Retirement Life

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Expert weighs in: In this new world of bushfire terror, I question whether I want to have kids

<p>As fires continue to burn along Australia’s south-east, it’s impossible to ignore how climate change can wreak devastation and disrupt lives.</p> <p>Australia has always experienced bushfires. However, climate change <a href="https://theconversation.com/weather-bureau-says-hottest-driest-year-on-record-led-to-extreme-bushfire-season-129447">means</a> this year’s bushfires were so extreme in their ferocity and spread they could be <a href="https://www.space.com/australia-wildfires-space-station-astronaut-photo.html">seen from space</a>. And this is just a taste of what’s to come.</p> <p>I’m a marine scientist, and research the effects of climate change on coral reefs. Aside from bushfires, coral bleaching is one of the most severe manifestations of climate change in Australia. Watching corals turn white and die is just another daily reminder of the disasters our children will be up against.</p> <p>Until now, my partner and I have both wanted to be parents one day. Now I’m not so sure. Here are the things I’m weighing up.</p> <p><strong>The forces at play</strong></p> <p>I am not alone in these family planning concerns. In September last year I hosted a Women in STEM seminar and photography <a href="https://www.emergingcreativesofscience.com/women-in-steam">exhibit</a> showcasing female scientists at the University of New South Wales. One of the major points of discussion was how to plan for a family, knowing how climate change will affect the quality of life of the next generation.</p> <p>Cases of “<a href="https://theconversation.com/the-rise-of-eco-anxiety-climate-change-affects-our-mental-health-too-123002">eco-anxiety</a>” when it comes to family planning are on the rise. <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/it-doesn-t-feel-justifiable-the-couples-not-having-children-because-of-climate-change-20190913-p52qxu.html">Many couples</a> in my generation are rethinking what it means to start a family. Even Prince Harry and Meghan Markle <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/royals/prince-harry-reveals-how-many-kids-he-and-meghan-will-have/news-story/1f6acaf856c50b6e613cd882aa0d9f74">said last year</a> they’ll have only two children at most, for the sake of the planet.</p> <p>But other factors also affect family planning decisions, such as religious, cultural and societal expectations. And of course there are the views of partners and spouses to take into account.</p> <p>In my case, I come from a large Italian-American, Catholic family. My family expects me to settle down and have babies as soon as possible. But my partner and I both agree the planet cannot sustain a growing population that results from these traditional religious expectations.</p> <p><strong>Would going childless make a difference?</strong></p> <p>Studies show having fewer children is one of the most effective ways an individual can mitigate climate change. Choosing to have one less child prevents <a href="https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa7541#erlaa7541f1">58.6 tonnes of carbon emissions</a> entering the atmosphere each year, according to a 2017 study. That’s like 25 Australians going car-free for the rest of their lives.</p> <p>In fact, even if you do your bit to reduce emissions in your lifetime, such as riding a bike and using energy-saving lightbulbs, having two children means your <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-family-planning-could-be-part-of-the-answer-to-climate-change-32667">“legacy” of carbon emissions could be 40 times greater</a> than that saved through lifestyle changes.</p> <p>But having one less child is not a quick fix for climate change. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4246304/">As research in 2014 pointed out</a>, even one-child policies imposed worldwide, coupled with events causing catastrophic numbers of deaths, would still leave the world population at 5–10 billion people by 2100 – enough to cause stress on future ecosystems.</p> <p>So it’s critical we, as consumers, start now in making our lifestyles more environmentally friendly if the world’s population continues to grow.</p> <p>The above research concluded the most immediate and effective way to keep the planet’s warming at bay is policies and technologies to reign in global emissions.</p> <p><strong>The planet our children will inhabit</strong></p> <p>On our current business-as-usual trajectory, we’re on track for at least a <a href="https://climateactiontracker.org/global/temperatures/">4℃</a>temperature increase by 2100. Even if the temperature increase was limited to 2.8℃ (now an optimistic scenario) major changes in <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/07/major-us-cities-will-face-unprecedente-climates-2050/">weather patterns would occur by 2050</a>.</p> <p>These changes would bring more <a href="https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/climate-change-and-drought-factsheet/">severe droughts</a>, <a href="http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/updates/articles/a023.shtml">flooding</a>, <a href="https://time.com/5627355/climate-change-heat-waves/">heatwaves</a>, <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/sea-level-rise/">sea level rise</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/11/what-are-the-links-between-climate-change-and-bushfires-explainer">bushfires</a>. This is not a future I want for my children.</p> <p>Already, <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0315-6">climate hazards have been implicated</a> in pre- and post-natal health problems for children. Children whose mothers were exposed to floods while pregnant exhibited increased bedwetting, aggression towards other children and below-average birth weight, juvenile height and academic performance.</p> <p>What’s more, exposure to smoke from fires during pregnancy may have affected brain development and resulted in premature birth, small head circumference, low birth weight and foetal death</p> <p>This season’s bushfires caused a <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/spike-in-ambulance-calls-for-help-before-smoke-haze-worsens-20200107-p53pea.html">51% spike</a> in people needing help for respiratory issues on one of the most extreme days in Melbourne. Children are among the most vulnerable to respiratory issues stemming from poor air quality.</p> <p>But it’s not just physical health in question – mental health is also at risk.</p> <p>Today’s children already know that without major change, the world they were born into will limit their quality of life. It’s not only affecting their <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/the-dread-and-worry-keeping-young-australians-up-at-night-20191115-p53aw5.html">mental health</a>, but also their process of identity formation, with children experiencing an “<a href="https://theconversation.com/the-terror-of-climate-change-is-transforming-young-peoples-identity-113355">existential whiplash</a>”.</p> <p>They’re caught between two forces: the belief held by previous generations that if you work hard you’ll have a high quality of life, and knowledge that climate change will make parts of the planet inhabitable.</p> <p><strong>Weighing it all up</strong></p> <p>Of course, improvements in family planning are not solely a matter for the developed world. As <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i2102">experts have stated</a>, family planning has the potential to empower women in developing nations, giving them the basic human right to choose whether to have children.</p> <p>Policies to support this – such as better access to contraception and giving more girls a quality education – <a href="https://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/87/11/08-062562/en/">would be a “win-win”</a>, improving reproductive rights and slowing the population growth to combat climate change.</p> <p>As for my own situation, my mind isn’t yet made up. I am seriously considering not having kids altogether. Or perhaps my partner and I will have only one child, or adopt.</p> <p>But one thing is clear. Whether you want to create a healthier planet or you’re concerned about the Earth your children will inherit, climate change should weigh heavily on your family planning decisions.</p> <p><em>Written by Melissa Pappas. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/in-this-new-world-of-bushfire-terror-i-question-whether-i-want-to-have-kids-126752">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Retirement Life

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From scandal to true love: All the royals who gave up their titles

<p>Ahead of the bombshell announcement from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex saying they have the intention to step back from the duty of being “senior royals” this January, there has been growing speculations that they might go as far to let go of their titles altogether.</p> <p>However, the act of renouncing a title is not new for royals all across the world. Whether by choice, law, request, punishment or scandal, there are a number of kings, queens, princes and princesses that have forgone their privileges and given up their titles for a different life.</p> <p><strong>1936: King Edward VIII</strong></p> <p>While it had been his birth right to ascend the throne, he gave it up after just 11 months and chose to abdicate in order to marry divorcée Wallis Simpson.</p> <p>An infamous speech he gave to the British public explained that he had “found it impossible” to remain king without Wallis betrothed to him.</p> <p>"I have found it impossible to carry the heavy burden of responsibility and to discharge my duties as king as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love,” he said.</p> <p>While he was allowed to keep his title of His Royal Highness, Duke of Windsor following his abdication, the scandal followed him for the rest of his life and drove him out of England as punishment. They lived their lives as celebrities and travelled all across the globe throwing expensive, lavish parties. Not only that, but they sympathised with the Nazis.</p> <p>They were both buried side by side at Windsor Castle as Duke and Duchess.</p> <p><strong>1947: Prince Philip</strong></p> <p>Just a mere ten years after his uncle-in-law, Philip renounced his own right ot the throne. This time however, it was so that he could join the British Royal Family rather than leave it.</p> <p>Philip was born a prince of both Denmark and Greece, so in him choosing to marry Princess Elizabeth, he gave up not one but two thrones.</p> <p>Always seen walking a few steps behind his Queen, the prince went on to father four children, his eldest Prince Charles who is the next in line to the British throne behind his mother.</p> <p>Prince Philip gave up his regular royal duties and appearances at the tender age of 96.</p> <p><strong>1972: Ubolratana Rajakanya</strong></p> <p>Asia has its own secret scandals and royal family to gossip about, and in this case it was Thai Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya who gave up everything she knew for love. In choosing to marry Peter Ladd Jensen, a fellow student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she left behind her father King Bhumibol Adulyadej and Queen Sirikit in Thailand. After moving to the US to live with Jensen, she went on to give birth to three children and maintained a strong relationship with her parents.</p> <p>When the pair divorced in 1998, the former princess of Thailand returned home with her children. After losing her royal title and marriage, Ubol was dealt another tragic blow when she lost her autistic son Bhumi in the deadly 2004 tsunami.</p> <p><strong>1981: Peter and Zara Phillips</strong></p> <p>While Princess Anne is the daughter of the Queen of England, it doesn’t mean she didn’t want a normal, unobtrusive and private life for her two children. Surprisingly, her kids were not automatically given a royal title when they were born and unlike her brothers, Charles, Edward and Andrew, she required the Queen to offer the titles as a gift.</p> <p>However, the offer was promptly declined for Peter and Zara. Peter remains 14th in line for the throne whilst Zara is behind his two daughters at 17th.</p> <p><strong>2014: Princess Srirasmi</strong></p> <p>After marrying into the royal family of Thailand’s Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn and nearly a decade later, Princess Srirasmi became embroiled in a family scandal. Seven of her family members were charged with serious criminal charges, including defamation of the monarchy. Under her husband’s orders, Princess Srirasmi was stripped of her title receiving 200 million baht ($5.5m/£4.3m) as a divorce settlement.</p> <p>Now she watches on as her son and ex-husband continue their lives in the royal household, without her. Since the pair’s divorce, her parents have also been arrested and later admitted to misusing their royal connections.</p> <p>2015: Princess Cristina</p> <p>The sister of King Felipe VI, Princess Cristina, married Iñaki Urdangarín in 1997. Together they were appointed as the Duke and Duchess of Palma de Mallorca and enjoyed their lavish royal lifestyle together and with their four children. That was, until Urdangarin was convicted of embezzling €6 million ($6.6m/£5m) of public funds and using his title of Duke for political corruption. </p> <p>Cristina was charged with tax fraud and became the first member of the Spanish royal family to stand trial. Due to this, the King had no choice but to strip his little sister of her titles. Urdangarin received a six-year prison sentence and, in 2017, Cristina was acquitted of all charges. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see all the royal family members who gave up their titles.</p>

Retirement Life

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A life of long weekends is alluring but not practical

<p>When Microsoft gave its 2,300 employees in Japan <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/nov/04/microsoft-japan-four-day-work-week-productivity">five Fridays off in a row</a>, it found productivity jumped 40%.</p> <p>When financial services company Perpetual Guardian in New Zealand trialled <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/19/four-day-week-trial-study-finds-lower-stress-but-no-cut-in-output">eight Fridays off in a row</a>, its 240 staff reported feeling more committed, stimulated and empowered.</p> <p>Around the world there’s renewed interest in reducing the standard working week. But a question arises. Is instituting the four-day week, while retaining the eight-hour workday, the best way to reduce working hours?</p> <p>Arguably, retaining the five-day week but cutting the working day to seven or six hours is a better way to go.</p> <p><strong>Shorter days, then weeks</strong></p> <p>History highlights some of the differences between the two options.</p> <p>At the height of the Industrial Revolution, in the 1850s, a 12-hour working day and a six-day working week – 72 hours in total – was common.</p> <p>Mass campaigns, vigorously opposed by business owners, emerged to reduce the length of the working day, initially from 12 hours to ten, then to eight.</p> <p>Building workers in Victoria, Australia, were among the first in the world to secure an eight-hour day, <a href="https://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/publications/research-papers/download/36-research-papers/13812-heritage-note-no-1-2017-the-origins-of-the-eight-hour-day-in-victoria">in 1856</a>. For most workers in most countries, though, it did not become standard until the first decades of the 20th century.</p> <p>The campaign for shorter working days was based largely on worker fatigue and health and safety concerns. But it was also argued that working men needed time to read and study, and would be <a href="http://ergo.slv.vic.gov.au/explore-history/fight-rights/workers-rights/origins-8-hour-day">better husbands, fathers and citizens</a>.</p> <p>Reducing the length of the working week from six days came later in the 20th century.</p> <p>First it was reduced to five-and-a-half days, then to five, resulting in the creation of “the weekend”. This occurred in most of the industrialised world from the 1940s to 1960s. In Australia the 40-hour five-day working week became the law of the land <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/70-years-ago-today-the-40hour-five-day-working-week-began-20180101-h0c3dd.html">in 1948</a>. These changes occurred despite two world wars and the Great Depression.</p> <p><strong>Stalled campaign</strong></p> <p>In the 1970s, campaigns for reduced working hours ground to a halt in most industrialised countries.</p> <p>As more women have joined the paid workforce, however, the total workload (paid and unpaid) for <a href="https://theconversation.com/grappling-with-the-time-bomb-of-australias-work-rest-and-play-5330">the average family increased</a>. This led to concerns about “time squeeze” and overwork.</p> <p>The issue has re-emerged over the past decade or so from a range of interests, including feminism and environmentalism.</p> <p><strong>Back on the agenda</strong></p> <p>A key concern is still worker fatigue, both mental and physical. This is not just from paid work but also from the growing demands of family and social life in the 21st century. It arises on a daily, weekly, annual and lifetime basis.</p> <p>We seek to recover from daily fatigue during sleep and daily leisure. Some residual fatigue nevertheless accumulates over the week, which we recover from over the weekend. Over longer periods we recover during public holidays (long weekends) and annual holidays and even, over a lifetime, during retirement.</p> <p>So would we be better off working fewer hours a day or having a longer weekend?</p> <p>Arguably it is the pressure to fit family and personal commitments into the few hours between getting home and bedtime that is the main source of today’s time-squeeze, particularly for families. This suggests the priority should be the shorter working day rather than the four-day week.</p> <p>Sociologist Cynthia Negrey is among those who suggest reducing the length of the workday, especially to mesh with children’s school days, as part of the feminist enterprise to alleviate the “sense of daily time famine” she writes about in her 2012 book, <a href="http://politybooks.com/bookdetail/?isbn=9780745654256">Work Time: Conflict, Control, and Change</a>.</p> <p><strong>Historical cautions</strong></p> <p>It’s worth bearing in mind the historical fall in the working week from 72 to 40 hours was achieved at a rate of only about 3.5 hours a decade. The biggest single step – from six to five-and-half days – was a reduction of 8% in working hours. Moving to a six-hour day or a four-day week would involve a reduction of about 20% in one step. It therefore seems practical to campaign for this in a number of stages.</p> <p>We should also treat with caution results of one-off, short-term, single-company experiments with the four-day week. These typically occur in organisations with leadership and work cultures willing and able to experiment with the concept. Employees are likely to see themselves as “special” and may be conscious of the need to make the experiment work. Painless economy-wide application cannot be taken for granted.</p> <p><em>Written by Anthony Veal. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-life-of-long-weekends-is-alluring-but-the-shorter-working-day-may-be-more-practical-127817">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Retirement Life

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Smash hit Senior Moments returns for sequel with no equal

<div> <div> <p><span>A show for people who can remember being told the King was dead - that's George, not Elvis.</span></p> </div> </div> <p>The <em>Senior Moments</em> gang is back for another bout of hilarity from legendary performers Tony Barber, Max Gillies and Normie Rowe.</p> <p>These days Australian TV icon Tony Barber of <em>Sale of the Century</em> fame is having more and more “Senior Moments”. So is master satirist Max Gillies (<em>The Gillies Report</em>) and original rock legend Normie Rowe (<em>Les Misérables</em>).</p> <p>It’s no coincidence. They are appearing as part of the classic cast in the new show that follows the smash hit comedy revue <em>Senior Moments</em>. After wowing more than 55,000 seniors Australia-wide on their national 2019 season, the <em>Senior Moments</em> gang is back with a new show for another national tour in 2020.</p> <p><em>Senior Moments 2: Remember, Remember</em> is another 90 minutes of hilarious comedy sketches, songs and inspired senior silliness from a cast old enough to know better.</p> <p>“The show is suitable for all ages,” says Max Gillies, “As long as that age is in the high double digits or you can remember when we still used pound notes and milk came in glass bottles.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7833944/senior-moments-hero.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/088a1889a1024f71b4afc9f8da5f9208" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>The gang getting ready for the show</em></p> <p>Among the highlights of the show: Tony Barber will be asking the questions in the quiz show sketch “Senior of the Century”. Yes, the senior contestants may be a little slower on the buzzers, and their short-term memory may not be what it used to be, but they still remember when “Boomer” used to be a kangaroo that people liked, not a generation young people blamed for everything.</p> <p>The show may be called <em>Senior Moments</em>, but Tony still can’t get away with asking the same question twice in a row.</p> <p>This is a show for people who remember when ‘wireless’ meant the radio, not an internet connection option.</p> <p>Amongst the silliness, Normie Rowe plans to sing one of his classics, but only if Max Gillies doesn’t sing one of his. But Max has even persuaded Bob Hawke to make a cameo!</p> <p>The <em>Senior Moments 2</em> cast also includes Kim Lewis (<em>Sons &amp; Daughters</em>), David Callan (<em>The Goon Show Live</em>) and Dave Gibson (<em>Andrew Denton Breakfast Show</em>) with the shockingly young virtuoso Mitchell Price-Norgaard dazzling on piano.</p> <p>It’s a second serving of hilarious sketches and wonderfully witty songs performed by legendary show business seniors ageing disgracefully before your eyes.</p> <p><em>Senior Moments 2: ‘Remember Remember’</em> is a seriously funny revue for slightly old people. If that’s you (be honest!) then grab some tickets before you forget!</p> <p><strong><em>Senior Moments 2</em> is touring Australia in Feb-March 2020. Dates and Tickets via the website. <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.seniormomentsshow.com.au/" target="_blank" data-auth="NotApplicable">www.SeniorMomentsShow.com.au</a></strong></p> <p>Here's what people said about the original <em>Senior Moments</em>.</p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2454727404755605" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>I just loved your show ... saw it at Sutherland... so funny. The writing and acting were just excellent. And the walking...</p> Posted by <a href="#">Meaghan Lee</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2454727404755605">Thursday, April 4, 2019</a></blockquote> </div> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2453677374860608" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>An absolute MUST to go and see. Especially if you're 50+. Laughed from start to finish - Only problem was.... I resemble most of it !!!</p> Posted by <a href="#">Chris Guest</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2453677374860608">Tuesday, April 2, 2019</a></blockquote> </div> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2429443733950639" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>Thank you for a delightful afternoon of fun at Chatswood on Wednesday. Best wishes for your future shows. Noela</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/people/Diamond-Fish/100012601412031">Diamond Fish</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/seniormomentsshow/posts/2429443733950639">Friday, February 22, 2019</a></blockquote> </div> <p><em>This is a sponsored article written in partnership with the <a href="https://www.seniormomentsshow.com.au/">Senior Moments</a> gang.</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Australia’s oldest man at 110 reveals his secrets for long life

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>As Dexter Kruger celebrates his 110th birthday, he wants to make it clear that he is still sharp as a tack.</p> <p>Kruger is also well aware that everyone wants to know his secrets to living to such an old age.</p> <p>“I knew you were going to bring that up because everyone does,” he said to the<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/australias-oldest-man-dexter-kruger-turns-110/news-story/24f422827c45ecb2275a16e60e1becea" target="_blank">Courier Mail</a>.</p> <p>“Always eat when you are hungry, always drink when you are dry, always sleep when you are sleepy, don’t stop breathing or you’ll die,” Mr Kruger said, borrowing from an often-quoted old verse, with a cheeky grin.</p> <p>However, he realises that it might just be down to good genes.</p> <p>“I had two cousins who made 100, and then my ­mother’s sister made 103, and I am 110,” he explained.</p> <p>Kruger was born on January 13th, 1910 in what he describes as a different world.</p> <p>“You could say that the horse and buggy was still the transport while motor cars were coming on,” he said of his childhood.</p> <p>“The change (of technology) has been very gradual – it’s hard to realise.”</p> <p>Kruger appreciates the technology as it helps him indulge in one of his favourite hobbies, which is writing.</p> <p>“I do find the technology, especially in producing my books, just marvellous,” he said.</p> <p>As Kruger started writing at the age of 86, he has since published 12 other books and is working hard on his latest one.</p> <p>“It’s a long way off being published – it is a biography – but I have 12 other books (published),” he said.</p> <p> </p> <p>He has plenty to keep him busy on his birthday, as he will be surrounded by 50 of his friends and family.</p> <p>“We only invited about half a dozen people really, but it was sort of an open-ended invitation,” he says.</p> <p>“It’s going to be quite a day.”</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"><em>Photo credits: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/australiasoldestman/">Dexter Kruger - Australia's Oldest Man</a></em></div> </div> </div> </div>

Retirement Life

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Getting a divorce in New South Wales

<p>Divorce is a delicate subject, especially over the holiday period when families are meant to be coming together rather than falling apart.</p> <p>But there is no denying the holidays can have a way of magnifying tensions in relationships that aren’t strong and thriving.</p> <p>In fact, typically around the world, Christmas and the New Year tend to be the busiest times for <a href="https://www.sydneyfamilylawyers.com.au/">divorce lawyers</a> to take calls from new clients.</p> <p>In Australia the divorce rate is declining, and currently stands at 2 in 1,000 marriages. But these numbers don’t include the significant number of marriages and de-facto relationships that simply end without any kind of official paperwork. While it is not illegal to avoid divorce, there are implications to consider if you don’t formally end your relationship or marriage.</p> <p>If there are children under the age of 18 from the relationship then their ongoing needs and care must be a priority. Chances are there is property and joint financial commitments too. Superannuation can be considered a joint asset in long term relationships.</p> <p>To protect yourself, and to make a clean break so you and your former partner can both move on, it’s important to consider ‘officially’ ending the relationship.</p> <p>So, what are your options? And what is the difference between divorce, ending a de-facto relationship and annulment?</p> <p><strong>Divorce</strong></p> <p>The definition of divorce in Australia is simply the termination of a marriage. It’s called a “divorce order”.</p> <p>In Australia, you can actually apply for a divorce order online, as we have a “no fault” divorce system, meaning you don’t need to prove anyone has caused the relationship to end, you just need to show that the relationship has broken down, which in the eyes of the law, is demonstrated by being separated for 12 months.</p> <p>You also will have to live as separated for at least 12 months before you can apply for the divorce order, no matter how long you’ve been married. If you separate, but remain living together under the same roof for the sake of convenience, then you also need to prove that the relationship has ended.</p> <p>While you can take as much time as you like from splitting up to applying for a divorce, there are some minimum time restrictions. For example, if you have been married for less than two years, you will need to attend some counselling before the family court will accept your application.</p> <p>The other time restriction relates to your financial affairs. From the date of the divorce there is a 12 month time limit to be able to access the <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/family-court-needs-urgent-overhaul-say-new-chief-justice/">Family Court</a> if intervention is required over financial or property matters.</p> <p>While you don’t have to get a divorce, it’s an important consideration if you want to remarry. <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/is-polygamy-a-crime-in-australia/">Polygamy is illegal in Australia</a>.</p> <p><strong>Children and divorce or separation</strong></p> <p>If you and your co-parent can’t agree custody and living arrangements of the children, then you are required to go through a process of meditation before going to court, unless there are mitigating circumstances.</p> <p><strong>De facto relationships  </strong></p> <p>De facto relationships, and their breakups, are handled under the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00101/Html/Volume_1">Family Law Act 1975</a>.</p> <p>A de facto relationship is defined by the fact that you’re not legally married to each other, and you are not related to each other but have a relationship as a couple living together on a domestic basis. The difficulty with de-facto relationships is proving when they started which can impact the settlement terms. When there is a marriage certificate, the date is recorded.</p> <p><strong>What about an annulment?</strong></p> <p>Annulment means that a marriage is declared null and void. It’s different from a divorce.</p> <p>In Australia, it is not popular to seek an annulment, but they can sometimes be granted to declare a marriage is void, in circumstances such as:</p> <ul> <li>One or both parties were already married</li> <li>If one or both people is under 17 and doesn’t have special court approval, or someone is not able to provide informed consent</li> <li>It’s a prohibited relationship (such as siblings marrying, for example)</li> <li>The legal requirements were not met at the time of the marriage (for example, the celebrant wasn’t qualified)</li> <li>If either party was forced into the marriage</li> </ul> <p>This kind of legal annulment shouldn’t be confused by an annulment that is sometimes granted by a religious faith for the spiritual side of the marriage.</p> <p><strong>Prenuptial agreements</strong></p> <p>Prenuptial agreements (otherwise known as ‘prenups’) are not common in Australia, and recent case-law has made clear they may be difficult to enforce.</p> <p><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/how-a-prenuptial-agreement-will-cover-you-when-your-marriage-falls-apart/news-story/9aa0ff72d9fd2e5dcfa8d039d645d2ae">Recent research suggests</a> that while a vast majority think they’re a good idea (74%), only about 18% of people actually have one. Prenuptial agreements don’t set a relationship up to fail, but they do protect both parties if that should happen and can make any divorce process run much more smoothly.</p> <p>Prenuptial agreements are outlined in Sections 90B-90KA of the Family Law Act 1975 deal with financial agreements by parties that are married, while sections 90UA-090UN apply to de facto couples, including same sex couples.</p> <p>The Act covers de-facto couples in all states and territories except Western Australia. prenups are best organised through a lawyer.</p> <p>Like Wills, if they are scribbled in the back of an envelope not ‘officially’ executed in accordance with the legislation, this can cause problems if anyone chooses to launch a dispute, ending in lengthy, expensive legal battles and delays.</p> <p><strong>Family violence</strong></p> <p>If the relationship is <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/changing-attitudes-an-interview-with-domestic-violence-nsw-ceo-moo-baulch/">ending because of violence</a>, then first and foremost, you need to consider your own (and your children’s) safety. The research consistently shows that the most dangerous time for a victim is as the relationship is ending. Contact the local police and get <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/">legal advice</a>. There are mechanisms that can be put in place to protect you, and police and lawyers can assist you to make a plan to leave safely, assisting you with emergency accommodation, food and clothing if need be.</p> <p><strong>Important steps</strong></p> <p>Because every relationship is unique and the reasons for the breakdown are also unique to the situation it is best to protect your own interests and seek legal advice. While many parties do ‘go it alone’ they do so at their own peril. A lawyer will have your best interests at heart and make sure that the terms of the separation or divorce are fair and equitable.</p> <p>It’s also worthwhile, once all of the custody, financial, property and legal aspects are finalised to consider getting help from a professional financial planner who can help you to understand your financial position and help you prepare for the future.</p> <p>It’s also really important to consider the benefits of hiring a life coach or finding a support group or a counsellor too. Having someone to talk to is paramount to moving forward, helping you plan the next phase of your life.</p> <p>Relationship breakdowns, no matter how amicable can still be stressful, so take time to take care of your physical and emotional health.</p> <p><em>Written by Sonia Hickey. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/getting-a-divorce-in-new-south-wales/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a> </em></p>

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Before you hit ‘share’ on that cute animal photo – consider the harm it can cause

<p>Limbani the chimpanzee has about 650,000 Instagram followers. In recent months the account has featured viral photos and videos of the captive young ape playing the guitar, bouncing on a trampoline and wearing a giant banana costume.</p> <p>Fans are also offered real-life encounters with the chimp at a Miami facility, paying US$700 for a ten-minute session.</p> <p>Experts, including renowned primatologist <a href="https://news.janegoodall.org/2019/04/25/inappropriate-videos-on-social-media-are-hurting-chimpanzees/">Dr Jane Goodall</a>, have raised <a href="http://primatesanctuaries.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Limbani-Chimp-Video-Letter-1.pdf">concerns about Limbani’s care</a>. They question why he is not in the company of other chimpanzees, and say his exposure to humans could cause stress and other health issues.</p> <p>So before you click on or share wildlife content online, it’s worth considering how you might affect a species’ welfare and conservation in the wild.</p> <p><strong>Smiling chimps are actually stressed</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08927936.2018.1406197">Chimpanzees</a> are frequently depicted in greeting cards, advertisements, film, television and internet images. They are often clothed, in human-like poses and settings. These performing animals <a href="https://www.janegoodall.org.au/great-apes/#eluid6c5879d2">are usually taken from their mothers</a> as infants, physically disciplined in training, and can spend their retirement in poorly regulated roadside attractions or breeding facilities.</p> <p>For example the chimpanzee, who appeared with Leonardo DiCaprio in <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em> <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/4451790/chance-the-chimp-who-starred-in-wolf-of-wall-street-with-leonardo-dicaprio-tethered-in-a-roadside-zoo-and-yanked-round-by-the-neck/">has reportedly</a> since been kept in a roadside zoo, dragged around by the neck and forced to perform circus tricks.</p> <p>Primates are complex social animals, and the trauma they suffer when forced to perform is often clear. <a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9781351243131/chapters/10.4324/9781351243131-12">Research has shown</a> the “cheeky chimp grins” we associate with happiness are actually a sign of fear or submission.</p> <p>But it’s not just primates who are suffering. Earlier this year US banking giant JPMorgan Chase s<a href="https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/338072/jpmorgan-chase-pulls-elephant-ads.html">uspended an advertising campaign</a> featuring captive elephants. The move followed an outcry from conservationists, <a href="https://www.thedrum.com/news/2019/07/12/jp-morgan-axes-campaign-filmed-with-captive-elephants">who explained</a> that elephants are often trained “using harsh and cruel methods” to perform unnatural behaviours and interact directly with people.</p> <p><strong>Endangered in the wild</strong></p> <p>Images of wildlife in human-like poses and environments can also skew public perception about their status in the wild.</p> <p>For example, the International Union for Conservation of Nature <a href="https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/15933/129038584">classifies chimpazees as endangered</a>. In the last century their numbers have decreased from some <a href="https://www.worldchimpanzeeday.org/">1-2 million to as few as 350,000.</a></p> <p>However research has shown that the prevalence of chimpanzees in media and entertainment can lull viewers into believing wild populations are thriving. This undermines both the need and urgency for in-situ conservation.</p> <p>A 2008 article published in <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/319/5869/1487">Science</a> reported on the findings of two surveys where participants were asked to identify which of three great apes were endangered. In the first, 66% of respondents thought chimpanzees were endangered (compared with 95% for gorillas, and 91% for orangutans). In the second, 72% believed chimpanzees to be endangered (compared with 94% for gorillas and 92% for orangutans).</p> <p>Participants in both studies said the prevalence of chimpanzees in television, advertisements and movies meant they must not be in jeopardy in the wild.</p> <p>A PETA video objecting to a chimp appearing in the film Wolf of Wall Street.</p> <p><strong>Suitability as pets</strong></p> <p>Images of animals in close proximity with humans also affects their perceived desirability as exotic pets. Such images include <a href="https://d31j74p4lpxrfp.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/ca_-_en_files/amazon_selfies_report_-_canada.pdf">“wildlife selfies”</a> shared on social media by tourists, pet collectors and celebrities.</p> <p>The demand for exotic pets drives the illicit trade in live animals. In Japan, unprecedented demand for otters as pets <a href="https://www.otterspecialistgroup.org/osg-newsite/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/otter-alert-vfinal-web-100-1.pdf">is likely fuelled by an increase</a> in the visibility of pet otters in social and mass media. The pet trade has been identified as <a href="https://d2ouvy59p0dg6k.cloudfront.net/downloads/otter_report_060618_1.pdf">a pressing threat to the survival of otters</a>.</p> <p>Social media provides an easy way for traffickers and buyers to connect. Over six weeks in 2017 in France, Germany, Russia and the UK, the <a href="https://d1jyxxz9imt9yb.cloudfront.net/resource/223/attachment/regular/disrupt-wildlife-cybercrime.pdf">International Fund for Animal Welfare</a> identified more than 11,000 protected wildlife specimens for sale via more than 5,000 advertisements and posts. They included live otters, tortoises, parrots, owls, primates and big cats.</p> <p><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/10/facebook-puts-ads-on-pages-illegally-selling-animal-parts.html">Facebook is also allegedly</a> profiting from advertisements on pages illicitly selling parts and derivatives of threatened animals, including elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger teeth.</p> <p><strong>Slow progress</strong></p> <p>Social media giants have gone some way to recognising the harmful impact of their wildlife content.</p> <p>Facebook and Instagram are partners of the <a href="https://www.endwildlifetraffickingonline.org/">Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online</a> which aims to reduce wildlife trafficking online by 80% by 2020. Both platforms also banned the sale of animals in 2017 – however it is not well policed, and the advertisements persist.</p> <p>In 2017, Instagram <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/12/wildlife-watch-instagram-selfie-tourism-animal-welfare-crime/">encouraged users</a> not to harm plants or animals in pursuit of a selfie, and consider the potential animal abuse behind photo opportunities with exotic animals.</p> <p>But there are <a href="https://news.mongabay.com/2019/10/holding-social-media-companies-accountable-for-facilitating-illegal-wildlife-trade-commentary/">persistent claims</a> these measures aren’t proactive or effective enough.</p> <p>There is cause for cautious optimism. Researchers and social media platforms are collaborating to develop <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-machine-learning-can-help-fight-illegal-wildlife-trade-on-social-media-115021">artificial intelligence to help in wildlife trafficking investigations</a> and <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46945302">facial recognition</a> technology is being used to track individual animals.</p> <p>Social media users are also key in promoting respect and safety for wildlife. To find out more, you can access resources on <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshiels/2016/09/07/deadly-virtual-postcards-lead-poachers-to-rare-endangered-trophy-animals/#592c765e23ad">“responsible tagging”</a>, <a href="https://www.worldanimalprotection.us/wildlife-selfie-code">“wildlife selfie codes”</a>, <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2019/07/ethical-wildlife-photography/">ethically sourcing footage</a>, and <a href="https://www.wildcru.org/research/wildlife-tourism/">how to research wildlife attractions</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Zara Bending. Republished with permission of <a href="/Limbani%20the%20chimpanzee%20has%20about%20650,000%20Instagram%20followers.%20In%20recent%20months%20the%20account%20has%20featured%20viral%20photos%20and%20videos%20of%20the%20captive%20young%20ape%20playing%20the%20guitar,%20bouncing%20on%20a%20trampoline%20and%20wearing%20a%20giant%20banana%20costume.">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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5 thyroid facts everyone should know

<p>This little gland plays a huge part in controlling our heart rate, respiration, major organs and metabolism. Here's what the thyroid experts want us to know.</p> <p>1. This little gland in your neck should not be taken for granted</p> <p>For such a small organ, the thyroid – that butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of your neck above your collarbone – wields a lot of power. It directly or indirectly controls virtually every function in the body. Here’s what you need to know.</p> <p>2. What your thyroid does</p> <p>The thyroid makes the hormones known as T4 and T3, which are used by all the cells of the body. “These hormones are essential for life,” says Dr Terry Davis. “When there is too much of them or too little then things can go seriously wrong.” Too much thyroid hormone, for example, can aggravate the heart, causing palpitations and anxiety. Too little can cause weight gain; and “because the brain is very thyroid dependent,” says Dr Davies, too little thyroid hormone can also cause depression.</p> <p>3. Thyroid issues can affect your overall health</p> <p>With great power comes great responsibility, and the thyroid is no exception. Unfortunately, there are many ways in which this gland can be thrown off, and there are a number of conditions that fall under the category of thyroid disease. The big ones are hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid gland), hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), Hashimoto’s (an autoimmune disorder that attacks the thyroid, causing hypothyroidism), and Graves’ disease (an autoimmune disorder that causes hyperthyroidism). “In addition, the thyroid may form growths or even thyroid cancer,” says Dr Davies.</p> <p>4. Getting your thyroid checked is easy to do</p> <p>Whether as part of your annual physical or something you schedule because you’re concerned that something is off, bloodwork can reveal troubles with your thyroid. Initially, “an excellent and sensitive blood test called TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) can diagnose abnormal thyroid function very easily,” says Dr Davies. “TSH is the messenger hormone from the brain to the thyroid gland telling it to work harder. When the thyroid fails, the message gets louder so TSH is increased. When the thyroid is overworking the brain does not need to send messages so TSH is low.” If your TSH test results are not normal, you will need at least one other blood test – T4, T3, or thyroid antibody tests – to help find the cause of the problem.</p> <p>5. Thyroid conditions can arise at any age</p> <p>A study published in the Journal of Clinical &amp; Diagnostic Research found that there are a number of myths about thyroid disease. For instance: almost 40 per cent of study participants thought obese people are more likely to get hypothyroidism; about 27 per cent believed elderly people are more affected, and around 13 per cent believed women get more affected with hypothyroidism. Only nine per cent were aware that hypothyroidism can affect all age groups.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/thyroid/13-thyroid-facts-everyone-should-know?slide=all">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">best subscription offer.</a> here’s our <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">best subscription offer.</a></em></p>

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Martin Scorsese speaks up on embracing death

<p><span>Martin Scorsese has shared that embracing his mortality motivates him to continue making films. </span></p> <p><span>“You just have to let go, especially at this vantage point of age,” the 77-year-old director said in a new interview with <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/02/movies/martin-scorsese-irishman.html">The New York Times</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>Scorsese said his acceptance of death encourages him to keep working, even after more than half a century in the film industry.</span></p> <p><span>“Often, death is sudden … If you’re given the grace to continue working, then you’d better figure out something that needs telling,” he said.</span></p> <p><span>“As they say in my movie, ‘It’s what it is’ … You’ve got to embrace it.”</span></p> <p><span>The <em>Taxi Driver </em>director said there are other things he wants to carry out apart from producing movies. </span></p> <p><span>“I would love to just take a year and read,” he said. “Listen to music when it’s needed. Be with some friends. Because we’re all going. Friends are dying. Family’s going.</span></p> <p><span>“The problem is, time is limited and energy is so limited – the mind, also, of course ... Thankfully, the curiosity doesn’t end.”</span></p> <p><span>The director also shared that he has not seen the 2019 thriller <em>Joker</em>, which paid homages to his own work. “I saw clips of it,” Scorsese said of <em>Joker</em>. “I know it. So it’s like, why do I need to? I get it. It’s fine.”</span></p>

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Global emissions to hit 36.8 billion tonnes – beating last year’s record high

<p>Global emissions for 2019 are predicted to hit 36.8 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂), setting yet another all-time record. This disturbing result means emissions have grown by 62% since international climate negotiations began in 1990 to address the problem.</p> <p>The figures are contained in the Global Carbon Project, which today released its <a href="https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget/">14th Global Carbon Budget</a>.</p> <p>Digging into the numbers, however, reveals a silver lining. While overall carbon emissions continue to rise, the rate of growth is about two-thirds lower than in the previous two years.</p> <p>Driving this slower growth is an extraordinary decline in coal emissions, particularly in the United States and Europe, and growth in renewable energy globally.</p> <p>A less positive component of this emissions slowdown, however, is that a lower global economic growth has contributed to it. Most concerning yet is the very robust and stable upward trends in emissions from oil and natural gas.</p> <p><strong>Coal is king, but losing steam</strong></p> <p>The burning of coal continues to dominate CO₂ emissions and was responsible for 40% of all fossil fuel emissions in 2018, followed by oil (34%) and natural gas (20%). However, coal emissions reached their highest levels in 2012 and have remained slightly lower since then. Emissions have been declining at an annual average of 0.5% over the past five years to 2018.</p> <p>In 2019, we project a further decline in global coal CO₂ emissions of around 0.9%. This decline is due to large falls of 10% in both the US and the European Union, and weak growth in China (0.8%) and India (2%).</p> <p>The US has announced the closure of more than 500 coal-fired power plants over the past decade, while the UK’s electricity sector has gone from 40% coal-based power in 2012 to 5% in 2018.</p> <p>Whether coal emissions reached a true peak in 2012 or will creep back up will depend largely on the trajectory of coal use in China and India. Despite this uncertainty, the strong upward trend from the past has been broken and is unlikely to return.</p> <p><strong>Oil and natural gas grow unabated</strong></p> <p>CO₂ emissions from oil and natural gas in particular have grown robustly for decades and show no signs of slowing down. In fact, while emissions growth from oil has been fairly steady over the past decade at 1.4% a year, emissions from natural gas have grown almost twice as fast at 2.4% a year, and are estimated to further accelerate to 2.6% in 2019. Natural gas is the single largest contributor to this year’s increase in global CO₂ emissions.</p> <p>This uptick in natural gas consumption is driven by a range of factors. New, “unconventional” methods of extracting natural gas in the US have increased production. This boom is in part replacing coal for electricity generation.</p> <p>In Japan, natural gas is filling the void left by nuclear power after the Fukushima disaster. In most of the rest of the world, new natural gas capacity is primarily filling new energy demand.</p> <p>Oil emissions, on the other hand, are largely being driven by the rapidly growing transport sector. This is increasing across land, sea and air, but is dominated by road transport.</p> <p>Australia’s emissions have also seen significant reductions from coal sources over the past decade, while emissions from oil and natural gas have grown rapidly and are driving the country’s overall growth in fossil CO₂ emissions.</p> <p><strong>Emissions from deforestation</strong></p> <p>Preliminary estimates for 2019 show that global emissions from deforestation, fires and other land-use changes reached 6 billion tonnes of CO₂ – about 0.8 billion tonnes above 2018 levels. The additional emissions largely come from elevated fire and deforestation activity in the Amazon and Southeast Asia.</p> <p>The accelerated loss of forests in 2019 not only leads to higher emissions, but reduces the capacity of vegetation to act as a “sink” removing CO₂ from the atmosphere. This is deeply concerning, as the world’s oceans and plants absorb about half of all CO₂ emissions from human activities. They are one of our most effective buffers against even higher CO₂ concentrations in the atmosphere, and must be safeguarded. Not all sinks can be managed by people – the open ocean sink being an example – but land-based sinks can be actively protected by preventing deforestation and degradation, and further enhanced by ecosystem restoration and reforestation.</p> <p><em>Written by Pep Canadell, Corinne Le Quéré, Glen Peters, Pierre Friedlingstein, Robbie Andrew, Rob Jackson and Vanessa Haverd. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/global-emissions-to-hit-36-8-billion-tonnes-beating-last-years-record-high-128113">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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The royal family responds to rumours of Queen’s retirement

<p><span>A Clarence House spokesman has issued a statement amid rumours that Queen Elizabeth II will step back from her role at the age of 95.</span></p> <p><span>The 93-year-old monarch will continue her reign until the end of her life, the press office for Prince Charles confirmed. “There are no plans for any change in arrangements at the age of 95 – or any other age,” the spokesman told <em><a href="https://people.com/royals/is-queen-elizabeth-planning-to-retire-when-she-turns-95-in-favor-of-son-prince-charles/">People</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>The statement came after reports emerged that the Queen considered pulling back from public life in 2021 following her 95<sup>th</sup> birthday in favour of Prince Charles. The Duke of Cornwall was said to be in the process of taking over the reins after <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/prince-charles-office-issues-statement-about-queen-s-retirement-1.4719891" target="_blank">allegedly taking leadership</a> in the fallout from the scandal involving his brother Prince Andrew.</span></p> <p><span>The claim first came up in Robert Jobson’s 2018 biography of Prince Charles, <em>Charles at Seventy: Our Future King</em>. Jobson wrote that the Queen is likely to “trigger a period of regency”, in which she will grant her eldest son the “full power to reign”.</span></p> <p><span>The Queen’s husband Prince Philip retired as a working royal in 2017 when he was 96 years old.</span></p> <p><span>A palace source told <em>People </em>that the Queen will continue to have a full schedule. “The Queen is as busy as ever in terms of audiences, investitures and meetings. It is business as usual,” the source said.</span></p>

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How to cook the perfect Christmas roast

<p>One of the most loved Christmas traditions is the succulent roast we devour with family and friends over Christmas lunchtime or dinner. Below are some tips and tricks that will help ensure your roast ham, pork or turkey is the most tender and tasty roast you've made yet. </p> <p><strong>Ham</strong><br />Glazed ham is a Christmas classic and with these simple tips you’ll be on your way to ham heaven. You want to make sure you’re choosing the right sized ham – a 4kg ham for example will feed up to 10 people and allows a little extra for leftovers.<br /><br />To give the ham a decorative look, use a sharp knife to cut around the shank in a zig-zap pattern. Run a knife under the rind and gently pull it off. Use the knife to cut diamond squares into the ham.<br /><br />To glaze your ham, place it on a wire rack in a large baking dish. Brush the surface of the ham with your glaze of choice – options could include honey, mustard, apricot or orange jam. Bake for as long as the instructions on the package tell you too, and make sure to brush the ham at frequent intervals with glaze whilst cooking.</p> <p><strong>Pork</strong><br />It’s hard to resist a plate full of tender pork and crispy crackling at Christmas time – and the best thing is, making the perfect roast pork isn’t all that hard! Contrary to popular belief, pork doesn’t have to be cooked all the way through as overcooking it makes the meat dry and tough. Cooking it to slight blushing pink will ensure it remains succulent and juicy.</p> <p>As a general guide when roasting pork with rind, preheat your oven to 220c to crisp the rind (roughly 15-20 minutes) and then reduce the temperature to 180 to finish cooking the meat. The pork should be in the oven for 45 minutes per kilo. To get a crispy crackling, rub some oil and salt into the rind before cooking.<br /><br />Once the pork is done, remove it from the oven, cover it in foil and let it sit for 5-10 minutes – this ensures all the flavours and juices to settle which keeps the meat tender. Carve up the pork, serve and enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Turkey</strong><br />While everyone prepares their turkeys in different ways, if you’re thawing a frozen turkey make sure you always thaw it in the fridge and never on the bench. A full-size turkey can take up to three days to defrost properly so keep that in mind when it comes to preparing it. Turkey breast is very lean so it can potentially dry out during the long cooking process. Rub the outside of the turkey top and bottom with softened butter (use liberal amounts) and place it breast side down on a baking tray. The butter prevents the turkey (particularly the turkey breast).</p> <p>Some recipes say to cover the turkey with foil, or leave it uncovered. We recommend that you brush it with butter then place two large sheets of foil in a roasting pan then place your turkey in the centre and bring the foil up to form a loose tent. Make sure there is a pocket of air between the turkey and the foil. This ensures the turkey will cook in a moist environment and not dry out.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/food-and-wine/how-to-cook-the-perfect-christmas-roast.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Appreciating the 50-year-old brain: “Ages like fine wine”

<p>It’s no secret that the big five-oh may come with a few unwanted health complaints. A few more jiggly bits that weren’t there a decade ago. Some aches and pains, perhaps. Definitely more hair in unwanted places.</p> <p>But like a fine wine (and hopefully if you haven’t quaffed too much of it over your time on the planet), there is one part of the body that’s actually doing better in a lot of ways than it did when you were younger.</p> <p>Believe it or not, it’s your brain. Sure, you’re not as good at multitasking as you used to be, and things are possibly operating a little slower up there too – which can be annoying when grappling with a particularly tricky Sudoko or trying to remember Cousin Janet’s daughter’s name. But your brain has learned to compensate for its slightly slower processing speed by using more of itself, according to studies – something it simply couldn’t or didn’t do when you’re younger. Pretty amazing, right?</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3359129/">one study</a>, an MRI taken of a teenager working through a problem shows mainly activity on one side of the brain, the area used for conscious reasoning. The amazing upshot of doing the same test on a middle-aged person? It shows both sides of the brain sharing the task equally.</p> <p>And, research involving air-traffic controllers and airline pilots found that those between the ages of 50 and 69 took more time to learn new equipment than their younger counterparts, but once they had, they made fewer mistakes while using it.</p> <p>Experts also say the 50-year-old brain is more adept at making rational decisions and has better judgement – helped, no doubt, by a lifetime of memories and experiences. You’re also far more likely to make smarter financial decisions, and enjoy better impulse control (something many of us probably couldn’t lay claim to in our youth).</p> <p>The 50-year-old brain can reportedly also adapt, absorb new information and gain new skills and wisdom, too. Your reasoning is better. When faced with a problem, you may be slower to come up with a solution, but the one you put on the table will no doubt be more elegant and shrewder than that of a younger person. Research shows you’re better able to articulate in your 50s and you continue expanding your vocabulary as you age, too. (Clearly, there are good reasons why the <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com.au/this-is-what-you-need-to-become-a-ceo-of-an-asx-200-company-2014-10">average age of CEOs</a> in Australia – men and women – is 54).</p> <p>So, you’re probably feeling smarter, wiser, calmer and more mature right about now. Rightly so; you and your brain have earned it. But that’s not to say you should rest on your, er, noggin.</p> <p>In fact, if you want to keep your brain in its prime for as long as possible, maintaining a healthy weight and doing as much as you can to challenge your grey matter are key in staying sharp and strong upstairs. <a href="http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/regular-exercise-changes-brain-improve-memory-thinking-skills-201404097110">Exercise is huge too</a>: it’s well documented some daily cardiovascular activity can go a long way towards maintaining good brain function (particularly the area involved in verbal memory and learning). Lifting weights may work your guns, but it seems you’ve got to break a sweat for your brain to enjoy the knock-on effects.</p> <p>The best news, though, is that you’ve got a heap of ammo to whip out next time a younger family member starts joking about your doddery ‘senior moments’. You now know better than anyone that you’re far more of a braniac than they are, and actually, it’s all thanks to your age. Who would’ve thought?</p> <p><em>Written by Rachel Smith. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/in-praise-of/in-praise-of%E2%80%A6-the-50-year-old-brain.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Where there’s Wilbr, there’s a way to make a Will

<p>Have you written your professional Will? Is it on your to-do list? </p> <p>More than half of Australians leave this world without a professional Will each year, resulting in confusion and uncertainties for their immediate family, and the prospect of working through a mountain of complex legal paperwork during a time of intense grief. </p> <p>A personal binding Will shouldn’t be difficult or expensive. Even so, thousands of Australians are likely to avoid the task of creating a professional Will. This is not helped by a proliferation of legally suspect online DIY will kits, and concerns over exorbitant costs charged by law firms.</p> <p>The process can be incredibly costly, time consuming, confusing or unclear, or just sensitive and difficult to face. Thankfully, that real stress can be avoided because an Australian-based company has created a platform that enables anyone to remotely and securely create a binding Will.</p> <p><a href="https://wilbrwills.com/au/register">Wilbr</a> was founded in August 2019 by a senior lawyer with a simple goal: that access to legally binding and easy-to-navigate wills should be offered to all Australians and that any friction or obstacles should be removed. All you have to do is Write, Sign and Store.</p> <p>The company has removed any worries about the legality of the Will by allowing people to sign digitally via its own technology, which encrypts your signature, creating total security and authenticity.</p> <p><strong>Why Wilbr? </strong></p> <p>The benefits of Wilbr? No waiting to see a lawyer, no hidden costs or fees, and no need to fret about the process. The Wilbr platform is seamless, transparent and easy to navigate, making the process less stressful and quite possibly, even enjoyable. You can even use the platform to calculate your own net worth.</p> <p>Wilbr allows anyone to commence writing their Will whenever they like, wherever they like – on their laptop, tablet or mobile device. The company offers a once-off fee Will for only $169. Approved by solicitors and barristers, Wilbr is legally binding and just as trustworthy as seeing your own local lawyer.</p> <p>Wilbr can be signed and verified authentically online, without the hassle of printing copious streams of paper. The Wills are stored securely online and the all-important signature is captured digitally. There is no excuse anymore for creating heartache for your loved ones.</p> <p>You can <a href="https://wilbrwills.com/au/register">sign up for Wilbr here</a>.</p> <p><em>This is a sponsored post in partnership with <a href="/Wilbr%20Wills">Wilbr</a>. Guest author Doron Rivlin is the founder of Wilbr Wills and a practising solicitor based in Sydney. </em></p>

Retirement Life

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Veterans have poorer mental health than Australians overall

<p>A career in the Australian Defence Force (ADF), or the armed forces in any country, can be rewarding, but also demanding. Challenges include the rigorous training, frequent moves, and maintaining social connections.</p> <p>Beyond this, military personnel may be exposed to trauma during combat, peace-keeping missions, border protection, disaster and humanitarian relief, and training accidents.</p> <p>They may be confronted not only with threats to their own lives or safety, but also with the suffering or death of others, which can have a significant emotional and <a href="http://www.defence.gov.au/Health/DMH/Docs/MHPWSReport-FullReport.pdf">psychological impact</a>.</p> <p>So it’s not surprising we see <a href="https://www.dva.gov.au/health-and-wellbeing/research-and-development/health-studies/mental-health-prevalence-report">higher rates of mental illness</a> among veterans compared to the overall Australian population.</p> <p>The rates of suicide are also concerning, particularly among younger veterans. Between 2001 and 2016, <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/veterans/national-veteran-suicide-monitoring/contents/summary">373 Australian veterans</a> took their lives. Male veterans under 30 had a suicide rate more than twice the national average for men the same age. These figures have led to considerable community concern, including <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/drive/plea-to-pm-for-royal-commission-into-veterans-suicide/11678984">calls for a royal commission</a> into veteran suicide.</p> <p>Whether or not this eventuates, we should be targeting veterans with a high level of care that better reflects their unique set of needs.</p> <p><strong>Transitioning back into civilian life</strong></p> <p>Recent research has highlighted <a href="https://www.dva.gov.au/health-and-wellbeing/research-and-development/social-research/transition-and-wellbeing-research">one of the most challenging periods for military personnel</a> can be transitioning back to civilian life.</p> <p>Major lifestyle changes can be stressful for anyone, but leaving the ADF can feel like more than leaving a job. It will likely represent a change in a person’s way of life across the board.</p> <p>While many transitioning personnel may initially experience some uncertainty and a sense of losing some part of themselves, most make the adjustment successfully. For others, the problems may not go away and for some, may become worse, unless they receive help.</p> <p>A comprehensive study commissioned by the Departments of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA) and Defence in 2015 found ADF members who had discharged or transitioned to the Reserves were <a href="https://www.dva.gov.au/health-and-wellbeing/research-and-development/social-research/transition-and-wellbeing-research">at greater risk</a> of experiencing mental health issues compared to both those who were still serving and the broader Australian community.</p> <p>For example, in the previous 12 months, 17.7% of transitioned ADF personnel had experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to 8.7% still serving in the ADF full-time, and 5.2% in the Australian community.</p> <p>Other common mental health conditions in transitioned ADF personnel include depression (11.2%), and anxiety disorders such as panic disorder (5.4%), agoraphobia (11.9%) and social phobia (11%), all estimated to be higher than <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4326.0Main+Features32007?OpenDocument">rates in the general population</a>.</p> <p>Rates of suicidality (thinking about, planning or attempting suicide) were more than double for those who had transitioned out of full-time ADF service compared to those still serving in the ADF full-time (21.7% versus 8.8%), and <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4326.0Main+Features32007?OpenDocument">ten times greater</a> than the Australian community.</p> <p><strong>Seeking and receiving help</strong></p> <p>About 75% of veterans who reported they had mental health concerns in the DVA study had sought and received assistance at some point from a GP or mental health professional. These rates are much higher than in the general community and auger well for the <a href="https://www.dva.gov.au/health-and-wellbeing/research-and-development/health-studies/pathways-care-report">preparedness of veterans to seek care</a>.</p> <p>However, as is the case in the Australian community and internationally, there is an under-engagement with evidence-based treatment and practice. Only <a href="https://www.dva.gov.au/health-and-wellbeing/research-and-development/social-research/transition-and-wellbeing-research">about 25%</a> of help-seeking veterans were estimated to be receiving evidence-based care, such as cognitive behavioural therapy. This may be because veterans don’t stay engaged in health services for long enough to receive evidence-based treatments.</p> <p>So while the help-seeking and care delivery for veterans is on par with, and in some ways exceeds, that of the general community, there’s room for improvement to ensure veterans remain engaged with services and receive the treatment they need.                                                                                                                                                                                                            </p> <p><strong>What could we be doing better?</strong></p> <p>Coming from a health system in the armed forces where health care is organised for them, veterans may have heightened expectations about the level of coordinated and integrated practice.</p> <p>So first, we need improved integration and coordination of services, including development of outreach capabilities which more proactively engage with veterans and their families and connect them to appropriate services. Outreach can be led by health professionals or intersect with existing peer support networks.</p> <p>Second, we need to enhance the knowledge and skills among health professionals in the various services to which veterans are reaching out. Importantly, services and treatments should be delivered with appropriate “military cultural awareness”.</p> <p>This means practitioners demonstrating they understand the types of experiences veterans may have been exposed to, and the potential lasting impacts of these experiences. Veterans are likely to be more engaged in services if they feel well understood.</p> <p>Parallel to this, we need to be aware of the needs of, and actively support, the families who often bear the brunt of the mental health problems experienced by the veterans. <a href="https://www.openarms.gov.au/">Open Arms – Veterans &amp; Families Counselling</a>, a free national counselling service, plays a large role in provision of this support.</p> <p>Ultimately we need to continue to focus on innovations in the prevention of and early interventions for mental health problems among veterans, including suicidality. In doing so we must maintain a focus on well-being outcomes more broadly and not just on symptoms and conditions, ensuring our goal remains assisting veterans in living a meaningful and satisfying life in all its domains.</p> <p><em>If this article has raised issues for you or you’re concerned about someone you know, call Open Arms on 1800 011 046 or Lifeline on 13 11 14.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Nicole Sadler. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/veterans-have-poorer-mental-health-than-australians-overall-we-could-be-serving-them-better-119525">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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‘Life just went to crap’: why army veterans are twice as likely to end up in prison

<p>The question of whether Australia does enough to support its ex-service personnel is growing in urgency, with Labor leader Anthony Albanese this week <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/news/we-must-do-better-labor-backs-royal-commission-into-veteran-deaths">adding his voice</a> to those calling for a royal commission into veteran suicides.</p> <p>The numbers are alarming – between 2001 and 2017, <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/veterans/national-veteran-suicide-monitoring/contents/summary">419 serving and ex-serving</a>Australian Defence Force personnel died by suicide. But while the suicide rate for men still serving was 48% lower than in the equivalent general population, the rate is 18% higher for those who had left the military.</p> <p>For women it’s a similar story, where the suicide rate for ex-serving women is higher than Australian women generally. However, the small numbers of ex-service women who have been studied means the data are limited.</p> <p>But there’s another issue afflicting ex-military men that’s not often discussed: they are imprisoned twice as often as men in the general Australian population. This is according to the first known Australian prison audit to identify incarcerated ex-service members, conducted in South Australia last year.</p> <p>In fact, these findings support <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/342/bmj.d3898.extract">research from England</a>, which identifies ex-service men as the largest incarcerated occupational group.</p> <p>The high rate of imprisonment, along with the spike in the suicide rate of ex-members, reflects the challenges some service people face transitioning from military service back to civilian life, and the critical lack of available transition planning and support.</p> <p><strong>Why do some veterans turn to crime?</strong></p> <p>When a United States ex-Marine fatally shot 12 people in California in 2018, President Donald Trump promoted a widespread, oversimplified connection between military service and criminal offending. He <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-rankles-veterans-with-comments-about-ptsd-and-california-shooter/2018/11/09/2c4ab5ba-e463-11e8-a1c9-6afe99dddd92_story.html">said</a> the shooter</p> <p><em>was in the war. He saw some pretty bad things […] they come back, they’re never the same.</em></p> <p>We have so far interviewed 13 former service men for our ongoing research, trying to explain the findings of the South Australia audit. And we found the connection between military service and criminal offending is more complex than Trump suggests.</p> <p>The combination of childhood trauma, military training, social exclusion and mental health issues on discharge created the perfect cocktail of risk factors leading to crime.</p> <p>For many, joining the service was a way to find respect, discipline and camaraderie. In fact, most interviewees found military service effective at controlling the effects of childhood trauma. One man we interviewed said he “could see me life going to the shit, that’s when I went and signed up for the army […] The discipline appealed to me. To me I was like yearning for it because I was going down the bad road real quick.”</p> <p>Another explained that joining the military was the: “BEST thing I ever did. LOVED it. Well they gave me discipline, they showed me true friendships and it let me work my issues out […] I loved putting my uniform on and the respect that I could show other people, whereas before I’d rather hit them.”</p> <p><strong>Leaving the military can aggravate past trauma</strong></p> <p>However, all men complained military discharge was a complete, “sudden cut”. This sudden departure from the service, combined with the rigorous military training, can aggravate previous trauma. As one ex-service member put it: “The military is a fantastic thing […] but the moment that you’re not there […] it magnifies everything else and it’s just like a ticking time bomb.</p> <p>“I mean you’re trained to shoot people.”</p> <p>Another reflected that when he left the army, he lost the routine that kept his past traumas at bay.</p> <p>“I was working myself to the bone just to stop thinking about it. Then when I got out issues were coming back, coming back. I’ve lost my structure […] and life just went to crap.”</p> <p>Every man we interviewed had been diagnosed with some combination of post traumatic stress, multiple personality disorder, anti-social personality disorder, bipolar, depression, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder or alcohol and other drug dependence.</p> <p>They arose from various combinations of pre-service and service-related trauma.</p> <p>All interviewees lacked support from the Australian Defence Force or government veteran services. One explained how he found it difficult to manage post traumatic stress since his usual strategies were “getting very thin”.</p> <p>And the lack of support for their mental health issues worsened when they were incarcerated because they said the Department of Veterans Affairs cut ties, and “no-one inside the prison system is going to pay for psychological help”.</p> <p><strong>Maintaining identity</strong></p> <p>For some men, joining criminal organisations was a deliberate way to find a sense of belonging and the “brotherhood” they missed from the defence force. One man reflected:</p> <p>“I found a lot of Australian soldiers that are lost. You think you’re a civilian but you’re not, you never will be […] even three years’ service in the army will change you forever.</p> <p>“And the Australian government doesn’t do enough.”</p> <p>Ex-service men in prison are a significant, vulnerable part of that community. The Australian Defence Force and government veteran agencies need to urgently reform transition support services because current discharge processes are costing lives.</p> <p><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638237.2017.1370640">English research</a> has found peer support helps service men transition into civilian life, but the men we interviewed did not receive peer support until they were in prison.</p> <p>Then, it was through a <a href="https://xmrc.com.au/">welfare organisation</a> and Correctional Services, not defence agencies.</p> <p>One man told us that after his discharge</p> <p><em>I actually went back and asked if I could mow the lawns for free, just so I could be around them still. They wouldn’t allow it.</em></p> <p>If ex-service men could maintain contact with the Australian Defence Force through peer support and informal networks, their identity and sense of purpose could be maintained to reduce the risk factors for offending and re-offending.</p> <p><em>If you or anyone you know needs help or is having suicidal thoughts, contact Lifeline on 131 114 or beyondblue on 1300 22 46 36.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Kellie Toole and Elaine Waddell. Republished with <a href="/For%20women%20it’s%20a%20similar%20story,%20where%20the%20suicide%20rate%20for%20ex-serving%20women%20is%20higher%20than%20Australian%20women%20generally.%20However,%20the%20small%20numbers%20of%20ex-service%20women%20who%20have%20been%20studied%20means%20the%20data%20are%20limited.">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Why it's important to try new things in later life

<p>As soon as you reach the middle age of 60, then many people seem to think that this is when it's time to start taking things a little more slowly. However, this is little more than a cultural stereotype, and there are even suggestions that <span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/constructive-wallowing/201801/could-60-be-the-new-40">60 is the new 40</a>. With many more people over the age of 60 continue to work and enjoy an active lifestyle, and it seems that our ideas of ageing are shifting. </span></p> <p>It looks like age is never a limit when you want to try out some new things. If you are more a stay-at-home person, then things like gardening, writing a book or remodelling your home, may seem like a great idea. Even if you are a fan of a sports fan and fancy watching live games, there are many <span><a href="https://aussiebet.com/betting-sites/new/">new sites offering betting odds</a> and streaming services for your favourite team that you can enjoy the comfort of your home.</span></p> <p>But if you're not ready to call it quits and devote your remaining time to daytime television and playing chess with your friends, what are the best ways of enjoying this golden era of your life?</p> <p><strong>Try new hobbies</strong></p> <p>It's all too easy to get stuck in your ways when you get over the age of 60. After all, if you've spent the majority of your time at a full-time job, then you may have limited energy left for trying something new. But now could be the time to cut loose and try those things that you just haven't had the chance to do.</p> <p>You could always try to try to watch some <span><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Ross">Bob Ross</a> tutorials and learn painting. From various painting techniques to types of paint strokes, in just a short time, you could become an experienced painter and create something that can be a great gift idea to your closest ones.</span></p> <p>Similarly, if you have always been a music fan, then now could be the perfect time to try and play a musical instrument. While there might be little chance of performing in front of adoring crowds, it's all about enjoying making music for its own sake which is undoubtedly much more edifying.</p> <p><strong>Learn new skills</strong></p> <p>It's also a good idea to put the grey matter to the test by learning new skills. While you can use the afternoon away by playing a crossword or Sudoku challenge, it could be even better if you discover a unique talent that you can put into action.</p> <p>In particular, it could be a great idea to try and learn a new language. Most of us will have suffered from trying to learn languages at school, but if you do it under your own steam, then it might even be enjoyable. That is especially so as many people of a certain age have found <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jul/25/care-home-residents-learn-new-language">numerous benefits from learning a second language</a> that includes improvements in verbal fluency and memory.</span></p> <p>Above all, it's about giving yourself a new challenge and putting yourself out of your comfort zone. While it might be easier to relax into old habits, if you do anything from learning how to paint to trying out some new culinary techniques, then it can all do a great job in adding some spark to your days.</p> <p><strong>Enjoy new social situations</strong></p> <p>Finally, we can't underestimate the importance of keeping social as you grow older. Our social skills play a crucial role in boosting our mood and keeping our mental faculties alert.</p> <p>That is why it's a great idea to get outdoors every now and then and meet new people. We don't have to do anything too extreme like going nightclubbing like the younger generations. Still, anything from organising a museum visit to heading out to the cinema can work wonders on our spirits.</p> <p>Even if you've exhausted all options of making new acquaintances, then never underestimate how <span><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/new-research-shows-that-dogs-really-do-chase-away-loneliness">some of our furry friends can work wonders</a> in chasing away loneliness and boosting our moods.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Builder wins $200 million in EuroMillions jackpot

<p>A builder who won a £105 million (AU$200 million) EuroMillions jackpot has pledged not to stop working after receiving the “life-changing” windfall.</p> <p>Steve Thomson said he was “on the verge of a heart attack” when he realised he had won the lottery.</p> <p>Thomson and his wife Lenka said their priority would be buying a new house with a bedroom each for their daughter and two sons, who currently share in a “shoebox” three-bedroom house in West Sussex.</p> <p>“Everyone is going to have a good Christmas,” Thomson said. “Not sure what we are going to do, I am not cooking, Mum is not cooking, Lenka is not cooking. Christmas will be good this year, it really will.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">NEWS: EuroMillions results LIVE: Winning numbers for lottery jackpot for Tuesday November 26 - <a href="https://t.co/HQOEdeQZh8">https://t.co/HQOEdeQZh8</a> <a href="https://t.co/Z7uH7JVvbA">pic.twitter.com/Z7uH7JVvbA</a></p> — EverythingNorthEast (@everything_NE) <a href="https://twitter.com/everything_NE/status/1199417058460614661?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 26, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The 42-year-old said he would be “sensibly generous” with the money prize. “It’s so much money, I am going to be generous. I live in a small village, I do not want to leave the village, whatever I can do for the village, I will,” he said.</p> <p>“I have to be sensibly generous. I still can’t get my head around it, one [million] would have done but I have got 105, it’s just amazing.”</p> <p>Thomson said his children had their requests after learning about the jackpot. “My eldest’s reaction, he’s a very sensible kid, he said: ‘Dad, can I have my own room?’ I said: ‘No problem, of course you can son.’ My middle son said: ‘Can I have a Tesla,’ and my daughter asked for a pink iPhone and she’s going to get that.”</p> <p>Despite having become wealthier than famous figures such as Emma Watson and Ronnie Wood, Thomson said he would not stop working as a builder immediately and would complete all his jobs before Christmas.</p> <p>“Once I am over the shock I will need to keep doing something, I am not the type just to sit still. My business partner knows that if he needs a hand I’ll be there,” he said.</p> <p>“At the end of the day I’m still Steve – and she is still Lenka – that is not going to change. We’re just better off financially.”</p>

Retirement Life

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“He picked the wrong house to break into”: 82-year-old bodybuilding grandma beats home intruder

<p><span>An 82-year-old award-winning female bodybuilder turned the table – literally – on a home intruder as she fought and dragged the unwelcome guest out of her property.</span></p> <p><span>Retired social worker Willie Murphy said she was getting ready for bed Thursday night at her home in Rochester, New York when a man pounded on her door, asking her to call an ambulance for him, <em><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/11/24/us/82-year-old-bodybuilder-grandma-intruder-trnd/index.html">WHAM</a> </em>reported.</span></p> <p><span>Murphy said the man broke through the door when she wouldn’t let him in her house.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s kind of semi-dark and I’m alone, and I’m old. But guess what, I’m tough,” said Murphy, who won a weightlifting competition earlier this year. “He picked the wrong house to break into.”</span></p> <p><span>Murphy said she used various household items to attack the intruder, starting with her table.</span></p> <p><span>“I took that table and I went to working on him, and guess what? The table broke,” she said, adding that she used the metal table legs to keep hitting the man afterwards.</span></p> <p><span>She said she also used a bottle of baby shampoo and a broom to attack the man before dragging the man out of the house.</span></p> <p><span>“He wants to get the heck out of there. And I’m trying to help him get out of the house, but he’s too heavy. I can’t move him. He’s dead weight.”</span></p> <p><span>When police officers arrived a few minutes later, the intruder was apprehended.</span></p> <p><span>“He’s laying down already because I had really did a number on that man. I’m serious. I think he was happy when he went in the ambulance,” Murphy said.</span></p> <p><span>“The officers that came wanted to go on my front porch and take selfies with me.”</span></p> <p>Murphy has made headlines before for her record-setting participation in the World Natural Powerlifting Federation. Speaking to the American <em><a href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/a-drunk-man-broke-into-her-house-this-82-year-old-bodybuilder-did-a-number-on-him-she-says/ar-BBXjW6M?li=BBU4PL8">Today</a> </em>show, she said she began powerlifting in her mid-70s to stay healthy and fit.</p>

Retirement Life

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Sisters believed to be Australia’s oldest living triplets turn 90

<p><span>The Melbourne sisters thought to be the oldest living triplets in Australia celebrated their 90<sup>th</sup> birthday on Saturday.</span></p> <p><span>Helen, Judy and Barbara Houlihan were born ten weeks premature on November 23, 1929. The triplets said their parents, Ivy and Tom Houlihan, had been expecting to have twins and were “shocked” to have three babies.</span></p> <p><span>At the time of their birth, the family already had two young girls aged four years old and 18 months old respectively.</span></p> <p><span>“We’ve had a wonderful life, we really have,” Helen said.</span></p> <p><span>“We giggled our way through everything,” Barbara added.</span></p> <p><span>The sisters became known as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/lifestyle/familyandrelationships/sisters-believed-to-be-australias-oldest-living-triplets-turn-90/ar-BBXcLwr?li=AAgfLCP" target="_blank">the Houlihan triplets</a>, a moniker that stuck even after they got married – Helen to John Smith, Barbara to Bill Dodd and Judy to Peter Beech.</span></p> <p><span>Judy’s daughter Gillian Beech said her mother and aunts still play golf and bridge together. “They don’t get out on the course now as much as they would like to but spend a lot of there time there doing lunches and playing bridge with their friends,” Beech said.</span></p> <p><span>“They love a punt on the horses and love their daily VB.”</span></p> <p><span>The three of them now have 35 offspring between them, including children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.</span></p> <p><span>Records for age are self-reported. Other records show that 79-year-old Florence, Dorothy and Betsy Audino are thought to be Australia’s oldest living identical triplets.</span></p>

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