Retirement Life

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Australia Post boycott: Why this Aussie grandmother drove her Christmas presents across Australia

<p>A woman so fed up with the services of Australia Post has decided to deliver her grandchildren’s Christmas presents herself by driving across the country, after making a decision to boycott the postal service.</p> <p>Mandy Hickman has relied on the delivery company for a long time, but after a bad experience that occurred recently, she has sworn off Australia Post completely.</p> <p>A month prior, Mandy was anticipating a delivery from the US which contained important supplements and vitamins, but instead of receiving her parcel, she had gotten her hands on another one.</p> <p>“A parcel came to my place, addressed to the wrong address. I opened it, then I got my glasses and realised it wasn’t my parcel,” Ms Hickman told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9now.com.au/a-current-affair/2017" target="_blank"><em>A Current Affair</em></a>.</p> <p>After contacting the number on the package, she discovered that the intended recipient lived a few streets away.</p> <p>The two women spoke on the phone, and the other woman confirmed that Ms Hickman’s parcel was delivered to her by accident, but when she went to exchange parcels, the woman took her own package but never gave Ms Hickman hers.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7822353/lady.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f0797886484e4103b65d09edf53350f7" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/2018/12/06/16/01/queensland-grandmother-boycotts-australia-post-over-dodgy-delivery">A Current Affair</a></em></p> <p>Australia Post gave confirmation that the two parcels had been mixed up.</p> <p>The addresses had the same home number, same suburb but different street names.</p> <p>Australia Post has made five attempts to retrieve the parcel but has not been successful so far.</p> <p>Ms Hickman has also asked the lady multiple times to hand over her parcel but has had no luck.</p> <p>But despite the drama surrounding her package, Ms Hickman was more furious over the fact that Australia Post only offered to pay $50 compensation for goods that cost $650.</p> <p>“You don’t get any compensation for what the goods are worth, what they actually cost and that’s not fair,” said Ms Hickman.</p> <p>Now, after being so exasperated with the delivery service, Ms Hickman is ready to drive from Queensland to Victoria to deliver her grandchildren’s presents herself.</p> <p>And turns out, she isn’t the only one who has complained.</p> <p>Australia Post has proved to be so unreliable that <em>A Current Affair</em> is constantly being bombarded with emails about those who have been left empty handed due to the service.</p> <p>One delivery driver was accused of throwing packages over the fence, squeezing oversized parcels through mail boxes and leaving packages that required signatures.</p> <p>Australia Post has now decided to fully compensate Ms Hickman after being contacted by <em>A Current Affair</em>.</p> <p>In a statement, they said:</p> <p>“It is always disappointing in any instance when we fail to deliver for a customer. This year our hardworking posties and delivery drivers will deliver more than 3 billion parcels and letters effectively and on time, including millions of items in time for Christmas.</p> <p>“We've spoken to both customers to express our disappointment in the way their complaints were handled and apologised. We're working with them on prompt resolutions, with full compensation being organised for the lost international parcel.  </p> <p>“On our busiest day this Christmas we will deliver close to 3 million parcels across the country and we've hired almost 3,000 additional workers to make sure this Christmas is a success.</p> <p>“We encourage customers with any enquiries about their mail delivery to contact us on 13 POST or online."</p> <p>Have you had any bad experiences with Australia Post? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Retirement Life

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How I found strength on my long walk to recovery

<p>On the phone, her voice is calm, clear and full of positivity. You wouldn’t guess that six years ago, Kathleen Jordan was lying in a hospital bed at Royal Melbourne Hospital after suffering a major right haemorrhagic stroke – one of the most severe and deadly forms of stroke.</p> <p>“It was a major bleed,” Kathleen explains, “In fact, one doctor said they’d never seen such a big bleed in anyone that had survived.”</p> <p>The doctors had warned her family to prepare for the fact that she may end up in an aged care ward for the rest of her life, or worse, she could be in a permanent vegetative state.</p> <p>“They actually said to my daughters that they should probably consider an NFR. An NFR means a ‘not-for-resuscitation’ order, but the girls said, ‘No, that’s not gonna happen. She’s going to be fine.’”</p> <p>And Kathleen proved her daughters right. “I’m back doing all the things I used to do. I see my grandchildren, I go to the ballet and the opera, I see my friends, I’m living in the most wonderful retirement complex in Carlton … and I’ve got lots and lots of friends,” she says. “A lot of it is good and I’m very grateful for the life I’ve got.”</p> <p>Prior to the incident, Kathleen led a busy life, running her own leadership coaching business which sent her travelling around Australia and across the world. By contrast, having to spend almost two years recovering in hospital was a huge adjustment.</p> <p>Stroke is one of Australia’s biggest killers and a leading cause of disability. While Kathleen says her blood pressure was under control and there was no clear cause for the stroke, she recalls her doctor warning her to take it easy.</p> <p>“My doctor had been saying to me, ‘You need to slow down a bit, you’re doing a lot.’ And I would always say, ‘But I’m loving what I’m doing.’ I guess it’s when your body is in resolves with your mind really.”</p> <p>Sharon McGowan, CEO of the National Stroke Foundation, says 80 per cent of strokes can be prevented. “The advice is to know your blood pressure and maintain it within normal range, eat well, keep a healthy weight, don’t smoke, keep blood pressure down, exercise regularly and keep alcohol consumption to a minimum.”</p> <p>“Stroke doesn’t discriminate. It can happen to anyone at any age, however risk factors do increase with age,” she adds.</p> <p><strong>Recovering after a stroke</strong><br />For Kathleen, the haemorrhagic stroke resulted in partial paralysis on the left side of her body. She is unable to use her left hand and will have to continue doing physiotherapy, probably for the rest of her life.</p> <p>“Every single day is a struggle day, but I’m not going to give up that struggle because – even six years later – I’m still making improvements,” says Kathleen.</p> <p>“It’s still very hard. Some silly things are difficult, like I was trying to get something out of a package before – and trying to do it with one hand. I was just getting very cross because I couldn’t do it.”</p> <p>The operation to stop the significant bleed in her brain damaged some neurons, sometimes causing Kathleen to search for words when speaking – pausing mid-sentence or often repeating herself.</p> <p>“It’s called aphasia,” explains Kathleen. “However, when I say that to my friends, they all just laugh and say, ‘But we all have trouble finding words!’”</p> <p><strong>Overcoming adversity</strong><br />Kathleen’s resolve and tenacity following her recovery is inspiring, despite her initial fears of being unable to live a normal life again.</p> <p>“I had to just rely on thinking about [my] strengths, and every time I made a little bit of progress, my family and my friends [would] help me celebrate that progress.</p> <p>“For a long time, I couldn’t really walk or sit up without falling over but, with physio and determination, I am now walking around my apartment.”</p> <p>Kathleen actually set in place what she calls her ‘Hope Team’, made up of her close friends and family members. “Whenever I was feeling low, I could ring one of the people in my Hope Team and say, ‘Help me, what do I need to do?’ and they would very quickly give me some encouragement. So, my Hope Team helped me tremendously. They just wanted to support me, even more than what was perhaps expected of them.”</p> <p>In her book, <span><em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/standing-up--kathleen-with-steggall-vicki-jordan/prod9781925384024.html">Standing Up! My Story of Hope, Advocacy &amp; Survival after Stroke</a></em></span>, Kathleen shares the tools that helped her progress during her stroke journey, and how she achieved resilience and happiness by reframing issues.</p> <p>“I wrote the book for stroke victims and their loved ones. I want to give people hope that they too can recover from stroke, from other illness, by really focusing their minds ... [with] the belief that you can.</p> <p>“Have hope that you can recover and work hard on your physio,” she suggests. “Surround yourself with positive people – perhaps create a ‘Hope Team’ that will help you feel strong and focussed on your recovery.”</p> <p>While the road to recovery can be an uphill battle, there are platforms for the Australian stroke community to discuss and seek support. The <a href="http://www.enableme.org.au/">enableme</a> website is a good place to start. It provides a forum for stroke survivors, carers and loved ones to share their experiences, set recovery goals and gain further knowledge about stroke.</p> <p>“Setting personal recovery goals and self-directed rehabilitation continues to play an important role in Kathleen’s journey after stroke,” says Sharon McGowan of the Stroke Foundation. “[She] is a true inspiration and her experience demonstrates the determination, vital support and services stroke survivors need to live well after stroke. Kathleen shows that there is life after stroke.”</p> <p>Although Kathleen has been able to return to semi-normality, she will have carers for the rest of her life. “Sometimes I got a bit miserable about that,” says Kathleen. “And then I thought, ‘Kathleen, just be grateful for the fact there are carers available, and that they want to do a good job and look after you.’ So that made me feel a lot better. Rather than feeling miserable, just think, ‘What have you got?’”</p> <p>“I am just so happy that my life is back on an even keel,” she adds. “I can’t do everything I used to do – for instance, I can’t drive a car anymore, but I’ve got people who look after [me] and who care for me. I’m just blessed really.”</p> <p>Have you had to overcome a major trauma in your life? How did you find the strength?</p> <p><em>Written by Maria Angela Parajo. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/how-i-found-strength-on-my-long-walk-to-recovery.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Combating loneliness: How to meet new friends 

<p><span>Many of us will feel lonely at some point in our lives. It’s that sadness that comes from being by yourself or feeling disconnected from the people around you. For some it’s fleeting, for others it becomes entrenched and damaging.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Several recent studies indicate loneliness is set to reach epidemic proportions by 2030. Experts say it’s as bad for us as smoking 15 cigarettes a day.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Britain has even appointed a minister for loneliness. A </span><span><a href="https://www.jocoxloneliness.org/pdf/a_call_to_action.pdf">report published by the Jo Cox Commission</a></span><span> showed nine million people “always or often feel lonely” and 200,000 older people in the UK have not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Here at home, we have the </span><span><a href="http://endloneliness.com.au/">Australian Coalition to End Loneliness (ACEL)</a></span><span>. Inspired by the work of the </span><span><a href="https://www.campaigntoendloneliness.org/">UK’s Campaign to End Loneliness</a></span><span>, the ACEL aims to address loneliness in Australia.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>The good news is that feeling lonely is nothing to be ashamed of – the research is </span><span>clear that </span><span>millions of people are in the same boat.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>“Being connected to others socially is widely considered a fundamental human need,” says one of the most prominent researchers in the field, Julianne Holt-</span><span>Lunstad</span><span>, PhD, professor of psychology at Brigham Young University in the United States. “It is crucial to both wellbeing and survival.”</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>“Help, I’m lonely!"</strong></span><span> </span></p> <p><span>A community member recently asked if we have any suggestions on how to overcome loneliness.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>“I'm a young 50s and love doing things but I'm lonely. I have lost close friends due to them moving away. I have lost the contact with people. I think I'm a loner – help me. What groups could I join to meet people?”</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Here are some ideas for meeting new friends:</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>1. Volunteering</strong></span><span></span><br /><span>Volunteering is all about helping others, but it also benefits you personally – it offers the chance to make new friends, try a different career field, and explore your local area.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Organisations</span><span> that help refugees, the homeless, people with disabilities, disadvantaged youths or the elderly are numerous. Such </span><span>organisations</span><span> include </span><span><a href="http://mealsonwheels.org.au/">Meals on Wheels</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.thesmithfamily.com.au/">The Smith Family</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="http://www.salvationarmy.org.au/">The Salvation Army</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://youthoffthestreets.com.au/">Youth Off The Streets</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.midnightbasketball.org.au/">Midnight Basketball Australia</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.sacredheartmission.org/">Sacred Heart Mission</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/">Black Dog Institute</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="http://guidedogsaustralia.com/">Guide Dogs Australia</a></span><span>, and </span><span><a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/">Lifeline Australia</a></span><span>.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>The State Emergency Service (SES) in your state and </span><span><a href="http://stjohn.org.au/">St John Ambulance Australia</a></span><span> often put a callout for volunteers.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Wildlife rescue groups, such as </span><span><a href="https://www.wires.org.au/">WIRES </a></span><span>in NSW, and animal welfare </span><span>organisations</span><span> like the </span><span><a href="https://rspca.org.au/">RSPCA</a></span><span>, always appreciate an extra pair of hands – check the parks and wildlife service in your state. The NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, for example, is seeking volunteers for historic and cultural heritage tours, and for their threatened species and bush regeneration programs.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>If you enjoy working in customer service, try the local </span><span><a href="https://shop.oxfam.org.au/volunteer">Oxfam Shop</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.redcross.org.au/get-involved/connect/volunteer">Red Cross</a></span><span> or </span><span><a href="https://www.savethechildren.org.au/take-action/volunteer">Save the Children op shop</a></span><span>. Libraries need volunteers to help with </span><span>stocktake</span><span> to maintain the toy library and to deliver books to library customers. For music lovers, community radio stations are often run by volunteers – you might even have the chance to host your own show.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Major events also provide exciting opportunities for volunteers, so keep an eye out for big events that are coming to your town or city. Film, music and fashion festivals are often looking for volunteers.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>For more information, contact your local council or visit </span><span><a href="http://www.volunteering.org.au/">Volunteering Australia</a></span><span>.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>2.</strong> </span><strong>Fitness classes</strong></p> <p><span>If you’re into group exercise, you have a potential social network right in front of you. Try golf, tennis, dragon boat racing, rowing, squash, salsa classes, ballroom dancing, badminton, ocean swimming, sailing, aqua aerobics or yoga — or find a walking group via the </span><span><a href="http://walking.heartfoundation.org.au/">Heart Foundation Walking network</a></span><span>.</span><span></span></p> <p><span><strong>3.</strong> </span><strong>Hobbies</strong></p> <p><span>Do you like gardening, films, model airplane flying, bird watching, photography, chess, creative writing, clay target shooting, knitting, bridge, quilting, cooking or reading? Look in your local area for groups, clubs or classes that you could join.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Car fanatics could join a club, such as a classic car club. For motorcyclists, the </span><span><a href="http://www.ulyssesclub.org/">Ulysses Club</a></span><span> is a social group for people aged over 40 years. Its motto is “grow old disgracefully”.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>For the community or politically minded, you could attend local council meetings. And don’t forget your local </span><span><a href="https://mensshed.org/">Men’s Shed</a></span><span>, which provides a space to work on practical projects while enjoying some good old-fashioned </span><span>mateship</span><span>.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>4.</strong> </span><strong>Faith-based groups</strong></p> <p><span>Churches and religious </span><span>organisations t</span><span>end to host a lot of social gatherings outside of their regular services, offering golden opportunities to meet people with similar beliefs.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>5.</strong> </span><strong>Virtual spaces</strong></p> <p><span>Facebook, Instagram and other social networks can be used as a way to connect with old friends, make new ones, and keep up with what’s happening in your community.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>If you want to learn more about computers or social media, ask at your local library or visit a local computer club. The </span><span><a href="http://www.ascca.org.au/">Australian Seniors Computer Clubs Association</a></span><span> lists over 130 clubs for older Australians – one might be in your area.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><strong>6.</strong> </span><strong>Meetups</strong></p> <p><span><a href="http://www.meetup.com/">Meetup.com</a></span><span> is a nifty site that offers users the chance to join groups, known as Meetups, based on their location and interests. Examples of groups you can join include “Monopoly Players”, “More Bakeries Than Cycling Touring Club”, “Women’s Social Club”, and “French Movie Group”. If you can’t find a group that interests you, create your own!</span></p> <p><strong>7. Online dating</strong></p> <p><span>The major online dating sites are </span><span><a href="https://www.rsvp.com.au/">RSVP</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.eharmony.com.au/">eHarmony</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://au.match.com/">Match</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.oasisactive.com/">Oasis Active</a></span><span>, </span><span><a href="https://www.pof.com/">Plenty of Fish (POF)</a></span><span>, </span><a href="https://www.zoosk.com/"><span>Zoosk</span></a> <span>and </span><span><a href="https://tinder.com/">Tinder</a></span><span>.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>A good place to start might be with eHarmony, as it caters for a large number of older users. Billed as “Australia’s most trusted online dating site”, it offers specific dating advice for seniors. Of course, there are scams out there, so keep your wits about you.</span><span> </span></p> <p><strong>8. Lions and Rotary Clubs</strong></p> <p><span><a href="http://lionsclubs.org.au/">Lions </a></span><span>and </span><span><a href="http://rotaryaustralia.org.au/">Rotary </a></span><span>do a lot of good in their local communities and further afield. Lions’ motto is “where there’s a need, there’s a Lion”. Rotary is made up of members “who strive to make the world a better place”.</span><span></span></p> <p><strong>9. Returning to work</strong></p> <p><span>Working doesn’t have to be about the money. If you are in need of an outlet for mingling, going back to work could be the answer. Perhaps you could ask your former workplace about casual work or approach your local Bunnings Warehouse – the hardware chain encourages older workers back in to the workforce.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Former teachers might register for substitute teaching and pet lovers could advertise pet sitting or walking services. If you love weddings, why not become a marriage celebrant?</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Adore children? Ask parents you know if they need babysitting or someone to pick their kids up after school. Crafty? How about a market stall? Too many veggies in the garden? Try selling them at a farmer’s market. A spare bungalow, caravan or room could be decorated and listed on </span><span><a href="https://www.airbnb.com/">Airbnb</a></span><span>.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>Other ideas include freelance writing, consulting or selling your photos on a </span><span>microstock</span><span> site such as </span><span><a href="https://www.gettyimages.com/">Getty Images</a></span><span>.</span><span> </span></p> <p><strong>10. Pets</strong></p> <p><span>They are known as man’s best friend but having a dog can help you socialise more with people. A study by the University of Western Australia found “pet owners were significantly more likely to get to know people in their neighbourhood whom they didn’t know previously, compared with non-pet owners”.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Published in <em>PLOS ONE, </em></span><span><a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0122085"><em>The Pet Factor – Companion Animals as a Conduit for Getting to Know People, Friendship Formation and Social Support</em></a></span><span><em> </em></span><span>concluded that dog owners were more likely to get to know people in their community than owners of other pets, such as cats or birds.</span><span> </span></p> <p><strong>11. Reconnecting with old friends</strong></p> <p><span>Make a list of people that you remember fondly and reach out to them by phone, email or Facebook. If they live nearby, invite them out for coffee, and if they are interstate or overseas, send a short email – who knows, one day you might take a trip and meet up with them.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Don’t assume old friends have forgotten about you just because they haven’t been in touch – they may have been juggling work and parenting in their 30s and 40s, making it hard to stay in touch. Most likely, they will be pleased to hear from you.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span>What have you done to combat feeling lonely? Share you experiences and ideas below.</span><span> </span></p> <p><span><em>Written by Leah McLennan. Republished with permission of </em></span><span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/combating-loneliness-how-to-meet-new-friends.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au</em></a></span><span><em>.</em></span><span> </span></p>

Retirement Life

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The most misused word in the English language

<p>A traffic jam when you’re already late.<br /><br />A free ride when you’ve already paid.<br /><br />The fact that the King James Bible is the most shoplifted book in the United States.</p> <p>One of these three things is an example of irony – the reversal of what is expected or intended.<br /><br />The other two (no offense to Alanis Morissette) are not.<br /><br />The difference between them may be one of the most rage-inducing linguistic misunderstandings you’re likely to read about on the Internet or hear about from the determined grammar nerds in your life.<br /><br />“Ironic” does not, technically, mean “unfortunate,” “interesting” or “coincidental,” despite these terms often being used interchangeably. And that frequent misuse has not escaped linguists.</p> <p>According to the editors at <span><a href="http://WWW.DICTIONARY.COM">Dictionary.com</a></span>, “We submit that ironic might be the most abused word in the English language.”</p> <p>That’s a tough claim to prove, but it’s clear that confusion over the definition of irony is persistent and decades old.<br /><br />“Irony” makes Harvard linguist Steven Pinker’s <span><a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-58-most-commonly-misused-words-and-phrases-a6754551.html">list</a></span> of the 58 most commonly misused words in English, and ranks in the top 1 percent of all word lookups on Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary.<br /><br />Even Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald got it wrong, some say, when he claimed in 1939, “It is an ironic thought that the last picture job I took yielded me five thousand dollars five hundred and cost over four thousand in medical attention.” </p> <p>So what does irony mean, really, and where does the confusion come from?<br /><br />Part of the ambiguity probably stems from the fact that there are no fewer than three definitions of irony depending on which dictionary you use.<br /><br />There’s Socratic irony (an ancient rhetorical move), and dramatic irony (an ancient theatrical move), but the definition of irony we care about – and the kind that’s most bitterly debated ­– is situational irony.<br /><br />Situational irony occurs when, as the Oxford English Dictionary defines it, “a state of affairs or an event… seems deliberately contrary to what one expects and is often wryly amusing as a result”. </p> <p>The trick, according to purists, is the deliberately contrary part – for a situation to be ironic, it must be the opposite of what is expected, not merely an amusing coincidence.<br /><br />A traffic jam when you’re already late may be an undesirable coincidence, but it is not the opposite outcome one would expect when leaving for work late (especially if that person lives in a major city).<br /><br />In an article titled <span><a href="http://www.collegehumor.com/post/229130/lines-from-alanis-morissettes-ironic-modified-to-actually-make-them-ironic">Lines From Alanis Morissette’s “Ironic,” Modified to Actually Make them Ironic</a></span>, College Humor writer Patrick Cassels corrects the situation like this: “A traffic jam when you’re already late… to receive an award from the Municipal Planning Board for reducing the city’s automobile congestion 80 per cent.” Now that’s irony.</p> <p>Not every linguist goes by this limited view, though.<br /><br />Ever the champions of fluid language growth, Merriam Webster <span><a href="https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irony">argues</a></span> that Mr. Fitzgerald, Ms. Morissette, and anyone else who uses “ironic” to mean “coincidental” isn’t actually wrong, but is actually just trailblazing.<br /><br />“The word irony has come to be applied to events that are merely curious or coincidental,” the editors write, “and while some feel this is an incorrect use of the word, it is merely a new one.”</p> <p>Now isn’t that something.</p> <p><em>Written by Brandon Specktor. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/our-language/most-misused-word-english-language">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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9 words that will immediately make you sound old

<p>Want to close the generational gap? You’ll need to strike some of these out-of-date words from your lexicon.</p> <p><strong>1. Pocketbook</strong></p> <p>This European word dates way back to the 1600s, when it was used to describe a small bag used to carry coins.</p> <p>The name comes from – you guessed it – a small book that used to be carried in one’s pocket, and also held bank notes and money.</p> <p>While your grandmother might still use the term, younger women tend to call their bags “purses” or “handbags”.</p> <p>You are more likely to hear the term pocketbook these days when it refers to an app or a handheld touchscreen computer. Seem confusing? Bone up on <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/4-most-confusing-computer-technology-terms-explained">today's computing terms</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>2. Whippersnapper</strong></p> <p>This word, which is an alteration of the term “snippersnapper,” first appeared in the 1700s, making it abundantly clear that even our earliest ancestors were easily annoyed by petulant children.</p> <p>In its more modern form, the term relates to an overconfident child or young person who acts more important than he or she actually is: “That clueless whippersnapper doesn’t know a darn thing about life!”</p> <p>Let's face it – kids can be a challenge sometimes. Here's 7 ways they can really get your goat and <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/drama/7-ways-kids-are-annoying-and-how-you-can-deal-it">how to manage them</a></span>. </p> <p><strong>3. Tape</strong></p> <p>If you came of age in the 1980s, chances are you still use the word “tape” when it comes to recording your favourite music or TV shows, as in, “I’m not going to be home tonight to watch ‘Knight Rider.’ Could you tape it for me?”</p> <p>With the advent of digital media, there’s obviously no longer a need to record anything on magnetic tape, but still, old linguistic habits die hard.</p> <p>Speaking of old habits dying hard, is the convenience offered by technology making us lazy, forgetful and <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/Deskilling-in-the-Age-of-Digital-Amnesia">unable to solve basic problems</a></span>?</p> <p><strong>4. Xerox</strong></p> <p>Xerox launched its first commercially available copy machine in the 1960s.</p> <p>Due to its rapid success, the brand name Xerox soon became interchangeable with the word “copy,” much like the brand Kleenex has become synonymous with “tissue”.</p> <p>Today, there are many new printing companies on the market, and most workers refer to making copies as … making copies.</p> <p>Therefore, if you ask a younger co-worker to “Xerox” a document for you, you might be met with a blank stare. </p> <p>You may need to school up on how to deal with the onslaught of tech in the home and workplace by <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/3-Survival-Tips-for-the-Digital-World">reading this survival guide to the digital age</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>5. Floppy disk</strong></p> <p>If you used a computer in the 1980s and ’90s, chances are, you used a square floppy disk for file storage.</p> <p>As CDs became more ubiquitous, the need for floppy disks faded away, so much so that computers stopped manufacturing computers with built-in floppy disk drives.</p> <p>Asking a colleague to save something on a disk will certainly make you sound old, as tiny “thumb” or “flash” drives have since replaced bulkier storage media … for now.</p> <p>Perhaps you just <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/In-Praise-of-Technology">need to embrace technology</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>6. Stewardess</strong></p> <p>In the early days of air travel, a woman who attended to her passengers’ needs was called a stewardess.</p> <p>As years went on, the term took on a negative connotation, because of the restrictive emphasis put on the way women looked.</p> <p>As more men entered the profession, and as women fought back against gender bias in the 1960s and 1970s, the term was replaced with the more gender-neutral title of “flight attendant”.</p> <p>Travelling is stressful as it is so look after yourself if taking a long-haul flight and take note of the <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/10-things-you-should-never-do-airplane">10 things you should never do on an airplane</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>7. Icebox</strong></p> <p>Before people had refrigerators, they used to keep food cold by placing them in iceboxes, which, quite literally, were insulated metal or wood boxes that held large blocks of ice.</p> <p>Once home refrigerators became more commonplace in the 1930s and ‘40s, iceboxes were no longer necessary.</p> <p>For those older folks who grew up without mechanical refrigeration, however, the word “icebox” is forever etched in their vernacular.</p> <p>Does anyone still use the term icebox today? It's certainly not the <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/our-language/most-misused-word-english-language">most misused word in the English language</a></span>. </p> <p><strong>8. Dungarees</strong></p> <p>Today, we call them “jeans,” but people once referred to pants made out of heavy denim as “dungarees”.</p> <p>The name comes from a cheap coarse type of cloth imported from Dongari Kilda, India.</p> <p>The word “dungaree” eventually transformed into “jeans” when clothing manufacturers began importing the cloth from Genoa in Italy, which is referred to as “Genes” in French.</p> <p>Despite its antiquated terminology, you still might periodically hear old-timers referring to heavy work pants as dungarees.</p> <p>Got some old dungarees or other vintage clothes you can't bring yourself to throw out? Here are <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/4-steps-keep-treasured-vintage-clothing-its-best">4 steps to keep treasured vintage clothing looking it's best</a></span>.</p> <p><strong>9. Groovy</strong></p> <p>The origins of this word date back to the jazz age of the 1920s, when it started as a slang term for good music – found “in the grooves” of a vinyl record.</p> <p>It gained widespread prominence during the 1960s and ’70s, when it was used as a synonym for “excellent” or “cool.”</p> <p>By the 1980s, the word was pretty much out of fashion.</p> <p>Today, if you refer to someone or something as “groovy” (without a hint of sarcasm, that is), you’ll sound anything but hip.</p> <p>Fancy yourself a bit of a wordsmith? Never at a loss to find the right word? <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/quiz/test-your-vocabulary-obscure-words-quiz">See if our quiz can stump you</a></span>.</p> <p><em>Written by Jennifer Brozak. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/10-words-will-immediately-make-you-sound-old?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Does a smartphone make us smart?

<p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><u>Does a smartphone make us smart?</u></p> <p style="text-align: left;">Once upon a childhood, we recall that we lived in a different world. On Saturday</p> <p style="text-align: left;">afternoons, our parents would drive us to a far-flung suburb, where our maternal</p> <p style="text-align: left;">grandparents lived. The adults loved us dearly, but believed that children should be seen</p> <p style="text-align: left;">and not heard.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">We would arrive punctually at 2pm. After a brief pit stop, our Nanna would say,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">“Go for a walk!” Our mother would add, “Come back at four o’clock.” So that is exactly what</p> <p style="text-align: left;">we did.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">In an unfamiliar suburb, with no street directory, or no GPS, or no watches to tell</p> <p style="text-align: left;">the time, not even a modern plastic bottle of water for refreshment, three young</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Australians would “Go for a walk!” Thus, we walked, past front yard gardens, along strange</p> <p style="text-align: left;">streets. We would walk for approximately one hour, then we turned around and walked</p> <p style="text-align: left;">back to our grandparents’ home. My elder sister must have had a good sense of geography.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Upon reflection, I do wonder what the current parent police would say now, to such</p> <p style="text-align: left;">child-raising habits. As every reader is aware, these days, there are smart phones employed</p> <p style="text-align: left;">to supervise children’s adventures in society. Such smart phones had not been imagined</p> <p style="text-align: left;">once, let alone invented.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Our oldies collectively had no idea where we were walking to, or even if we would</p> <p style="text-align: left;">return let alone at the correct time. Somehow, we just knew it was nearly four o’clock in</p> <p style="text-align: left;">the afternoon. Maybe we all lived in a safer world, where we were mostly a lot more naïve</p> <p style="text-align: left;">than folk and children are today.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Times change. These days, in the digital world of the 21<sup>st</sup> century, if children go for</p> <p style="text-align: left;">a walk, the parent police phone their offspring up every five minutes on their smart phones.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">As passers-by, we can hear some very strange conversations, in shopping centres or railway</p> <p style="text-align: left;">stations. Here is one I heard, not long ago.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">The parent police must have asked, “Where are you now?”</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Teenager on phone: “I am at the shops, Mum.”</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Mum must have inquired, “Where are you going?”</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Teenager’s response: “I am going to the loo!”</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Mum’s next question, “What are you doing now?”</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Teenager, sounding slightly exasperated, “I’m in the loo, having a wee! Mum!””</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Well, really. I wondered if it was really necessary to share with society, including</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Now there is someone calling on my smart phone! Whoops missed call. I must cease</p> <p style="text-align: left;">everything and return the call. It seems everyone I see is either gazing at a smart phone, or</p> <p style="text-align: left;">chatting on one. Are we so scared to be alone?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Are we all like the teenager in the shopping centre loo, with her mother calling her</p> <p style="text-align: left;">incessantly on her smart phone, the modern parent police? Would parents in these modern</p> <p style="text-align: left;">days even say, “Go for a walk!”, to send their children off for two hours, with no time pieces,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">or smart phones to monitor them? These days the parents must check for the location of</p> <p style="text-align: left;">their children, and for potential predators.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">So, the world is no longer as safe as it once appeared to be. There was the famous</p> <p style="text-align: left;">case of the Beaumont children. “Go for a walk, go for a swim!” Those three children have,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">unfortunately, never been seen again.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Amazingly, the three young girls we once were never disappeared, got lost, and</p> <p style="text-align: left;">always arrived back by four o’clock, unmolested. These days, our mother would have</p> <p style="text-align: left;">phoned us every five minutes on our smart phones, so we were not feeling apart. The smart</p> <p style="text-align: left;">phone is a great invention, but if everyone has to relate every action on a smart phone, has</p> <p style="text-align: left;">the smart phone really made us smart? Food for thought. “See ya!” (The great Australian</p> <p style="text-align: left;">smart phone farewell.). Yeah, “See ya!”</p>

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Good news: The change Centrelink has just announced

<p>After 48 million calls were left unanswered in the last financial year, Centrelink has announced that they will be employing 1500 extra staff to keep up with the demand.</p> <p>According to the figures, 47,950,425 million calls to the welfare organisation had to deal with a busy line, while 5,313,954 were abandoned.</p> <p>Those wanting to reach out were left flustered and angry as complaints increased by 237,000 in the last year, which was an extra 68,000 than the year before, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/queensland-government/contractors-found-to-be-more-efficient-for-centrelink-call-centres/news-story/423ecf3686184b563f341fd821f6ef6a" target="_blank">The Courier Mail</a></em>.</p> <p>The government organisation is in charge of providing and keeping track of welfare payments throughout the country, and one major age bracket that has been affected are the elderly.</p> <p>Those wanting an update on their pension applications and payments were left on hold for hours and after the long wait, failed to receive adequate answers.</p> <p>To improve the service and minimise complaints, the Federal Government revealed that it would be adding an increased amount of call centre numbers as the demand was increasing per year.</p> <p>In the first four months of 2018, a massive 10,986,832 calls had to deal with the busy signal.</p> <p>Michael Keenan, the Human Services Minister, announced in a press conference that Centrelink plans to hire 800 staff members who have extensive experience working in Australian-based call centres.</p> <p>“We will be putting on an extra 1500 people within the department of human services to improve processing times and to improve our performance on our telephone services,” he said.</p> <p>“This announcement is on top of the 1250 staff we’ve already announced that we will be putting on.”</p> <p>Mr Keenan believes the extra hands will help keep up with the amount of calls Centrelink receives in a day.</p> <p>“It’s very important that when people need the support of the government they know that they can contact us in a reasonable timeframe and they are going to be dealing with someone who knows exactly what they are doing,” he said.</p> <p>And even though the abundance of complaints has forced the government to add an increased amount of staff, Mr Keenan hopes that digital communication will be introduced to the welfare service in the near future.</p> <p>“Over time I certainly would much prefer that people interact with us through digital channels and we’ve got a very significant transformation program within my department that is going to make accessing those channels as easy as possible.”</p> <p>He said that hopefully, it would result in a “significant reduction in telephone calls".</p> <p>“Because it’s much more convenient for people to interact with us when they feel like it.”</p> <p>Rachel Stewart, the acting Co-Deputy Leader of the Greens, said that the government made the right decision in hiring more staff, but it’s disappointing it took them this long to take action.</p> <p>“While it’s welcome that the department has started to focus on reducing unanswered calls, I’d hazard a guess that it’s because they keep getting called out for the millions of calls going unanswered, estimates after estimate,” she said in a statement.</p> <p>“There have been significant staff cuts and this year we have seen reports of students going an entire semester without their payment being processed and pensioners going months waiting for the claims to be processed.”</p> <p>Miss Stewart believes that the staff cuts were not a wise decision, and with the increased amount of calls, it was a decision made due to bad judgement.</p> <p>“We need a stable, well trained workforce and the Government should commit to reinstating the nearly 1200 jobs cut from the Department of Human Services in the 2017-18 Budget,” she said.</p> <p>“Older Australians, single parents, students and those looking for work should not have to be put through these significant hurdles just to reach Centrelink and get a payment they are entitled to.”</p> <p>How do you feel about the new changes Centrelink is implementing? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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David Koch reveals the moment he almost quit Sunrise

<p>Since 2002, David Koch has appeared on Aussie screens for Seven’s breakfast morning show <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise.</em></p> <p>However, in a new interview the 62-year-old admitted that he recently considered walking away from the show.</p> <p>Speaking to <em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Stellar</u></em> magazine, he said: “I thought this would be my last year. I was wondering whether it was time for a change.”</p> <p>But after the persuasion of network executives, the presenter, who is affectionately known as ‘Kochie’, decided to stay in his role.</p> <p>“I've got another two years,” Kochie told <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Stellar,</em> describing his current contract as “good”.</p> <p>Recently, <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise</em> has consistently beaten its Channel Nine rival, the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today</em> show, in the ratings wars.</p> <p>Despite being a long-standing presence on the show, Kochie has battled several controversies while hosting the breakfast program.</p> <p>Most recently, Kochie came under fire after a controversial comment he made about slavery during a sports segment.</p> <p>Presenter Mark Beretta was reading out a story about Usain Bolt potentially moving from the Central Coast Mariners soccer team to a European club.</p> <p>“So the Mariners sell him for money, they make a lot of money out of it?” Kochie asked. </p> <p>Mark replied: “It's a win-win. You keep him, great. You sell him, so be it. That's the tough world of professional football.”</p> <p>Kochie then shot back: “Who said slavery was over – anyway, no.”</p> <p>His fellow panellists appeared shocked by his comment.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BmrX0rFH2on/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BmrX0rFH2on/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Sunrise (@sunriseon7)</a> on Aug 19, 2018 at 3:44pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Shortly after, a spokesman for the TV personality told <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Daily Mail </em>Australia that his phrasing was “clumsy”.</p> <p>In 2013, Kochie also caused a stir after urging women to be “more discreet” when breastfeeding in public.</p> <p>His comment caused 50 women to gather outside the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise</em> studio in Sydney’s Martin Place to stage a “nurse-in”.</p> <p>Later that year, he also drew criticism for questioning whether Irish people were behind the Boston Marathon bombings.</p> <p>He asked on the show: “Some people – is this a long bow? – of course it’s a very big Irish Catholic setting … Margaret Thatcher’s funeral coming up tomorrow, in London – is it a really long stretch to think they could be related?”</p> <p>Do you watch <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise</em>? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Retirement Life

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The hilarious A-Z guide on the perils of ageing

<p><strong><em>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle. </em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><u>Retirement Alphabet Soup!</u></p> <p>Here is an ode to say,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Retirement Soup for us today!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">A is for aging with attitude,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">We are feisty old chicks and dudes!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">B is for bronchitis, cough and blow,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">And for bursitis, where did vigour go?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">C is for COPD we were stoking,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">With all our youthful smoking.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">D is for diarrhoea,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">No doctor wants to know ya!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">E is for euthanasia,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Some geriatrics’ fantasia.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">F is for the flatulence part,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Yes, we are grand old farts!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">G is for the geriatricity stuff,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">We got old, suck that up!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">H is for halitosis for us,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Listerine is good, no need to fuss.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">I is for Imodium’s task,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">All you do is the chemist ask.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">J is for jellybeans, eh?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Been to the pharmacist, let’s say,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Brought the lolly trolley today!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">K is for our kids who also grow old,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Us they tell what to do, be told!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">L is for laxatives for that constipation,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">The flip side of grey consternation.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">M is for MRI scans and tests,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">All clear, we hope, that’s best.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">N is for negative Normans around,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Wish grey positivity would abound.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">O is for obesity sighs,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Cellulite for all our thighs!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">P is for pappa’s don’t preach,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Lard butts so out of reach.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Q is for hope we don’t go queer,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">No dementia here yet, dears.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">R is for Retirement years,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">We race on, switching gears.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">S is for that sexuality bit,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Hope you made memories of blips!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">T is for testicles, you can’t see ‘em,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Do oldies belong in museums?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">U is for ultrasounds,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Our medical tests do abound.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">V is for Ventolin inhalers for us,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Breathing disorders cause a fuss.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">W is for the water works,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Fluid tablets are the worst!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">X is for more X-rays today,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Got a photo of my bad back, yah!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Y is for that yellow jaundice for oldies,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Bilirubin levels make us feel mouldy.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Z is for this human zoo,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">No rocking chairs for me and you!</p> <p style="text-align: left;"> </p> <p style="text-align: left;">That’s your alphabet soup today,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Welcome to our new old age!</p>

Retirement Life

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6 myths about older ladies that just aren’t true

<p><strong><em>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</em></strong></p> <p>Here are some versions of common myths about older ladies. This is for our retirement years.</p> <p><strong>1. Is it too late to exercise, if I never have before?</strong></p> <p>FACT: It’s never too late to exercise. Even if we are in our fifties or sixties, and have not exercised too much, we can adopt a moderate, balanced exercise regimen. In retirement, we have more leisure time, so can explore gym memberships, or golf, or aqua aerobics, or senior yoga, or pilates, or anything we fancy. We all need a balanced, moderate physical regimen.</p> <p><strong>2. Is dementia inevitable?</strong></p> <p>FACT: Dementia is a medical condition, for which treatments are evolving and developing. It is not an inevitable or normal factor of ageing. Steps can be taken to prevent this condition. We can engage in healthy exercise, and persevere with intellectual pursuits, such as reading, crosswords, letter writing, puzzles, and maintain a support network for our communication skills.</p> <p><strong>3. Shall we become depressed?</strong></p> <p>FACT: Depressive conditions can occur at any age. Some people believe all older people become isolated and depressed. But if depression occurs, it can be treated, with appropriate health professionals. Take things one day at a time, but you can plan and look forward to your golden years. One good practice is to write down all your blessings on a daily basis. You woke up! Great! The sun rises and blesses you with another day on Earth, make the most of it!</p> <p><strong>4. Does ageing mean the end of love?</strong></p> <p>FACT: No, life can begin at sixty. If we have a long-term significant other, we can develop our old love life in an understanding manner. If we are single, we might meet ‘the one’. But use precautions, these guys were active in the swinging sixties. They are called STD’s, part of the legacy of the baby boomers.</p> <p><strong>5. Do older ladies fear ageing?</strong></p> <p>FACT:  In general, older ladies do not fear ageing. We cannot worry about, or control, normal signs of growing older. We can have grey hair, we like it that way! We get chicken necks, and double chins, by heck! But we don’t need the undertakers yet!</p> <p>Lots of women embrace their post-menopausal years, with a positive mindset. There are never enough hours in the day. Women our age can succeed in many pursuits. Plus, wisdom and enlightenment can come with age, but we still don’t know everything!</p> <p><strong>6. Is arthritis part of ageing?</strong></p> <p>FACT: Women over fifty years of age, arthritis can be more likely to develop. This is due to the loss of cartilage in our joints. We can adopt suitable strategies such as sensible flat shoes, not expansive high heels, and less jogging or stressful activities for our musculoskeletal system. The key factor to managing this condition is pacing ourselves in physical activities. Use it or lose it! But if there is arthritic pain being experienced, there are holistic remedies to alleviate it. These include: heat packs, massage, maybe acupuncture, hydrotherapy, or TENS, known as electrotherapy. Sometimes, rest is best, sometimes simple exercises can be beneficial, for a balanced lifestyle, now we are ‘older ladies’.</p> <p>What are some myths about older ladies you are debunking?</p>

Retirement Life

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Hilarious poem about the perils of men in retirement

<p><strong><em>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle. </em></strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><u>Perils of Men in Retirement</u></p> <p style="text-align: left;">Here’s an ode for ladies of a certain age,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Your men are going to retire one day,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Very old joke—is this your hunch?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">You married him for better or worse, not lunch!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">His first day at home, what’s he going to do?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">He wants to come to the supermarket with you!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Now this is a man on a mission,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Buys half the shop with no permission,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Well, that was an expensive shop,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Now he wants you to cook this lot,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">A retired husband is a full time job!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">What’s this? He’s gardening with his chainsaw,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Well, those were your plants… but wait, there’s more,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">He’s bought an electric guitar,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">You wish his greyboy band would go far</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Away, that is! Oh no, not this,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">He wants to go camping with his grey old miss,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">NO! NO! God gave you a home, not a tent,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Yes, girls, camping is a defence,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Well, aren’t we both having fun?</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Wife wishes she’d bought a gun,</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Never mind, it’s only retirement together, day one!</p>

Retirement Life

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15 enduring myths about life today debunked

<p>As we know, facts tend to get in the way of a good story. But gossip, rumours, scandals and old wives’ tales can be very real in the telling; and we tend to believe a lot of them until they are debunked. After all, they can be interesting, entertaining, comforting and often convincing.</p> <p>Our younger generations, especially millennials, have a blunt statement about all of this: get real! Learning to do this without sacrificing our basic values poses a challenge to us all.</p> <p>In the interest of reality — and guiding well-intentioned adults, their children and their grandchildren into the future — let’s begin by pointing out some of the myths we continue to believe as we prepare to enter the 2020s.</p> <p><strong>1. Housing is now dangerously unaffordable. </strong></p> <p>It is; but this has always been the case for newlyweds and low-income earners. Interestingly, Australia’s debt servicing ratio (interest payments as a share of disposable income) for mortgage and other debt is currently as low as it has ever been in four decades. But, yes, housing prices in Sydney and Melbourne were off the chart in 2017: a big bubble indeed.</p> <p><strong>2. The rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting poorer.</strong></p> <p>Not by much at all, in fact: The share of income and wealth held by the rich and well-off has only increased by a few per cent since the start of this century. It is also important to remember that this 40 per cent of households is paying 85 per cent of all taxes, so their wealth is being distributed.</p> <p><strong>3. We are now working harder than ever, with not enough time to scratch ourselves.</strong></p> <p>Not true. In 1800, males entered the workforce at 13 years of age and worked 65-hour weeks, clocking up 80,000 hours of paid work over 25 years, before dying at an average age of 38. Today, we still work 80,000 paid hours in a lifetime; but we work less than half as many hours per week across a longer period of 50+ years. And the hours are still falling. Most of us also have two months’ off a year via vacation, public holidays and sick leave; and we have more discretionary and leisure time than at any time in history.</p> <p><strong>4. There won’t be enough jobs in the future due to technology, robots and artificial intelligence.</strong></p> <p>Yes, there will: we are good at creating jobs. Over the past five years to 2017, we created six times more jobs (yes, six times!) than we lost. In addition to our current pool of over 12 million jobs, there are millions more in the making which will replace those lost through technology and digital disruption.</p> <p><strong>5. Marriages don’t last as long as they once did.</strong></p> <p>Surprisingly, the average length of a marriage — 20 years — has remained the same for centuries. Of course, there was a time when we didn’t live long enough (38 years) to have a divorce! Equally surprising is the fact that the divorce rate is now much lower than it was 40 years ago, with less than one per cent of marriages ending in divorce each year.</p> <p><strong>6. Crime is on the rise, especially murders.</strong></p> <p>This is, fortunately, not the case. The murder rate in Australia is not only one of the world’s lowest, at around one per 100,000 each year, but it has also fallen to record lows in recent years.</p> <p><strong>7. Speed on the road is the number one killer.</strong></p> <p>No: things like distractions, falling asleep and intoxication are.</p> <p><strong>8. We need a big population to compete in a globalising world.</strong></p> <p>No, we don’t. Some 18 of the world’s 20 highest standard of living countries have a population lower than Australia’s 25 million in 2018; and most of them house less than a third of our population. However, with so few people living in Australia at present, we will ultimately need to increase our population to justify our enormous land mass and resources in Asia. With many Asian cities already accommodating bigger populations than our entire nation, the time has come for us to share the load.</p> <p><strong>9. Immigrants take our jobs.</strong></p> <p>No, they don’t. More often than not, they take the jobs we don’t like. And if a migrant family arrives, they create a demand for more jobs than they can fill for at least five years in terms of the needed infrastructure and annual consumption expenditure.</p> <p><strong>10. Australia will run out of workers due to ageing.</strong></p> <p>No, we won’t. Being too young a population, as we were in the 19th century, was a worse problem; and to get enough workers to support the population, we needed children to start work at under 15 years of age, and often as young as 11–13 years. As this century unfolds, working beyond 65 years of age, and up to 75 or more — often on a part-time or casual basis — is a realistic expectation for a workforce where we are increasingly using our brains over brawn. (And, as we know, the only way to wear the brain out is to stop using it.)</p> <p><strong>11. We need to make things to create basic wealth.</strong></p> <p>No, we don’t. A wealth-creating industry is one which is producing products that customers actually want and are prepared to pay for, whether they are goods or services.</p> <p>Furthermore, we don’t ‘make’ things so much as we modify or convert existing things. By this definition, agriculture, mining, manufacturing and construction are all, oddly enough, service industries. Humans didn’t create the raw materials on which these industries are based, they were already here; and until governments put a price on water for its usage and taxes on minerals for their extraction, these materials are free for the taking. The term ‘goods industry’ is just a way to separate tangible from intangible products.</p> <p>These days, the Agriculture industry creates just two per cent of our GDP, and the Manufacturing industry creates less than six per cent; only eight per cent all up. In 1960, these two industries totalled 38 per cent, not eight per cent! Despite this, Australia’s standard of living (SOL) is nearly three times higher than it was at the end of the Industrial Age in the mid-1960s. If anything, our ‘service’ industries are propping up some of the ‘goods’ industries in this new century.</p> <p><strong>12. We are too-highly taxed. </strong></p> <p>No, we aren’t. Australia is one of the lowest-taxed nations among the developed countries, with taxes making up 28 per cent of our GDP. By contrast, the average taxation rate is 37 per cent, and many nations are nudging 50 per cent. This is one of the most pernicious lies being trundled out by both sides of politics in Australia.</p> <p><strong>13. The government should cut their expenditure to balance the Budget.</strong></p> <p>If they did, we would need to make sure that the government was still providing adequate support for single parents, the unemployed, the aged, the disabled or other disadvantaged citizens. But, yes, we should be getting better value for our taxes than we do. One-fifth of our GDP is produced by governments, and that sector’s productivity has been poor for decades.</p> <p><strong>14. Australia could become the food bowl of Asia.</strong></p> <p>If only — but we don’t have enough water. That said, we will probably increase our output this century fivefold, as we did in the 20th century, but that will only feed five per cent of the Asian population at the end of the 21st century.</p> <p><strong>15. Nuclear is the world’s most dangerous energy ever used.</strong></p> <p>Wood may actually have killed more people per kilowatt (kW) of energy produced (e.g. via the harvesting process, or due to fire or asphyxiation). While terrifying to most humans, nuclear energy may, ironically, be the safest energy source on the basis of deaths per kW of energy — especially considering the safeguards that are now being implemented as a result of past accidents.</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from </em>The Future for Our Kids<em> by Phil Ruthven, available at all good book stores including Dymocks, Readings or online at <span><a href="https://www.wilkinsonpublishing.com.au/book/future-our-kids">Wilkinson Publishing</a></span>. </em></p>

Retirement Life

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Why returning back to my childhood home was so emotional

<p><strong><em>Ray Thomas left his family farm in South Australia when he was in his 20s and moved to New Zealand. He has always loved writing short stories and watching sport. He married an amazing woman 16 years ago and they both retired three years ago. They love family life, travelling, spending time in their large garden and fostering young children.</em></strong></p> <p>My wife and I had been planning the trip to my home state of South Australia, for many months. Now, after very little sleep because of our early flight, combined with great anticipation, we were finally on our way. Like excited young children off on their first overseas holiday, we happily boarded our aircraft. We grinned at each other saying, “Aussie here we come”.</p> <p>This, in all likelihood will be final trip home to South Australia, the country I left about 45 years ago, but still the country I call home. I fully expected the holiday to be full of mixed emotions. Fortunately, I had my amazing wife beside me, to share it with.</p> <p>So what the real reason for this trip, and why do it now? I have older siblings who are not in the best of health, so thought it would be nice to spend time with them, while I have the opportunity. We also thought it would be nice to visit places that meant a great deal to me, in my younger days, and allow myself to take one last trip down memory lane.</p> <p>We arrived in Adelaide several hours later than we had expected due to cancelled and alternative flights. To arrive in a city I had once called home (but had obviously changed a great deal), with a Google map to guide us, in peak hour traffic before a long weekend, was somewhat daunting, challenging and stressful.</p> <p>It was with great relief, when we finally arrived at ours friends home. Wayne and Wendy were relieved and delighted to finally see us. So began an amazing few days, full of laughter and great fun.</p> <p>It was great to spend time with our close friends, and we really appreciated everything they did for us.</p> <p>The following day was the first of many that were to follow of mixed emotions, as we took them with us around the district where I spent the first 17 years of my life.</p> <p><strong>Closure</strong></p> <p>First, we drove around the township of Gawler. It was great to revisit places that used to mean so much to me, and share it with my wife and close friends.</p> <p>I noticed a sign above a shop door with the name of distant family members where they once ran a thriving business. Then we walked up to the house where my grandparents once lived. We then drove passed the church where my brother was married over 55 years ago, to name but a few of the places, we visited, all of which brought back happy memories. It had been decades since I last visited Gawler, but instinctively I knew where to go. I was home. Upon leaving the town, I had mixed emotions. I felt perfectly happy and content, but also a sense of not needing to return.</p> <p><strong>Heartbreaking sadness</strong></p> <p>And so we travelled out to Reeves Plains and our former home and farm. What initially struck me was how dry and barren the district was after months of drought. I had also forgotten how flat the country was. Despite little recent rain, and the high cost of piped water, from reservoirs many miles away, combined with the searing heat, the total absence of gardens still shocked me.</p> <p>I noticed our shearing shed, but was then amazed to see our large sheep yards had vanished.</p> <p>As I surveyed the nearby paddocks, I was deeply saddened that for whatever reason, no sheep were to be seen. I presume farmers now rely totally on growing cereal crops, which upset me, because the district once had large numbers of sheep.</p> <p>It was desperately sad to see our old house and gardens looking so badly run down, almost like it was un-loved. The barn where we once spent countless happy hours playing table-tennis still stood proud amongst the drought and desolation.</p> <p>We then drove passed the decaying and broken old school and the adjoining tennis courts.</p> <p>The odd metal post which once helped to support the tennis net’s, stood strong and defiant. With overgrown trees and long since disintegrated tennis courts, we would never have known they ever existed. What was once one of the meeting places in the district is now confined to the minds of those who are old enough to remember the importance of the courts all those years ago.  </p> <p>A short time later, we arrived at Redbanks and walked around what was once our local church and community hall. Many happy memories came flooding back. It was heart breaking to see what was once a fun filled building decaying and slowly succumbing to nature.</p> <p>The once bustling township of Wasleys still exists, but like so many rural towns, is now struggling to survive. However, it was heartening to see the Bowling Club Clubhouse where both my parents once happily played with their many friends, had been rebuilt after the disastrous fire, which swept through the district a few years ago.</p> <p>It was the only glimmer of life we had seen in the district all day. Was it a day of mixed emotions? The answer is undoubtedly yes. I now have closure with no desire or intention of returning to that part of my life. I found it to be deeply upsetting to see everything so badly decayed, largely because of time and I suspect, years of low rainfall.</p> <p>I felt it was far better for me to remember our home and district, as it used to be, rather than (I fear) the inevitable total disintegration that will follow in the years to come.</p> <p><strong>Family time</strong></p> <p>The next day we visited my niece and family in Riverton. It was great to see them all again, and relive the happy time we spent together on their trip to New Zealand a few years ago.</p> <p>Then we travelled to the Barossa Valley and visited my elderly sister. It was nice to share old family photos and happily talk about the “old days” with her and rekindle the relationship we once had.</p> <p>It had been a long, hot, emotionally tiring day. Surprisingly, for the first time in many years, I began to realise I was missing MY family. It turned out to be a day of mixed emotions which I had not expected.</p> <p><strong>Childhood memories </strong></p> <p>Many decades ago, when we stayed at Port Elliot, our family often ate fish and chips for tea and then together went for a walk afterwards.  My wife and I found ourselves often doing exactly the same thing.</p> <p>We spent many happy days walking along the many paths, which offered magnificent views of fantastic scenery, and along the quiet streets, most of which had not changed. Several great trips to nearby Victor Harbour and walking around Granite Island and climbing The Bluff were also highlights of our time spend in that amazing area. Both towns were fantastic places to relax and unwind.</p> <p>Being our final night, it seemed appropriate to eat fish and chips overlooking the golden sandy beach. We then went for a leisurely walk, into the fast setting sun, sitting briefly on the rocks overlooking Green Bay, soaking in the sight and sound of the waves crashing on the rocks. We left the next morning, but not before our final walk, and say our “Goodbyes” to the many places we had frequently visited and enjoyed.</p> <p>In my youth (55-60 years ago) I had only climbed over the rocks. The paths were only for “oldies”. Now, I was THAT “oldie”, and quite happy to do just that, while fondly remembering my “long ago” youth.</p> <p>We were both sad to leave.  It was great to share the special area which means so much to me with my wife. Both of us would love to return, which we hope to do again sometime in the near future.</p> <p><strong>Overwhelming grief</strong></p> <p>Visiting the Mundalla cemetery however left me with very real mixed emotions. To walk around and see the names of many of my parent’s friends and bowling mates and people that I knew, was very sad.</p> <p>A short time later, we located my parent’s headstones. We left flowers and tidied the around the area, “talking” to them as we did so. I had an overwhelming sense that Dad was quite happy, as he had Mum beside him, and he was surrounded by people he knew. Mum is also surrounded by people she knew, but when I kissed her headstone to say “Bye Mum” before turning to leave, I sensed her saying “Don’t go, stay here with me”. Walking away with tear filled eyes, I clutched my chest thinking and re-affirming “here is where you will always be and always stay”.</p> <p>I once read: “A mother holds her children’s hands for a-while but their hearts forever”, and I thought how appropriate.</p> <p>I joined my wife who was sitting on a nearby seat. We held each other, for several minutes, the silence broken only by the sound of the kookaburra’s in the nearby gum trees. Somehow, words were not required.</p> <p>Visiting the cemetery affected me more than I thought it would. Very real mixed emotions and my feeling of home caught me by surprise.</p> <p><strong>More family time</strong></p> <p>And so on to Mount Gambier, where we stayed with my brother and his wife. Yes, he was very frail, but he still remained my much loved, admired older brother, with his wife I had known virtually all my life beside and taking care of him. We spent many happy hours, laughing together, sharing old ‘photos and reliving our younger days together.</p> <p>On his 78th birthday, it was great that most of his family were able to celebrate his birthday with him. It also gave us the opportunity to catch-up with many family members we had not seen for many years.</p> <p>All to soon it was time to leave and return home, but not before my brother said to my wife and I, separately and alone, in his softly spoken, frail voice “I hope I will see you again”, to which we could only mutter with voices choked with emotion, something that we hoped sounded bright and positive, knowing that in our hearts, it would be highly unlikely. After hugging and saying “Bye big brother”, and a “Thank-you” hug, for my amazing sister-in-law, we were on our way.</p> <p>So was it a trip of mixed emotions as I had expected? Absolutely, and for parts of it, a sense of total and absolute closure. For other parts of me, a very strong desire to return, at least for a holiday.</p> <p>The desire to suddenly want to live closer to family, has taken me by surprised, and I am uncertain what (if anything) can be done about it. With time, hopefully the concerns I am currently having with my mixed emotions will be resolved.</p>

Retirement Life

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“She’s chucking it in”: Denise Drysdale responds to claims she has quit Studio 10

<p>New claims have emerged that Denise Drysdale is walking away from the breakfast TV show,<em> Studio 10. </em></p> <p>During a radio segment on <em>The Kyle and Jackie O Show</em>, entertainment journalist Peter Ford revealed that the 69-year-old is “chucking it in”.</p> <p>Denise’s departure follows a recent string of exits on <em>Studio 10</em>, with the recent resignation of Ita Buttrose and Jessica Rowe.</p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black;">“<span style="letter-spacing: -.1pt;">She's quitting the <em>Studio 10 show</em>. She's chucking it in,” Peter told Kyle Sandilands and Jackie "O" Henderson. </span></span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white; min-height: 0px; orphans: 2; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px;" class="xxmol-para-with-font">Peter then went on to suggest the possible reasons for her departure, saying: “She's now got the house all built on the Gold Coast. She's got a new baby [a dog] on the way. She's adopted a dog.”<span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Following the segment, a spokesperson for Network Ten said that Denise would address Peter’s claims that morning. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">On-air this morning, Denise revealed that she won’t be leaving the show, but she will be taking a break. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">She said: “I have been touring for 54 years in this job and I am sick of the travel and sick of sleeping in other people's beds."</span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white; min-height: 0px; orphans: 2; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px;" class="xxmol-para-with-font">She continued, “I spoke to our executive producer and said, 'I need to go'. I had a meeting and they said, ‘We don't want you to go. Have a break. Then come back’. So I am lucky to still be working at my age and have an opportunity to have a little break.”<span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">In 2016, Denise transitioned from being a fill-in presenter to a permanent host on the breakfast TV show. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Throughout her time on <em>Studio 10</em>, Denise faced rumours of tensions between her and former co-host Ita Buttrose, 76. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">The speculation was heightened after Denise threw a brussels sprout at Ita in an on-set incident last November. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Fans were also quick to comment on the pair’s relationship during Ita’s farewell segment in April, when Denise stayed noticeably silent. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">However, in a statement to <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk"><em><strong><u>Daily Mail Australia</u></strong></em></a><u>,</u> Network Ten denied the claims there was a rift between the two, labelling the allegations “offensive”. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Ita’s departure came a month after Jessica Rowe told viewers on-air that she was resigning to spend more time with her family. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg7xS9BBoIC/?utm_source=ig_embed" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 36.94444444444444% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg7xS9BBoIC/?utm_source=ig_embed" target="_blank">A post shared by Studio 10 (@studio10au)</a> on Mar 29, 2018 at 9:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt; background: white;">“After much soul searching and discussions with my family, it is with a heavy heart that I have decided to leave Studio 10,” Jessica said. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">The resignations have also impacted <em>Studio 10</em>’s ratings, with the show only averaging 63,000 viewers a day in April this year.</span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">In January 2014,<em> Studio 10</em> was averaging more than 90,000 viewers a day across Australia. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p>Would you be sad to see Denise Drysdale leave <em>Studio 10?</em> Tell us in the comments below.  </p>

Retirement Life

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War widow kicked out of home after 20 years

<p>A war widow has been left to fend for herself after being told that she was getting kicked out of the apartment she had lived in for 20 years.</p> <p>Up until a year ago, Ila Harvey lived in a small, low-rise complex owned by the War Widows Guild at Drummoyne, in Sydney’s inner-west.</p> <p>When Ila lost her soldier husband, who had served on the Kokoda Track and at Milne Bay in New Guinea, she found herself friends in her local area and hobbies that kept her busy. </p> <p>However, this time last year, she was told the complex was being sold because the Guild had run out of funds, and the sale would help better serve the Guild’s four thousand members.</p> <p>Ila said the Guild suggested she move to a nursing home, but she felt there was still plenty of living to do, reported <a href="https://www.9news.com.au"><strong><em><u>Nine News</u></em></strong></a>.  </p> <p>After contacting a nearby MP, Ila and her family members started lobbying for support from the government.</p> <p>Her situation was eventually passed on to the Better Regulations Minister Matt Kean, who made an interesting discovery.</p> <p>Mr Kean found that under the Retirement Villages Act, the Guild was obliged to provide Ila with support to find similar accommodation.</p> <p>However, as the Guild have sold seven similar properties in their possession since 2002, the chances of her finding accommodation were slim.</p> <p>But, when the NSW branch of the RSL heard her story, they stepped in to help the widow.</p> <p>A new place in Cherrybrook was found for Ila through its aged accommodation arm RSL Life Care and state president James Brown.</p> <p>After months of uncertainty, Ila is celebrating her new home with the people who helped her get it. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the Guild wrestles with what to do with their Drummoyne site after Canada Bay Council’s independent planning and assessment panel rejected the proposal to demolish Ila’s old complex. </p>

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The heartwarming moment hero tradesman pays for pensioner’s meal

<p>A tradie, who was filmed paying for a pensioner’s meal at McDonald’s in Bendigo, Victoria, this week has said that he only did what all Australians should do after noticing the elderly man fumbling with a handful of change.</p> <p>Dave Love, 42, generously offered to pay for the meal on Tuesday and the good deed was secretly recorded and has since gone viral.</p> <p>The elderly man who was the recipient of the act of kindness, Bert, is a widower who recently lost his daughter.</p> <p>“When I looked at that man I saw my dad, who has passed away. I just had to help him,” Dave told <em><u><a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk"><strong>Daily Mail Australia</strong></a>.</u></em></p> <p>“Pensioners need our help. I just hope people who see the video remember to do a similar thing in the future.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Flangleyfamily%2Fvideos%2F10155685354745814%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=267" width="267" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>The video was secretly captured by Melanie Langley, Dave’s partner, who explained that he regularly does kind things for strangers.</p> <p>“He has the best heart - he always puts himself last and would do anything for anyone,” Melanie, 39, said.</p> <p>Dave’s eldest daughter, Eliza, said she was proud of her dad.</p> <p>“He does this stuff all the time, one day he was really broke but saw an old lady needed some money for food at the supermarket and gave her the rest of the money he had til payday,” she said.</p> <p>Dave offered to pay for Bert’s meal alongside his own coffee at a McDonald’s in Bendigo, Victoria.</p> <p>Bert initially resisted Dave’s offer but eventually accepted it, saying: “Thank you very much… you're a gentleman, thank you.”</p> <p>In the video, Bert can then be seen moving away from the counter with his order number.</p> <p>Dave then handed him a $20 note, saying: “That's for your next coffee.”</p> <p>Since the video was shared online, Dave has received many messages praising his kindness.</p> <p>“It's not about me - it is about helping people out. I didn't do this for attention but I'm glad it has made people realise how far a little kindness can go,” he said.   </p> <p>“These people built our country so we can live the lives we have today - for my generation and the generation after us,” he said. </p> <p>“If I was prime minister tomorrow I would fix the pension.”</p> <p>Bert has since been given a year’s supply of McDonald’s.</p>

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20 years ago and now: Top toys compared

<p>A lot has changed in the world of toys in the past 20 years, but one item maintains its hold on children's hearts: the Hot Wheels car.</p> <p>"They are a simple toy but they are a fabulous toy," says Warehouse toy buyer Lonnica Van Engelen, of the classic collectible, which features in the toy department's top 10 sellers now, as it did 20 years ago.</p> <p>Also wildly popular in the late 90s were Tamagotchis, Polly Pockets and the boardgame Operation. While Operation is still around and Polly Pockets are due to make a return to shelves later this year, Tamagotchis have been superseded by technology. </p> <p>Children who once would have spent hours tending their virtual pet will now spend hours on the iPad.</p> <p>Van Engelen says the market for collectible toys, driven in part by the YouTube craze for unboxing videos, has grown "exponentially" in recent years. Children watch their favourite YouTubers build massive collections of toys, and they want to do that too. </p> <p>The most popular of these young superstars is American 7-year-old Ryan of ToysReview, who has been opening and playing with toys in front of a camera since he was three. He now makes an estimated $16 million a year, and his last name and location are kept secret to protect him. </p> <p>Ryan has reviewed Hot Wheels twice in the past year, racking up 3.4 million views for a post from two months ago, and 13 million views for a video posted seven months ago.</p> <p>Many of his most popular videos (the ones snagging up to 890 million views) feature the word "surprise" in the title. </p> <p>Sonya Brooks, a toy buyer and owner of Toy Fest in Christchurch, says surprise is a key element of a toy's success. The same delight that previous generations got from lucky dips is ignited in children who open an LOL Surprise, Smooshy Mushy Mystery Pack or Lost Kitties Blind Box – all top sellers, and all popular YouTube searches.</p> <p>"Even a year ago we didn't have this many collectibles in the top 10," says Van Engelen. "I think it comes down to children at a party. Children love to watch other children open presents. They are learning different ways to play."</p> <p>Brooks has also noticed a return to quality toys that will be passed from one generation to the next, possibly a reaction to all the plastic that comes with toys. Toys that inspire role play, like dolls and prams, are riding a wave of popularity.</p> <p>Of Hot Wheels she says, "You can't go past good old cars. I remember the first time my son picked up a car and put it on the floor and went vroom. He'd never had a vehicle, it's innate."</p> <p><strong>TOP TOYS 2018</strong> (in no particular order)</p> <ul> <li>Pomsies </li> <li>Zuru 5 Surprise Ball</li> <li>LOL Surprise Confetti Pop</li> <li>Hot Wheels basic cars</li> <li>LEGO Millennium Falcon</li> <li>Play-doh single tub</li> <li>Smooshy Mushy Mystery Pack</li> <li>Lost Kitties Blind Box</li> <li>Monopoly Here and Now</li> <li>Zuru Schnooks Plush Series 2</li> </ul> <p><strong>TOP TOYS 1998</strong> (in no particular order)</p> <ul> <li>Brick Game 9 in 1</li> <li>Chatter Rings</li> <li>Pro Yo II</li> <li>Tamagotchi</li> <li>Hot Wheels basic cars</li> <li>Barbie Picnic Van</li> <li>Super Soaker</li> <li>Polly Pocket</li> <li>Operation</li> <li>Magna Doodle</li> </ul> <p><em>Source: The Warehouse</em></p> <p><em>Written by Eleanor Black. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><u>Stuff.co.nz.</u></strong> </a></em></p>

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Is ageism affecting you?

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>Yah, we made it! We got old! Now we are ageing in the millennial world, which we have played a part in creating.</p> <p>Is ageism affecting you? Ageism is simply discrimination against older people in the workforce, in the media, in advertising, and in the social scene.</p> <p>One of the major areas where ageism is evident, is in the employment of older workers. Older workers can provide years of experience, life skills, and be great mentors to younger workers. But nearly a third of the officially unemployed workers are aged 45-65 years old. If someone loses their job at this age, they may never gain more than a casual, part-time position. These are the vital years pre-retirement, when employees build up savings and superannuation for their golden years.</p> <p>Basically, many employers do discriminate against hiring older workers from their candidates. Some unemployed older worker can retrain, but may battle an overlooked prejudice, the ageism of the potential employer. These retrained workers may never gain employment. If they do, they may have only 5-10 years of working life remaining. Many employers prefer to hire someone younger.</p> <p>Ageism is also evident in the media. For instance, no weather girl on the television is an old, grey, fat woman. Weather girls are anorexic, beautiful, blonde bimbos who can barely read an autocue. Maybe old, fat, grey women don’t want to be weather girls. That’s okay. Maybe they do, and the employers in television land hire young, attractive babes. That is ageism.</p> <p>On the other hand, ageism can factor in a reverse situation. An older, more experienced nurse, doctor, allied health professional, or a teacher, can still attract job opportunities. Society regards their experience as both valid and valuable. In my personal experience, as a teacher/tutor for 42 years, I receive part-time job offers as a tutor, several times per week. Nice to be asked.</p> <p>Moreover, seniors have discounts on travel fares, a senior’s card discount on purchases, and some concessions with their pensions. But is the level of the senior’s pension, a sign of ageism itself? Most household budgets are eroded by the cost of food and bills.</p> <p>What are your experiences? Is ageism affecting you?</p>

Retirement Life

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Is ageism affecting you?

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>Yah, we made it! We got old! Now we are ageing in the millennial world, which we have played a part in creating.</p> <p>Is ageism affecting you? Ageism is simply discrimination against older people in the workforce, in the media, in advertising, and in the social scene.</p> <p>One of the major areas where ageism is evident, is in the employment of older workers. Older workers can provide years of experience, life skills, and be great mentors to younger workers. But nearly a third of the officially unemployed workers are aged 45-65 years old. If someone loses their job at this age, they may never gain more than a casual, part-time position. These are the vital years pre-retirement, when employees build up savings and superannuation for their golden years.</p> <p>Basically, many employers do discriminate against hiring older workers from their candidates. Some unemployed older worker can retrain, but may battle an overlooked prejudice, the ageism of the potential employer. These retrained workers may never gain employment. If they do, they may have only 5-10 years of working life remaining. Many employers prefer to hire someone younger.</p> <p>Ageism is also evident in the media. For instance, no weather girl on the television is an old, grey, fat woman. Weather girls are anorexic, beautiful, blonde bimbos who can barely read an autocue. Maybe old, fat, grey women don’t want to be weather girls. That’s okay. Maybe they do, and the employers in television land hire young, attractive babes. That is ageism.</p> <p>On the other hand, ageism can factor in a reverse situation. An older, more experienced nurse, doctor, allied health professional, or a teacher, can still attract job opportunities. Society regards their experience as both valid and valuable. In my personal experience, as a teacher/tutor for 42 years, I receive part-time job offers as a tutor, several times per week. Nice to be asked.</p> <p>Moreover, seniors have discounts on travel fares, a senior’s card discount on purchases, and some concessions with their pensions. But is the level of the senior’s pension, a sign of ageism itself? Most household budgets are eroded by the cost of food and bills.</p> <p>What are your experiences? Is ageism affecting you?</p>

Retirement Life