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Insane ALDI suitcase sale is back!

<p>Shoppers can expect to set their alarm early this Saturday, as ALDI is bringing its travel-themed Special Buys sale to stores near you.</p> <p>This week’s offerings include a range of luggage and travel gear at competitive prices.</p> <p>Some of the main highlights come from the Skylite luggage collection. The discount supermarket’s hard-shell polypropylene options come in at $79.99 for the bigger 76cm model, and $49.99 for the carry-on. When empty, the cases weigh just 4.3kg and 2.5kg respectively.</p> <p><img style="width: 388px; height: 314px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828079/wk26_pd_388x314_45a.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ff1997f0f7f1424e8ad4ca71e6608306" /></p> <p>Another steal is the Ultra Light set, which is priced at $89.99 and includes two cases weighing 2.8kg and 2.5kg each.</p> <p>All the cases in the Skylite collection come with a TSA lock.</p> <p><img style="width: 388px; height: 314px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828078/wk26_pd_388x314_48a.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d6f7f43a35fe44e0a0314fb1c72705ab" /></p> <p>If past reviews are anything to go by, the luggage range is a great buy. </p> <p>Last year, consumer group <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.choice.com.au/products/travel/on-holidays/luggage/aldi-skylite-56cm-spinner-carry-on" target="_blank">CHOICE</a> gave ALDI’s $40 Skylite 56cm Spinner Carry On a score of 86 per cent with a perfect mark in the lift and drop test. This was on par with the Samsonite 72 Hours DLX 78cm Spinner, which scored 87 per cent but came in at a whopping price of $479.</p> <p>Apart from suitcases, the German retailer is bringing back its popular set of noise cancelling headphones for $39.99. The Bauhn headphones come with a built-in rechargeable battery that lasts up to 20 hours and Bluetooth connectivity that enables wireless use.</p> <p>“They are highly effective, especially taking into account the price,” a shopper wrote on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.productreview.com.au/listings/bauhn-noise-cancelling" target="_blank">productreview.com.au</a>. “Also, they have quality features you wouldn’t expect at the price … I have found them to be comfortable to wear on long flights. Well worth considering, especially for the budget conscious.”</p> <p>ALDI will also sell digital suitcase scales for $9.99, a trolley backpack for $39.99, a rolling duffle bag for $24.99 and a universal travel adaptor kit for $19.99.</p> <p>There will also be a $29.99 travel security pack containing a security waist pouch, two luggage tags, a security wrap and a passport organiser in assorted colours and designs.</p>

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Who’s a tourist? How a culture of travel is changing everyday life

<p>Every year, on September 27, the global tourism community celebrates <a href="http://wtd.unwto.org/">World Tourism Day</a>. This year’s theme is about community development and how tourism can contribute to empowering people and improve socio-economic conditions in local communities.</p> <p>But who are the people who might visit “communities” and what does it mean – these days – to be a tourist?</p> <p>There are many tourist stereotypes – an overweight Westerner in shorts with a camera dangling around their neck, or maybe a trekking-shoed backpacker hanging out in the Himalayas. Many people think of “tourism” and “holidays” as distinct times of the year when the family travels to the seaside or the mountains.</p> <p>World Tourism Day is an opportunity to discuss how much more encompassing the phenomenon of tourism is than most people might think.</p> <p><strong>What is a tourist?</strong></p> <p>People are more often a “tourist” than they realise. The United Nations World Tourism Organisation broadly defines a tourist as anyone travelling away from home for more than one night and less than one year. So, mobility is at the core of tourism.</p> <p>In Australia, for example, in 2013 <a href="http://www.tra.gov.au/documents/NVS_onepager_Dec2013_FINAL_07032014.pdf">75.8 million</a> people travelled domestically for an overnight trip – spending 283 million visitor nights and $51.5 billion.</p> <p>Reasons for travel are manifold and not restricted to holidays, which makes up only 47% of all domestic trips in Australia. Other reasons include participation in sport events, visiting a friend or relative, or business meetings.</p> <p>Some of the most-visited destinations in the world are not related to leisure but to other purposes. For example, pilgramage tourism to Mecca (Saudi Arabia) triples the population from its normal 2 million <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hajj">during the Hajj</a> period every year.</p> <p>Travel, work and leisure: what’s the difference?</p> <p>Tourists are not what they used to be. One of the most pervasive changes in the structure of modern life is the crumbling divide between the spheres of work and life. This is no more obvious than in relation to travel. Let me test the readers of The Conversation: who is checking their work emails while on holiday?</p> <p>A <a href="http://www.gfi.com/blog/survey-worklife-divide-the-gap-has-all-but-disappeared-thanks-to-email-infographic/">recent survey</a> undertaken in the US showed that 44.8% of respondents check their work email at least once a day outside work hours. Further, 29.8% of respondents use their work email for personal purposes.</p> <p>Post-modern thinkers have long pointed to processes where work becomes leisure and leisure cannot be separated from work anymore. Ever-increasing mobility means the tourist and the non-tourist become more and more alike.</p> <p>The classic work-leisure divide becomes particularly fluid for those who frequently engage in travel, for example to attend business meetings or conferences. Conferences are often held at interesting locations, inviting longer stays and recreational activities not only for participants but also for spouses and family.</p> <p>Further, city business hotels increasingly resemble tourist resorts: both have extensive recreational facilities such as swimming pools and spas, multiple restaurants and often shopping opportunities (e.g. <a href="http://www.marinabaysands.com/index.html">Marina Bay Sands, Singapore</a>). And, of course, they offer internet access – to be connected to both work and private “business”.</p> <p>Understanding how people negotiate this liquidity while travelling provides interesting insights into much broader societal changes in terms of how people organise their lives.</p> <p>For some entrepreneurial destinations these trends have provided an opportunity; namely the designation of so-called <a href="http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/137/">dead zones</a> – areas where no mobile phone and no internet access are available. Here the tourist can fully immerse in the real locality of their stay.</p> <p><strong>Fear of missing out</strong></p> <p>The perceived need to connect virtually to “friends” (e.g. on Facebook) and colleagues has attracted substantial psychological research interest, with new terms being coined such as <a href="http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/how-fomo-fear-of-missing-out-is-ruining-my-life/story-fnixwvgh-1226862030711">FOMO (fear of missing out)</a> addiction, or internet addiction disorder.</p> <p>A recent <a href="http://www.tnooz.com/article/facebook-users-cite-travel-most-often-as-their-biggest-life-moments-infographic/">Facebook survey</a> found that this social media outlet owes much of its popularity to travel – 42% of stories shared related to travel. The motivations for engaging in extensive social media use and implications for tourism marketing are an active area of tourism research.</p> <p>Thus, understanding why and what people share while travelling (i.e. away from loved ones, but possibly earning important “social status” points) might provide important insights into wider questions of social networks and identity formation, especially among younger people.</p> <p>Tourism and emigration</p> <p>The increasingly global nature of networks has been discussed in detail by sociologist <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/john-urry-14141">John Urry</a> and others. They note the growing interconnectedness between tourism and migration, where families are spread over the globe and (cheap) air travel enables social networks to connect regularly.</p> <p>As a result, for many people local communities have given way to global communities, with important implications for people’s “sense of place” and resilience. The global nature of personal networks extends to business relationships where the degree to which one is globally connected determines one’s “network capital”.</p> <p>Urry also noted that mobility has become a differentiation factor between the “haves” and “have nots”, with a small elite of hypermobile “connectors”. Thus travel and tourism sit at the core of a potentially new structure of leaders and influential decision makers.</p> <p><strong>The global ‘share economy’</strong></p> <p>Engaging in this global community of tourists is not restricted to those who travel actively. The so-called <a href="http://www.forbes.com/pictures/eeji45emgkh/airbnb-snapgoods-and-12-more-pioneers-of-the-share-economy/">Share Economy</a>, where people rent out their private homes (e.g. AirBnB), share taxi rides or dinners, has brought tourism right into the living rooms of those who wish to engage with people who they may not meet otherwise.</p> <p>Potentially this parallel “tourism industry” provides a unique opportunity for bringing people together and achieving peace through tourism (see <a href="http://www.iipt.org/">International Institute for Peace through Tourism</a>). A whole new area for research travellers, “guests and hosts” and their economic impacts, is emerging.</p> <p>In a nutshell, tourism is much more than the service industry it is usually recognised for, both in practice and as a field of academic enquiry. Tourism and the evolving nature of travellers provide important insights into societal changes, challenges and opportunities. Engaging with tourism and travel also provides us with an excellent opportunity to better understand trends that might foster or impede sustainable development more broadly.</p> <p><em>Written by Susanne Becken. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/whos-a-tourist-how-a-culture-of-travel-is-changing-everyday-life-30896"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Australia’s pristine beaches have a poo problem

<p>Australians love our iconic coastal lifestyle. So many of our settlements are spread along our huge coastline. Real estate prices soar where we can catch a view of the water.</p> <p>But where there are crowded communities, there is sewage. And along the coast it brings a suite of problems associated with managing waste, keeping the marine environment healthy, and keeping recreational swimmers safe.</p> <p>Sewage is not a sexy topic. People often have an “out of sight, out of mind” attitude. But where does sewage go, and is it treated and disposed of in the waters that we Australians love?</p> <p>The bigger the coastal community, the bigger the volume of sewage. Disposal of human waste into the ocean might solve one problem, but we now realise that the “waste” is as precious as the ocean it pollutes.</p> <p><strong>Understanding the problem from a national perspective</strong></p> <p>Such problems play out continuously along our coastline. Each isolated community and catchment issue arises and is resolved, often in ignorance of and isolation from similar issues somewhere else.</p> <p>At present, places where sewage impacts are generating community concern include <a href="https://aboutregional.com.au/merimbula-ocean-outfall-is-that-really-our-best-option/">Merimbula</a>, <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/environment/sustainability/how-a-wave-of-nurdles-woke-up-the-people-of-warrnambool-20180928-p506md.html">Warrnambool</a> and, perhaps most bizarrely, <a href="https://www.sydneywater.com.au/SW/water-the-environment/what-we-re-doing/current-projects/improving-our-wastewater-system/refresh-vaucluse-and-diamond-bay/index.htm">Vaucluse and Diamond Bay</a> in Sydney’s affluent eastern suburbs.</p> <p>It’s hard to believe this location has raw and untreated sewage from 3,500 people discharged directly into the Tasman Sea. Sydney Water pledged in 2018 to fix this unsightly pollution by transferring the flow to the nearby Bondi sewage treatment plant.</p> <p>Community group <a href="https://www.nespmarine.edu.au/project/project-c4-national-outfall-database">Clean Ocean Foundation</a> has worked with the Marine Biodiversity Hub to start the process of viewing outfall pollution – where a drain or sewer empties into the sea – as part of a bigger picture. It’s a first step towards understanding from a national perspective.</p> <p>Together they have produced the <a href="https://www.outfalls.info/">National Outfall Database</a> to provide the first Australia-wide comparison.</p> <p><strong>The best and worst offenders</strong></p> <p>Previously the information available to the public was sketchy and often not easily accessed. The database shows how differently Australia manages coastal sewage with information on the outfalls.</p> <p>Clean Ocean Foundation CEO John Gemmill said:</p> <p>Water authorities in the main do a great job with severe funding constraints. But they can be reticent to divulge information publicly.</p> <p><a href="https://www.cleanocean.org/news/cof-major-report-released-class-a-by-2030">One authority</a>, suspicious of the research project, initially refused to give the location of the outfall, claiming it would be vandalised by enraged “surfies and fishermen”.</p> <p>Sydney has Australia’s biggest outfall. It provides primary treatment at Malabar, New South Wales, and serves about 1.7 million people. The outfall releases about 499 megalitres (ML) per day of treated sewage, called “effluent”.</p> <p>That’s about eight Olympic-sized swimming pools of effluent an hour. It is <a href="https://www.cleanocean.org/flow-volumes.html">discharged</a> to the Pacific Ocean 3.6 kilometres from the shoreline at a depth of 82 metres.</p> <p>The cleanest outfall (after sustained advocacy over decades from the Clean Ocean Foundation) is Boags Rock, in southern Melbourne. It <a href="https://www.outfalls.info/detail/locations/49">releases</a> tertiary-treated sewage with Class A+ water. This means the quality is very suitable for reuse and has no faecal bacteria detected (Enterococci or E.coli).</p> <p><strong>Recycling sewage</strong></p> <p>Treated sewage is 99% water. The last 1% is what determines if the water will harm human and environmental health. Are we wasting a precious resource by disposing of it in the ocean?</p> <p>As desalination plants are cranking up in Sydney and Melbourne to extract pure water from salty ocean, why shouldn’t we also recycle sewage?</p> <p>Clean Ocean Foundation has released <a href="https://www.cleanocean.org/2019-upgrading-australias-outfalls.html">a report</a> showing it would pay to treat sewage more thoroughly and reuse it. This report finds upgrading coastal sewage outfalls to a higher level of treatment will provide tens of billions of dollars in benefits.</p> <p>Industry analysis <a href="https://www.cleanocean.org/2019-upgrading-australias-outfalls.html">suggests</a> that, for a cost outlay of between A$7.3 billion and A$10 billion, sewage treatment upgrades can deliver between A$12 billion and A$28 billion in net benefits – that is, the financial benefits above and beyond what it cost to put new infrastructure in place.</p> <p>Then there are non-economic benefits such as improved ecological and human health, and improved recreational and tourism opportunities by use of suitable recycling processes.</p> <p><strong>What the rest of Australia can learn from WA</strong></p> <p>Clean Ocean Foundation president Peter Smith <a href="https://static-promote.weebly.com/share/489288f8-e62b-40d8-b766-828e110cd013">said</a> Australia’s key decision-makers now, more than before, have a “golden opportunity” to adopt a sea change in water reform around coastal Australia based on good science and sound economic analysis.</p> <p>In the context of the drought of southeast Australia, recycling water from ocean outfalls is an option that demands further debate.</p> <p>As expensive desalination plants are switched on, <a href="https://www.sydneywater.com.au/SW/water-the-environment/how-we-manage-sydney-s-water/wastewater-network/wastewater-treatment-plants/index.htm">Sydney proposes</a> to double the size of its desalination plant – just a few kilometres from massive ocean outfalls that could provide so much recycled water. And to our shame, NSW ocean outfalls are among the lowest in standards of treatment.</p> <p>Western Australia, on the other hand, leads the push to recycle wastewater as it continues to struggle with diminishing surface water from climate change.</p> <p>In fact, in 2017 the Water Corporation <a href="https://watersource.awa.asn.au/business/partnerships/perth-recycled-water-project-gets-262-million-investment/">announced</a> massive investment in highly treated sewage being used to replenish groundwater supplies. Perth now sources 20% of its drinking water from groundwater, reducing its reliance on two desalination plants. A key factor was successful engagement with affected communities.</p> <p>The discharge of poorly treated sewage to rivers, estuaries and oceans is a matter of national environmental significance and the Commonwealth should take a coordinating role.</p> <p>Our oceans do not respect state boundaries. The time is ripe for a deliberate national approach to recycling sewage and improved systems to manage outfalls.</p> <p><em>Written by Ian Wright, Andrew Fischer, Boyd Dirk Blackwell, Qurratu A’yunin Rohmana and Simon Toze. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/australias-pristine-beaches-have-a-poo-problem-116175"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Biggest overhaul in 32 years: Qantas announces major changes to its Frequent Flyer program

<p>Qantas has just made the biggest announcement in the 32-year history of its Frequent Flyer program, with massive changes benefiting the customer into paying less fees and having access to more seats along with the opportunity to earn points while on the ground.</p> <p>Speaking to the media on Thursday, CEO Alan Joyce and divisional head Olivia Wirth made the revelation which will affect 13 million members.</p> <p>It is expected for the changes to take place over the next 12 months, with the airline investing $25 million into the scheme.</p> <p>The biggest changes will be access to more seats, with over 1 million seats reserved for Frequent Flyers. Destinations that will benefit the most will be London, Los Angeles, Tokyo and Singapore.</p> <p>Another plus is reduced fees and carrier charges when redeeming points.</p> <p>If you’re someone who tends to travel in economy, you will now be using less points for a Classic Rewards seat.</p> <p>But if you prefer to fly first class, business class and premium economy, then the news is slightly bleaker as you will be paying an increased fee of 15 per cent – which is a first for the airline. You will also be paying more for an upgrade to a premium cabin – up to 9 per cent.</p> <p>“While the points required for business class seats on international and domestic flights will increase slightly, it is the first increase in 15 years and the product has improved a lot in that time,” said Mr Joyce.</p> <p>“There’s a lot about the Qantas Frequent Flyer program that our members tell us they love but there are also areas of the program that have increasingly come under pressure as a result of rapid expansion,” added Ms Wirth.</p> <p>“What we’re announcing today is all about investing more into the heart of our program, the member experience.”</p> <p>However, the most exciting change is the new “Points Club” program which helps members earn points when they aren’t up in the air.</p> <p>The club is comprised of two tiers and entry gained based on members meeting an annual criteria.</p> <p>Once travellers gain access to the exclusive club, they will receive lounge entry and bonus star credit, as well as bargain deals across their “partner” network.</p> <p>“The combination of the new Points Club, the introduction of our most elite tier in Lifetime Platinum, and the increase in seats across our network means the revamped program should offer something for everyone,” said Ms Wirth.</p>

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Japanese onsen etiquette explained

<p>The thought of soaking in a hot spring sounds fantastic, especially after a long day sightseeing or skiing. But before you grab your swimmers and towel and rush off – check these rules on Japanese Onsen etiquette.</p> <p><strong>Yukata on</strong></p> <p>If you are staying at a traditional Japanese Inn, or Ryokan, you should have a yakata in your room. This light cotton kimono should be worn to the onsen, to breakfast and dinner. You can go naked underneath it, or just wear underpants.</p> <p>Make sure you fold the yakata correctly. You need to fold the right side UNDER the left side. Only dead bodies placed in coffins have the yukata folder right over left. Don’t be fooled by the pictures – no one wears the yukata inside the onsen – we’ll get to that soon. If the hotel has a jacket – that can be worn over the top of the yukata for cold days.</p> <p><strong>Grab your towel from your room (and maybe a washcloth)</strong></p> <p>You will need your towel for after your onsen soak. Bring it from your room. Trust us. Otherwise, you may be left trying to dry yourself with a towel the size of a washer. And you will also look silly. If you are going to a public onsen you will also need your own washcloth. Note that the Japanese often carry their own wash clothes to use in public toilets. That’s why you can never seem to find the paper towels – they carry their own.</p> <p><strong>Sexes divide</strong></p> <p>Japanese onsens are strictly gendered. If the hotel has two onsens they will swap the male and female onsens each day to be fair. Children must go with women into the female onsen.</p> <p><strong>When to go</strong></p> <p>We highly recommend going a few times during your stay. You don’t want to miss the best onsen. My Japanese guide tells me you should go before dinner, after dinner and before breakfast. If you drank alcohol at dinner, you should wait at least an hour before going to the onsen. The heat can make you feel faint.</p> <p><strong>Shoes off</strong></p> <p>Before you enter the onsen, you need to remove your shoes. You should take note of how and where the Japanese remove their shoes <a href="https://www.familytravel.com.au/stories/japan-culture-mistakes/?__hstc=224028740.2b4f31e7a1a1fd4ad6142555b1fed403.1559530192640.1560901826457.1560990902411.6&amp;__hssc=224028740.3.1560990902411&amp;__hsfp=4182817123">to avoid making a mistake</a>. If you reach the onsen via indoors, you may need to take off your shoes before you reach the tatami mats.</p> <p>Watch the Japanese guests when they take off their slippers. They back up to the step until their heels touch the edge. They step out of their slippers and up onto the step backwards. Then when it comes to going down, they can effortlessly slip their slippers on and walk away. The picture above shows how NOT to do it. Those shoes should be neatly lined up with the heels pressed against the step.</p> <p>Other times, you will find a bench for slippers at the entrance to the onsen. Look for numbered pegs – sometimes you should clip your slippers together with the peg and then use that number for your clothing basket inside. After you have removed your shoes you will head into the change room. Most onsens will have baskets for your clothes.</p> <p><strong>Strip off and get naked</strong></p> <p>Yes, naked. No swimmers. We know all the onsen pictures make it look like you can cover yourself. That’s just for photos. In real life – you must be naked. Everyone is naked. No one cares. Although if you are travelling with teens and tweens – you are going to have to explain this one.</p> <p><strong>Put your clothes in a basket</strong></p> <p>Find a basket to put your clothes and towel into. Fold them nicely. If you had a numbered peg for your shoes – you should match that number to your basket. If not, pick anyone you want. Leave your towel in the basket. Do not carry it into the onsen. Grab your washcloth – you’re going to need it for the next step.</p> <p><strong>Time to shower</strong></p> <p>Every onsen will have shower taps, soap, shampoo and conditioner. Before you go anywhere near the water, you must cleanse.</p> <p>Sit on the stool and place the bucket on the small step in front of you. Turn the taps on and make sure you wash down every part of your body. Once you’re done, put your washcloth in the bucket. Turn the taps to cold and get the washer nice and soaked with cold water.</p> <p><strong>Put the cold washer on your head</strong></p> <p>Some Japanese ladies like to make it fancy. Others just sit it on top. This cold washer will help you to adjust to the heat of the onsen.</p> <p><strong>Head for the onsen</strong></p> <p>Now, naked and with your washer on your head, you can head for the onsen. If you do feel self-conscious you can wait to put the washer on your head and have it dangle in front to give you a small semblance of privacy. Make sure you check outside doors – sometimes there’s another onsen pool outside, or hidden around the corner.</p> <p><strong>Don’t stay in too long</strong></p> <p>An onsen soak is delightful, but don’t overdo it. You probably want to remain in for about 30 minutes max. You want to take the soak easy. Dip in a little, immerse, then sit back on a step. Get up, out of the water occasionally and change positions or pools. In cold snowy areas, some people like to take the bucket and use it as a water scoop to keep their top half warm.</p> <p><strong>Shower again</strong></p> <p>Once you’ve had enough you need to go back to the showers. Scrub and wash every part of your body before you head back to the change room to dry.</p> <p><strong>Pamper yourself</strong></p> <p>You will often find the change room has hair dryers, body cream and brushes you can use. You can do this naked, in a towel or in your yukata.</p> <p><strong>Time to go</strong></p> <p>Put your wet washer in the collection bin provided. Get dressed into your clothes and head off. Make sure that you put your slippers on correctly as you leave.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/japanese-onsen-etiquette/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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4 reasons to visit Norfolk Island

<p>Ask anyone who has been to Norfolk Island and they will tell you they want to go back.</p> <p>Norfolk Island is often known in Australia as a convict settlement, a 1980s tax-dodge and a home for Bounty mutineers. But dig a little deeper and you will find a fascinating South Pacific Paradise, jam packed with adventure, gastronomy and incredible views.</p> <p>It’s the kind of place you have to see to believe. </p> <p>Norfolk Island is technically Australia, although you will need to take a 2.5 hour flight from the mainland. From 2016, Australians travelling from the mainland to the island <a href="https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/ente/norfolk-island-travellers">no longer required a passport</a>. However, you will still need identification such as a drivers licence. </p> <p>So what do you do when you get there? Here’s four things that may surprise you.</p> <p><strong>1. Eat</strong></p> <p>Norfolk island is a paddock-to-plate heaven. All fruit and vegetables are grown on the island, in season and picked daily for you to enjoy that day. Add to that fresh fish, local beef and boutique products such as coffee, honey and cheese and you can see why so many Australians adore Norfolk.</p> <p>The islanders really love their pies. They will add anything that is in season to a pie. Try banana, coconut or guava. Trust us, it’s divine.</p> <p>Norfolk Island has one winery, Two Chimneys, established by Rod And Noelene McAlpine in 2006. Two chimneys has a tasting room and guests can enjoy delicious reds, whites and roses. Our top tip – get a cheese platter as well. It’s a sight to behold.</p> <p>Head to Sweeties Chocolate Factory for a sweet treat. The shop sells locally made chocolate and imported sweets. They also have an ice-cream counter and loads of specialty gifts.</p> <p>Book ahead if you want to head to Hilli Restaurant &amp; Cafe. This spectacular restaurant gets rave reviews on TripAdvisor. We’re told the seafood crepes are to die for.</p> <p><strong>2. Explore</strong></p> <p>Grab a <a href="hours:%20Museums:%20Monday%20to%20Saturday%20all%20venues%2011.00am%20to%203.00pm,%20Sundays%20-%20Pier%20Store%20only%2011.00am%20to%203.00pm%20%20The%20Norfolk%20Island%20museums%20reveals%20to%20you%20Norfolk's%20amazing%20and%20multi-layered%20stories.%20The%20Island%20was%20first%20settled%20by%20the%20Polynesians,%20discovered%20by%20Captain%20Cook%20in%201774,%20then%20in%201788%20by%20the%20British%20who%20later%20made%20it%20a%20convict%20hell%20hole.%20Since%201856%20it%20has%20been%20the%20home%20to%20the%20descendants%20of%20the%20Bounty%20mutineers.%20The%204%20museums%20located%20in%20World%20Heritage%20Kingston,%20help%20you%20explore%20the%20island's%20past%20as%20well%20as%20today's%20living%20local%20culture.%20%20No.%2010%20Quality%20Row%20-%20A%20Georgian%20House%20built%20for%20the%20Foreman%20of%20Works%20and%20restored%20to%201844.%20%20Pier%20Store%20-%20Housing%20the%20Pitcairn/%20Norfolk%20stories,%20including%20artefacts%20from%20the%20Bounty,%20Pitcairn%20Island%20and%20Norfolk%20Island%20since%201856.%20%20Sirius%20Museum-%20Housing%20nationally%20significant%20artefacts%20from%20the%20Flag%20Ship%20of%20the%20First%20Fleet%20HMS%20Sirius%20wrecked%20at%20Kingston%20in%201790.%20%20Commissariat%20Store%20-%20Archaeological%20remains%20that%20have%20been%20collected%20from%20around%20the%20Kingston%20area%20are%20on%20display%20here.%20%20A%20museum%20pass%20is%20available%20$25%20for%20adults,%20school%20children%20are%20free.%20Explore%20at%20your%20pace,%20multiple%20entry%20or%20join%20a%20guided%20tag%20along%20tour.">museum pass </a>and delve into Norfolk Island’s fascinating history.</p> <p>Norfolk Island was first settled by Polynesian Islanders. In 1774 Captain Cook stopped at the island on his first voyage. In 1788 Norfolk Island became “a convict hell hole” and in 1856 it became the home of the descendants of the Bounty Mutineers.</p> <p>The island has four main museums: The Pier Store, Sirius museaum, Commissariat Store and No. 10 Quality Row. There’s also a fascinating convict cemetery that offers guided tours every Tuesday and Friday at 11.30am.</p> <p>Pitcairn Settler’s Village offers tours every Wednesday and Saturday. Ride in Norfolk’s first tour coach, a charming model A Ford. Check out a historical film and visit a blacksmith’s forge. Explore the charming original homestead and WWII army hut.</p> <p>But history doesn’t just happen in the museums. One of the highest-rated Norfolk Island experiences is the <a href="http://www.pinetreetours.com/holiday/ghost-tour/">lantern-lit ghost tour</a>. On it you will hear stories that will send shivers down you spine.</p> <p>If all this history has made you wonder about your own past, you can research your own family tree and convict ancestry at the Research centre in town.</p> <p><strong>3. Get outdoors</strong></p> <p>Norfolk Island real is spectacular outdoors. The towering Norfolk Pines actually store water in their trunk. Don’t be afraid to hug them on a hot day – they will actually cool you down.</p> <p>The island also has a rare green parrot. Grab a camera and a pair of binoculars and see if you can spot them. Or join a bird-watching tour to discover the unique bird life on land, and on the sea.</p> <p>If you love to hike, Norfolk has plenty to offer. Explore the stunning Cockpit Waterfall at the Cascade, take the walking track to the bottom of Anson Bay or head to the National Parks to hike one of the many walking trails.</p> <p>Given that it’s an island, there’s plenty to do on the water too. Marvel at the rock formations on a guided sea kayaking tour or go for a swim at Emily bay lagoon, one of the top 10 beaches of the South Pacific.</p> <p>Don’t forget to get out at night too. Norfolk Island is so far from the mainland that the stargazing is sensational. Look up, the Milky Way is incredible.</p> <p><strong>4. Join the locals</strong></p> <p>Norfolk Island is a pretty small place. It takes very few tourists. You’re bound to see the same faces again and again. So why not join in the fun and act like a local.</p> <p>Enjoy a fun night at Housie or Bingo every Monday at the Paradise hotel. Chill out in a local Yoga or Tai Chi class or get involved with conservation work with WILDMOB.</p> <p>Another great tip for Norfolk Island is to make sure that you wave to passing cars it’s called the “Norfolk wave”.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/four-incredible-things-to-do-on-norfolk-island/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Beautiful Bruny will blow you away

<p>Head south from Bruny Island and the next stop is Antarctica. This spectacular Tasmanian wilderness has an incredible food culture and link to Tasmania’s dark history.</p> <p>Bruny Island is actually two islands – North and South Island which are separated by a narrow isthmus called “The Neck”.</p> <p>Don’t be tempted to think you can come here on a day trip. The islands are nearly 100km long. You will need at least a few days to uncover the island’s secrets.</p> <p>Both islands are a farmer’s paradise with rich soil producing berries, cheese, whisky and wine. The ocean also produces delicious oysters.</p> <p>Bruny’s South Island is hilly, timbered, contains large pockets of rainforest. This is where you will find South Bruny Lighthouse, the second-oldest and longest continually staffed lighthouse in Australia, and the townships of Adventure Bay, Alonnah and Lunawanna.</p> <p>The highlight of the South Island has to be South Bruny National Park, which has towering cliffs overlooking white sandy beaches, coastal heathland and underwater kelp gardens. It’s also home to several endangered plants and animals including the hooded plover, swift parrot, ground parrot, and forty-spotted pardalote. The coast is dotted with mutton bird (short-tail shearwater) and penguin rookeries. Other residents include echidnas, possums, pademelons, and wallabies.</p> <p>Bruny island was once home to the Nuenonne people. Remnants of their settlements can still be seen on the South Island. The most famous resident was the Indigenous Australian Truganini, often incorrectly known as the last Indigenous Tasmanian. She was the daughter of the chief Mangana and is believed to have been born sometime around 1812.</p> <p>After the arrival of the Europeans, Truganini’s life of searching for shellfish and hunting in the bush changed forever. By 1829, her mother had been killed by sailors, her uncle shot by a soldier, her sister abducted by sealers, and her fiancé murdered by timber-getters.</p> <p>Truganini died in Hobart in 1874. Her body was on display in the Tasmanian museum until 1951. In 1976, more than a century after she died, the Tasmanian Aboriginal Community requested that she be cremated and her ashes scattered in the D’Entrecasteaux Channel near her homeland. The request was granted.</p> <p>Truganini Lookout at The Neck offers some of the best views on the island, a fitting tribute to the Indigenous elder whose life was turned upside down by European settlement.</p> <p>The island also has a fascinating European history. It was partly charted by Abel Tasman in 1642. Tasman sailed the Zeehan and Heenskerck along the coast and briefly entered Adventure Bay but was prevented from landing due to gale force winds.</p> <p>Captain Tobias Furneaux visited with Captain James Cook in 1773. Cook was sailing the HMS Resolution and Furneax the HMS Adventure – after which Adenvture bay was named. The sailors entered the bay replenish their water and wood supplies.</p> <p>Four years later, in 1777, Cook returned to Bruny on the HMS Bounty with a botanist named Nelson. The pair were said to have planted some seeds which they had brought with them from the Cape of Good Hope. In 1792, Captain Bligh arrived in Bruny Island and found an apple tree had grown from one of the seeds. According to local legend, this is how the apple isle first got its nickname.</p> <p>Evidence of whaling stations can still be seen on the islands particularly around Grass Point.</p> <p>The name Bruny Island comes from French explorer Bruni D’Entrecasteaux. Originally Bruni, the spelling was changed to Bruny in 1918. The Indigenous name for the islands was Lunawanna-alonna – which is reflected in the names given to the two towns on the South Island.</p> <p>Access to the island is by vehicular ferry departing from Kettering. The trip takes 15 minutes and arrives at Roberts Point on North Bruny. The island has a population of around 620 and is deceptively large – being about 100 kilometres in length.</p> <p><strong>What can you do there?</strong></p> <p>The island has several spectacular walks. The challenging three-hour Fluted Cape walk from East Cove carpark to Grass Point offers stunning coastal views and the opportunity to spot White Breasted Sea Eagles. For a shorter, easier option, try the Clennett’s Top Mill Site. This 30 minute walk passes through rainforest on the western side of Coolangatta Road to an old mill where you can see ancient machinery.</p> <p>One of the best things to do is to eat. <a href="http://www.brunyisland.org.au/food-and-dining/">Bruny Island Tourism</a> have a list of all the delicious options on the islands including Bruny Island House of Whisky, the Get Shucked Oyster Farm and the Bruny Island Cheese Company.</p> <p>This year a new gallery has opened up at Dennes Point, the northernmost tip of the island. The Art at the Point gallery showcases the work of more than 40 artists who live on Bruny Island.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/why-you-should-go-to-bruny-island-in-tasmania/"><em>MyDiscoveries.</em></a></p>

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The Qantas seat hack you didn't know about

<p>Scoring a good seat on a flight can be tricky – but flying in economy doesn’t have to be an unpleasant experience. If you’re travelling with Qantas, there is a way to get a seat of your preference using the 80-hour hack.</p> <p>Most airlines will let you pick a seat during the booking process – however, the seats available for selection may change depending on the timing. With Qantas, the availability of the <a href="https://thehighlife.com.au/improve-seat-qantas-flight-80-hours-before-departure/">most coveted</a> seats – including upfront seats and exit rows – will be limited to Frequent Flyer members with Gold or Platinum status, while everyone else is relegated to the back of the plane.</p> <p>“The most sought-after seats at the front are reserved for platinum-level customers and above, while the next few rows are accessible to gold status holders and above,” David Goldman of travel company Goldman Group told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.escape.com.au/travel-advice/qantas-seat-trick-do-this-80-hours-before-departure/news-story/5a97fd233e87d36543cbe70d09693706" target="_blank"><em>Escape</em></a>. </p> <p>“Silver and Bronze members are only able to select seats further back.”</p> <p>These premium seats are generally reserved until 80 hours before departure, when the restriction is lifted and the options are released for all frequent flyers, including those on silver and bronze levels.</p> <p>At this point, you can review your seat allocation and pick from the choices that had been unavailable previously.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.virginaustralia.com/au/en/experience/on-board-the-flight/seat-selection/#frequent-flyers" target="_blank">Virgin Australia</a> also has a similar model, albeit with a slight difference in details. Most seats in the “preferred zone” are opened up to all Velocity frequent flyer members 48 hours before the scheduled departure time. If these seats are still unbooked until 12 hours before the flight, they will be released to all passengers.</p> <p>So, next time you’re flying, it may be worthwhile to set a reminder to see if you can score a better seat! </p>

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3 travel myths debunked

<p>The world of travel has changed quite a bit over the years, with many tips and tricks people used to rely on to nab bargain deals, now being made redundant. Which is why you should be wary when someone gives advice on how to travel the world for a much more affordable price tag.</p> <p>Here are some top myths debunked</p> <p><strong>Myth 1: Booking directly with the airline gets you the cheapest deal</strong></p> <p>Not true. If you end up doing thorough research, you may find that it’s better to fly from Sydney to Brisbane with Jetstar and return with Tiger Airways. Mixing up your airlines is a great way to ensure you get the best deal, and besides, when you book directly with the airline, you’re unable to compare prices which is why an online comparison tool is a must.</p> <p><strong>Myth 2: Buying a round trip will ensure a better price</strong></p> <p>Not all the time. While this used to be true, most airlines now sell their one-way fares for exactly half the price of a return ticket.</p> <p>There are exceptions though, such as Qantas who offer a more affordable rate on their round-trip fares.</p> <p><strong>Myth 3: If you book on a Tuesday, you’ll get a cheaper price</strong></p> <p>False. Back in the days people used to believe that airlines would announce their best deals on a Monday, which meant Tuesday was the best time to book flights.</p> <p>Now, airlines announce deals at different days and times, so if you want to grab yourself a bargain then sign up to alerts from deal hunting websites.</p>

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8 ways to de-stress while travelling

<p><strong>1. Plan your time</strong></p> <p>If you’re always missing transport connections, look at how you are allotting your time. Your travel guide may say it takes 40 minutes to get to the airport. Allow at least an extra 20 minutes so you arrive feeling fresh and calm.</p> <p><strong>2. Escape briefly</strong></p> <p>Slip away from the hustle and bustle once in a while. Most cities have botanic gardens, and there are always nature trails where you can enjoy the local scenery.</p> <p><strong>3. Avoid unnecessary tech accessories</strong></p> <p>Smartphones, tablets or computers remind us of home. Leave as much technology behind as you can and allow yourself to feel a sense of freedom from everyday life.</p> <p><strong>4. Do just one thing a day</strong></p> <p>For example, if you’re sightseeing, choose one place to visit (instead of four) and make a day of it with lunch or coffee in a nearby cafe.</p> <p><strong>5. Bring snacks</strong></p> <p>Have a bag of non-perishable snacks on hand (try protein bars, dried fruit and nuts, juice boxes, or pretzels). Unexpected delays on a long journey will be more stressful if you’re hungry.</p> <p><strong>6. One in a while, do nothing</strong></p> <p>Lie down and just unwind.</p> <p><strong>7. Stretch</strong></p> <p>Long bouts of sitting on planes and trains take a toll on your circulation. Lift your knees and stretch your calves for 30 seconds. This reduces the risk of blood clots that can result from sitting too long in one position.</p> <p><strong>8. Keep perspective</strong></p> <p>Your troubles are often smaller than they seem. To remind yourself of that, keep a picture of the Earth taken from space, a starry night, or the ocean, and look at it whenever you feel overwhelmed. Amid countless stars and the crashing of waves against the shore, how important is getting to that third museum, really?</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/destress-while-travelling"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The 2 travel trends to watch out for

<p><strong>1. Bagging a cheap-as-chips airline ticket</strong></p> <p>Think of this promotion as more playful than practical. In April 2015, Dutch low-cost airline Transavia released “SnackHolidays” packets of chips, gummy bears and cereal bars that doubled as a passenger ticket and boarding pass. The range was stocked at French supermarkets and cinemas and in vending machines on train platforms. All potential passengers had to do was decide between gummy sweets (Lisbon), potato chips (Barcelona) or a cereal bar (Dublin). Ranging in price from €30-40, the packets featured printed QR codes that booked the flight.</p> <p>Definitely a novelty, but one we think deserves a round of applause for originality. And yes, there was a use-by date.</p> <p><strong>2. Mini fashion bars</strong></p> <p>For anyone who hates packing or has a habit of forgetting things – this could be for you. Visitors to the Banks Hotel in Antwerp now have something extra in their room. Each room is fitted with a Mini Fashion Bar, featuring casual easy-to-wear clothing from the French brand Pimkie. The mini bars are stocked with seasonal accessories, shoes and outfits to suit the guest’s age and size, as well as any preferred holiday activities. To ensure the right choices are waiting when they check in, guests are asked to contact the hotel’s dedicated fashion concierge before arriving in town.</p> <p>So what’s the catch? Well, we couldn’t find any – apart from having to buy the clothes if you wear them. Plans are set to introduce the concept to the company’s hotels in Paris, London, Berlin and Milan.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/Two-Travel-Trends-to-Watch-Out-For"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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5 travel tips that are no longer true

<p>We all love an insider tip, but some of the classic tips for travellers no longer hold true. Check the updates on these tall tales to save cash and add experience to your trip.</p> <p><strong>1. Book a plane ticket far in advance to save money</strong></p> <p>This myth may have been true back in the ’60s, when flights were less common than they are today. Back then, the demand for a flight would naturally increase as the date approached, there being few other options. These days, a plethora of alternatives for the most popular routes means that demand is levelled out. According to recent studies, the best time to buy a domestic ticket is between six and seven weeks out.</p> <p><strong>2. The best hotel prices are on travel websites </strong></p> <p>Don’t overlook the benefits of going straight to the hotel to negotiate a good deal on a room. Many hotel chains offer rate guarantees and encourage customers to book directly. Hotels also frequently have discount or perk offers that third-party websites aren’t privy to. On top of this, hotels give the upgrades, not the booking agents.</p> <p><strong>3. Avoid street food When in Rome, do what the Romans do</strong></p> <p>If this means standing up at a cheap street stall, then follow the crowd. Don’t sit down at a restaurant and spend four times more, on the simple assumption that it’s the only safe option. Can you see what’s going on the kitchen?</p> <p><strong>4. Put your money in a money pouch or belt </strong></p> <p>This is the fastest way to stand out from locals – who will have their money in a wallet or purse. Only take what you need when you leave your hotel room and make sure to put your wallet in a front pocket.</p> <p><strong>5. Duty free is cheaper </strong></p> <p>This is only true if you’re buying products that are heavily taxed, such as cigarettes and alcohol. Avoid sunglasses and perfumes, as these usually have a much higher base price than what you’ll find outside the airport.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/travel-myths"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Why you need to visit Heron Island

<p>Every night on Heron Island, baby turtles are wriggling and cracking their way out of their eggs and waddling their way to the ocean for the first time.</p> <p>At this time of year, the turtle hatching is a constant. What’s really special about this island is that you don’t have to go far from your hotel room to see this awesome event.</p> <p>If you stay here – you don’t need to catch a boat to the reef – you are on it, in it, surrounded by it.</p> <p>Heron Island is a coral cay. Sand built up over time to form an island in the middle of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Seeds dropped by migrating birds eventually grew into a wild canopy, a safe haven for muttonbirds and Pacific Reef Heron – after which the island is named.</p> <p>Heron Island is one of the southern Great Barrier Reef islands and is unaffected by any of the coral bleaching that has occurred further north. The island is easily accessible by ferry from Gladstone. The ferry ride is incredible – you won’t believe the colour of the water and sometimes dolphins will swim along with the boat.</p> <p><a href="http://heronisland.com/?utm_source=FAMILYTRAVEL.com.au">Heron Island has one resort</a> and one marine research station. It feels exclusive, small and intimate.</p> <p>You can walk around the Island in about 40 minutes. But trust us, you won’t be able to do it that fast. You will get distracted by coral, reef sharks, sea cucumbers, rays and fish. All of which you can see from the beach.</p> <p>To get to the reef, just pop on your flippers and snorkel and wade in. For deeper snorkelling head over to the wreck – if you’re lucky you will see a reef shark among hundreds of colourful fish species. Brave snorkellers can head to “shark bay” where reef sharks, wobbegongs and nurse sharks line up waiting for the tide to be high enough for them to swim over the inner reef.</p> <p>But the real stars of this island are the turtles.</p> <p>January marks the beginning of Baby Green and Loggerhead Turtle hatching season, a cycle that will continue from now for five months leading into May.  Undeterred by human presence the hatchlings emerge from their sandy nests between 25 to 50 metres from shore and make their way to the reef, just beyond the water’s edge.</p> <p>The journey is perilous – many are eaten by gulls, larger fish and other predators. Those who do make it will come back to the same spot to lay their own eggs year after year.</p> <p>“During turtle hatching season the baby’s journey to the sea is an imprint on the environment to them so they know to return to these sands as mature adults, it’s therefore very important that they’re permitted to make their own journey to the water without assistance or hindrance,” Tony Barradale, Heron Island’s General Manager says.</p> <p>Barradale lives on the island and loves to entertain guests with his many facts about turtles life, biology and the precious eco-system they live in. Heron Island is a protected habitat and national marine park. The turtles return each year from October to December to nest on the island sands, which they themselves hatched on up to 30 years earlier.</p> <p>Naturalist guides on Heron Island lead educational tours observing the hatchlings. The best time to see them is in the evening two hours each side of the high tide. Just imagine watching the sunset over the water as the baby turtles wriggle their way down the sand. It is something you will never forget.</p> <p>Bed and breakfast turtle hatching packages to Heron Island start from $347AUD per night. This price is for double occupancy, including daily buffet breakfast, a turtle gift, turtle talk and snorkelling trip for two.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/heron-island-turtles/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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The best high teas in Asia

<p>Classic high tea doesn’t have to be taken in an English country garden. These two teas enjoyed in Asia take the cake!</p> <p>I would say that I’ve had more than a 1000 afternoon teas. Call them Cream Teas, Afternoon Tea, Devonshire Tea, High Tea, Afternoonsies, or a mid-arvo cuppa and cake – I’ve had them.</p> <p>I think it is the most civilised and friendly ritual anyone could indulge themselves it.</p> <p>Now, I don’t roll out the cake stand and the best teapot on a regular basis but when I’m travelling I always plan an afternoon tea experience into the itinerary mix.</p> <p>My two standouts for 2018 are both set in Asia. The first was in Hanoi, Vietnam (yes, there’s so much more than pho) and the second was in Singapore (hold the chilli and pass the cakes!).</p> <p><strong>Hanoi</strong></p> <p>To stay in the Sofitel Legend Hanoi Metropole Hotel is to be treated like royalty and to be immersed in Hanoi’s long and complex history. The French carved out a colony in Vietnam from 1887 until its defeat in the First Indochina War in 1954 when independence was claimed for the country.</p> <p>After that Vietnam couldn’t catch a break and until the mid-70s war between North and South with many other nations putting their oar in raged until peace at last.</p> <p>The French left many beautiful buildings especially in the north – Hanoi has the lion’s share of splendid, restored colonial villas and public buildings. The Queen is the Sofitel Legend Metropole Hanoi, gleaming white, brass polished as a shining ritual and all things here, tres bon. The staff still greet each guest throughout the hotel with a warm “bonjour”.</p> <p>The hotel includes 364 rooms and the historic Metropole wing has 106 guestrooms and three Legendary Suites. The suites are named after famous residents and visitors to the hotel (Graham Greene, Charlie Chaplin, Somerset Maugham).</p> <p>Afternoon tea here is best entered into with a stout heart and a competitive spirit.</p> <p>Every day, between three and 5.30pm, an irresistible chocolate library opens in the Club Bar. Praline, ganache, éclairs, mille-feuille pastries, chocolate fountain, a selection of every imaginable kind of French pâtisseries and delectable chocolate in all shapes and form appears and appeals seductively to the afternoon tea fanatic.…Its reputation has spread well beyond the borders of Vietnam.</p> <p>Made from the finest Vietnamese grown cocoa, the Metropole Ganaches are carefully prepared to make the finest grade couverture chocolate. The chef here was dipping tiny matcha nougat squares in chocolate while we watched. There were two of us and we decided to share the love. One of us would take the High Tea and the other would take up the Chocolate Library challenge. This is a buffet extraordinaire – try one of everything – chocolate truffle, mousse and ice cream, macarons, a chocolate fountain and a hot chocolate for good measure.</p> <p>The High Tea comes on a layered stand – where to start? From the bottom with savoury snacks including baby quiche Lorraine’s and tiny sandwiches. Up a level and the scones call to you. Jam and cream of course and decorated fruit tarts – on top now – a display of wee cakes to slip delicately into one’s mouth.</p> <p>There are other wonderful restaurants here – but don’t book on the same day as you have the High Tea.</p> <p>From the Paris-inspired cafe La Terrasse to the popular poolside Bamboo Bar or Vietnamese restaurant Spices Garden, the multi-award French restaurant Le Beaulieu or the stylish Italian-influenced restaurant and new lounge Angelina – the hotel promises a gastronomic journey.</p> <p>And did I mention cakes?</p> <p><strong>Singapore</strong></p> <p>I once read a food travelogue that described Singapore as the ‘world’s best restaurant’. Every Asian cuisine melds with all world food here and whether you eat at markets, food courts, hole-in-the-wall treasures or five-star gourmet extravaganzas – there is not a dish that you could miss out on here.</p> <p>I’m a sucker for simple old-school chicken and rice and anything that is presented from Little India and have always been on the hunt for the perfect afternoon tea.</p> <p>On my most recent visit, I finally got to enjoy afternoon High tea at the famous Fullerton Hotel.</p> <p>The magnificent Fullerton Building is a grand neoclassical landmark built in 1928. Gazetted in December 2015 as a National Monument, it was once home to Singapore’s General Post Office, the Exchange Room and Exchange Reference Library, and the prestigious Singapore Club. Today, The Fullerton Hotel is a stunning 400-room heritage hotel in Singapore. </p> <p>Located in the Fullerton Hotel Singapore’s vast sunlit atrium lobby, The Courtyard (North and South sections) is the lively restaurant setting for all-day dining, whether for a light meal, a signature Japanese or Indian curry buffet, leisurely afternoon tea with unlimited replenishment of your tiered contents and free-flowing coffee and tea; or an elegant cocktail.</p> <p>We stuck with the afternoon tea and despite the generous offer to replenish…we only ordered extra scones, they were that good!</p> <p>Tastefully furnished with plush sofas and a friendly ambience – the tea event was being enjoyed by many other High Tea aficionados.</p> <p>Our tea arrived as the lovely silver art deco three-tiered stand arrived laden with all that is good under heaven. The scones are a little exclusive and like to be served away from the rest of the sweet treats – they arrive on their own plate, jam and cream to the side.</p> <p>Small sandwiches, finger-style were filled with egg, smoked salmon and smoked duck. Brie cheese with plum jelly on a hazelnut cracker was devoured without a second thought. Little samosas, miniature pies covered the savoury offerings and the various layers of all types of cakes and patisserie beckoned. Chocolate éclair, lemon tart and English fruit cake were savoured slowly.</p> <p>A special, traditional Singapore cake is the Kueh Lapis. The cake has, it is reported, to have its origins in the Nonya cuisine or the Indonesia cookbook, who knows? The delicate cake is a layered cake, sometimes called the thousand-layer cake – or ladder cake. No matter where it comes from, it was delicious, light and geometrically perfectly layered.</p> <p><em>Written by Bev Malzard. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/best-hotel-high-tea-in-asia/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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5 genius packing tips from flight attendants

<p>Taking the time to plan what to pack before you fly can save you time, money and hassle. “How many times do you pack a lot of stuff, but never wear half of it?” asks flight attendant Michele Radon. “Lay it out before you pack it. You may find that you’ll be able to wear a pair of pants with two different tops.”<br /> <br />It’s also OK to wear the same thing twice, adds flight attendant Abagail Valencia. When it comes to handbags and dress shoes, choose just one and wear your bulkiest items such as coats, suit jackets and boots, when you travel. Mix and match your go-to travel outfits. A favourite top, blazer and tailored pants can be mixed and matched for both casual and unexpected dressier occasions. The following useful tips will help make your next trip a breeze.</p> <p><strong>1. Pack “double duty” clothes</strong></p> <p>If you want to travel light, simplify your travel wardrobe to include items that can serve more than one purpose. A comfortable jumper or pashmina wrap, for example, is essential, says Radon. Airlines don’t always give out blankets, so you can use it as a blanket or a ‘pillow’ when on the plane and then wear it.<br /> <br />Pack one pair of jeans and one pair of black pants that can be dressed up or down, suggests Valencia. A couple of T-shirts is all you need for casual wear, and one dressy shirt will suffice when going out at night, she says. If you need dressier attire, add a black dress, scarf and heels, while a smart blazer should work for men.</p> <p><strong>2. Streamline your toiletries bag</strong></p> <p>When travelling light, streamline your getting-ready routine, explains flight attendant Jane Frilicci. If you’re not dedicated to a certain brand, just use the shampoo, conditioner, body wash and body lotion the hotel supplies and use the hotel’s hairdryer. Be careful of taking bulky glass aftershave and perfume which can break or is not allowed in hand luggage on international trips. Consider using up sample size atomisers or refillable sprays, roll or cream perfume instead.<br /> <br />Take the opportunity to use up those sample size products you’ve been storing or fill your favourite product in travel size storage. If you’re going to a remote place or a resort area, prices may be high and you may not be able to buy whatever you need, so taking enough to last the trip makes sense. Frilicci recommends getting a clear travel bag so you can see all of your toiletries when going through security and on your trip.</p> <p><strong>3. Compress and protect</strong></p> <p>Bulky items such as puffy coats for colder destinations that take up a lot of room in your suitcase can be managed by using compression cubes. If you have to travel with bulky items, compression space bags can easily compress your clothes, says Valencia. They save room in your suitcase and protect your items from dirt, moisture, odours and allergens.</p> <p><strong>4. Keep kids occupied and other passengers happy</strong></p> <p>Parents need to be prepared when travelling with kids, says Frilicci. “People get bent out of shape when there is a screaming kid, especially when they’re trying to sleep.”<br /> <br />To keep kids and passengers happy, Frilicci suggests packing a new toy, not an old one. Some parents make gift bags for the passengers seated next to them – including packaged sweets, earplugs and a note that says something like “Hi, I’m Jake, I’m three months old, and I’m not the best traveller so you might hear my loud voice.”</p> <p><strong>5. Keep useful items in your carry-on bag</strong></p> <p>“Keep a separate carry-on bag with all of your essentials that you need to access during the flight – things such as a toothbrush, make-up, passport and a pen,” Frilicci says.</p> <p><em>Written by Kim Fredericks. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/flights/8-genius-packing-tips-flight-attendants"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Visit the Game of Thrones shoot locations and relive your favourite episodes

<p>After almost a decade of captivating audiences, Game of Thrones has finally come to an end for TV viewers. But if you still want your GoT fix, visiting one of the show’s filming locations may be the next best thing.</p> <p>Bursting onto the small screen in 2011, Game of Thrones was quick to garner critical acclaim and be catapulted into cult-like TV status. As well as launching its actors into the public eye, Game of Thrones also helped propel its filming locations into the travel hotspot stratosphere. With shot locations as diverse as Croatia, Iceland, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Northern Ireland and Scotland, travellers have the opportunity to enter the world of fire and ice as envisioned by George R.R. Martin. With the show’s final season now ended, you can begin your own pilgrimage to one (or all) of these majestic destinations and set out on your own quest for the Iron Throne.</p> <p><strong>Croatia</strong></p> <p>King’s Landing’s real-world location can be found within the mediaeval walls of <a href="https://www.webjet.com.au/cheap-flights/dubrovnik/">Dubrovnik</a>, a coastal city in the south of <a href="https://www.webjet.com.au/flights/croatia/">Croatia</a>. The city’s 16th-century Old Town is used for all King’s Landing exterior shots and is encircled by a three-kilometre ring of defensive limestone walls. Croatia has been used as the King’s Landing filming location since the second season and provides the setting for some of the show’s biggest plot points.<br /> <br />Lovrijenac Fortress is the backdrop for The Red Keep, the palace of King’s Landing occupied by the Lannisters. This limestone fortress is located just outside the western wall of Dubrovnik and stands 37 metres above sea level. The fort overshadows the two entrances to the city, by sea and by land, and sets the scene for the spectacular Battle of Blackwater Bay. The inner streets of Old Town have also played a part in bringing some major scenes from the books to life.<br /> Jesuit Staircase</p> <p>Head to the famous Jesuit Staircase to see where Cersei took her ‘walk of shame’ along St Dominic Street. This same street is also used in many of the series’ market scenes and was the spot where the gold cloaks killed one of Robert Baratheon’s biological children.<br /> Pile Bay, Bokar Fortress and Trsteno Arboretum</p> <p>Be sure to visit Pile Bay on your trip to Dubrovnik. Pile Bay most notably hosts the disturbing scene of the slaying of Robert Baratheon’s bastards from season two. Moving outwards from Pile sits the Bokar Fortress. The Bokar Fortress is one of the most recognisable structures in both Dubrovnik and Game of Thrones, in which this beautiful mediaeval construction features heavily in seasons two and three. The fortress hosts the scene where Varys discusses Tyrion’s work as the Hand of the King, as well as the deliberation of key battle strategies in the defeat of Stanis Baratheon’s army.<br /> <br />Moving out of the city of Dubrovnik, be sure to visit Trsteno Arboretum. This luscious garden which is positioned only 20 minutes’ drive outside of the city was built in the late 15th century, offering visitors panoramic views of the Adriatic Sea. The majority of the palace garden scenes that take place in the show are filmed in Trsteno Arboretum.</p> <p><strong>Diocletian’s Palace and Fortress of Klis</strong></p> <p>Another filming location worth noting is Diocletian’s Palace in the Croatian seaside city of <a href="https://www.webjet.com.au/flights/split/">Split</a>. The palace was constructed in the 4th century by the Roman Emperor Diocletian. This UNESCO World Heritage Site received modern fame for being the setting for where Daenerys trained her dragons and where the ‘kill the masters’ scene in season four took place. While in the region be sure to visit the grand mediaeval Fortress of Klis which is only a 30-minute drive north of Split. This dominant structure features heavily in season four and is the location in which Daenerys overthrows the Meereen, the greatest of the three great city-states of Slaver's Bay. The Fortress of Klis was built in the 3rd century into and on top of an isolated body of rock. The fortress is completely inaccessible from three sides and offers visitors panoramic views of Split and the Adriatic Sea.</p> <p><strong>Iceland</strong></p> <p>A trip to Iceland on a Game of Thrones filming expedition wouldn’t be complete without visiting Iceland’s most famous waterfall, Skogafoss. This breathtaking cascade of water is a national icon, a representation of just how picturesque and powerful the Icelandic landscape can be. As dramatic as the series, Skogafoss spews an enormous amount of water into the depths below. The waterfall features in the first episode of season eight where Daenerys and Jon Snow ride the dragons and perch next to a series of ice-covered waterfalls.<br /> <br />What other location in the world could play the part of The Wall as perfectly as <a href="https://www.webjet.com.au/flights/iceland/">Iceland</a>? Large glaciers in Snæfellsjökull, Svinafellsjökull and the hills of Höfðabrekkuheiði have been used to depict the Fist of the First Men and the Frostfang Mountains. Visit Dimmuborgir, a lava field with interestingly shaped rocks and great significance in Icelandic folklore and find yourself in the spot where Jon Snow and the Wildlings set up camp. Thingvellir National Park was also used for many of the exterior scenes beyond The Wall, and, during the warmer months, for Arya and The Hound’s travels in season four.<br /> <br />On your trip north of The Wall be sure to visit Hengilssvæðið to truly experience the rugged and confronting terrain that Iceland provided in the making of the series. Located a 30-minute drive from the capital (Reykjavik), the Hengill area was the filming location for the face-off between Brienne of Tarr and the Hound in season four, episode 10.<br /> <br />Moving further east of Reykjavik, the Þjórsárdalur Valley is a must see on every Game of Thrones diehard wishlist. It is here where the ransacking and destruction of Olly’s village in season four-episode three takes place. Olly is left as the lone survivor, leaving everyone and everything in his village dead and destroyed behind.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/visit-game-thrones-shoot-locations-and-relive-your-favourite-episodes"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The best places to hike in Switzerland

<p>Switzerland is known for snow-capped mountains, glassy lakes, waterfalls, verdant valleys and moors. In between, it all is a dense network of hiking trails – ripe for exploration.</p> <p>More than 1500 Swiss volunteers have ensured that each of the trails is clearly marked with signposts and way-markers and the tracks are pedantically maintained.</p> <p>According to the Swiss Tourism board, about 50 per cent of Australian visitors to Switzerland will embark on at least one hike during their stay. Most people choose to DIY – because it’s so easy.</p> <p><strong>So where should you start?</strong></p> <p>The Via Alpina is the classic among the long-distance hikes in Switzerland. This trail crosses 14 of the most beautiful alpine passes. It meanders through the northern Alps of Switzerland (Vaduz – Montreux, via six cantons). On this trail, you will experience the picture-postcard scenery and fine Swiss hospitality.</p> <p>The Alpine Passes Trail is challenging and wild. It connects Chur with Lake Geneva via some of the most stunning passes in the Graubünden and Valais Alps. This trail is ideal for long-distance hikers. Expect views of 4000m peaks and classic mountain huts.</p> <p>The Jura Crest Trail is the oldest long-distance trail in Switzerland. Relatively unknown to non-Swiss hikers, this gentle, easy graded-trail is a local favourite. The Jura Crest hike connects Zurich and Geneva via the Jura mountains. You’ll walk through an untouched remote landscape with glorious views.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/switzerland-hikes/">MyDiscoveries</a>.</em></p>

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Ernie Dingo is back! "Viewers are in for a real treat"

<p>Looking for a wholesome TV show to spend your night with? You will be in for a treat next month.</p> <p>Ernie Dingo’s travel show<span> </span><em>Going Places with Ernie Dingo</em><span> </span>is coming back for a new season, and viewers can expect to follow the Indigenous Australian actor on his journey to some of the country’s most iconic destinations on a new channel.</p> <p>The series, which has been on air since 2016 on NITV, is set to move to SBS for its third instalment with 16 half-hour episodes.</p> <p>“<em>Going Places with Ernie Dingo</em> has been a firm favourite with NITV audiences for the last two seasons and I am thrilled that it will be reaching even more Australians on SBS,” said Tanya Orman, channel manager at NITV.</p> <p>In this season, the 62-year-old explores various destinations across Australia, including Charlotte Pass (NSW), Horizontal Falls (WA), Yirrkala (NT), Hervey Bay (QLD), Grampians (VIC), Bruny Island (TAS), Ceduna (SA), Mount Kosciuszko (NSW), Broome (WA), Jindabyne (NSW), Stradbroke Island (QLD), Lake Mungo (NSW), Gold Coast Hinterland (QLD), Strahan (TAS) and Port Lincoln (SA).</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6VSrLgouB/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6VSrLgouB/" target="_blank">A post shared by SBS Australia (@sbs_australia)</a> on May 1, 2019 at 12:25am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Ernie has a long history of travel presenting on Australian television and our viewers have loved seeing him in his element, travelling the country and getting to know everyday Aussies along the way,” Orman told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/tv/going-places-with-ernie-dingo-sbs-55795" target="_blank"><em>TV Week</em></a>.</p> <p>“His open and relaxed interview technique brings out some amazing stories and viewers are in for a real treat as he visits some of the most beautiful places in our country.”</p> <p>Starting June 12, viewers can catch the show every Wednesday at 7.30 pm on SBS.</p>

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New Zealand aviation experiences you need to try

<p>New Zealand’s diverse landscapes offer an ever-unfolding natural backdrop for flight-seeing and aerial adventures so it’s no wonder that aviation tourism is a popular activity all over the country.</p> <p>New Zealand by air makes for spectacular sightseeing. Vast coastal expanses, high mountain peaks, deep fresh-water lakes, braided rivers, dramatic fiords and colourful volcanic landforms are some of the scenic highlights of the land – celebrated as the home of Middle-earth – that are best revealed from above.</p> <p>Most regions have multiple aviation adventures and activities – from flight-seeing and helicopter landings on an active volcano or a grand tour of the highest peaks in the Southern Alps, to champagne picnics in wilderness locations, West Coast glaciers heli-hikes or heli-ski excursions into remote snowy expanses.</p> <p>Many luxury lodges, wilderness retreats and city hotels have helipads offering easy access, transfers to and from, and the-skies-the-limit activity options – including weddings in majestic natural locations.</p> <p><strong>North Island aviation activities</strong></p> <p>White Island – an active marine volcano off the North Island’s Bay of Plenty coast – is a spectacular and unique landmark. Scenic flights over the island operate from Tauranga, Rotorua and Whakatane, along with helicopter tours that land on the island for a hiking option.</p> <p>New Zealand’s famed central North Island volcanic plateau also sets the scene for flights over Lake Taupo, a cluster of volcanic peaks – Tarawera, Ruapehu, Tongariro and Ngauruhoe – and the treasured dual world heritage Tongariro National Park.</p> <p><strong>South Island aviation activities</strong></p> <p>The South Island, with its sweeping Southern Alps mountain chain, and the continuous parade of lakes and glaciers is an aerial feast.</p> <p>Early morning balloon flights take in the vast expanse of the Canterbury Plains, Pacific seaboard and the snowy mountain peaks while The Grand Traverse is a dramatic scenic flight exploring the highest peaks on both sides of the island and over Mt Cook and Westland national parks.</p> <p>Aviation pioneer Mount Cook Ski Planes has been landing fixed-wing planes on a glacier for more than 50 years – and it’s still the only opportunity in the world for tourists to make this kind of glacier landing.</p> <p>In Westland National Park, helicopters take tourists on a spectacular ascent onto the twin West Coast glaciers – Franz Josef and Fox – with an ice landing and hike across the frozen landscape.</p> <p>The ski fields of the Southern Alps are the launching pad for heli-ski excursions away from the crowds on resort slopes. Methven Heliski operates from a Canterbury high country sheep station, taking powder hounds into the mighty glaciated Arrowsmiths mountain range to make first tracks across the fresh powder.</p> <p>Queenstown’s Over the Top luxury helicopter excursions reveal stunning hidden gems that set the scene for gourmet picnics, extreme golfing, exclusive wine and fly fishing experiences.</p> <p><strong>Home of Middle-earth</strong></p> <p>Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film fans from around the world know New Zealand as the home of Middle-earth, and flying is the best way to see some of the top Lord of the Rings tourism destinations – guided by locals who helped find the locations and transport the stars during filming.</p> <p>In the Nelson Tasman region, Reid Helicopters operates flights to stunning Lord of the Rings locations in the beautiful Abel Tasman and Nelson Lakes national parks.</p> <p>From Queenstown, Glacier Southern Lakes, Trilogy Trail and Heli Works share insider stories on a string of Middle-earth locations throughout the Southern Lakes region.</p> <p><strong>In the pilot seat</strong></p> <p>New Zealand is an attractive destination for experienced pilots who want to take the controls while experiencing scenic highlights.</p> <p>Flight charter companies and aero clubs throughout New Zealand rent planes for self-fly excursions or offer flying lessons.</p> <p>Omarama, surrounded by the Southern Alps, is a renowned destination for gliding enthusiasts from around the world.</p> <p>At Wanaka, U-Fly Wanaka offers budding aviators the opportunity to pilot a dual-control Light Sports aircraft while enjoying the stunning alpine and vineyard landscape below.</p> <p><strong>Aviation heritage</strong></p> <p>New Zealand’s national symbol might be the flightless kiwi bird but that has never held back the human Kiwi population whose love-affair with the skies and all things aerial – from planes, helicopters, gliders and hot air balloons, to airborne adventure sports like skydive and paragliding – goes back to the earliest days of flight.</p> <p>New Zealanders embraced the aviation revolution as inventors, pilots and passengers. Some rose to fame – including solo pilot Jean Batten for her record-breaking journeys, early inventor-aviator Richard Pearse, and tourism pioneer Sir Henry (Harry) Wigley whose Kiwi ingenuity developed the world’s first retractable skis for planes.</p> <p>At New Zealand’s oldest aerodrome – Mandeville airfield near Croydon, in Southland – the Croydon Aircraft Museum has a collection of planes from the 1930s era including de Havilland aircraft. Visitors can take a nostalgic flight in a Tiger Moth or, for the daring, experience the adrenalin rush of an acrobatic joy ride. They can also watch activities in the workshop which is recognised as a world leader in aviation restoration and, once a year in February, the Mandeville Fly-In Weekend attracts incredible vintage aircraft from the 1920s and 1930s.</p> <p><strong>Aviation museums &amp; collections</strong></p> <p>New Zealand’s aviation heritage and heroes are celebrated in a series of museums and collections throughout New Zealand. Notable world-class aviation collections are open to visitors in Auckland, Tauranga and Masterton (in the North Island), Marlborough and Wanaka (in the South Island). Many smaller collections are also open to the public:</p> <p><strong>Auckland:</strong> MOTAT Aviation Display Hall – one of the southern hemisphere’s most impressive aircraft collections.</p> <p><strong>Tauranga:</strong> Classic Flyers Aviation Museum – includes classic aircraft that regularly take to the skies and aviation memorabilia.</p> <p><strong>Masterton:</strong> The Vintage Aviator Fighter Collection – rare rotating collection of airworthy WWI and WWII fighter aircraft on display at Hood Aerodrome.</p> <p><strong>Marlborough:</strong> Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre – not just another museum, this is an inspiring multi-sensory experience featuring film-maker Sir Peter Jackson’s incredible collection of WWI and WWII aircraft displayed in out-of-this world movie sets.</p> <p><strong>Christchurch:</strong> Air Force Museum – features several generations of classic aircraft, and entry is free.</p> <p>Wanaka: Wanaka Airport – home of the biennial Warbirds over Wanaka airshow – draws together several aviation experiences. Warbirds &amp; Wheels Museum is a collection of rare fighter aircraft and vintage vehicles that tells the stories of the New Zealand flying aces of WWI and WW2 and documents the life of local flying legend Sir Tim Wallis. The National Transport and Toy Museum is one of the world’s largest private collections and includes rare and unusual aircraft and vehicles. Classic Flights will take nostalgic punters up and away in a vintage Tiger Moth.</p> <p><strong>Aviation events</strong></p> <p>New Zealand hosts several high profile aviation airshows and events:</p> <p>Wings over Wairarapa – three-day biennial event (February)</p> <p>Mandeville Vintage Aircraft Fly-in – two-day event (March)</p> <p>Classic Fighters at Omaka – three-day biennial event (April)</p> <p>Balloons over Waikato – five-day event (March)</p> <p>Wairarapa Balloon Festival – held annually (April)</p> <p>Warbirds over Wanaka – three-day biennial event (April)</p> <p><strong>More information</strong></p> <p>Aero Clubs: <a href="http://www.flyingnz.co.nz">www.flyingnz.co.nz</a></p> <p>Air licensing requirements: <a href="http://www.caa.govt.nz">www.caa.govt.nz</a></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/new-zealand-aviation-tours-experiences/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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The item set to walk off the shelves during ALDI's biggest sale of the year

<p>Those who shop at ALDI love the annual snow gear Special Buys sale. The event, launched in 2008, is ALDI’s most popular Special Buys event.</p> <p>From jackets, goggles, boots and thermal wear, ALDI’s Special Buys snow sale provides shoppers with everything they need to stay warm in the snow at a low price point.</p> <p>Insiders revealed to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-ideas/ski/item-aldi-insiders-say-will-walk-off-the-shelves-during-snow-sale/news-story/ec080817b090c4c8042a9f4b57cec4b2" target="_blank">news.com.au</a> what items will be in high demand when the sale launches on Saturday, May 18, which just so happens to be the same day as the federal election.</p> <p>Some of the items that are in high demand include:</p> <p><strong>Adults Merino Thermal Underwear</strong></p> <p>As they’re all under $40 and are also breathable, these are set to be a big seller.</p> <p><strong>Adults and Children’s Ski Jackets and Pants</strong></p> <p>The jackets are waterproof, but each item holds a different rating. The higher the number is, the more waterproof the jackets and pants are.  All items are under $60.</p> <p>The jackets and pants also have DuPont’s Sorona wadding, which is a renewably sourced fibre that keeps the outer garments insulated, moisture resistant and heat retentive no matter the alpine conditions.</p> <p>The jackets also contain a ski lift pass pocket and zips in the pockets for wet conditions.</p> <p><strong>Children’s Thermo Boots</strong></p> <p>The boots contain a polar fleece lining and are all under $20. The boots also contain a three-layered EVA in-sock in aluminium and thinsulate layers, as well as being waterproof to keep feet warm and dry. The boots also look like sneakers, which will be popular with the kids.</p> <p><strong>Adults and Children’s Goggles</strong></p> <p>This is possibly the most crucial item you need whilst hitting the slopes, and it’ll only cost you under $15. The goggles have an adjustable head strap, two different lenses to choose from, as well as offering UV protection. They come in two colours, which are black and grey, and are anti-fog coated so you can still see whilst the weather isn’t the nicest.</p> <p>As the journey of heading to the snow can be an expensive venture for the family, there’s a reason that this sale is so popular amongst Aussies.</p> <p>“A ski holiday isn’t the most affordable vacation option, so we’re proud to do what we can to make this experience more affordable for Australian families,’’ ALDI textiles buying director Renata Hay told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/aldi-faces-competition-in-ski-gear/news-story/e0a00a48884a43915631bbaa45f87d26" target="_blank"><em>The Weekend Australian</em>.</a></p> <p>“We’ll be shipping more than 10 per cent greater volume of ski products in to our stores this year than last. The demand and ­double-digit growth have continued to surpass population growth and our store growth.”</p> <p>The ski and snow sector is now dominated by ALDI’s annual sale and has created such a cult following that ALDI has now introduced a competition that gives shoppers the chance to win a Perisher weekend package.</p> <p>One of 10 Perisher weekend packages are on offer, which include accommodation, ski lift passes, lessons and ski or snowboard hire. The competition gives shoppers the chance to win more than $30,000 in prizes.</p> <p>As always, items are available Australia-wide until stock sells out.</p>

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