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Mack Horton’s controversial refusal to share podium with "drug cheat" causes furore

<p>Mack Horton has received a flurry of criticism online through his social media platforms from furious Chinese swimming fans.</p> <p>The Australian swimmer sparked a heated debate after refusing to stand on the podium next to his Chinese rival "drug cheat" Sun Yang at the swimming championships on Sunday night.</p> <p>The bold move of refusing to stand next to Yang by Horton made international headlines.</p> <p>Sun underwent a three-month doping suspension in 2014 and is now being investigated again finishing first in the 400m freestyle – beating Horton by 0.73 of a second.</p> <p>The Australian Olympian made his anger apparent by snubbing the medal podium where he would stand next to Yang – a clear protest to show he was unhappy with the Chinese swimmer being allowed to compete in the eight-day championship.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828825/new-project.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9c9a3591c0ac4d3b90f22c561d1ca172" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Silver medalist Mack Horton of Australia, gold medalist Sun Yang of China and bronze medalist Gabriele Detti of Italy.</em></p> <p>The incredible move and bitter rivalry between the two has sparked an intense international debate after Yang accused Horton of disrespecting China.</p> <p>“I was aware that the Australian athlete had dissatisfaction and personal feelings towards me,” Yang said via an interpreter.</p> <p>“But it was unfortunate because disrespecting me is okay but disrespecting China was very unfortunate and I felt sorry about that.</p> <p>“I’m aware of the rumours (about his alleged hammer attack). (But) I think this has been the greatest achievement in history for the Chinese (swimming) team.”</p> <p>10-time world champion Yang is accused of smashing vials of his blood during a clash with drug testers last year, however, he was allowed to compete in the eight-day swimming event while he awaits a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing in September.</p> <p>Horton has not been shy of his feelings on Yang, suggesting <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/aussie-team-stands-by-mack-horton-in-china-swimming-feud" target="_blank">he was a “drug cheat” at the 2016 Rio Olympics.</a></p> <p>The Olympian admitted on Sunday he was unhappy with the results of the race.</p> <p>“Frustration is probably it,” Horton said after the race.</p> <p>“I think you know in what respect.”</p> <p>Andrew Horton, father of the swimmer, told 3AW Radio their family have a “huge respect” for China.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of commentary about China. We have huge respect for China. This is about ensuring that there are systems and processes in the sport that keep the sport clean,” he said.</p>

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Who wants your parents' stuff?

<p>Helping your parents clean out the family home or, even worse, taking on the task after they’ve died can be heartbreaking – layers of history to be sorted through; decisions to be made about what should be saved and what to do with the rest.</p> <p>While no one wants to look on the exercise as a money-making venture, taking the time to sell items that have some value not only helps cover the costs involved with moving, but also has the benefit of being more environmentally friendly than sending everything to the tip.</p> <p>The first step is to work out how much time you have. If you and your siblings already have full plates, you can call in an expert team to do the clearance, once you’ve removed items – keepsakes, photographs, documents – you want to keep.</p> <p>Rebecca Mezzino operates Adelaide-based company <a href="http://clearspace.net.au/">Clear Space</a>, which offers downsizing and estate clearances. She works with local dealers and auction houses to sell whatever has value, donates usable goods to charities and disposes of any rubbish. She also has some tips for doing the job yourself.</p> <p>“Most of the services you need are quite separate,” says Rebecca. “So, you can get a second-hand dealer to come and take what they want, you can get a skip to put rubbish in, and you can take things to the Salvo’s, but it’s quite difficult to get it all done in one go.”</p> <p>Of course, the average person won’t know whether a piece of furniture will be worth anything to someone else. Auction houses, advises Rebecca, will look at photos of your goods and tell you whether it’s worth selling them. Second-hand dealers, too, will visit and take away what they think they can sell.</p> <p>“Anything that’s mid-century vintage is in demand,” says Rebecca. “Things like Dad’s old tools that are 50 or 60 years old will sell at auction, too. People will say to me, ‘It’s rusty and it’s old,’ but it should be sent to auction. There are often surprises.”</p> <p>Of course, with all sorts of information at your fingertips, you can use Google to get an idea of what people are paying for certain items. For instance, stamps on the bottom of vintage dinner sets or a silver tea set can help you date them, which is helpful when you’re talking to auction houses. Bids on sites like eBay (“not what sellers are listing them as a Buy Now price,” warns Rebecca) are also a good indication.</p> <p>For anything that isn’t considered a collectable – furniture and working white goods, for example – you can use a website such as Gumtree, where you’ll often get a better price than if you sell it at auction.</p> <p>“At auction houses you’ll get a bargain basement price,” says Rebecca, “but you do need to put effort into Gumtree. We always tell people not to throw anything away because you’d be surprised at what can be sold or what people will collect for free. Free stuff on Gumtree goes really quickly.”</p> <p>If your family has specific types of collections, it’s often worth contacting a specialised dealer. Nicole Jenkins from <a href="http://circavintageclothing.com.au/">Circa Vintage Fashion</a> in Melbourne often assesses collections during house clearances.</p> <p>“Many vintage fashion items are valuable not for their age, but for their quality, uniqueness and how favoured they are by the current market,” she explains. “There are a lot of points to consider, so if you think you’re handling a collection that might have exceptional value, it’s best to call in the experts for advice. It should be remembered that age does not necessarily equate to value, especially if it's in poor condition.”</p> <p>Nicole says couture labels, such as Chanel, Dior and Balenciaga, and garments from the 1960s and 70s – Australian labels such as Tullo, Prue Acton and House of Merivale, as well as Biba, Thea Porter, Pucci and Halston – are particularly sought after at the moment: “As a general rule, if it was expensive when originally purchased and it’s been maintained in excellent condition, then it should retain an element of that value – subject to the vagaries of fashion.”</p> <p>Similar experts can be sought out if you find a number of what could be rare vinyl records, antiquarian books or other well-maintained collections.</p> <p>As for sentiment, Rebecca says you should keep what means something to you and can’t be replaced. “I always say to clients, ‘What emotional need is this meeting?’ then ask how much is enough so they have all their emotional needs met.</p> <p>“Another good idea is to take photos of rooms and everything that leaves the house, then to put together a photo album of memories of the house. A lot of people can have their emotional needs met with just that.”</p> <p><em>Written by Carrie Hutchinson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/who-wants-your-parents-stuff.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Australian tennis legend passes away aged 64

<p>Former Australian Davis Cup tennis star Peter McNamara has died aged 64.</p> <p>“Macca,” who reached a career-high number seven in the world in 1983, left a memorable mark when he beat two all-time greats Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl to win two of his five singles titles.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.39400921658984px;" src="/media/7828812/eacpdumueaiyi11-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8fca7dad11f949949a1e0a3f6767101c" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Peter McNamara, 2014. </em></p> <p>However, what the tennis star was perhaps most highly regarded for was his doubles partnership with Paul McNamee – the duo went on to win Wimbledon twice in 1980 and 1982 as well as the Australian Open in 1979.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hard to believe that after 50 years of friendship Macca is gone... you lived life to the full mate and will be missed by your loved ones and many more...a toast to the great times mate <a href="https://t.co/0RVbCD6ZRd">pic.twitter.com/0RVbCD6ZRd</a></p> — Paul McNamee (@PaulFMcNamee) <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee/status/1153066090760511490?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Melbourne-born McNamara retired in 1987 and enjoyed a successful coaching career.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So saddened to wake up to the news of Peter McNamara’s passing overnight. A great player, great coach that improved every player he worked with, and gun of a person. Big hugs to his family, friends and of course, his great mate <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PaulFMcNamee</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> 😔 <a href="https://t.co/CeFBai2jYI">pic.twitter.com/CeFBai2jYI</a></p> — Darren Cahill (@darren_cahill) <a href="https://twitter.com/darren_cahill/status/1153063153724354560?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>He coached Mark Philippoussis and guided Grigor Dimitrov in his formative years. More recently, he coached Matt Ebden and Wang Qiang.</p> <p>Until February, McNamara worked with Qiang and helped her to reach the world’s top 20 in their four-year partnership.</p> <p>The Aussie legend died peacefully at his home in Germany on Saturday night after a long and brave battle with prostate cancer.</p> <p>David Law, commentator and long-time friend of the tennis star and coach said McNamara went on to compete in exhibition matches and coach throughout his illness without many people ever knowing about his personal health issues.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So sad to wake up &amp; hear the news of Peter McNamara’s passing 😢 he was always one of the coaches I could sit down with on tour &amp; be able to have a great chat with. Mostly about life &amp; our kids. I will never forgot him telling me to live my life &amp; be happy with who I am <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — Casey Dellacqua OLY (@caseydellacqua) <a href="https://twitter.com/caseydellacqua/status/1153042613152337920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>McNamara is survived by his wife Petra, his children and grandchildren.</p> <p>The tennis world took to social media to voice their love and admiration of the late tennis legend.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">When you represent Australia.. you get the chance of meeting so many good people. One of them was Australian tennis legend Peter McNamara. Ripper bloke and will sadly be missed. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/tennis?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#tennis</a> 😪</p> — Dean Jones (@ProfDeano) <a href="https://twitter.com/ProfDeano/status/1153074719203233795?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Peter McNamara was one of the greats, a great person. He gave his all to everything he did, respected life &amp; always had a smile &amp; time for you. He’s someone you wanted to be in the trenches with. He fought in silence and now he can rest peacefully . <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — roger rasheed (@roger_rasheed) <a href="https://twitter.com/roger_rasheed/status/1153038830552772608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">One of the greats 🇦🇺 🙏<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://t.co/iYJvS3qDBq">pic.twitter.com/iYJvS3qDBq</a></p> — TennisAustralia (@TennisAustralia) <a href="https://twitter.com/TennisAustralia/status/1153078863129264128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote>

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Aussie cricket legend Ian Chappell reveals cancer battle

<p>Cricket commentator and former Australian captain Ian Chappell has revealed that he has been undergoing treatment for skin cancer.</p> <p>The 75-year-old has reportedly completed five weeks of intensive radiation therapy after having carcinomas removed from his shoulder, neck and underarm.</p> <p>Chappell told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/test-cricket-legend-ian-chappell-reveals-skin-cancer-battle/news-story/1092ad54c11a54cb0f333ce8fdf17249?utm_source=Daily%20Telegraph&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=editorial" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Telegraph</em></a> that the prognosis is positive. </p> <p>“I didn’t tell too many people early on. Mainly because I just wasn’t sure what the radiotherapy would involve and how weary I’d be,” said Chappell.</p> <p>“But as it turned out, it wasn’t so bad. A bit of tiredness at night and a bit of skin irritation, but other than that I’m feeling pretty good.”</p> <p>The Test cricket legend said he has gotten used to having skin cancers over the years. </p> <p>“When you hit 70 you feel (vulnerable) anyhow, but I guess I’ve got so used to bloody skin cancers over the years, and the fact that none of them have been melanomas, probably provides a bit of comfort. It may be naivety on my part,” Chappell told<span> </span><em>The Daily Telegraph</em>.</p> <p>“I’ve had multiple skin cancers cut off, burnt off and every other way you can get rid of them,” he added.</p> <p>Chappell said he decided to deal with the disease after watching his mother “come to grips with death”.</p> <p>“You get to 70 and you start to think, ‘Christ, it’s getting near the end now’,” he said.</p> <p>“But I saw my mother Jeanne near the end and she’d come to grips with death, and that’s probably when I thought, ‘Shit, this is something you need to deal with’.”</p> <p>He also shared out the deaths of close pals Richie Benaud and Tony Greig affected him. </p> <p>“When Richie and Tony (Nine commentary comrades Richie Benaud and Tony Greig) went … again, it was just a reminder that it happens to everybody," Chappell reflected. </p> <p>Chappell has continued to work in the commentary box for the Nine Network during his radiotherapy. He confirmed that he will take part in the network’s Ashes coverage next month. “With the Ashes coming up now, I’ll speak to Nine and just say, ‘Look, I’m ready to go if you need me.’”</p>

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Living fabulously after separation or divorce

<p>Living fabulously after separation/divorce requires us to take time to not only grieve the ending of the relationship but also the breakdown of many of the other important life structures. For example; we may need to re-establish parenting arrangements, restructure our financial responsibilities, work obligations, move house, develop new friendships and establish new boundaries in our personal and work relationships.<span> </span><br /><br />Most people don’t get married thinking that they will one day be attending to a separation/divorce. Even if you were the one who instigated the divorce, the split still represents a loss that carries long-term life changing implications in many areas of your life. The time needed to grieve and re-establish balance again will vary for each person and it is important not to move quickly through the grieving phase or we may miss the opportunity to build a strong foundation for establishing our new identity and a new life that has both meaning and purpose.<span> </span><br /><br />The first step to living fabulously after separation/divorce requires you to form a new identity as a single person. This can be a harrowing task as it first requires us to breakdown our old partnership attachment identity and then to define new values, beliefs and thinking patterns aligned to your new goals as a single person.<span> </span><br /><br />Living fabulously after separation/divorce is not about becoming a better person but about becoming brand new; reinventing yourself from the inside out. This requires you to begin to make conscious choices about remaking yourself in a different form. It means intentionally doing things differently. This stage of life presents a wonderful opportunity to create a new future for yourself and a life that will allow you to express who you really are. Important considerations to assist you with this include pondering the following; How did I get to this place? What do I now want my life to look and feel like as a newly single person? What steps are now required of me to begin moving in my new direction?</p> <p><strong>Steps to Living Fabulously include:</strong></p> <p>1. Allow time to grieve the past. Find ways to work through the lingering emotions from the demise of your partnership. This is essential if you are to successfully wrap up the past, make peace with it and move on to create a brand new you. There is now an empty space in your life and you want to ensure you fill it with people and activities that will be aligned to your new single status. You may want to engage a suitable therapist and/or coach to assist you.</p> <p>2. Learn to LOVE YOU! It’s now ME TIME. Regardless of your other responsibilities ensure you set aside time to begin to envision the life you would like to attract for yourself. Think about what your new future self looks and feels like. Where will you be living? What will you be wearing? What changes would you like to see occur in the future? This is a great time to engage in a fitness program, engage a stylist, change your look!</p> <p>3. Change your vibe by experimenting with a new attitude. How do you want the world to see you? Make time to go through your cupboards and decide what needs to go. Make your motto; “Ta, ta to the old, and hello to the new!” </p> <p>Be authentic, find your passion and your inner calling. You now have a blank canvas in front of you and the power to choose the colours and landscape of your new fabulous life.<span> </span><br />Remember happiness is contagious; live fabulously and become someone people want to catch! </p> <p><span>To find out more about Marina’s services and products and dating and relationship tips visit: </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.modernlovesolutions.com/" target="_blank">modernlovesolutions.com</a></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Marina Bakker. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/living-fabulously-after-separation-or-divorce.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></span></em></p>

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Kylie Kwong opens up to Anh Do about devastating baby loss: "We felt blessed he lived for six days"

<p>Kylie Kwong has opened up about her experience of coming out as gay to her parents and losing her son.</p> <p>The celebrity chef and her partner Nell lost their baby Lucky to a premature stillbirth in 2012.</p> <p>The 49-year-old told Anh Do on <em>Anh’s Brush With Fame </em>that she “cried for 10 hours straight” after Nell’s waters broke five months early and the doctors delivered the devastating news that their son would be stillborn.</p> <p>“In the end we felt blessed he lived for six days … inside Nell, alive, and then he let go. But the six days was profound,” said Kwong.</p> <p>Kwong bid her goodbye to Lucky with the help of a Zen Buddhist teacher, who performed a spiritual ritual over Nell’s pregnant belly.</p> <p>“It was so important because we got to be with him, we got to mother him, we got to say goodbye to him,” Kwong said.</p> <p>When Do asked what Kwong said, she replied, “I said, I really love feeding you.</p> <p>“I said I want you to know that your mother is the most amazing person in the world and that you are very, very loved.</p> <p>“I said to him that I want you to know that we have always loved you, and I promised him that Nell and I would always look after each other.”</p> <p>Kwong also shared how she came out as gay to her family at the age of 19. After telling her mother Pauline, Kwong waited another six months to break the news to her father Maurice. But he suspected that Kwong was seeing a woman and confronted her one evening.</p> <p>“He came into my room and said, ‘So darling, are you seeing that woman?’” Kwong recalled.</p> <p>“And I said, ‘Yes dad, I am. Dad, I’m gay.’</p> <p>“I said, ‘Dad, I respect you. During our childhood, you and Mum always brought us up to be truthful and honest, and you’ve always said to us, we three kids, that you just want us to be happy.’</p> <p>“I said, ‘Dad, this makes me really happy. This is just who I am. And I’m really sorry if I’ve disappointed you or let you down but I just need to be myself.’”</p> <p>He thanked her for her honesty but asked her to move out of the house in four days. </p> <p>“’From this moment, I disown you as my daughter’, he said that, he said that sentence,” Kwong recounted. </p> <p>“’And when you call home, you can speak to your mum and your brothers, but I’m not going to speak to you’.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FABCTV%2Fvideos%2F956729351385863%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>However, after two “very quiet” nights, she woke up to her father’s “sobbing face on my pillow”. He took back his words and asked her to stay, Kwong said.</p> <p>“His whole kind of energy and demeanour was of this vulnerable … a lot kind of smaller presence. A beautiful presence,” said Kwong.</p> <p>“And he’s like, ‘Oh my darling, I can’t do it to you. You’re my baby. You’re my little girl, and I love you and I just can’t … Even though I don’t understand your way of life, I can’t throw you out and I love you and I want you to stay.’</p> <p>“What he actually did in that moment was, he was 52, he dropped 52 years of ego, just like that.</p> <p>“He had done this transformation in those two silent nights. He dropped ego and he became human.”</p> <p>Since then, Kwong maintained a “wonderful relationship” with her father until his death from prostate cancer in 2006.</p> <p>Two months later, Kwong started a relationship with Nell. She proposed to the artist in 2015 and <a rel="noopener" href="https://qnews.com.au/we-are-so-happy-aussie-chef-kylie-kwong-marries-her-partner/" target="_blank">tied the knot in March this year</a>.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0CEGMlnzSy/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0CEGMlnzSy/" target="_blank">A post shared by ABC TV + iview (@abctv)</a> on Jul 17, 2019 at 2:03pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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Why are friends so important?

<p>In this thoughtful book extract from <a href="http://www.exislepublishing.com.au/Mary-and-Me.html">Mary &amp; Me: A Lasting Link Through Ink</a> Kathy Jindra says she survived the happiest and hardest years of her life with a little help from her friends.</p> <p>Sometimes I ask myself: how did we get by without the Internet?</p> <p>We relied a lot on our friends—that’s how.</p> <p>It was 1982. I had just moved into a new neighbourhood with my husband, Gary, two-and-a-half-year-old son, Justin, and six-month-old daughter, Sarah. It was exciting to upgrade from a two-bedroom apartment into this beautiful three-bedroom house with a yard. The only problem? I knew no one.</p> <p>One morning, the doorbell rang. There stood a smiling lady with two children. She told me about a babysitting co-op and asked if I would like to come to their next meeting. Little did either of us know that my door- bell ringing would be the beginning of many new friendships, and that thirty-two years later, the babysitting co-op would still be going strong.</p> <p>I attended that first gathering and was given my forty now-obsolete computer punch cards. That was the group’s form of money. Each card was worth half an hour of babysitting. We took turns hosting evening meetings for the mothers as a way to get acquainted, so we could feel comfortable leaving our children with each other. But they turned into so much more.</p> <p>My husband, Gary, knew he had to be home on time on the co-op evenings, because he was in charge of the kids. I looked forward to those meetings when we would sit, laughing and talking. Before we knew it, it would be midnight (and some nights, 1:00 a.m.). When it was my turn, I learned to host it in the family room instead of the living room, which was at the bottom of the stairs leading up to the bedrooms. It’s amazing how loud ten to fifteen women were once they all started laughing.</p> <p>Our husbands wondered what we could possibly talk about until midnight. Since it would be a month between meetings, there were all kinds of things to catch up on. We shared suggestions and ideas about potty training, how to get rid of the dummy, good preschools, ballet teachers, and teenage babysitters (although if you found a good one, it was really, really hard to give out her name for fear she would then always be busy). We set up playgroups and carpools. We talked about family trips. We discussed the kids riding the bus to school, the good and bad teachers they shared, when our kids would be old enough to walk or ride their bikes to high-school, taking our fifteen-year-olds out driving once they earned their driver’s permit, sports, curfews, dating, university choices, and much, much more.</p> <p>And, yes, there was even some talk about husbands, but we can’t ever let them know. It was such a good place to vent and discover there probably isn’t a perfect husband out there. Like us, they all have their little quirks, but we are blessed to have them.</p> <p>Each month, we paid two dollars in dues into a kitty to be used to send flowers when a new baby was born. I had my third child, Bethany, two years after joining, and received one of those bouquets at the hospital. There were many babies born, which gave us even more to talk about.</p> <p>Now we are all in our fifties and sixties. Fifteen years ago, we looked at each other, laughing, realising we hadn’t used each other to watch our kids in years. We can’t give up our monthly meetings, but it seems silly to keep calling ourselves “the babysitting co-op.” So we are now just “the co-op.” Friends have moved, but there are still ten women in our group. One dear friend passed away, but her memory will always be with us. We no longer spend our kitty to send flowers for new babies, but for our own surgeries and illnesses.</p> <p>It took our husbands years to finally realise there were no kids to watch when we had our gatherings. Now, on the evenings we meet, they go out to dinner together. At least twice a year, we combine our groups and let them take us out. Our conversations have turned to our parents’ health and nursing homes, our health and surgeries (cancer, knee replacements, heart attacks, and pacemakers, to name a few), vacations, retirement, our children’s weddings, and most fun of all: our grandchildren.</p> <p>Moving to this neighbourhood thirty-two years ago and having that doorbell ring was such a blessing. The friendships I have gained from the co-op fill me with happiness.</p> <p><em>Written by Kathy Jindra. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/why-are-friends-so-important.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a> </em></p>

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Roger Federer's touching Aussie ritual that will warm your heart: "I hope he would be proud"

<p>Since he began his professional tennis career in 1998, Roger Federer has competed in various tournaments across the world.</p> <p>But only at the Australian Open does he have a special ritual.</p> <p>Since 2005, an elderly couple has accompanied the world number three player and his team every year at the Melbourne event.</p> <p>The pair are Bob and Diana Carter, parents of Federer’s first international coach, Peter Carter.</p> <p>Federer was just nine years old when Carter took him under his wing. The Australian coach helped Federer develop his signature technique of a one-handed backhand.</p> <p>“I think if I can say thank you for my technique today, it’s to Peter,” Federer told <a rel="noopener" href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/07/tennis/federer-carter-emotion-tennis-spt-intl/index.html" target="_blank"><em>CNN Sport</em></a> in January.</p> <p>Carter died aged just 37 in 2002 in a car accident while honeymooning in South Africa.</p> <p>According to <em>The Australian</em>, the then-20-year-old Federer “ran through the streets bawling” upon hearing the news.</p> <p>David Law, a former communications manager at the Association of Tennis Professionals, said on his <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/tennis/the-tragic-accident-that-changed-the-trajectory-of-roger-federers-career/news-story/a08ac4e47b64c643c4a62569d3814482">podcast</a> that the incident prompted Federer to leave behind his temperamental attitude. </p> <p>“That made Federer grow up incredibly quickly because I don’t think he’d ever had to think about mortality before,” said Law.</p> <p>“This is someone he knew well, who he saw every day, who he travelled everywhere with.</p> <p>“It hit Federer incredibly hard and I think that – and this is a feature of Federer as a boy becoming a man – is that at every stage of his life, whatever has happened, he’s digested what has happened and he’s learnt from it.”</p> <p>Federer said of Carter, “I guess he didn’t want me to be a wasted talent, so I guess it was somewhat of a wake-up call for me when he passed away and I really started to train hard.”</p> <p>When asked what Carter would think of his 20 grand slams record, Federer said, “I still miss him so much. I hope he would be proud.”</p> <p>In tribute to the late coach, Federer has reached out to Carter's parents every year since 2005.</p> <p>Every December, Federer’s team would send an all-expenses paid itinerary to the Adelaide-based couple, including flights and accommodation details and Australian Open tournament tickets.</p> <p>The Carters can usually be spotted sitting behind Federer’s coach in Rod Laver arena.</p> <p>This year, Federer finished in the fourth round of the Australian Open after losing to Greece’s Stefanos Tsitsipas.</p>

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"Nothing can forgive that": Maggie Beer's disgust at aged care food standards

<p>Maggie Beer has slammed the quality of the food served in aged care homes, saying the $7 budget for each resident was inadequate.</p> <p>It is “impossible” to prepare quality meals for the residents with such a limited budget, the celebrity chef told the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety on Tuesday.</p> <p>“They would have to use processed food, frozen food, frozen vegetables, fish that is usually frozen and imported, not even Australian,” she said.</p> <p>Some aged care facilities spend as little as $6.50-$7 a day on food per resident to cut costs, the royal commission has been told.</p> <p>Chef Nicholas Hall said he had to “cut corners” at one home he worked at, which had a food budget of $7.20 per resident.</p> <p>“[The food] wasn’t great, that’s for sure,” said Hall. “You’re having to use frozen foods, you’re having to use processed foods just to feed the residents.</p> <p>“At the end of the meal if the resident was still hungry and they wanted more food, there was no more food to give them.”</p> <p>Hall said some aged care providers and third-party caterers are focused solely on saving costs. “They're just racing to the bottom to see who can feed for the lowest amount of cost.”</p> <p>Beer recalled seeing the food her aunt would eat when she was in aged care in Sydney 50 years ago. </p> <p>“My aunt didn’t want to eat anything, lost all the weight because the food was without a smell. It was institutionalised food in its most basic form,” she said.</p> <p>Beer said she feels terrible when she reads complaints about the food from residents and their relatives. </p> <p>“It just breaks your heart because it doesn’t have to be like that. It should never be like that,” she said.</p> <p>Beer said she is “shocked” at the evidence presented at the commission. “Nothing can forgive that and nothing can accept that.</p> <p>“We have a responsibility to give a good way of life for those in aged care and in the community.”</p> <p>Beer said while the minimum food budget should be increased to $10.50, “you can do really good food” with $14.</p> <p>“Every bite of sustenance should be of goodness, but flavour first: flavour, goodness and pleasure,” she said.</p> <p>“Without those things in equal measure they don’t have enough to look forward to to get up in the morning.”</p>

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"Greatest sporting finale in my lifetime": The gracious moment that left fans in awe at Cricket World Cup

<p>As England celebrated their victory in the Cricket World Cup after an intense, nail-biting final, the emotions on the other end of the spectrum could not have been more different.</p> <p>Martin Guptill is New Zealand’s fastest player, but his efforts weren’t enough to help him score a second run on the final ball of the match. The difference came down to a metre as the Black Caps saw their dream slip away from their hands when Guptill was caught short of his ground to give England its first ever World Cup title.</p> <p>As Lords erupted in cheers for the host country, the heartbreak on Guptill’s face is one that cricket fans around the world will never forget.</p> <p>The 32-year-old sunk to his haunches after an electrifying ending, the look of devastation evident on his face. Needing two runs off the final ball to take home the trophy, Guptill was shattered that he couldn’t get his side home.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">This picture. The Freddie Flintoff/Brett Lee moment 14 years on. Sums up everything we love about sport. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/cwc19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#cwc19</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/englandcricket?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@englandcricket</a> <a href="https://t.co/xoCTZfqE5h">pic.twitter.com/xoCTZfqE5h</a></p> — Eleanor Oldroyd (@EllyOldroyd) <a href="https://twitter.com/EllyOldroyd/status/1150688116879089664?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 15, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>But in one of the classiest moves of sportsmanship the game has seen, England seamer Chris Woakes approached the batsmen and his partner Jimmy Neesham to offer his condolences.</p> <p>Rooted to the spot, Guptill was inconsolable, and instead of celebrating his victory, Woakes chose to show an act of sportsmanship by offering his support to the opposition.</p> <p>The historical match is one that will be remembered, a rare game where neither side deserved to lose. But the image of Woakes standing by his crushed rivals will forever stand the test of time and act as a reminder that the spirit of cricket is more than a wicket or a trophy.</p> <p>The classy gesture was reminiscent of one from the past, between Brett Lee and England’s Andrew Flintoff in the 2005 Ashes series.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828649/brett.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3499a5ca552d41619fc237388472ed1a" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Andrew Flintoff and Brett Lee - 2005 Ashes series</em></p> <p>After England won a thrilling Test by two runs at Edgbaston, as they battled it out against Australia who delivered a stunning fight, Flintoff showed his true spirit by comforting a fallen Brett Lee, who similar to Guptill, was struggling with heartbreak.</p> <p>Fans took to Twitter to react to the exciting end to the tournament, commending both sides for their perseverance and hard work in hoping to obtain the World Cup with one claiming that it was “the most exciting game of cricket ever seen.”</p> <p>“I can state without a doubt that it was the greatest final of sport in my lifetime,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“We should have won it comfortably, but New Zealand played a superb match,” said a British fan.</p> <p>“This game really showed sportsmen at the top of their game,” said another.</p>

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Are you cheating yourself of sleep?

<p>We all know that sleep patterns can change with age. Quality and quantity of sleep can sometimes deteriorate and studies are now pointing toward this having adverse health impacts.</p> <p>Perhaps the importance of good sleeping patterns has been downplayed in our modern culture, but the potential health benefits make it worthwhile to identify ways you can improve this vital ‘biological downtime’.</p> <p><strong>Poor sleep linked to cognitive function<br /></strong>Studies have pointed toward a link between poor sleep and cognitive performance. A University of Oregon-led study examined around 30,000 adults over age 50 in six nations. Their findings were a real eye-opener (pardon the pun) with suggestions that both lack of sleep and too much sleep can both have adverse effects. Tests revealed that those with less than six hours, and more than nine hours sleep, revealed that cognitive functions such as memory, recall, and verbal fluency had reduced performance. </p> <p>Another study even pointed toward poor sleep creating brain imaging patterns akin to someone with Alzheimer's. While much more research needs to be done to give conclusive proof, the indications are that it is worth taking a closer look at your sleep in order to be at your best later in life. <u><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/7-ways-to-improve-your-brain-health.aspx">Read more tips on improving your brain health</a></u>. </p> <p><strong>What can you do about it?<br /></strong>Many over 50s report an increase in interruptions during sleep and this can mean a loss of the valuable periods of deep sleep, where the body and mind achieve the greatest restorative benefits. The objective, therefore, is to work on techniques to reduce broken sleep patterns.</p> <p><strong>Re-set your body clock (and nap less)<br /></strong>The occasional nap during the day may well boost your daytime stamina and may be something you increasingly look forward to, but if it is affecting the quality of night time sleeping then it is best to limit naps to no more than 30 minutes. It also helps to get your biological clock into a rhythm by having set times for when you go to bed and when you wake up, and maintaining a regular pattern.</p> <p><strong>Move more!<br /></strong>Exercise is important too for burning off energy and encouraging your body to get some solid rest. Aim for at least 30 minute sessions at least three days a week. It doesn’t need to be intense; even <u><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/walk-your-way-to-better-health.aspx">a brisk walk</a></u> will create the desired effect, but make sure you don’t do it too close to bedtime.</p> <p>An added benefit of doing something active outdoors is the fresh air and daylight that you are exposed to, which can improve sleep too. There are plenty of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/get-fit-no-gym-required.aspx">simple ways to make fitness fun</a>.</p> <p><strong>Think about what you are consuming (and when)<br /></strong>Drugs and stimulants need to be controlled, so watch the timing of any caffeine, chocolate and sugar intake, and check your medications to see if they are causing sleeplessness if taken too late in the day. Dietary patterns can aid sleep too. Reduce alcohol and other liquids close to bedtime and don’t go to sleep either too full or too hungry.</p> <p>Good deep sleep can be an integral part of better health management, so assess the above issues in your daily routine and gain greater benefits from a quality night's rest.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Duchess Meghan fans bite back at mum shamers: “She was doting on him”

<p>The Duchess of Sussex appears to be loving life as a new mum and on Wednesday, the royal <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/archie-s-first-official-outing-the-royal-babies-steal-the-spotlight-from-their-dads" target="_blank">had her first public outing with two-month-old Archie</a> along with his big cousins, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.</p> <p>The family watched on as Prince Harry and brother-in-law Prince William went head to head in a charity polo match, and photographs released of the fun day out showed the Duchess doting on her new bundle of joy.</p> <p>“She was doting on him, there’s no doubt about that,” an onlooker told <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-doting-archie-first-outing-polo-match/" target="_blank"><em>PEOPLE</em></a>. “She was kissing and stroking him and bouncing him up and down.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828528/new-project-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b884ffd34799433082c2ecc88832bd1c" /></p> <p>Critics, however, took to social media to share their distaste for the way the Duchess was holding her son in a way that made him look like he was about to fall out of her arms.</p> <p>“Meghan looks like she’s about to drop him” one comment read.</p> <p>“She is also not able to hold the baby.”</p> <p>Another cruel comment said: “You can tell she doesn’t even take care of her own kid. What kind of mother holds their baby like that.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828527/new-project-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/efa965cbca524521bd9ddcc4613fc90b" /></p> <p>However, royal supporters hit back at the cruel criticisms, writing: “She’s still new to it and we’ve all held our babies awkwardly.”</p> <p>Another said: “She’s a brand-new mother. Stop the damn mum-shaming! Jesus!”</p> <p>Maternity nurse and author Lisa Clegg told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank">Fabulous Digital</a> </em>she didn’t see any issue with the way the Duchess was holding baby Archie.</p> <p>“To me, her body language looks like she’s holding him in a very protective way, by supporting his bottom and the top of his back, so she’s ready to catch that inevitable head flip they sometimes do, until they learn better head and neck control.</p> <p>“Is it surprising that she’s holding him very close and in such a protective nature, when she has the world looking at her?”</p> <p>Along with baby Archie and the Duchess of Sussex was the Duchess of Cambridge who was also doting on her youngest son, 15-month-old Prince Louis.</p> <p>Wednesday’s royal outing was part of a charity scheme which saw Prince Harry and Prince William battle it out for a charity polo game in honour of Leicester City Football Club owner, who tragically died in a helicopter crash last year.</p>

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How a hobby can enhance your life and health

<p>Ever heard of healing with hobbies? Here's how the hidden power of hobbies can help relieve the symptoms of stress, grief and more.</p> <p>Coping with the stresses of life or coming to terms with grief and loss can be overwhelming and sometimes debilitating. While the cliché of ‘time healing all wounds’ does hold some truth, it is important to know there are pro-active strategies for overcoming challenging times and getting your life back on track.</p> <p><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/10-steps-to-improve-your-health.aspx">Healthy diet</a>, regular exercise, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">proper sleep</a> and stimulating social connections are all important, but another beneficial approach is to engage in a hobby. Our ancestors enjoyed the healing value of creative pursuits, because activities such as sewing, knitting and woodwork were more of a necessity than a pastime.</p> <p>Nowadays computers and televisions dominate our leisure time and their passive and sedentary nature can be a hindrance to our mental wellbeing. Taking up a craft or hobby can be a very practical and positive way to restore balance to our lives.</p> <p><strong>Can hobbies induce positive physiological changes?<br /></strong>Performing a task that engages the mind in a focused and creative way may naturally seem like it would induce a beneficial response, but is there any hard evidence for this assumption? One study quoted in the Journal of the American Medical Association analysed 30 women who sewed as a hobby.</p> <p>Their stress responses, such as blood pressure, heart rate, perspiration rate and skin temperature were measured before and after various leisure activities. The results, when they were sewing, produced measurable improvements in the stress indicators, compared with increased stress responses when they engaged in other pastimes, such as playing cards or video games.</p> <p>One theory is that hobbies and crafts – especially those which require repetitive and rhythmic activities - can actually induce a relaxation response that improves psychological and physical wellbeing.</p> <p>Perhaps this is due to the ‘grounding’ effect they have on us. Regularly performing something that engages our creativity and concentration can bring our minds into the present and reduce the tendency to project negatively into the future or dwell on painful past events.</p> <p><strong>A healing and wholesome therapy<br /></strong>While the hustle and bustle of modern life may have typecast some hobbies and crafts as simply being a last resort for boredom or an unnecessary time-waster, the reality is that they may well be a primary vehicle for reclaiming a sense of purpose, wellness and recovery from life’s traumas.</p> <p>Rather than marginalising it, why not make the time and space in your life to dedicate to a craft as a way of restoring balance and contentment. Take a course at a community centre or join a craft club can be a great way to get you kickstarted. Make sure you then have a regular time set aside at home, (daily if possible), and have a set space devoted to your craft or hobby. Open your mind to the possibilities and you too can reap the benefits of healing with hobbies. </p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/how-to-heal-with-hobbies.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p> <p> </p>

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The Project host rushed to hospital amidst health fears

<p>Host of <em>The Project<span> </span></em>Tommy Little has been rushed to hospital, but thanks to his comedic ways, he’s discovered a way to make light of the serious situation.</p> <p>The 34-year-old sent fans into a panic after he uploaded two photos to his Instagram account of himself lying in a Gold Coast hospital bed, with his arm attached to an IV drip.</p> <p>But he quickly assured his 213,000 fans not to worry and instead to focus on the mismatched pair of socks he was wearing.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzu3UKPnsYy/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzu3UKPnsYy/" target="_blank">For years my mum’s been telling me to grow the fuck up and start wearing matching socks and to get private health insurance. Anyway, years later, here I am, wearing odd socks in a public hospital. The upside is that Australia is awesome. All the nurses and doctors here on the Goldy are the absolute best and thanks to them I’m on the mend. Feeling very lucky to have been born here....Australia I mean, not hospital....but I guess both are lucky....anyway also on the upside, GO MAROONS!!!!!!!!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/mrstommylittle/" target="_blank"> Tommy Little</a> (@mrstommylittle) on Jul 10, 2019 at 3:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“For years my mum’s been telling me to grow the f**k up and start wearing matching socks and to get private health insurance,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Anyway, years later, here I am, wearing odd socks in a public hospital.</p> <p><img style="width: 419.32624113475174px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7828493/tommysocks.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/37e2cbaaa9494e2ba0e60ebd7a8cd90c" /></p> <p>“The upside is that Australia is awesome. All the nurses and doctors here on the Goldy are the absolute best and thanks to them I’m on the mend.</p> <p>“Feeling very lucky to have been born here … Australia I mean, not hospital … but I guess both are lucky … anyway also on the upside, GO MAROONS!!!!!!!!!” he concluded, making a reference to the State of Origin series that Queensland lost.</p> <p>It remains unclear as to why the comedian was admitted to hospital but with one photo showing an inhaler by his side, people have assumed it’s due to an intense asthma attack.</p> <p>“You can’t tell us you’re in hospital and not tell us why,” wrote one worried fan, to which another responded: “Asthma. There’s Ventolin in the picture and a spacer.”</p> <p>Others agreed, saying it’s plausible that the host had an asthma attack during the middle of the night.</p>

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Easy ways to reinvigorate your relationship

<p>As couples grow and age together, so to do their level of comfort and familiarity. However, with heightened intimacy also comes greater difficulty in keeping the flame of romance alive.</p> <p>Whether a relationship is long-term or new-found, it is essential to put in effort to maintain the often elusive ‘spark’. </p> <p>Here are a few simple ways to re-invigorate your relationship and keep the flame burning bright!</p> <p><strong>Set a Date Night<br /></strong>With kids, work and other stresses cluttering your life, it is essential to occasionally remove yourself from life’s many obligations and simply be together. As a couple, you’ll benefit from the private dates, which will help strengthen your relationship in every way. Dating will give you something to look forward to, a shared passion that can help re-ignite your tired minds and bodies. So set a ‘date night’ and remind yourselves of the pleasures of spending precious alone time together.</p> <p><strong>Get Active!<br /></strong>Physical activity is a great way to relieve relationship stress, while simultaneously working out the kinks. Teamwork is also the best way to re-establish effective communication with your partner, offering both parties the opportunity to grow and learn. Enjoying each other’s company is an essential element of staying happy; so don’t underestimate the simple joys of getting out and about together. Couples can book weekend or mid-week retreats and adventures, or sign up to a new exercise class together. Popular activities include canoeing, sailing, tandem-bike riding, bush walking or yoga.</p> <p><strong>Surprise Each Other<br /></strong>When a relationship is blossoming, it’s possible to surprise each other each and every day. But as time passes, it becomes easy to fall into the traps of routine and predictability. So shake off the schedule and make time for life’s many wonderful surprises. The surprise could be as simple as an unexpected bouquet of flowers or a trip to a local wine bar. Regardless of the size of the gesture, spontaneity and unpredictability are vital to keeping a relationship alive and fresh.</p> <p><strong>Show Your Partner You Care<br /></strong>A relationship thrives on intimacy and honesty. But often couples fall into monotonous routines that make statements of love seem like the response on an answering machine and acts of intimacy the work of a robot. When you ask how your partner’s day was, for example, really listen and care about the answer. When you part in the morning, look at them and kiss them goodbye with meaning. Studies have even shown that kissing for over five seconds at least once a day can work wonders in revitalising intimacy. Focus on staying in tune with your partner’s frame of mind and be there for them in times of stress or adversity. When you communicate openly and with candour, you unlock the true potential of your relationship. Re-establish a bridge of communication by paying attention, and showing legitimate and honest care for your significant other.</p> <p><strong>Go Travelling Together<br /></strong>Travelling allows couples to bond and find out more about each other. The process of seeing and experiencing new things together will re-invigorate your minds and your understanding of one another. By embarking on a shared experience, it’s easy to work through the rust and get back to having good old-fashioned fun! Cruises and other more leisurely options will do the trick, but travelling to new places and getting out of your respective comfort zones will also lead to an undeniable blossoming of romance.</p> <p>There’s more to any relationship than a few banner days and predictable celebrations, so make sure you’re always trying your best to make your partner feel your love. With the right amount of attention and patience, you really can re-ignite the passion for eachother keep the steady flame of romance burning bright.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/easy-ways-to-reinvigorate-your-relationship.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Carrie Bickmore reveals surprising struggle with new baby Adelaide: “It was a shock!”

<p>Carrie Bickmore is truly a woman who can manage it all. From parenting her children and taking care of her family, to working as a television and radio host, the mother-of-three somehow handles everything perfectly.</p> <p>She appeared on our screens back in 2006 after she joined<span> </span><em>Rove Live<span> </span></em>and it didn’t take long for the country to warm up to her empathetic approach and down-to-earth demeanour.</p> <p>“Perhaps I get more emotional at work than I should, but as I’ve gotten older, I’ve accepted that is who I am and I can’t apologise for that,” the 38-year-old told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/parenting/celebrity-families/carrie-bickmore-adelaide-56853" target="_blank">OK! Magazine</a>.</em></p> <p>And there’s no need for an apology, because it seems that same approach is the secret to her success, one that has earnt her a Gold Logie.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/By-VWKxnjqs/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/By-VWKxnjqs/" target="_blank">Ciao Mamma, l’italia mi rende felice 😊💕</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bickmorecarrie/" target="_blank"> Carrie Bickmore</a> (@bickmorecarrie) on Jun 21, 2019 at 6:45am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Now, as she prepares to return to<span> </span><em>The Project</em><span> </span>after an eight-month hiatus due to giving birth to her baby daughter Adelaide, she says she’s more than ready for the “craziness” of her schedule.</p> <p>“We’re settling into life as a family of five and it feels like the right time to be going back to work,” she said.</p> <p>We can expect to see her back on our screens on July 8, and she can’t wait to get back into it.</p> <p>“I’ve been doing radio from home, thanks to the power of technology these days, but going back to<span> </span><em>The Project</em><span> </span>will be different.</p> <p>“Obviously I wish we could do<span> </span><em>The Project</em><span> </span>from my living room every night, around the kids, but I’m really looking forward to getting back to it.</p> <p>“I’ve been off the desk for a little longer than I planned. I didn’t set out to stick to a set time, as I didn’t quite know how we’d go when Adelaide arrived – and it’s good because she’s been a lot more challenging that I could ever have imagined!</p> <p>[Adelaide’s] had reflux and she’s a baby who just wants to be cuddled and held all the time, which has been really exhausting but also really lovely and rewarding, too.”</p> <p>After having a relatively easy time with her first two kids, Adelaide has proven to be a challenge for the media personality.</p> <p>“It was a shock! I was like, ‘What’s happened?’ I’m yet to call my good friend Chrissie Swan out on this because she was like, ‘Oh, having a third is easy, you won’t even notice!”.</p> <p>“Now I’m like, ‘What a liar you are!’ Adelaide has definitely been the hardest one yet, as adorable as she is.”</p>

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A family's difficult journey: Meet the 7-year-old girl going through menopause

<p>At just four weeks old, little Emily Dover had grown a whole four centimetres taller in just a week.</p> <p>Emily’s parents, Tam Dover and Matt McAuliffe from Woy Woy on the NSW Central Coast – who are both tall – were told by medical professionals their newborn girl was a reaction of her genetics.</p> <p>However, a year-and-a-half later when Matt pulled little Emily out of the bath, he was hit with the smell of body odour and a little pimple on her face.</p> <p>Not long after, the child began complaining of discomfort around her chest area.</p> <p>“When she was two she started complaining that she had a sore chest and we thought, 'well that's a little bit different' ... and she was breast budding at the time and that came with cystic acne,” Tam explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/australia/a190703ylpem/meet-the-seven-year-old-girl-going-through-menopause-20190703" target="_blank"><em>10Daily</em></a> and<span> </span><em>Studio 10</em>.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828320/studio-10-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d7467fc58a7a4ff7bf6b0562f4915714" /></p> <p><span>Tam and Matt, with the help of doctors, investigated why their child’s hormones were developing at such a fast and unusual pace, and during that time they discovered Emily had autism and a sensory processing disorder.</span></p> <p>“When Emily was about two or three she had such a yearning to have a child that there was a child at her daycare who called her 'Mum' and ... you see the yearning and the nurturing because the hormones are driving it,” Tam said.</p> <p>“We all have had time to grow into our hormones and have life experience and know what is appropriate and what is not appropriate, and then you have someone who says I feel these things and then the joy of autism on top of it is that there is no filter.”</p> <p>Then when Emily was four years old, she began getting her period.</p> <p>Both Tam and Matt had starting hormone testing with their daughter when they had to teach the young pre-schooler how to use a menstrual pad.</p> <p>Emily’s condition left a financial burden on the family, as injections were required to stop their little girl’s puberty from developing until she was old enough to undergo the changes – and cost both Tam and Matt $1,500 per month.</p> <p>However, the injections failed to stop the growth of little Emily’s pubic hair, her breasts or halt her periods.</p> <p>While the family have stopped with the injections and Emily is now going through menopause, she will still be treated symptomatically.</p> <p>Despite the difficult journey for the family, Emily has managed to maintain her bright and positive nature at just seven years old.</p> <p>Tam and Matt hope that sharing the story of their little girl will aid in raising awareness for other families and children who are going through similar hardships.</p>

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How to flirt safely with online dating

<p>Online dating has revolutionised the way we meet people and more and more over 50s are joining this burgeoning online community. However there are some pitfalls you need to be aware of before you go looking for love online in order to avoid flirting with danger.</p> <p>By and large, these dating sites provide the perfect environment to meet interesting, like-minded people as friends or for potential long term or casual relationships.</p> <p>If you aren’t particularly drawn to bars, clubs or hobby or interest groups, it can be difficult to meet people. Online dating sites allow you to be discerning and select people who match your set of interests and philosophies on life. It’s convenient and can be successful, when done safely. And nowadays there are growing number of sites targeted specifically to Baby Boomers.</p> <p><strong>Beware the scammers!</strong></p> <p>Online dating is still a relatively new and modern concept, so you may already be aware that people have been known to encounter some bad experiences online, including in some cases losing significant sums of money as well as their self-confidence and self-esteem.</p> <p>Last year there were 2,770 reports of Dating and Romance scams - a 13.6% increase on the previous year. 43% of Australians who came into contact with dating and romance scams lost over $25 million collectively. You should approach these sites with a healthy mix of enthusiasm and caution.</p> <p>A few of the cardinal rules for those new to online dating are; never organise a date with someone unless it’s in a busy setting with other people around; Do not give away your personal details until you are completely confident about the other party and definitely do not part with any money for a site or person that you don’t know is a completely bona fide entity.</p> <p><strong>Things to watch out for:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Listen to your gut instinct if something doesn’t feel right</li> <li>Do not give out personal info too early</li> <li>Do a background check on the person</li> <li>Beware of people who pressure you to meet up instantly</li> <li>Look out for inconsistencies in the person’s profile compared to what they say about themselves when you actually talk to them</li> </ul> <p><strong>Great tips for online flirting:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Try to have light, general conversations online initially – humour is always a good start (always keep it tasteful!)</li> <li>Always compliment your date</li> <li>Avoid being overly suggestive and using sexual innuendo</li> <li>Don’t feel pressured to meet with someone you are uncertain about</li> <li>If you are a male Baby Boomer, it is always polite to offer to pay for the female date on initial outings</li> <li>It sounds obvious, but don’t drink too much alcohol</li> <li>Initially go for a shorter date for a first meeting, in case there is no chemistry or common ground</li> <li>It’s never makes a good impression to talk about your ex-partners on the first couple of dates</li> <li>Don’t go on about yourself for too long, remember to also be a good listener</li> <li>It’s ok to kiss on a first date nowadays – but just a peck on the cheek!</li> <li>Appropriate dressing – ladies, don’t wear something too provocative, nor too frumpy and shapeless. Go for smart, confident and slightly on trend. (the latter applies to men also)</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/how-to-flirt-safely-with-online-dating.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Feel great about your life ahead

<p>Today over 85 per cent of the male population reaches retirement age and the average time in retirement has increased to more than 19 years.</p> <p><strong>The benefits of working longer</strong><br />The old delineation between work and retirement is being blurred and the notion of having a fixed retirement age and a sudden change of life is becoming less relevant for many. While some may be happy to jump into retirement as soon as possible, others may be equally happy to carry on a productive and happy working life – and why shouldn’t we? Technology is making work options more flexible and the shift in the economy away from manufacturing and toward service industries means that it is feasible in many occupations to continue working well beyond age 65.</p> <p>While no one likes to see their entitlements curtailed, the value of staying employed (at least part-time) in later life can be a real positive. Why surrender to a norm that says you should retire if you don’t want or choose to? Your talents and ability don’t magically disappear at any prescribed age. in fact, the more experience and knowledge you have, the more valuable you are.</p> <p>After all many of those who retire on the dot of age 65 will end up longing for the social interaction, fulfilment and mental stimulation that their work provided.</p> <p><strong>More time to enjoy life</strong><br />The other dynamic at play in the retirement formula is that life expectancy is still creeping higher. Even though retirement age is going up, the length of retirement is actually getting longer. The real question is not so much how long we will be retired, but what is the quality of life will we enjoy in retirement and what can we do to enhance it.</p> <p>Will you stay fit and active? Maintain independence? Will you be engaged in activities and relationships that will stimulate and enrich your life?</p> <p>At a broader level, the government has an important role to play in facilitating quality of life through the health system. While focus seems to be on the retirement age issue, the projected growth in health costs is a much bigger budgetary problem for the country. Perhaps all the angst over changes to retirement ages would be better directed at asking governments to ensure they adequately fund quality health care instead.</p> <p>Governments can only do so much, however, and it is at the personal level that we each must make our own decisions and nurture our own attitudes about living a full and productive life as we get older.</p> <p><strong>Ready to start today?</strong><br />While some physical differences are inevitable, it is our approach to the years passing and our ability to embrace it that can make such a positive difference. We can’t always prevent the stiffer joints and greyer hair, but we can take action to enjoy and appreciate life more fully.</p> <p><strong>These ideas will help:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Pursue vitality: Focus on staying healthy, strong and fit. Set exercise goals that are achievable yet challenging. Make an effort to be more proactive and informed on making food choices too – it is never too late.</li> <li>Engage in the present: Rediscover the simple pleasures of life. Stop and appreciate your environment, your partner, your family and friends. Be thankful and live in the moment, rather than worrying about the future or regretting the past.</li> <li>Appreciate yourself: Don’t obsess about your body, but do take care of your body better to improve self-esteem. It is never too late to shake off bad habits that limit your enjoyment of life and your ability to love yourself.</li> <li>Nurture creativity: Rediscover your creative self. When we were children we loved making things with our own hands. A life of work may have made it difficult to spend time on creative pursuits, so why not rediscover your inner child and rekindle an old skill or learn a new one.</li> <li>Foster relationships: Make the effort to look outside of yourself by remaining as socially active as possible, rather than dwelling in your own world. Meaningful contact with family, friends, ex-workmates, neighbours, club associates or church acquaintances helps to keep your mind stimulated and positive and keeps you as a participant in life instead of a spectator.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/feel-great-about-your-life-ahead.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Magda Szubanski's question brings man to tears: “I’ll live with the decision I made”

<p>A Canberra man who was close to facing jail time for helping his terminally ill wife take her own life has broken down on TV after he was asked a heartbreaking question from Magda Szubanski.</p> <p>Neil O’Riordan appeared on <em>The Project</em> last night, only a few short hours after the charges made against him were dropped.</p> <p>The 63-year-old was arrested earlier in the year and was charged with assisted suicide after he helped his wife of 25 years end her life.</p> <p>Shane Drumgold, the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions, said forcing Neil to face court would be “unduly harsh and oppressive”, saying he was “motivated wholly by love and compassion”.</p> <p>His wife Penelope Blume made the tough decision after she was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2016 and saw her health getting progressively worse.</p> <p>She then turned to her husband about ending her life.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Imagine being faced with a terminally ill partner who’d made the decision to end their life. You can’t change their mind, so you decide to help fulfill that wish. Then imagine being dragged through the courts immediately afterwards. This is Neil's heartbreaking story. <a href="https://t.co/0r8ku53eDF">pic.twitter.com/0r8ku53eDF</a></p> — The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1145983997283098624?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">2 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“For Penelope, who’d always enjoyed good health, having a body that didn’t work anymore was catastrophic,” Neil told <em>The Project</em>.</p> <p>By March, Penelope was completely dependant on Neil for everything. It was soon after she made the painstaking decision to say goodbye.</p> <p>“It’s the bravest thing I’ve ever seen. I’ll live with the decision that I made,” he said.</p> <p>Neil said he was relieved to not be facing jail time of potentially 10 years but also wishes the ACT accepted euthanasia in the same way as Victoria.</p> <p>The state legalised voluntary euthanasia two weeks ago.</p> <p>“I grew up in what used to be a compassionate and caring country, and I guess I’ve become concerned that we display less and less of those characteristics,” said Neil.</p> <p>“I would hope when it comes to the issue of voluntary assisted dying that we go back to the compassion and caring country that we used to be.”</p> <p>Neil kept his emotions in check throughout the interview but broke down after Magda Szubanski asked him a sensitive question.</p> <p>“It must have been an incredibly hard thing to do,” Szubanski said.</p> <p>“When the final moment came, were you at peace with the decision because you knew that it was what Penelope wanted?”</p> <p>He laughed slightly before responding: “OK. Theoretically, yes, I was perfectly fine with it,” he said, as his voice began breaking.</p> <p>“Until it happened. And I was devastated. I wailed. I thought about the unfairness about why couldn’t I be doing this with my family? Why did we have to be covert?”</p> <p>The couple spent their final night together by going on a date but spoke openly about what was to come.</p> <p>“We weren’t secretive about it. I’m surrounded by people who love and care about me. People were aware of what was going to happen,” he said.</p> <p>“I guess the covertness comes from the fact that the way that it had to happen. I would hope there are opportunities in the future for people to perhaps do that with their family more involved for the processes to be less covert.”</p> <p>Neil then revealed that their final hours spent together was exactly what Penelope wanted.</p> <p>“She wanted to see the beach again, eat seafood again, difficult to acquire in Canberra, and mostly, I guess, we wanted to spend some time alone together,” he said.</p> <p>“I was prepared to and fully expected to be charged, and I guess at some level I expected to be convicted, and I’m very grateful that the court made a different decision.”</p>

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