisa-wilkinson-awarded-am-for-media-charity-mentoring-work">Lisa Wilkinson AM</a> had been the co-host of Channel 9’s <em>Today</em> since 2007 before transitioning to <em>The Project.</em></p> <p><strong>Have your travel interests changed over the years?</strong> <br />Sure, more than anything I now love diversity in the places I travel to and what I can do when I’m there.  And I just love a place that inspires me photographically.  </p> <p><strong>Has your way of travel changed over the years?</strong> <br />No, planes have always seemed pretty good to me.  Although I do love a fast train these days, particularly when I’m in somewhere like Europe.  Much less fussing at train stations rather than airports when you’re crossing borders.  And back home I’m really keen to do the Ghan all the way from Adelaide up to Darwin.  Everyone I know who has done it has absolutely raved.  </p> <p><strong>Best travel experience when you were young? </strong> <br />A holiday house mum and dad rented for a week down at Huskisson on the NSW south coast when I was about 5.  Such a beautiful spot and I still remember watching my brother jump off the bridge into the river and hoping one day that I would be big enough to do that. The shop did the best fish and chips wrapped in newspaper. And don’t even get me started on the pineapple fritters!  </p> <p><strong>Best recent travel experience?</strong> <br />Santorini in <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/greece">Greece</a>. I hadn’t been for 27 years and now I’m wondering why I stayed away so long.  </p> <p><strong>Favourite place in Australia? Why?</strong> <br />The <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/Destinations/Northern%20Territory">Northern Territory</a>, for it’s stunning and diverse landscapes, huge range of activities, beautiful waterfalls, night skies, great bars and restaurants, and the best sunsets anywhere. And if you go, you have to visit the Devil’s Marbles outside of Tennant Creek.  It’s a landscape that is unlike anything I’ve seen anywhere on the planet.  The word “stunning” goes nowhere near describing just how extraordinary and other-worldly this place is. Take your camera!  </p> <p><strong>Favourite place in the world?</strong>   <br />Apart from my own home, it would have to be a toss-up between <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/paris">Paris</a> and <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/new%20york">New York</a>.  Both cities just have most incredible energy, mixed with beautiful parks, great streetlife, restaurants. I walk everywhere, which is a great way to get to know a city.  </p> <p><strong>What are you looking forward to?</strong> <br />Making that trip on the <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/Specials/The%20Ghan">Ghan</a>.  </p> <p><strong>Pet peeve when travelling?</strong><br />Long queues. My husband and I once stood in a queue for four hours at the incredible Gaudi church Sagrada Familia in <a href="http://travel.wyza.com.au/search-result/barcelona">Barcelona</a>, only to get to the ticket office and discover that we hadn’t registered on the “app”.  Sooo not happy.  </p> <p><strong>Never leave home without?</strong> <br />My Canon camera.  </p> <p><strong>I’ll never …</strong> <br />Say never.  I’m open to anything when I travel. The proof is probably in the time I bungee-jumped off a perfectly good bridge above the Zambezi river in Africa, three weeks after another Aussie had done the same, only to have the elastic ropes snap when she was at the bottom of the fall. Crazy I know, but I’m so glad I did it. And it scored me huge brownie points with my kids!  </p> <p><strong>My travel dream is …</strong> <br />The <a href="http://www.salzburg.info/en/sights/guided_tours/tours_from_salzburg/sound_of_music">Sound Of Music tour</a> in Austria.</p> <p><em>Written by Lisa Wilkinson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/insider-travel-tips-lisa-wilkinson.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

How tiny homes for older women facing homelessness are saving lives

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Homelessness is becoming a bigger issue each year for older women, and Kim Connolly who is the founder of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tiny Habitat Homes </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">understands that it is a problem that must be addressed. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Which is why she created a solution to aide ageing women with housing issues in 2017. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Bureau of Statistics</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> reports over 6860 ladies aged over 55 were classified as homeless in 2016, which is 5234 more since 2011, Kim told </span><a href="https://www.thesenior.com.au/story/6114985/could-tiny-homes-solve-senior-homelessness/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Senior</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">these stats might not be entirely correct. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" target="_blank">My first Tiny House Build. Love my Tiny!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the massive jump is a concern, the former high school teacher explained the number did not reveal the full extent of the issue as many women would choose not to ask for help after facing homelessness or becoming homeless. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kim Connolly came up with the idea to offer transportable, affordable and tiny village homes as a method to decrease homelessness after multiple conversations with women her age admitted they were struggling with financial difficulties. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" target="_blank">The Tiny has landed! Safe and sound. Thanks Nifty for sending me this photo of my baby in her new workshop home. #lovemytiny #lovemybuilder</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Oct 15, 2018 at 9:13pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Over and over again women kept coming to me and saying, 'I'm going to be homeless, if not in the next few months, in the next few years',” Ms Connolly told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-29/are-tiny-homes-the-answer-for-older-women-facing-homelessness/11049272"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC News.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I found out all the statistics and research and I didn't have an answer, [but] I love tiny houses and I thought, 'That's it, I'm going to build one'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Connolly developed such a passion for her housing-solution idea, she set up her village-building business, with a plan to create a community of 15 tiny houses to majorly occupy women. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Currently, Ms Connolly is in the process of setting up a not-for-profit organisation to help make her tiny village concept.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said: “It's women who are just like me and they're shaking their heads saying, 'I don't know how this happened, I never thought I'd end up in this situation'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My idea of the village would be 15 houses — there would be three houses that are rental houses, the other 12 would be owned by the occupants, there'd be two couples and the other 10 houses would be all older women,” Ms Connolly explained.</span></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Tips for travelling with grandkids

<p>As we get into our senior years it becomes more difficult for us to take holidays on our own. If you want to still enjoy the pleasures of a vacation, the alternative is to take your grandkids with you when you holiday. This may seem a daunting prospect (especially if you have your own children to cater for too), but with the right approach and some smart planning it can be a success. Here's what to consider making it work.</p> <p><strong>Finding the right location and accommodation</strong></p> <p>This choice of holiday venue can make a big difference to the success or failure of a joint vacation. The key factors to making it work are firstly to ensure that accommodation is central to amenities, such as shops, clubs, beaches or places of interest. You don’t want to have to far to travel once you arrive and having everything close by may give you greater independence if you are mobile enough.</p> <p>Generally speaking, it’s best to settle on just one destination, rather than doing a lot of moving around and having to re-pack several times. Check that accommodation has easy access and is suitable for those who have limited mobility issues. It is also very helpful if the accommodation has pleasant surroundings and outlook, so that it is still an appealing place to spend time if you are not able to get out and about as much as your grandkids. Garden areas, pools, cafes and recreation facilities will help in this regard.</p> <p>The type of accommodation needs some forethought too. It’s preferable to have sufficient space to give your grandchildren some privacy and their own area to retreat to, so that everyone is not on top of each other all the time. This is especially true if you have children with you too. A home or apartment that can give you your own living space and bathroom is a good idea. If it is a hotel, then a separate room for them is preferable.</p> <p><strong>Plan and agree on schedules and expenses</strong></p> <p>While there is no need for a rigid schedule, it is important to allocate time for doing things jointly and for doing some things separately. This can help avoid the stress of being together full time and ensures that all parties get proper relaxation and regeneration. Ideally this should be discussed with your grandchildren in advance and perhaps a rough schedule agreed upon so that everyone is on the same page before you go.</p> <p>Make sure also that things like meals, transport and touring activities are discussed in advance so that you are not packing too much in and that there is agreement on how costs are being shared. If you are doing organised tours or attractions, don’t feel it is essential to do everything together – it may cause unnecessary tensions. Meal arrangements can be varied too, so that there is a combination of joint meals and some private time too.</p> <p><strong>Planning your packing</strong></p> <p>Make sure medicines are in good supply and spare prescriptions arranged. If there is any medical equipment that needs to be taken, make sure you investigate the type of power supply and if adapters are required, if you are going to a foreign country. It’s wise to have spare spectacles and hearing aid batteries on hand too. Pack light too, if you are planning on multiple destinations; you will already be carting extra luggage for them, so you don’t want to make this a bigger burden than necessary.</p> <p>Travel insurance needs to cover all persons on the trip to avoid nasty bills if there are any medical emergencies.</p> <p><strong>Test the waters before making a big commitment</strong></p> <p>If it is the first time you have taken a break together, it may be best to start out by trying a shorter break first to see how things pan out and what issues arise. Even a weekend away may be enough to test the waters to see how the dynamics will work. It is possible to achieve a successful holiday together, as long as the right planning and a little common sense are applied.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/tips-for-traveling-with-parents.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a> </em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

How to choose a home for retirement

<p>There comes a time in everyone's life when enjoying a comfortable retirement is top of the priority list. You might want to swap the big family home for something a little more manageable, but you should also give some thought to how you can adapt your home to your future needs.</p> <p>A few simple adjustments can be all it takes! Here are a few tips to get your house ready for retirement and some tips on what to look for in a new property, if you’re planning on moving into something smaller.</p> <p><strong>Ready and steady</strong></p> <p>When you're buying a home to spend your retired years in, imagine yourself using the property in day-to-day life. Consider the entrances to your home. During your property search, have a think about how many stairs there are. Single storey homes or units are much more practical than a few too many tricky steps. You might need to install handrails along high steps and stairwells at some point, or chat with a builder or engineer about making the house more accessible with ramps.</p> <p>If you become interested in a double story home, it’s best if there is at least one bedroom and a bathroom on the lower level. Door frames are also something to keep in mind - can they be widened to fit wheelchairs and walking frames? There might even be a number of grants for seniors if you want to do some minor renovations so check with the local government to see what you can get help with.</p> <p><strong>How important are bathrooms?</strong></p> <p>Bathrooms are one of the first things people look at in a home, but they can be especially important when you're a bit older. Think about the floor finish. A hardwood floor or tiles may look beautiful in the bathroom now, but it can actually be a hazard when balance doesn't come easily. While there are some simple non-slip mats that you can lay in the shower area to prevent falls, think about whether the bathroom is big enough to install handrails or a shower chair.</p> <p><strong>Essentials</strong></p> <p>Families might look for schools and parks, but retirees might need a home that's close to a medical centre and shops. Investigate how accessible public transport is from the property, should you become less able to drive. You might also want something a little closer to friends and family - and social activities! Retirement village vs retirement home Most retirees consider moving to a retirement village or retirement home if the gardening, housework and maintenance has become more than can be easily managed. If you think you’ve reached that point, make sure you’ve considered alternatives like local community home help, a handyman or moving to a smaller nearby apartment first.</p> <p><strong>Five other common reasons to move could be:</strong></p> <ul> <li>You’ve lost your partner or spouse and have allowed yourself adequate time to adjust before making such an important decision</li> <li>You believe the social or religious activities available in a village would appeal to you</li> <li>You can see the time approaching where level access, doorways that can easily fit wheelchairs, and other support would be handy</li> <li>You’d feel more relaxed knowing emergency assistance is readily available</li> <li>You feel you’d appreciate being part of a village community and the social interaction it offers</li> </ul> <p><strong>What about costs?</strong></p> <p>There are many different types of retirement villages and retirement homes and the financial implications of your choice can be complex. It is important you have sought the advice of a solicitor, lawyer or financial advisor and you fully understand the costs of entry, residency, exit and who pays what bills. There is usually an initial entry price, recurring service charges and a departure charge when you leave, plus, there are a great many departure fee structures so it’s vital that the structure you are considering is explained to you.</p> <p>Ask the village you are considering for comprehensive information about its fees and charges then seek professional advice. Most retirement villages and retirement homes charge an entry contribution of some sort and this usually goes toward ongoing updates to the common property and individual homes/units. If you have limited funds, some villages may offer an apartment and negotiate a small donation of several thousand dollars.</p> <p><strong>Will my pension be affected?</strong></p> <p>A complex range of factors affects your pension so it’s important to speak to the Centrelink – Department of Human Services for detailed advice. It’s possible your pension and/or rent assistance situation might be affected but Centrelink will assess any entry costs you may incur.</p> <p>There are enough personal decisions to make when it comes to deciding how to adapt your property or what your next property should be but, ideally, consider consulting a financial planner before you make any major changes. Once you’ve weighed your options, and you’re across all the practical considerations, then you can confidently determine what’s best for you.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/property/how-to-choose-a-home-for-retirement.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Think Einstein was smart? Here are 8 people with higher IQs

<p><strong>1. Jacob Barnett: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>Jacob Barnett was <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/autistic-boy-genius-iq-higher-einstein-article-1.1340923">diagnosed</a> with moderate to severe autism at two years old, and doctors predicted he’d never learn to tie his own shoes.</p> <p>Needless to say, he’s mastered dressing himself. The American child prodigy finished grades six through twelve in less than a year, then went to college at age ten.</p> <p>He was a published physicist <a href="https://psmag.com/magazine/jacob-barnett-30-under-30">by the time he was 13</a>.</p> <p>Now he’s <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/physics-astronomy/about/people/j3barnet">working toward his PhD</a> at age 19.</p> <p><strong>2. Judit Polgár: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>The Hungarian chess master is considered the best female chess player of all time.</p> <p>When she was 15 years and 4 months old in 1991, she was the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1992/02/04/news/youngest-grandmaster-ever-is-15-ferocious-and-female.html">youngest player</a> to become an International Grandmaster.</p> <p>She’s <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/smartest-person-in-the-world-2011-12/#bert-byrne-is-alleged-to-have-an-iq-of-170-3">reported</a> to have an IQ of 170.</p> <p><strong>3. Rick Rosner: IQ 192 to 198</strong></p> <p>Rick Rosner has taken <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/interview-with-rick-rosner-2014-11?r=UK&amp;IR=T">more than 30 IQ tests</a>, revealing his IQ is between 192 and 198, depending on how the tests define their scores.</p> <p>Before the allegedly second-smartest man in the world became a TV writer, he worked as a bouncer, stripper, and nude model.</p> <p>He famously <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/entertainment/lawsuit-millionaire-player-answer-article-1.927553">sued</a> ABC network for a faulty question after losing <em>Who Wants to Be a Millionaire</em> at the $16,000 level, but he lost the case.</p> <p><strong>4. Evangelos Katsioulis: IQ 198</strong></p> <p>With a score of 198, Evangelos Katsioulis, MD, MSc, MA, PhD, has the highest tested IQ in the world, according to the <a href="http://psiq.org/home.html">World Genius Directory</a>.</p> <p>The Greek psychiatrist also <a href="http://www.katsioulis.com/evangelos-katsioulis/">has degrees</a> in philosophy and medical research technology.</p> <p><strong>5. Sho Yano: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>American physician Sho Yano started college at age nine, and earned an MD and PhD <a href="http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/06/young-medical-student-graduate.html">by the time he was 21</a>.</p> <p>He has a black belt in tae kwon do and started composing music when he was four, but he’s put his focus on <a href="https://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Sho_Yano.html">child neurology</a>.</p> <p><strong>6. Nathan Leopold: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>The infamous Nathan Leopold had an IQ of 200 and spoke nine languages by age 18, but he didn’t use his intelligence for the greater good.</p> <p>When he was 19, he and an accomplice were <a href="https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/leopold-and-loeb-gain-national-attention">arrested for murder</a> in 1924 after trying to commit the “perfect crime.”</p> <p>Leopold spent 33 years in jail before being released on parole.</p> <p><strong>7. Marilyn vos Savant: IQ 228</strong></p> <p>When Marilyn von Savant was ten years old, an adult-level Stanford-Binet test revealed she had an <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/4add9230-23d5-11de-996a-00144feabdc0">IQ of 228</a>, which later landed her a Guinness World Record until the company removed the category in 1990 because the numbers are considered inexact.</p> <p>She’s been answering philosophical and mathematical questions for <em>Parade</em> magazine readers in her “Ask Marilyn” <a href="https://parade.com/member/marilynvossavant/">column</a> since 1986</p> <p><strong>8. Ainan Cawley: IQ 263</strong></p> <p>This Irish child genius is <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3721556/The-smartest-40-people-time-revealed-List-includes-geniuses-Einstein-da-Vinci-s-number-one.html">projected</a> to have an IQ of 263.</p> <p>At eight years old, he was already taking third-year chemistry courses at Singapore Polytechnic, and by the time he was nine, he’d memorized the first 518 decimal places of pi.</p> <p>Now 18, he seems to have a knack for entertainment, having written the script and composed music <a href="https://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/irish-child-prodigy-puts-talent-to-use-for-typhoon-charity-254202.html">for a short film called <em>Reflection</em></a> at age 12. </p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/think-einstein-was-smart-here-are-8-people-higher-iqs?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Would you consider shared housing later in life?

<p>Renting in a share house is almost a rite of passage for many young Australians. You know the story — the property is a bit run-down, and it’s messy and unkempt but fantastic memories are made day after day.</p> <p>As we start families, we tend to seek more privacy and a home of our own, whether that’s through renting or a mortgage.</p> <p>Unexpected events can always occur though, and as a result some of us have to give up the independence and privacy of our own home to stay afloat.</p> <p>“When there has been some sudden change — divorce, death of a partner, loss of a job — it can force people into [moving back into shared housing]. It can be a stressful time,” says Andrew Colagiuri, a real estate agent and founder of Bright Residential.</p> <p>However, moving into a share house in our later years isn’t necessarily a tragedy for our independence, and it may well be the opposite for our financial wellbeing.</p> <p>For some people, once the kids have grown up and moved out, moving out of the empty nest and living with others again can be an option.</p> <p>“Shared housing isn’t a new concept for older Australians — they practically pioneered it in their youth — but many never thought they’d be back there looking for flatmates in their 60s,” says Colagiuri.</p> <p>In fact, the popular flatmate-finder website Flatmates.com.au has recorded the 60 to 64-year-old age bracket as having a 43 per cent growth in usage, followed by the 50-54 and 65+ brackets.</p> <p>Kathryn Daddo is a product of this growing trend, having moved into a shared housing situation with her sister later in life to try and live more comfortably. She wanted to move from full-time to casual employment and found that moving from her long-term rented home was the best way to do this.</p> <p>“The rent was just ridiculous. By the time I’d finished paying it, I had only a small amount to live off and pay for incidentals … with the opportunity to move in with my sister, I can have a better lifestyle and I don’t have to work to live,” says Daddo.</p> <p>There has been a gradual increase in the number of Australians in private rentals as outright home ownership falls. In 1992, there was a nearly 15 per cent disparity between the two, whereas the 2016 census found that these days, 30.9 per cent of Australians rent — almost equal with the 31 per cent who own outright.</p> <p>“The number of Australian homeowners has been falling for three decades now, with many destined to become ‘permanent renters’ which will have a domino effect leading to flatmates of all generations,” says Colagiuri.</p> <p>As well as the financial benefits, moving back into shared housing can also have a positive impact from an emotional and mental health perspective. Living alone in your later years can be a difficult time if you don’t have regular social interaction.</p> <p>“It’s very lonely living alone — you come home and talk to the walls … I’ve got other people my age who say, ‘I wish I had a sister like you do’ because it’s just an ideal situation for me,” says Daddo.</p> <p>The most important thing for those considering moving back into the shared housing market is to find someone you’re compatible with in a living situation. Similar interests, activities and lifestyle will make the transition especially beneficial.</p> <p>It’s also important to note that this trend isn’t just occurring in the swelling property markets of capital cities, but all across Australia.</p> <p>Daddo’s rental situation was in the Hawkesbury region of New South Wales, for example. “It’s all about supply and demand in these areas … I have heard of many people in rural areas being priced out due to a local mine or development taking off and forcing a rapid increase in house prices and rental prices,” explains Colagiuri.</p> <p>For some of us, revisiting living with flatmates also means having to relearn a fundamental childhood lesson — how to share with others.</p> <p>At the end of the day, whether this will suit you comes down to a balancing act between personal privacy and financial benefit — you’ll have to sacrifice one for the other. While she stresses it probably isn’t for everyone, Daddo says we shouldn’t underestimate the opportunities moving back into shared housing provides.</p> <p>“It’s certainly something that’s worth having a go at, because having the company and just being able to do the things you what to do is really beneficial at this stage in life,” she says.</p> <p><em>Written by Jamie Feggans. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/property/would-you-consider-shared-housing-later-in-life.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

The phone scam that cost this 78-year-old $5000

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A 78-year-old man from Midland was scammed out of $5,000 after a scam phone call convinced him his nephew was in life threatening danger. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Larry told </span><a href="https://www.ourmidland.com/news/article/Phone-scam-costs-Midland-senior-citizen-5-000-13773567.php"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Midland Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> he was swept up in a massive storm after an elaborate phone call claiming to be his sister said his nephew was in danger. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He was told his sibling had received a call saying her son had been in a car accident that had left a woman and her child seriously injured. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She told Larry that “Ryan” was asking for $15,000 to go towards a bond of $150,000 – although any amount of money would suffice. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This phone call however, was a scam that is not all that uncommon, Midland Police Sgt, Chris Wenzell told </span><a href="https://www.ourmidland.com/news/article/Phone-scam-costs-Midland-senior-citizen-5-000-13773567.php"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Midland Daily.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These “robo calls” can be near impossible to track because most of the time, these fraudulent calls are coming from outside of the country, he said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The worst part is, perpetrators target older adults due them being more “trustworthy,” Wenzell said.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It's very troubling,” the sergeant said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Because I think initially, (phone scams) were specifically geared toward the senior population. And what you see is, kind of a generation of individuals who are very trusting. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And if somebody said something, you took their word for it. So, there's a lot of believability to the person they're talking to on the other end.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The phone call left Larry sceptical at first, he said after he questioned why his sister would ask him first and why Ryan’s wife wasn’t taking care of the money. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In the meantime, you're all shook up, thinking about how to get him out (of jail),” Larry explained. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 78-year-old said he then received a phone call from his “nephew” and his “lawyer” claiming the money would help him. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That should have been a red flag,” Larry said but said the phone caller sounded exactly like Ryan. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To make the elaborate lie sound even more believable, the scammer mentioned Ryan’s trip to China. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We can’t even figure out how they got that information,” Larry said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But that was another nail to convince me that it was him talking.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">During the conversation, the men on the phone convinced Larry to send $5,000 electronically, however the Midland man explained to the media that he was not familiar with the online technology. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead, the caller offered a simple solution: Go to the nearest Home Depot and purchase five $1,000 gift cards. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While many are aware no legitimate businesses ask for gift cards as a form of payment, scammers make it sound so believable that people trust it, Larry said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After Larry completed the request and re-read the numbers on the gift cards over to the phone callers, they informed him he will call within the next day. The 78-year-old soon found out the whole event was a scheme to steal money. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sgt. Wenzell warns those who may receive calls such as these is to know places like Home Depot, Apple Music and Walmart are easy ways to get money from unsuspecting people as any cash placed on them can quickly be taken off of them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The moment (the scammers) receive those numbers that are associated with (the cards), that is immediate money,” he said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They are immediately using those and there's not a thing you can do.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">SEE MORE: </span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/how-to-outsmart-the-scammers/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">How to outsmart the scammers.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To file a report with the FTC, call 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or go online at ftc.gov.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To add your phone number to the FTC's National Do Not Call Registry call 1-888-382-1222 or visit www.donotcall.gov</span></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

This retirement home for ageing animals will warm your heart

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in southern Belgium lies the perfect care home for 150 ageing animals who are living out the rest of their days in peace. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The home which is ran by Valeria Luycx is called Les Petits Vieux meaning The Little Old Ones and is a shelter made to give older animals the best place to spend their final years. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in rural Chievres, the animal retreat is home to a number of animals, including Pastis, a pot-bellied pig, a number of elderly dogs, ponies and goats, as reported by the </span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-45142801"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fabcnews.au%2Fvideos%2F530188050727430%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The elderly animals were taken to the specialty home due to health problems or their original owners being too old to care for them any longer. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just some of the gorgeous rescues include a stunning 15-year-old European cat named Azuria, a nine-year-old Carlin dog named Ramses and Yam the nine-year-old Saint Bernard dog who loves a good pat. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The shelter was created in 2000 by Valerie and her husband Serge. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We wanted to recreate family life for the animals,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The older animals are never in cages and are able to explore to their hearts desire, although Valerie says they much prefer to be snuggled on the sofa with her. </span></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

How to keep your memories safe

<p>Before you go on holiday, it’s important to learn about how best to keep your photos safe. There is one main way to ensure that your photos won’t be lost even if you misplace your camera or phone.</p> <p>With the fear of losing our phones/cameras also comes the fear of losing all of the memories we have stored on these devices. But don’t worry, as long as you have internet connection abroad (e.g. wifi or SIM data plan), you should be able to follow the tip below and keep your memories safe.</p> <p>Every cloud has a silver lining. The silver lining of losing your phone is that you have already backed-up your holiday memories in the cloud. The cloud is a term used for a storage place on the internet.</p> <p>First step is to create an account with:</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://onedrive.live.com/about/en-au/" target="_blank">OneDrive</a><span> </span>(5GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dropbox.com/" target="_blank">Dropbox</a><span> </span>(2GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.google.com.au/drive/" target="_blank">Google Drive</a><span> </span>(15GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.box.com/home" target="_blank">Box<span> </span></a>(10GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive" target="_blank">Amazon Cloud Drive</a></p> <p>Once you have an account set up, you may then upload your photos/videos up onto this private virtual storage space. After you upload your memories, they exist now in two places, firstly still on your phone or computer, and secondly online. And since they exist online, you can access them from anywhere you have internet connection.</p> <p>A smart thing to do before you leave for your holiday is to backup all of your photos already existing on your phone or camera onto your computer or your cloud storage account (see above for some service options). That way, when you head out for vacation you not only have more space to take more photos on your phone/camera, but also don’t risk losing those older photos due to loss of device. Remember, you can always access any photos you have stored on the cloud as long as you have internet connection.</p> <p><span><strong>Pro Tip</strong>: </span><span>While you are on holiday, periodically take the time to find internet connection and upload your new holiday memories to the cloud. This way, you will be able to keep as many photos backed up as possible and stress a bit less!</span></p> <p>Many of these services offer smartphone applications available for download from your phone’s app store. If you are travelling without a computer, and plan to take photos with your phone camera, it could be wise to set up the cloud storage service application on your phone for easy access to your cloud account. </p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

"You can't cheat then?" Queen Elizabeth's hilarious reaction to self-serve checkouts

<p>Queen Elizabeth has popped into a supermarket and learnt how to use self-serve counters to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the British high street chain Sainsbury’s.</p> <p>The Queen went to London’s Covent Garden to visit a pop-up replica of the original Sainsbury’s store, which was founded in 1869 and sold just three items – butter, eggs and milk.</p> <p>She was greeted by Lord John Sainsbury, the great grandson of the supermarket chain’s founder John James Sainsbury, who showed her around and gave her an overview of the supermarket’s history and the popular trends among customers.</p> <p>“Tastes have changed,” she said when she was told how the average basket’s content shifted from porridge and orange during the war years to avocados and ready-made meals today.</p> <p>The 93-year-old monarch was also introduced to modern technology used in stores, such as self-service checkout and mobile phone payments.</p> <p>“And you can’t trick it? You can’t cheat then?” she asked during a demonstration.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxxKPvgHQaO/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxxKPvgHQaO/" target="_blank">Today, The Queen was taken back in time to Sainsbury’s stores from the past to celebrate the British retail chain’s 150th anniversary. The pop-up experience in London’s Covent Garden included a recreation of the very first store, founded by John James and Mary Ann Sainsbury on London’s Drury Lane in May 1869. It sold just butter, milk and eggs. Sainsbury’s 150th anniversary celebrations focus on the colleagues and customers who have helped shape the business over the years. Her Majesty met employees who have been involved in fundraising and volunteering in their local communities, and explored some of the technology which customers use today, including self-service tills. In the first image The Queen views a ration pack as presented by Lord and Lady Sainsbury and learns more about the work which was done with the government to develop the rationing process when goods were in short supply during the Second World War.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 22, 2019 at 7:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>When manager Damien Corcoran said the self-service counter is particularly popular amongst shoppers, she responded, “I’m sure they do – everybody wants to hurry.”</p> <p>The Queen also met Sainsbury’s employees who dressed up as store clerks from the era of the supermarket’s first store.</p> <p>She concluded the visit by cutting a birthday cake baked by Claire Ptak, who also created Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s wedding cake.</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

6 ways to keep your pet healthy

<p>What’s the difference between pets and children? Aside from no university or orthodontics fees, children eventually move out. Eventually.</p> <p>Pets, however, are a lifelong commitment. Yes, they require work and a cast-iron stomach when it comes to refuse collection, but the rewards far outweigh the drawbacks.</p> <p>To make this relationship last as long as possible, there are a few simple strategies to follow.</p> <p><strong>1. Vaccinations</strong></p> <p>Think of these as the equivalent of a prostate check. They come around quicker than you might expect but are necessary. As with so many other areas of medical science, veterinary medicine has advanced exponentially in recent decades and many of the potentially fatal illnesses can now be guarded against.</p> <p>However, these inoculations can’t be downloaded, so ask your vet to send you a reminder when the jabs are due and do the animal you love a favour.</p> <p>While we’re on the topic of medication, stay on top heartworm, flea and tick medications every three months. Look for brands including Comfortis, NexGard and Sentinel.</p> <p>Do your pets and family a favour and make sure they are vaccinated.</p> <p><strong>2. The right food</strong></p> <p>Just as your nutritional needs have changed with age, so too has that of your pet.</p> <p>Food companies with dedicated puppy/kitten, adult and senior ranges are not merely engaging in creative marketing. Science Diet Original Active Longevity, for example, includes glucosamine for healthy joints.</p> <p><strong>3. Exercise</strong></p> <p>Remember how you could chow down on burgers and still maintain a whippet’s silhouette? Now you’re more a Saint Bernard. That’s a slowing a metabolism for you and the pooch or moggy is going through exactly the same thing as the calendar pages tick over.</p> <p>Obesity can pose major health hazards (for both of you) and getting moving is key. If you have a cat, make time for play with toys that will keep them leaping and pouncing.</p> <p>For dogs, walks are mandatory. Twenty minutes a day will do you both the world of good. As will a romp in an off-leash park. The hound will enjoy it too.</p> <p>Make sure your pet gets a good night's sleep - it's far more adorable than being woken up in the early hours</p> <p><strong>4. Bedding</strong></p> <p>Prepare your “back in my day” stories now because there are animal beds on the market that run four figures plus. Clearly, these are not necessary.</p> <p>What is necessary is enough firm support for the spine and joints, a removable cover that can (and must) be washed regularly to get rid of fleas and ticks and a blanket to snuggle into.</p> <p>This last element is especially important with older animals in winter as age affects their body’s ability to regulate temperature.</p> <p><strong>5. Insurance</strong></p> <p>Imagine for a moment that your beloved pet needs a major operation – one costing the same as a second-hand hatchback. Now imagine not being able to afford the fee and having to see the animal in pain. Or worse. The sting of a monthly fee is nothing compared to the alternative.</p> <p>The fact is that at some point, the animal will need substantial medical care and on that day, you will be glad you had pet insurance.</p> <p>As with anything that comes with fine print, pop on those bifocals, read it carefully and ensure you’re across what’s included and what’s not.</p> <p><strong>6. Toys</strong></p> <p>At first glance, this may seem like an extravagance but hear us out. Just like their human counterparts, animals get bored and anxious. Especially if left alone for extended periods. This can result in furniture-chewing, cushion-shredding boredom or clingy neurosis. Neither of which are much fun.</p> <p>A shifting roster of toys will curb both behaviours by focussing attention elsewhere. Especially if they have treats secreted inside them which take some work to retrieve.</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

"It's like a slap in the face": Aussie retirees' $92K surprise bill nightmare

<p>A number of apartment residents in Victoria have been shocked with threats of huge fines and eviction after the state government identified their buildings with high-risk combustible cladding.</p> <p>Owners of 153 residences and offices around the state have been hit with tens of thousands in bills after a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.planning.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0025/395404/Victorian-Cladding-Taskforce-Update-October-2018-FINAL.pdf" target="_blank">Victorian Building Authority (VBA) report</a> <span>revealed that the highly flammable polyethylene cladding in their buildings must be removed.</span></p> <p>The same cladding was found in London’s Grenfell Tower inferno, which killed 72 people, and the Neo200 apartment building on Spencer Street, Melbourne, which caught fire in February.</p> <p>Owners have been asking why they had to foot the bill for building works when they “haven’t done anything wrong”.</p> <p>Pensioner Kevin Opie and wife Jennifer said when they bought their South Yarra apartment in Melbourne seven years ago, it was all signed off by proper authorities.</p> <p>“We trusted building regulations at that point but now we don’t,” he told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/news-victoria-cladding-buildings-residents-threatened-fines-eviction-regulator-news-melbourne/bf87cfdd-cbc8-40c3-8cf9-bf4b6d0a6fe1" target="_blank"><em>TODAY</em></a>. “We were just leading a normal life, we just retired, we just had enough savings to the end of our lives when this absolute terrible nightmare has befallen us.”</p> <p>The couple said they were notified that they owed $92,000, and failure to pay within three months will lead to eviction or a fine of over $20,000.</p> <p>Another couple in the same building, Jess Howse and Ryan Silvagni, said the surprise bill was “almost a joke”.</p> <p>“We have to come up with $90,000 to replace cladding that wasn’t disclosed on any documentation that was signed off by local councils and fire authorities, it’s like a slap in the face to be honest,” Silvagni said.</p> <p>The bill is part of the state government’s Cladding Rectification Agreement scheme, which is set to offer owners low-interest loans to replace the cladding, which owners will pay back through council rates. However, most councils across Melbourne have not agreed to participate.</p> <p>“You cannot create a scheme for optics and say, ‘Look how we are helping Australians’, when you make it optional and you make it flawed,” said Howse. “No one can access that scheme.”</p> <p>Even if the scheme is applied, it is still inaccessible to many who cannot afford to take up new loans. </p> <p>“We don’t have any money to repay the council every month,” said Mrs Opie.</p> <p>She also said selling up would be difficult, as the new owner had to bear the hefty rectification bill.</p> <p>According to the VBA’s audit deputy head Luke Exell, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/we-can-t-afford-bill-for-victoria-s-cladding-crisis-pensioners-say-20181117-p50go5.html" target="_blank">a 2017 Supreme Court decision</a> has established that the VBA does not have the power to order a builder or building surveyor to fix defective building works after an occupancy permit had been issued.</p> <p>In a statement to <em>TODAY</em>, the VBA said, “This means that owners are responsible for fixing their buildings. The VBA acknowledges the difficulty for owners and will help them navigate this complex task.”</p> <p>RMIT University urban planning expert Michael Buxton said the government should take responsibility to help fix “some of the world’s most dangerous buildings” in the state.</p> <p>“There needs to be a new legal framework to provide a financial solution for this, with the government chipping in,” Buxton told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/we-can-t-afford-this-home-owners-bear-brunt-of-cladding-crisis-20190220-p50yzy.html" target="_blank"><em>The Age</em></a>.</p> <p>“I think this is turning out to be one of the greatest scandals we have ever seen in the building industry.”</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

What your airline pilot won’t tell you

<p><strong>I’ve been struck by lightning twice</strong></p> <p>Most pilots have. Airplanes are built to take it. You hear a big boom and see a big flash and that’s it. You’re not going to fall out of the sky. – Airplane pilot for a regional US carrier</p> <p><strong>You may not be getting the airline you paid for</strong></p> <p>You may go to an airline website and buy a ticket, pull up to its desk at the kerb and get onto an airplane that has a similar name painted on it, but half the time you’re really on a regional airline. The regionals aren’t held to the same safety standards as the majors: their pilots aren’t required to have as much training and experience, and the public doesn’t know that. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>If you’re a nervous flier, book a morning flight</strong></p> <p>The heating of the ground later causes bumpier air, and it’s much more likely to thunderstorm in the afternoon. – Jerry Johnson, LA pilot.</p> <p><strong>The smoothest place to sit is often over or near the wing</strong></p> <p>The bumpiest place to sit is in the back. A plane is like a seesaw. If you’re in the middle, you don’t move as much. – Patrick Smith, airplane pilot and author of Cockpit Confidential.</p> <p><strong>Sit in the back if you’re always cold</strong></p> <p>The general flow of air in any airplane is from front to back. So if you’re really concerned about breathing the freshest possible air or not getting too hot, sit as close to the front as you can. Planes are generally warmest in the back. – Tech pilot at a regional US airline.</p> <p><strong>There’s a reason you can’t use your phone</strong></p> <p>Well, what can happen is 12 people will decide to call someone just before landing, and I can get a false reading on my instruments saying that we are higher than we really are. – Jim Tilmon, retired American Airlines pilot.</p> <p><strong>Listen when I tell you to put your laptop away</strong></p> <p>We don’t make you stow your laptop because we’re worried about electronic interference. It’s about having a projectile on your lap. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to get hit in the head by a MacBook going 200 miles per hour. And we’re not trying to ruin your fun by making you take off your headphones. We just want you to be able to hear us if there’s an emergency. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>Turbulence is not the problem</strong></p> <p>Pilots find it perplexing that so many people are afraid of turbulence. It’s all but impossible for turbulence to cause a crash. We avoid turbulence not because we’re afraid the wing is going to fall off but because it’s annoying. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>It’s updrafts we really worry about</strong></p> <p>A plane flies into a massive updraft, which you can’t see on the radar at night, and it’s like hitting a giant speed bump at 500 miles an hour. It throws everything up in the air and then down very violently. That’s not the same as turbulence, which bounces everyone around for a while. – John Nance, aviation safety analyst and retired airline captain.</p> <p><strong>Being on time is more important than getting everyone there</strong></p> <p> [In the United States], the Department of Transportation has put such an emphasis on on-time performance that we pretty much aren’t allowed to delay a flight anymore, even if there are 20 people on a connecting flight that’s coming in just a little late. – Commercial pilot from North Carolina.</p> <p><strong>We fudge numbers when it comes to flight time</strong></p> <p>No, it’s not your imagination: airlines really have adjusted their flight arrival times so they can have a better record of on-time arrivals. So they might say a flight takes two hours when it really takes an hour and 45 minutes. – AirTran Airways captain, US.</p> <p><strong>We are often low on fuel</strong></p> <p>I’m constantly under pressure to carry less fuel than I’m comfortable with. Airlines are always looking at the bottom line, and you burn fuel carrying fuel. Sometimes if you carry just enough fuel and you hit thunderstorms or delays, then suddenly you’re running out of gas and you have to go to an alternate airport. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You’ll never hear this phrase</strong></p> <p>You’ll never hear “One of our engines just failed.” What they’ll say instead: “One of our engines is indicating improperly.” (Or more likely, they’ll say nothing, and you’ll never know the difference. Most planes fly fine with one engine down.) You’ll also never hear, “Well, folks, the visibility out there is zero.” Instead they’ll say: “There’s some fog in the area.” – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>There’s no such thing as a water landing</strong></p> <p>It’s called crashing into the ocean. – Airplane pilot, South Carolina, USA.</p> <p><strong>The truth is, we’re exhausted</strong></p> <p>Our work rules allow us to be on duty 16 hours without a break. That’s many more hours than a truck driver. And unlike a truck driver, who can pull over at the next rest stop, we can’t pull over at the next cloud. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>We’re actually jealous of your onboard meal</strong></p> <p>Sometimes the airline won’t give us lunchbreaks or even time to eat. We have to delay flights just so we can get food. – First officer on a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>This is why you get sick after flying</strong></p> <p>Most people get sick after travelling not because of what they breathe but because of what they touch. Always assume that the tray table and the button to push the seat back have not been wiped down, though we do wipe down the lavatory. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>This is when to REALLY pay attention</strong></p> <p>It’s one thing if the pilot puts the seat belt sign on for the passengers, but if he tells the flight attendants to sit down, you’d better listen. That means there’s some serious turbulence ahead. – John Greaves airline accident lawyer and former airline captain, Los Angeles.</p> <p><strong>Driving is WAY scarier than flying</strong></p> <p>People always ask, “What’s the scariest thing that’s ever happened to you?” I tell them it was a van ride from the Los Angeles airport to the hotel, and I’m not kidding. – Jack Stephan, US pilot.</p> <p><strong>What pilots like to hear the most</strong></p> <p>Most of the time, how you land is a good indicator of a pilot’s skill. So if you want to say something nice to a pilot as you’re getting off the plane, say “Nice landing.” We do appreciate that. – Joe D’Eon, pilot at a major US airline who produces a podcast at flywithjoe.com.</p> <p><strong>Is travelling with a baby in your lap safe?</strong></p> <p>No. It’s extremely dangerous. If there’s any impact or deceleration, there’s a good chance you’re going to lose hold of your kid, and he becomes a projectile. But the government’s logic is that if we made you buy an expensive seat for your baby, you’d just drive, and you’re more likely to be injured driving than flying. – Patrick Smith. Here are 7 more incredibly dangerous parenting moves even careful parents make by mistake.</p> <p><strong>Keep your seatbelt on</strong></p> <p>Most of you wouldn’t consider going down the highway at 60 miles an hour without your seatbelt fastened. But when we’re hurtling through the air at 500 miles an hour and we turn off the seatbelt sign, half of you take your seatbelts off. But if we hit a little air pocket, your head will be on the ceiling. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You can recline but be mindful of who’s behind you</strong></p> <p>If you’re going to recline your seat, please check behind you first. You have no idea how many laptops are broken every year by boorish passengers who slam their seat back with total disregard to what’s going on behind them. – John Nance.</p> <p><strong>We don’t wear our hats in the cockpit, by the way</strong></p> <p>On TV and in the comics, you always see these pilots with their hats on, and they have their headsets on over the hat, and that always makes us laugh. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>There’s a good reason for everything we ask you to do</strong></p> <p>We ask you to put up the window shade so the flight attendants can see outside in an emergency, to assess if one side is better for an evacuation. It also lets light into the cabin if it goes dark and helps passengers get oriented if the plane flips or rolls over. – Patrick Smith</p> <p><strong>We hear some dumb things</strong></p> <p>I am so tired of hearing “Oh my God, you’re a girl pilot.” When you see a black pilot, do you say “Oh my God, you’re a black pilot”? –Pilot for a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>Leave flip-flops in your luggage</strong></p> <p>I always tell my kids to travel in sturdy shoes. If you have to evacuate and your flip-flops fall off, there you are standing on the hot tarmac or in the weeds in your bare feet. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>We do have control of the temperature</strong></p> <p>Cold on the airplane? Tell your flight attendant. We’re in a constant battle with them over the temperature. They’re moving all the time, up and down the aisles, so they are always calling and saying, “Turn up the air.” But most passengers I know are freezing. – Captain at a major US carrier.</p> <p><strong>Here’s the truth about airline jobs:</strong></p> <p>You don’t have as much time off as your neighbours think you have, you don’t make as much money as your relatives think you make, and you don’t have as many girlfriends as your wife thinks you have. Still, I can’t believe they pay me to do this. – Commercial US pilot</p> <p><strong>Don’t ask for directions</strong></p> <p>I may be in uniform, but that doesn’t mean I’m the best person to ask for directions in the airport. We’re in so many airports that we usually have no idea. – Pilot for a regional US carrier.</p> <p><strong>We sleep in the cockpit</strong></p> <p>Do pilots sleep in [the cockpit]? Definitely. Sometimes it’s just a ten-minute catnap, but it happens. – John Greaves.</p> <p><strong>We don’t dress up for cargo flights</strong></p> <p>One time I rode in the jump seat of a 747 freighter, which carries cargo, not passengers. As soon as the doors closed, the first officer went in back and put on a bathrobe and slippers. No kidding. He said, ‘I’ll be damned if I’m going to wear a tie for a bunch of boxes.’ – Tech pilot at a US regional airline.</p> <p><strong>Don’t complain</strong></p> <p>Remember this before you complain about the cost of a ticket: fares today are about the same as they were in the 1980s. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/34-things-your-airline-pilot-wont-tell-you">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

The pros and cons of becoming an entrepreneur later in life

<p><span>34-year old Mark Zuckerberg might seem like the poster child for successful entrepreneurs – but, as it turns out, his youth actually puts him in the minority. <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2018/08/05/proof-that-the-most-successful-entrepreneurs-are-older-ones/#6efd3d4d42dd">Forbes reports</a> that the majority of successful entrepreneurs are middle-aged or older. According to <a href="https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235357">Entrepreneur</a>, People older than 55 years of age have double the likelihood of launching a high-growth business venture as compared against people under the age of 35.</span></p> <p><span>Why is that? Let’s take a look at some of the reasons senior citizens tend to make <a href="https://www.inc.com/leigh-buchanan/next-act-why-age-isnt-the-only-thing-that-sets-older-entrepreneurs-apart.html">outstanding entrepreneurs.</a> Let’s also discuss a <a href="https://www.score.org/blog/pros-and-cons-starting-business-over-55">few of the things</a> that can hold seniors back from success in entrepreneurship.</span></p> <p><strong>The pros of becoming an entrepreneur later in life</strong></p> <p><strong>Life experience gives seniors an advantage</strong></p> <p>The longer you live, the greater your accumulation of life experience. An older person has a fundamental understanding of how long any given project is likely to take, how much money is realistically needed to accomplish a given task and how human relationships function. In contrast, lack of life experience can put younger founders at a disadvantage in understanding each of these areas.</p> <p><strong>Seniors are likelier to have well-developed professional networks</strong></p> <p>Many senior citizens have spent decades in the workforce and have cultivated a lifetime’s worth of professional contacts. Solid human relationships are important for every facet of business – including finding trustworthy suppliers, hiring talented employees and finding qualified customers.</p> <p><strong>Seniors are likelier to be able to fund their businesses</strong></p> <p>People tend to accumulate wealth as they age. This is in part because salaries often grow in correlation with experience, and experience grows with age. As salaries grow, they can be invested to create even more wealth. Sure, there are broke seniors and affluent young people -- but, in many cases, age can be a major advantage when it comes to securing the funds necessary to manage a business.</p> <p><strong>Cons of starting a business later in life</strong></p> <p><strong>Seniors may need to update their business skills</strong></p> <p><span>Many, but not all, seniors have demonstrated the ability to <a href="https://www.pcworld.com/article/2153080/baby-boomers-embrace-technology-as-much-as-younger-users.html">keep pace with technology trends</a> as well as young people do. But if you’ve fallen behind, you might have to invest some effort in educating yourself about whichever up-and-coming technologies will affect your own business and the businesses of your customers. This is an ongoing obligation that isn’t unique to seniors; everyone has to worry about the ever-accelerating pace of technological innovation in the future economy.</span></p> <p><strong>Seniors are less likely to have attained beneficial levels of higher education</strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.theherald.com.au/story/5905528/the-x-y-breakdown-of-generations-in-australia/">The Herald reports</a> that  Australian baby boomers’ participation rate in higher education has been weak as compared against that of Generations X and Y.</span></p> <p><span>Considering that the <a href="https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/312943">typical entrepreneur</a>  is well educated, higher education could potentially be a factor that increases one’s chances for success in business. One survey of successful entrepreneurs showed that the vast majority (more than 95 percent) hold bachelor’s degrees, whilst nearly half (47 percent) hold master’s degrees.</span></p> <p><span>An important takeaway: If you’re considering entrepreneurship, and you haven’t already studied <a href="https://online.scu.edu.au/business-courses/">business courses</a>, you’re likely to find them helpful.</span></p> <p><span>Senior citizens are well suited for entrepreneurship. Overall, there are more pros than cons to starting a business later in life. There are definitely many advantages to choosing <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2015/nov/02/retirement-meet-the-60-something-entrepreneurs">entrepreneurship over retirement</a>.</span></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Clever uses for ammonia you’ll wish you knew sooner

<p><strong>Powerful cleaning product</strong></p> <p>Ammonia often plays second fiddle to bleach, but it’s one of the most powerful cleaning products in your arsenal. Here are 20 smart ways to use ammonia all around the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean your electric oven</strong></p> <p>Here’s a practically effortless way to clean an electric oven: First, turn the oven on, let it warm to 65°C and then turn it off. Place a small oven-safe bowl containing ½-cup ammonia on the top shelf and a large pan of boiling water on the bottom shelf. Close the oven door, and let it sit overnight. The next morning, remove the dish and pan, and let the oven air out a while. Then, wipe it clean using the ammonia and a few drops of dishwashing liquid diluted in a quart of warm water. Even old baked-on grease should wipe right off!</p> <p><strong>WARNING: Do not use this cleaning method with a gas oven unless the pilot lights are out and the main gas lines are shut off. </strong></p> <p>Always take caution using ammonia! Never mix ammonia with bleach or any product containing chlorine. The combination produces toxic fumes that can be deadly. Work in a well-ventilated space and avoid inhaling the vapours. Wear rubber gloves and avoid getting ammonia on your skin or in your eyes. Always store ammonia out of the reach of children.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove soap and grease scum</strong></p> <p>To get rid of those unsightly soap and grease scum build-ups in your porcelain enamel bath and sink, scrub them with a solution of one tablespoon ammonia in 3.7 litres hot water. Rinse thoroughly when done. Find out more about the best ways to clean the most popular room in the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean bathroom tiles</strong></p> <p>Make bathroom tiles sparkle again – and kill mildew while you’re at it – by sponging tiled floors, splashbacks and shower enclosures with ¼-cup ammonia in 3.7 litres water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to repel moths</strong></p> <p>Pesky kitchen moths seem to come out of nowhere! Send them back to wherever they came from by washing your cupboards, drawers, and pantry shelves, with ½-cup ammonia diluted in 1 litre of water. Leave drawers and cabinet doors open to thoroughly air-dry. Head here for the best kitchen and dining room cleaning hacks.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to make crystal sparkle</strong></p> <p>Has the sparkle gone out of your good crystal? Bring back its lost lustre by mixing several drops of ammonia in 2 cups of water and applying with a soft cloth or brush. Rinse it off with clean water, then dry with a soft, dry cloth.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean oven racks</strong></p> <p>Get the cooked-on grime off your oven racks by laying them out on an old towel in a large washtub. You can also use your bathtub, though you might need to clean it afterward. Fill the tub with warm water and add ½-cup ammonia. Let the racks soak for at least 15 minutes, then remove, rinse off, and wipe clean. Check out the ultimate 10 step whole-house cleaning plan here.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to eliminate paint odours</strong></p> <p>Your freshly painted home interior sure looks great, but that paint smell is driving you up the wall! There’s no need to prolong your suffering, though. Absorb the odour by placing small dishes of ammonia in each room that’s been painted. If the smell persists after several days, replenish the dishes. Vinegar or onion slices will also work. Head here for more on how to banish bad smells from your home.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean fireplace doors</strong></p> <p>Think you’ll need a blowtorch to remove that blackened-on soot from your glass fireplace doors? Before you get out the goggles, try mixing 1 tablespoon ammonia, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and 1 litre of warm water in a spray bottle. Spray on some of the solution; let it sit for several seconds, then wipe off with an absorbent cloth. Repeat if necessary – it’s worth the extra effort. FInd out 16 clever house cleaning hacks the professionals use.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean gold and silver jewellery</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your gold and silver trinkets by soaking them for 10 minutes in a solution of ½-cup clear ammonia mixed in 1 cup warm water. Gently wipe clean with a soft cloth and let dry. Note: Do not do this with jewellery containing pearls, because it could dull or damage their delicate surface.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove tarnish from brass or silver</strong></p> <p>How can you put that sunny shine back in your varnished silver or lacquered brass? Gently scrub it with a soft brush dipped in a bit of ammonia. Wipe off any remaining liquid with a soft cloth – or preferably chamois.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to restore white shoes</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your dingy white shoes or tennis sneakers by rubbing them with a cloth dipped in half-strength ammonia – that is, a solution made of half ammonia and half water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from clothing</strong></p> <p>Ammonia is great for cleaning clothes. Here are some ways you can use it to remove a variety of stains. Be sure to dilute ammonia with at least 50 per cent water before applying it to silk, wool, or spandex.</p> <p>Rub out perspiration, blood, and urine stains on clothing by dabbing the area with a half-strength solution of ammonia and water before laundering.</p> <p>Remove most non-oily stains by making a mixture of equal parts ammonia, water, and dishwashing liquid. Put it in an empty spray bottle, shake well, and apply directly to the stain. Let it set for two or three minutes, and then rinse out.</p> <p>To erase pencil marks from clothing, use a few drops of undiluted ammonia and then rinse. If that doesn’t work, put a little laundry detergent on the stain and rinse again.</p> <p>You can even remove washed-in paint stains from clothes by saturating them several times with a half-ammonia, half-turpentine solution and then tossing them into the wash.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean carpets and upholstery</strong></p> <p>Lift out stains from carpeting and upholstery by sponging them with 1 cup clear ammonia in 2 litres warm water. Let dry thoroughly, and repeat if needed. Find out 14 cleaning hacks every cat or dog owner should know.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to brighten up windows</strong></p> <p>Dirty, grimy windows can make any house look dingy. But it’s easy to wipe away the dirt, fingerprints, soot and dust covering your windows. Just wipe them down with a soft cloth dampened with a solution of 1 cup clear ammonia in 3 cups water. Your windows will not only be crystal-clear, but streak-free to boot.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to strip wax from resilient flooring</strong></p> <p>Wax build-up on resilient flooring causes it to yellow in time. Remove old wax layers and freshen up your floor by washing it with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia in 2 litres water. Let the solution sit for three to five minutes, then scrub with a nylon or plastic scouring pad to remove the old wax. Wipe away leftover residue with a clean cloth or sponge, then give the floor a thorough rinsing.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia as plant food</strong></p> <p>Give the alkaline-loving flowering plants and vegetables in your garden – such as clematis, lilac, hydrangea, and cucumbers – an occasional special treat with a shower of ¼-cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. They’ll especially appreciate the boost in nitrogen. Head here to find other surprising fertilisers for your garden.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to stop mosquito bites from itching</strong></p> <p>If you forget to put on your insect repellent and mosquitoes make a meal of you, stop the itching instantly by applying a drop or two of ammonia directly to the bites. Don’t use ammonia on a bite you’ve already scratched open, though: the itch will be replaced by a nasty sting.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to keep animals out of your bin</strong></p> <p>Few things can be quite as startling as an animal leaping out of your garbage bin just as you’re about to make your weekly rubbish deposit. Keep away strays by spraying the outside and lids of your garbage bins with half-strength ammonia or by spraying the bags inside.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from concrete</strong></p> <p>Tired of those annoying discolourations on your concrete work? To get rid of them, scrub with 1 cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. Hose it down well when you’re done.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to fight mildew</strong></p> <p>Ammonia and bleach are equally effective weapons in the battle against mould and mildew. However, each has its own distinct applications and under no conditions should the two ever be combined. Reach for the ammonia for the following chores, but be sure you use it in a well-ventilated area, and don’t forget to wear rubber gloves:</p> <p>Clean the mildew off unfinished wooden patio furniture and picnic tables with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia, ½-cup vinegar, ¼-cup baking soda, and 3.7 litres water. Rinse off thoroughly and use an old terrycloth towel to absorb excess moisture.</p> <p>To remove mildew from painted outdoor surfaces, use the same combination of ingredients.</p> <p>To remove mildew from wicker furniture, wash it down with a solution of 2 tablespoons ammonia in 3.7 litres water. Use an old toothbrush to get into that hard-to-reach twists and turns. Rinse well and let air-dry.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/20-clever-uses-ammonia-youll-wish-you-knew-sooner?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> </p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

"I was sick of myself": The reason behind Sally Williams’ exit from Brand Power

<p>Sally Williams, the face of the iconic <em>Brand Power</em> commercials, has revealed why she left the TV job after more than 25 years.</p> <p>Since the early 1990s, Williams has advised Aussie consumers on household products under the tagline “Helping you buy better”. However, she decided to quit the job in 2017 after a “horrific” experience she had during a family holiday.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r2a1v5l4txA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>“I was in Indonesia around 10 years ago with my family on a boat stopping at islands in a beautiful, tropical paradise – but I was gobsmacked by the rubbish piling up on the beaches,” the mother-of-two told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/sally-williams-reveals-horrific-lightbulb-moment-that-changed-her-life/news-story/7c9cc5ea89c4f2aec7cd09d647826cc2" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“It was so bad I couldn’t find somewhere to put my feet without stepping on rubbish – it was horrific, and it made me feel ill.</p> <p>“I made the decision [to leave <em>Brand Power</em>] because I was sick of myself. I realised I was leading people into supermarkets, and they would come out with 20 plastic bags probably half filled with things I had advertised.”</p> <p>Williams said she had difficulty reconciling her environmental concerns with her role in promoting certain brands she does not support. “People would come up to me and say, ‘I remember this ad, you told me to buy this product, and that’s enough for me’,” she said. “They had so much trust in me for all those years.”</p> <p>The 57-year-old now has a regular segment on 3AW’s <em>Afternoon Show</em>, where she was dubbed as “Sustainable Sally”, and the TV show <em>Vasili’s Garden </em>on 7Two. She also works as an ambassador for shopping trolley manufacturer Supercart Australia to raise awareness of sustainable trolleys made out of recycled plastic.</p> <p>She still works with <em>Brand Power</em> non-exclusively under a policy of aligning herself only to sustainable brands. “I know if I can give people information around sustainable practices it will categorically change their purchase decisions,” Williams told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://mumbrella.com.au/sally-williams-quits-brand-power-to-take-stance-on-sustainability-524008" target="_blank">Mumbrella</a> </em>last year.</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

WWII Digger's Great Escape

<p>A khaki felt army cap has sat on a bookshelf in my home in Sydney for nine years.</p> <p>Two metal press-studs secure the brim, and the five-pointed, red communist star graces the front.</p> <p>The crown has the faint odour of human sweat.</p> <p>It is a partizanka, a cap worn by Yugoslav Partisan soldiers in Croatia and western Bosnia during World War II.</p> <p>The partizanka is something of a collector’s piece, as few like it remain.</p> <p>For me, it represents a promise I need to fulfil.</p> <p><strong>Partisan Promise</strong></p> <p>It is impossible to look at the cap and not wonder about its bloody history.</p> <p>It had two rightful owners, Boris Puks*, a Croatian Partisan fighter, and Ernest ‘Ern’ Brough, a World War II veteran from Geelong, Victoria, who gave it to me in 2009.</p> <p>My part in its history is a small footnote compared to the life it once led in the mountains and forests of wartime Yugoslavia.</p> <p>The cap arrived in the post not long after I met Ern, accompanied by a note: “Marc - a gift to me from Puks Boris, 1944, at Cassma, Croatia.”</p> <p>When I phoned Ern to thank him, he made me promise to give it to the Australian War Memorial when he died.</p> <p>This artefact now belongs where Ern had intended.</p> <p>The voices of World War II are fast disappearing and as Ern is still alive, I want him to have the chance to once again share his story.</p> <p>* Boris Puks is called Puks Boris in Ernest Brough’s book, Dangerous Days.</p> <p><strong>A Great Adventure</strong></p> <p>Six weeks after Ern turned 20, on March 28, 1940, he enlisted in the Second Australian Imperial Force.</p> <p>This apprentice butcher from Drouin, in rural Victoria, had very little life experience behind him, but the Army deployed him to Libya to protect the besieged port of Tobruk.</p> <p>He arrived in May 1941.</p> <p>“It was a case of keeping ’em out. Don’t let ’em in, that’s it. Fight for your life,” he said later.</p> <p>Following nearly three months of relentless battle, Ern was wounded by German machine-gun fire during a patrol.</p> <p>He recovered and was then sent to Egypt to fight in the pivotal Battle of El Alamein. Captured by German forces, Ern spent time in a POW camp in Italy before eventually ending up in Stalag XVIII-A/Z, a notorious Nazi POW camp in Austria.</p> <p>After two years, along with fellow Australian Sergeant Arnold ‘Allan’ Berry, and New Zealander Private Eric Baty, he escaped from an Arbeitskommando (prison farm camp) near Graz and spent two months on a desperate flight through first Austria, and then Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia.</p> <p><strong>A Story Revealed</strong></p> <p>Ern offered me Puks’s cap during our first interview in 2009.</p> <p>I had seen a photograph of it in his book and was taken by its historical significance. </p> <p>I knew that he treasured the partizanka cap and had proudly showed it to mates at his local RSL club.</p> <p>Ern appreciated my knowledge of the place where he spent the final months of World War II.</p> <p>“I reckon you can use it more than me, now,” he said.</p> <p>I was reluctant to accept Ern’s cherished cap, but he sent it to me soon afterwards.</p> <p>Now, nine years later, I hoped to return the cap to Ern and see about giving it to the Australian War Memorial.</p> <p>I call the phone number in Geelong that I’d dialled years earlier. After a few rings, a man answers. It’s Ern, who confirms he is very much alive.</p> <p>We arrange for me to interview him two days later. Not long after, Lizzie Campbell, Ern’s carer, calls me to check who I am.</p> <p>Ern has no problem remembering the cap, but he can’t remember giving it to me. These days, Lizzie explains, such memories can elude him.</p> <p>When I call him back as planned, Ern has had time to flick through his book.</p> <p>Details of his time in Tobruk and Croatia are clearer. “How the hell did we ever get through it?” he asks me in a wavering voice.</p> <p>While in Tobruk, fear wasn’t part of Ern’s thinking “A lot of them used to sweat it out,” he recalls. “They had a terrible time. I didn’t care. I was walking around as if I owned the place.”</p> <p>When I press him for more information about the cap and ­Boris Puks, his memory is sketchy. Ern remembers that the cap belonged to Puks, that he was a Croatian Partisan and that Puks gave him the cap as a gesture of thanks.</p> <p>That’s where it stops.</p> <p>“No, I don’t remember,” he tells me.</p> <p>“When you’re young, you learn something and you shove it aside.”</p> <p>More questions about the cap eventually jog his memory.</p> <p>“I used to put a big white turkey feather in it,” he says with a laugh.</p> <p><strong>After the War</strong></p> <p>After the war, Ern returned to country Victoria and resumed work as a butcher.</p> <p>They were difficult times. Shell-shocked and damaged, adjusting to peacetime wasn’t easy.</p> <p>He felt “wild on the inside” and at times resorted to fighting and drinking.</p> <p>“Allan, Eric and I had lived like dogs,” he writes in Dangerous Days.</p> <p>“Every day had been a dangerous day, every shadow a possible predator. We survived on instinct, so it was always going to be difficult to slip back into a civilised world.”</p> <p>Getting the images of war out of his head was hard and Ern believes he suffered from PTSD.</p> <p>He tells me about a time on a train to Melbourne when he attacked a man who had tried to scrounge the last of his tobacco.</p> <p>It took four other men to restrain him. He was also plagued by nightmares and one time woke to find himself trying to throttle his beloved wife, Edna May.</p> <p>Puks wrote to Ern several times and was interested in emigrating to Australia, but Puks was a communist, so the authorities kept an eye on the letters Ern received, placing him under surveillance for six years. ­</p> <p>Anti-communist sentiment was strong at the time.</p> <p>When Ern discovered his movements were being monitored, he was outraged but realised it was safer to end their correspondence.</p> <p><strong>A Promise fulfilled</strong></p> <p>Ever aware of my promise, I call the Australian War Memorial in Canberra to ask about donating the cap to its collection. They are keenly interested in Ern’s story – and the rare artefact – so decide to fly Ern and Lizzie to Canberra and appropriately recognise his donation.</p> <p>On February 6 this year, on a hot, dry Canberra morning, I arrived at the Australian War Memorial ready to hand over the cap to Ern.</p> <p>Frailer than when we last met, he still has that sparkle in his eyes and an easy laugh.</p> <p>In the Commemorative Courtyard before the Pool of Reflection, surrounded by the Roll of Honour commemorating the more than 102,000 Australians who have died in war, Sergeant Ernest James Brough of the 2nd/32nd Infantry Battalion presented the cap to Brendan Nelson, the director of the Australian War Memorial.</p> <p>“People will look at the cap and realise that a Partisan risked his own life and safety to help this Australian escape,” Nelson says.</p> <p>“And at the end he gave his cap to Ern. It will make people ask, ‘Why did he do that?’ Thanks to this simple gesture, the memorial now has an important artefact that tells Ern’s inspirational story of survival and mateship.”</p> <p>Across the courtyard, a group of 18 soldiers are practising a drill. Nelson calls them over and introduces them to Ern, the former POW and Rat of ­Tobruk.</p> <p>Each one eagerly approaches the old man to shake his hand. It is a moving moment. Young soldiers paying respect to a frail, decorated war hero from their own defence history.</p> <p>Ern visited Eric Baty in New Zealand 46 years after their escape. They talked about the time the Partisan attacked his brother and how Ern had stopped Eric from getting involved.</p> <p>“Eric thanked me for saving his life that time,” Ern told me in 2009. “They would have shot him for sure. But I said, ‘No, Eric, it’s me who must thank you for saving my life in the river.’ ”</p> <p>It took Ern more than 60 years to bring himself to write about his war experiences. He comes from a generation who were taught to be stoic but reticent in the face of misfortune.</p> <p>Writer Kim Kelly worked closely with Ern, talking with him every day for a month to research his memoir.</p> <p>She found that he did not want to talk about what happened when he returned to Australia.</p> <p>“The idea of PTSD was not talked about in his day,” she explains.</p> <p>“They used alcohol instead. Today, he is clear-sighted about it and believes returned soldiers need a story debrief about their war experiences, such as writing it down or speaking into a microphone.”</p> <p><strong>Ern's story</strong></p> <p>It helped Ern to be able to tell his war story.</p> <p>“He believed going to war was important and why Australia went to war was important, but Ern is still anti-war,” says Kim.</p> <p>“He thinks war makes no sense.” Ern remains close to her heart - Kim last visited Ern in Geelong last September.</p> <p>Today Ern lives alone. Lizzie visits most days and he keeps active tending oak trees in his garden. Most of his mates from the war have gone.</p> <p>Allan died in 1985, aged 67. Eric died in 1999, aged 80. Edna May, Ern’s wife of more than 60 years, in 2004. She was 81.</p> <p>Ern was so grateful for the treatment she received at Melbourne’s St Vincent’s Hospital that he sold his land and donated $300,000 towards buying an echocardiograph machine.</p> <p>“I keep saying to him that he has to get to 100,” says Lizzie. He is now the last surviving Rat of Tobruk in Geelong.</p> <p>When I handed the cap back to Ern in Canberra, he paused before handing it over to Nelson.</p> <p>I thought Ern was about to say what I was thinking – that it was more than a cap, that it is a symbol of the courageous people who fought against tyranny, a reminder of the debt owed to those who gave their lives to protect our freedoms. But no – to the delight of all present, Ern broke into the Australian Football League anthem, ‘Up There Cazaly’.</p> <p><strong><em>Up there Cazaly</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>In there and fight</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Out there and at ’em</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Show ’em your might</em></strong></p> <p>Later he turned to me and said, “What a wonderful day it is.” Then a joyful expression spread across his face and he let out an uproarious laugh.</p> <p>The khaki partizanka cap that started life in the hands of a young Croatian resistance fighter and was gifted in friendship to an Australian POW escapee is now carefully preserved in the Second World War Galleries of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.</p> <p><strong>History of the Partisan cap</strong></p> <p>The military side cap, or forage cap, that Boris Puks gave to Ernest Brough in 1944 was part of the Yugoslav Partisan uniform.</p> <p>It was called the triglavka in Slovenian and the partizanka in Croatian.</p> <p>The design was copied from the cap worn by Republican faction soldiers during the Spanish Civil War.</p> <p>A feature of the Yugoslav Partisan cap was the red communist star on the front.</p> <p>The first Yugoslav caps were made in 1941 in Zagreb for the communist People's Liberation Front of Croatia.</p> <p>In occupied Yugoslavia during World War II, this cap's use spread quickly throughout the Partisan resistance.</p> <p>The Slovenian triglavka, adopted in 1942, had a three-pronged ridge along its crown, representing Triglav mountain, Slovenia's highest peak. Puks's cap is a partizanka, so it has a flatter crown and a folded brim at the back.</p> <p>In 1943, the partizanka and the triglavka were replaced by the titovka, or Tito cap, which was named after the Yugoslav communist resistance leader, Josip Broz Tito, and modelled on the Soviet army cap, the pilotka.</p> <p>After the war, the titovka became the official headwear of the Yugoslav People's Army, or JNA.</p> <p><em>Written by Marc McEvoy. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/wwii-diggers-great-escape?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Secrets nurses wish they could tell you

<p><strong>We ask the questions you don’t</strong></p> <p>Doctors are clueless about what really happens in the beds, wards, and halls of our hospitals. That's why we went to the experts: nurses</p> <p>“We always question doctors because a lot of the time they are only there for five seconds and we have much more experience with patients.” - Registered nurse with 16 years’ experience</p> <p><strong>This is what I mean when I say to get a second opinion</strong></p> <p> “We’re not going to tell you your doctor is incompetent, but if I say, ‘You have the right to a second opinion,’ that can be code for ‘I don’t like your doctor’ or ‘I don’t trust your doctor.’” – Linda Bell, registered nurse</p> <p><strong>Before you gossip…</strong></p> <p> “Feel free to tell us about your personal life, but know that we’re here for 12 hours with nothing to talk about. So the stuff you tell us will probably get repeated.” – Registered nurse</p> <p><strong>A lot of my patients are incontinent</strong></p> <p> “I’m supposed to just use a wet washcloth to clean them. But if it’s a patient who’s been really nice and appreciative, I’ll go all the way to intensive care to get some of the heated wet wipes, which are a lot more gentle. Somebody who’s constantly yelling at me? I just use the washcloth.” – Registered nurse.</p> <p><strong>Tell us everything because we need to know</strong></p> <p> “If penicillin made your face swell up and your breathing get funny six months ago, it’s likely to do the same again. Please tell me these things. While we’re at it, tell me if you have a food allergy. Some things I can predict, other things, like you’re allergic to nuts, are not immediately obvious.” – Head-nurse.blogspot.com Here's how to get the most out of each and every medical appointment.</p> <p><strong>I always remain calm</strong></p> <p> “I’ve had people blow out arteries in front of me, where I know the patient could bleed to death within minutes. I’ve had people with brains literally coming out of their head. No matter how worried I am, I’ll say calmly, ‘Hmmm, let me give the doctor a call and have him come look at that.’” – A long-time nurse</p> <p><strong>The squeaky wheel won’t always work</strong></p> <p> “If you want me to give you better treatment, be more appreciative. I’m happy to do a bit extra for appreciative patients, such as massage their legs and feet with sorbolene after a shower. But a demanding patient will always wait longer to have their bell answered.” – Registered nurse with 25 years’ experience, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>Yes, you should have come in earlier</strong></p> <p> “I’d never tell a patient that he was stupid for waiting a week for his stroke symptoms to improve before coming to the hospital. Although I’d like to. Especially if his wife then complains that we’re not doing anything for the guy.” – A long-time nurse who blogs at head-nurse.blogspot.com</p> <p><strong>Don’t lie about your pain</strong></p> <p> “If you’re happily texting and laughing with your friends until the second you spot me walking into your room, I’m not going to believe that your pain is a ten out of ten.”  – Nurse, New York  Never tempt fate by lying about what's really bothering you.</p> <p><strong>Listen to our advice, you’ll recover faster</strong></p> <p> “If we tell you Papa must not drive after his stroke, that means Papa must not drive. Not ‘not drive long distances’ or ‘not drive a Toyota’ or ‘not drive to the store.’ It means that Papa now lacks decision-making ability, part of his visual field, and most of the use of one side of his body, and must not drive. Even a big car, even for short distances, even in town.” – Head-nurse.blogspot.com</p> <p><strong>Hospitals are full of drug-resistant germs</strong></p> <p> “Despite nurses’ best efforts, hospitals are still filthy and full of drug-resistant germs. I don’t even bring my shoes into the house when I get home.” – Gina, a nurse who blogs at codeblog.com</p> <p><strong>The sickest patients are the only VIPs in here</strong></p> <p> “If you’re a private patient in a public hospital, don’t complain about not having a private room. The only times you’ll get one is if you’re dying or have a golden staph infection and need to be isolated. If you see a sign with MRSA, it means there’s a risk of multidrug-resistant staph. Either way, you should count your lucky stars you’re in a shared room.” – Nurse, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>I’ll always come into your room with a smile</strong></p> <p> “No matter how many times you use your call light, even if it’s every ten minutes, I will come into your room with a smile. However, if you don’t really need help, I will go back to the nurses’ station and complain, and this may affect how the nurses on the next shift take care of you.” – Cardiac nurse, California.</p> <p><strong>We can tell when you exaggerate the pain</strong></p> <p> “Don’t tell me you need more pain relief – I know you’ve just come back to the ward after having a cigarette.” – Nurse, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>Over-the-counter drugs and herbals count as medications</strong></p> <p> “When your provider asks for a list of the medications you’re taking, make sure you include over-the-counter drugs and herbals. People think that if an herb is ‘all natural’ and ‘organic,’ it’s not a medication. But that’s not true. Herbals can interact with other medications and can cause serious complications.” – Kristin Baird, registered nurse and health-care consultant</p> <p><strong>The sicker you are, the less you complain</strong></p> <p> “I’ll have a dying patient with horrible chest pain who says nothing, because he doesn’t want to bother me. But the guy with the infected toe – he can’t leave me alone.” – Intensive-care nurse, California</p> <p><strong>We can tell when you’re frightened</strong></p> <p> “It’s frustrating to see people neglect themselves, but there’s no point reading them the riot act. One patient had a fungating wound from breast cancer that she’d hidden from her family for 18 months. How she did it I don’t know.” – Community nurse with 20 years’ experience</p> <p><strong>I’ll wait for the doctor to tell you about test results</strong></p> <p> “If you ask me if your biopsy results have come back yet, I may say no even if they have, because the doctor is really the best person to tell you. He can answer all your questions.” – Gina, nurse who blogs at codeblog.com</p> <p><strong>It’s stressful when a physician makes a mistake</strong></p> <p> “It can be intimidating when you see a doctor who is known for being a real ogre make a mistake. Yes, you want to protect your patient, but there’s always a worry: Am I asking for a verbal slap in the face?” – Linda Bell, registered nurse</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Couch and Louise Waterson. This article first appeared <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/70-secrets-nurses-wish-they-could-tell-you?items_per_page=All">in Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life