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Family heartbreak as newborn baby mauled to death by "jealous" dog

<p>A family has been left in shock after a newborn baby has been mauled to death by the family's dog.</p> <p>12-day-old Elon was attacked in Doncaster, northern England by a chow chow cross.</p> <p>The baby suffered from serious injuries and was taken to the hospital but later died.</p> <p>The family had celebrated the birth of Elon by posting pictures on Facebook, with mother Abigail and father Stephen commenting “Our gorgeous baby boy. Love him to bits”.</p> <p>The couple were arrested on suspicion of gross negligence manslaughter after the attack, but have both been released on bail.</p> <p>The baby's uncle said that the baby had been lying in his bassinette when the dog ran inside after escaping from a pen in the yard.</p> <p>The father and uncle tried to save the baby, but to no avail.</p> <p>“It was horrible and we’re all in total shock,” the uncle said.</p> <p>“My sister is in bits. She’s lost her baby.</p> <p>“Teddy’s not a dangerous dog... I think he was jealous when the baby came along.</p> <p>“Or maybe he thought the baby was a toy – he was a tiny thing.”</p> <p>One of Abigail's closest friends said that the mum was a "brilliant" parent.</p> <p>“She loves dogs and would never have a dog around the kids if she thought they were dangerous,” the friend said.</p> <p>Ellis' other three children were at the house at the time of the attack.</p> <p>The dog has been removed from the home as investigations continue.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/newborn-baby-mauled-to-death-by-familys-jealous-dog-c-1323940" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">7News</a></em></p>

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How Lindy Chamberlain is finally moving on from her tragic past

<p>Having suffered one of the worst injustices in Australian history when she was wrongly convicted and jailed for murdering her baby daughter, it would be understandable if Lindy Chamberlain was full of resentment.</p> <p>Instead, the inspirational mum could teach many about the art of forgiveness.</p> <p>Now, four decades after the horrifying incident when a dingo savagely snatched her daughter from a tent at Uluru – and the terrible aftermath to her tragedy - she’s haunted by the loss of Azaria.</p> <p>Speaking to <em>Woman’s Day</em> she said, “you can’t turn it off”.</p> <p>"You dwell on different memories over time, and there are aspects of it that soften – little insignificant parts of it. But others, I can just close my eyes and re-roll the film. I can see her in my arms. I can still clearly see expressions on her face when I was feeding her and talking to her, and the way she'd respond.”</p> <p>Recently she spoke about forgiveness and how she’s focusing on the positives and letting the past go.</p> <p>"It's not what happens that counts, it's how you choose to deal with what happens," she said at a National Christian Family Conference in Sydney.</p> <p>"You can choose if you're going to live with anger, regret and revenge and miserably think yourself a victim. Or you can choose to be a hero in your own life and forgive the past and move on. It doesn't happen immediately. Sometimes I go back and have to remind myself to start all over again. It isn't easy."</p> <p>But then Lindy has never had it easy since the tragic night on August 17, 1980 when she screamed into the night, “The dingo’s got my baby.”</p> <p> </p>

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The truth about “horrible” Michael Schumacher claims

<p>Former Ferrari boss Ross Brawn has exposed the truth about claims Michael Schumacher was a “despicable, horrible character”.</p> <p>The man who was by the German driver’s side during his seven F1 world titles said Schumacher was a very different person when off the track.</p> <p>The legendary racer was known to be a ruthless driver on the track, which swayed public opinion.</p> <p>The 51-year-old was accused of driving “dangerously” as he needed to win no matter what, but Brawn said Schumacher changed people’s opinions once they met him away from the track.</p> <p>“I don’t know if he quite enjoyed the impression he created because he was quite an intimidating character in many ways,” Brawn told Sky’s new docu-series<span> </span><em>Race to Perfection</em>.</p> <p>“But if you knew him personally he was quite the opposite, very engaging, very personal.</p> <p>“So many times I introduced him to people who, before they met him, thought he was a despicable, horrible character and you introduce them, and once they got to know him they completely changed.</p> <p>“I had that happen so many times because there was Michael the racing driver out on the track and there was Michael the human being away from the track.”</p> <p>Brawn says whoever had the chance to get to know Schumacher on a personal level thought the world of him.</p> <p>“I don’t know of anyone who worked with Michael who had a bad word to say about him,” Brawn said.</p> <p>“Lots of people who raced against him had a different opinion but nobody I know who ever worked with Michael ever had a bad opinion about him because of his integrity, his commitment, his human side.</p> <p>“He was a very strong team member of any team he was part of and it’s a tragedy what’s happened but he’s a lovely human being.”</p>

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Time to rescue these spaces from the conspiracists

<p>Digital communications have <a href="https://theconversation.com/are-conspiracy-theories-on-the-rise-in-the-us-121968">spread conspiracy theories more widely than ever before</a>, particularly in this uncertain and tumultuous year. QAnon, for example, is <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-conspiracy-theories-spread-online-its-not-just-down-to-algorithms-133891">a movement</a> that seeks to identify a “deep state” or “global elite” complicit in <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-church-of-qanon-will-conspiracy-theories-form-the-basis-of-a-new-religious-movement-137859">human trafficking, “Pizzagate” and the orchestration of a global pandemic</a>. One conspiracy theory “<a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-factcheck-children-rescued-tunnels/fact-check-35000-malnourished-and-caged-children-were-not-recently-rescued-from-tunnels-by-us-military-idUSKBN23M2EL">going viral</a>” is that extensive operations are taking place to rescue children held in secret underground locales beneath densely populated cities.</p> <p>Tunnel networks beneath major Australian cities such as <a href="https://twitter.com/BushmansMum/status/1287181188860227586">Melbourne</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/timetowakeupsw1/status/1246785772268683265">Sydney</a> have <a href="https://www.facebook.com/sarah.shanahan.58/posts/10157286425985685">received similar treatment</a>. Misconceptions of their form and purpose are communicated via social media. The stuff of urban legends, once circulated among acquaintances, is now online.</p> <p>The misunderstandings of these spaces reveal a more glaring oversight: of wartime histories, transportation follies, essential services and the unique geologies and climates that require drainage infrastructure. These tunnels are hidden by necessity. But they are close enough to the surface to be easily accessible, preventing their use for any large-scale conspiracy.</p> <p><strong>Why the fixation with tunnels?</strong></p> <p>Abandoned or atypical urban spaces have <a href="https://theconversation.com/reopening-londons-mail-rail-why-its-so-hard-to-recreate-the-thrill-of-exploring-urban-ruins-54423">long piqued the public imagination</a>. Sites of abandonment are also associated with notions of freedom and excitement. Urban exploration has increased significantly within the past decade, amplified by social media sharing of imagery and aesthetics.</p> <p>Rumours abound of complex tunnel networks in major Australian cities, created in the wake of the second world war. Larger air raid shelters were often located close to urban settlement, but escaped use. They remained in public memory as mythology: bunkers can be located across Australia, from Dover Heights in Sydney, to Prospect and Glenelg in Adelaide. <a href="https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/the-only-air-raid-pipe-shelters-in-brisbane-still-remain-a-mystery-20190425-p51h4u.html">Over 20 air raid shelters exist in Brisbane alone</a>.</p> <p>The fabled “<a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/north/a-tunnel-in-the-banks-of-the-merri-creek-has-finally-been-filled-in-by-darebin-council/news-story/5c811dc980967ebc61e9321ec222a0b4">Northcote Tunnel</a>” in Melbourne was the subject of decades of rumour. It was eventually found to be the result of a search for an underground stream, not the large-scale 1940s American construction it was said to be.</p> <p>Tunnels beneath Sydney served similar purposes, either by design or as the result of a failed transport infrastructure project. The St James tunnels are a prime example. This “hidden” space is about to be converted to <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/st-james-tunnel-vision-plan-to-revive-abandoned-sydney-railway-20181001-p5073u.html">a tourism precinct</a>.</p> <p>Beneath the streets of Melbourne, Sydney and beyond, mail and precious cargo were often transported about the city in underground tunnels from nearby railway stations or ports to parliament or the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Post_Office,_Melbourne">General Post Office</a>.</p> <p><strong>So what are these spaces used for today?</strong></p> <p>Today, urban tunnels carry telecommunications, gas, electricity, water and sewerage infrastructure.</p> <p>Exact locations remain secret for security and operational reasons. Access is allowed in rare cases. In the case of the <a href="http://www.health.vic.gov.au/healthvictoria/sep11/tunnel.htm">Royal Melbourne Hospital steam tunnels</a>, members of the public can book a place on once-yearly tours.</p> <p>Stormwater drains are most abundant in urban areas; perhaps this is why they feature so heavily in conspiracies. Where depressions, undulations or linear tracts of open space exist in the landscape, a stormwater drain is likely lurking beneath the surface. These drains are needed to divert rainwater from areas where hard surfaces would otherwise lead to flooding.</p> <p>In Melbourne, the <a href="https://www.melbournewater.com.au/water-data-and-education/water-facts-and-history/history-and-heritage/timeline-our-history">Melbourne and Metropolitan Board of Works</a> started building these drains in the early 20th century. I have explored many of these complex networks, <a href="https://www.melbournewater.com.au/water-data-and-education/water-facts-and-history/flooding/drainage-system">over 1,400 kilometres of drains</a> that span almost all of metropolitan Melbourne and its fringes. These drains are literally beneath the feet of city dwellers: many would be surprised to find that a drain runs <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/a-plan-to-turn-melbournes-elizabeth-street-into-a-rainforest-canal-20150304-13uk1x.html">beneath the major thoroughfare of Elizabeth Street</a>, historically Williams Creek.</p> <p>The Metropolitan Water Sewerage and Drainage Board built similar infrastructure in Sydney. Open and closed conduits were built in concrete and brick — as well as bluestone in Melbourne, and limestone in Sydney — throughout the past century. Sydney’s stormwater network <a href="https://www.sydneywater.com.au/sw/water-the-environment/how-we-manage-sydney-s-water/stormwater-network/index.htm">totals 454 kilometres</a> of drains and spans 73 water catchments. These drains ultimately carry <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/environment/where-does-all-the-stormwater-go-after-the-sydney-weather-clears-20150430-1mx4ep.html">500 billion litres into Sydney Harbour or Botany Bay</a>.</p> <p><strong>Dangerous, yes, but for more mundane reasons</strong></p> <p>These hidden spaces <em>can</em> be controversial or dangerous, but not for the reasons put forth by QAnon and its ilk.</p> <p>Social groups have emerged around drain exploration, with the Melbourne-based Cave Clan the best-known example. They have clear rules to ensure the safety of their members. “No drains when it rains” is one such rule: sudden rain can catch out explorers as water levels rise quickly inside drains.</p> <p>Drownings have been reported in both <a href="https://www.news.com.au/national/graffiti-drain-survivor-i-wish-i-had-died/news-story/40a663ce61814480552ad5348ea0d698?sv=d13fa3e80fab16b57ee6743c223cf149">Sydney</a> and <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/fears-for-lives-of-underground-explorers/news-story/e9a23d2f83212308d5a3b8928700fa07">Melbourne</a>. The unpredictability of sudden torrential flows means these spaces are fundamentally unsuited to the purposes suggested in conspiracy theories.</p> <p>Frequent visits by urban explorers would also quickly identify any secretive mis-uses of drainage infrastructure. This would equally apply to other underground spaces such as steam and service tunnels – maintenance staff would soon spot anything amiss.</p> <p>More crucial, however, is that the design of these drains means they could not play any part in supposed trafficking networks. Some of these drains are large enough for adults to explore. The vast majority, though, are too small to be accessed, with diameters as narrow as 300mm.</p> <p>Even the most cavernous drains would not be suitable for storage. Larger drains are designed to hold larger flows, often at a confluence of catchment areas. While they these drains <em>could</em> host human beings, they would be at risk of drowning whenever it rained. Tidal flows or litter traps can also prevent access.</p> <p>Child trafficking is a very <a href="https://theconversation.com/human-trafficking-and-slavery-still-happen-in-australia-this-comic-explains-how-112294">relevant</a> <a href="https://theconversation.com/jeffrey-epsteins-arrest-is-the-tip-of-the-iceberg-human-trafficking-is-the-worlds-fastest-growing-crime-120225">issue</a>, but it is certainly not taking place under cities across the nation. Rather than abandoning subterranean spaces to conspiratorial narratives or urban mythology, these spaces are important for other reasons. These point to the need to build a common understanding not only of their form and function, but also of the ethos underlying their existence, a concern for the common good.</p> <p>That something as impressive and as everyday as our civic infrastructure inspires such fascination and fear is indeed curious. Ultimately, these spaces are too utilitarian to serve the purpose claimed by viral social media posts.</p> <p><em>Photo: Victoria Kolankiewicz,</em></p> <p><em>Written by Victoria Kolankiewicz. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-lies-beneath-tunnels-for-trafficking-or-just-a-subterranean-service-time-to-rescue-these-spaces-from-the-conspiracists-144276">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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The rise of ultra-processed foods and why they’re really bad for our health

<p>Humans (and our ancestors) have been processing food for at least <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/processed-food-a-two-million-year-history/">1.8 million years</a>. Roasting, drying, grinding and other techniques made food more nutritious, durable and tasty. This helped our ancestors to colonise diverse habitats, and then develop settlements and civilisations.</p> <p>Many traditional foods used in cooking today are processed in some way, such as grains, cheeses, dried fish and fermented vegetables. Processing itself is not the problem.</p> <p>Only much more recently has a different type of food processing emerged: one that is more extensive, and uses new chemical and physical techniques. This is called ultra-processing, and the resulting products <a href="http://www.fao.org/3/ca5644en/ca5644en.pdf">ultra-processed foods</a>.</p> <p>To make these foods, cheap ingredients such as starches, vegetable oils and sugars, are combined with cosmetic additives like colours, flavours and emulsifiers. Think sugary drinks, confectionery, mass-produced breads, snack foods, sweetened dairy products and frozen desserts.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>Unfortunately, these foods are terrible for our health. And we’re eating more of them than ever before, partially because of aggressive marketing and lobbying by “Big Food”.</p> <p><strong>Ultra-processed foods are harming our health</strong></p> <p>So concludes our <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/7/1955">recent literature review</a>. We found that more ultra-processed foods in the diet associates with higher risks of obesity, heart disease and stroke, type-2 diabetes, cancer, frailty, depression and death.</p> <p>These harms can be caused by the foods’ poor nutritional profile, as many are high in added sugars, salt and trans-fats. Also, if you tend to eat more ultra-processed foods, it means you probably eat fewer fresh and less-processed foods.</p> <p>Industrial processing itself can also be harmful. For example, certain food additives <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872783/">can disrupt our gut bacteria</a> and trigger inflammation, while plasticisers in packaging can <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412019317416?via%3Dihub">interfere with our hormonal system</a>.</p> <p>Certain features of ultra-processed foods also promote over-consumption. Product flavours, aromas and mouthfeel are designed to make these foods ultra-tasty, and perhaps even <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30439381/">addictive</a>.</p> <p>Ultra-processed foods also harm the environment. For example, food packaging generates much of the plastic waste that enters marine ecosystems.</p> <p><strong>And yet, we’re eating more and more of them</strong></p> <p>In <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">our latest study</a>, published in August, we found ultra-processed food sales are booming nearly everywhere in the world.</p> <p>Sales are highest in rich countries like Australia, the United States and Canada. They are rising rapidly in middle-income countries like China, South Africa and Brazil, which are highly populated. The scale of dietary change and harms to health are therefore likely immense.</p> <p><strong>‘Big Food’ is driving consumption</strong></p> <p>We <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">also asked</a>: what explains the global rise in ultra-processed food sales? Growing incomes, more people living in cities, and working families seeking convenience are a few factors that contribute.</p> <p>However, it’s also clear “Big Food” corporations are driving ultra-processed food consumption globally — think Coca-Cola, Nestlé and McDonald’s. Sales growth <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1001235">is lower</a> in countries where such corporations have a limited presence.</p> <p>Globalisation has allowed these corporations to make huge investments in their overseas operations. The <a href="https://d1io3yog0oux5.cloudfront.net/_1b69e1e69528e5630a2842ce673df6eb/cocacolacompany/db/734/7242/annual_report/coca-cola-business-and-sustainability-report-2019+%281%29.pdf">Coca-Cola System</a>, for example, now includes 900 bottling plants worldwide, distributing 2 billion servings every day.</p> <p>As Big Food globalises, their advertising and promotion becomes widespread. New digital technologies, such as gaming, are used to target children. By collecting <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09581596.2017.1392483">large amounts of personal data online</a>, companies can even target their advertising at us as individuals.</p> <p>Supermarkets are now spreading throughout the developing world, provisioning ultra-processed foods at scale, and at low prices. Where supermarkets don’t exist, other distribution strategies are used. For example, Nestlé uses its “door-to-door” salesforce to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/16/health/brazil-obesity-nestle.html">reach thousands</a> of poor households in Brazil’s urban slums.</p> <p>Rising consumption also reflects <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">Big Food’s political power</a> to undermine public health policies. This includes lobbying policymakers, making political donations, funding favourable research, and partnerships with community organisations.</p> <p><strong>Here’s how things can change</strong></p> <p>The evidence that ultra-processed foods are harming our health and the planet is clear. We must now consider using a variety of strategies to decrease consumption. This includes adopting new laws and regulations, for example by using taxation, marketing restrictions and removing these products from schools.</p> <p>We cannot rely on industry-preferred responses such as <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14747731.2016.1239806">product reformulation</a> alone. After all, reformulated ultra-processed foods are usually still ultra-processed.</p> <p>Further, simply telling individuals to “<a href="https://theconversation.com/fat-nation-the-rise-and-fall-of-obesity-on-the-political-agenda-72875">be more responsible</a>” is unlikely to work, when Big Food spends billions every year marketing unhealthy products to undermine that responsibility.</p> <p>Should dietary guidelines now strongly advise people to avoid ultra-processed foods? Brazil and other Latin American countries <a href="http://www.fao.org/3/ca5644en/ca5644en.pdf">are already doing this</a>.</p> <p>And for us as individuals the advice is simple — avoid ultra-processed foods altogether.</p> <p><em>Written by Phillip Baker, Mark Lawrence and Priscilla Machado. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-rise-of-ultra-processed-foods-and-why-theyre-really-bad-for-our-health-140537">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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"I have outbursts": Djokovic breaks silence on US Open ejection

<p>Tennis star Novak Djokovic has broken his silence after he was disqualified from the US Open after hitting a line judge in the throat with a tennis ball.</p> <p>He explained that he has "outbursts" and can't promise that it won't happen again.</p> <p>He spoke in Rome ahead of competing in the Italian Open and said he was surprised he was disqualified from the competition but had accepted it.</p> <p>“Of course it was very hard for me to accept right after it happened,” said the 33-year-old.</p> <p>“For a couple of days I was in shock, and I was shaken by the whole default thing.</p> <p>“I checked with Laura after the match. She said that she was fine. No big injuries.</p> <p>“But, yeah, I mean, it was totally unexpected and very unintended, as well, of course to hit her.</p> <p>“But as I said, when you hit the ball like that, as I hit it, you know, you have a chance to hit somebody that is on the court.</p> <p>“The rules are clear, so I accepted it, and I had to move on. I have my first chance here in Rome.”</p> <p>It was the tennis player's first defeat in 2020.</p> <p>“I don’t think I will have any major issues coming back to the tour and being able to perform well and hit the tennis ball, of course during the point,” he said.</p> <p>Djokovic also explained that he couldn't guarantee that it wouldn't happen again.</p> <p>“I have outbursts, and this is kind of the personality and the player that I have always been, you know,” he said.</p> <p>“Obviously went through ups and downs in my career, managing to control my emotions more or less.</p> <p>“But you’re alone out there. It’s a lot of intensity and a lot of pressure.</p> <p>“I cannot promise or I cannot guarantee that I will never ever do anything similar to that in my life. I don’t know.</p> <p>“I mean, I definitely am going to try my best that something like that never happens again, obviously.”</p>

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Liz Hayes breaks down after revealing her father died in extraordinary hospital blunder

<p>Renowned<span> </span><em>60 Minutes</em><span> </span>journalist Liz Hayes suffered an emotional breakdown as she revealed her father died due to a major hospital mishap.</p> <p>Hayes father Brian Ryan, 88, passed away on September 11 last year as a result of a “catastrophic” stroke after he wasn’t given his prescribed medication for eight days. </p> <p>“I couldn't pretend that this was somebody else's story,” Hayes said on the Channel Nine program on Sunday night. </p> <p>“He said he was always fearful something like that would happen. I instinctively knew that what I was witnessing was wrong.”</p> <p>Mr Ryan had developed pneumonia last year before being taken to a local hospital in his hometown of Manning River, on the NSW mid-north coast.</p> <p>He was then transferred to another hospital where he successfully beat the infection.</p> <p>“In the country I think it is accepted that the medical services aren't like the city. But it is also trusted that there would be great care, dignity and as many resources as could possibly be found in the country,” she said. </p> <p>But it didn’t end there, as on September 7, just a few short hours after Hayes said goodnight, Mr Ryan suffered a stroke and was rushed to the hospital.</p> <p>“At two in the morning, Dad was wheeled into an empty room in a ward on the top floor,” she said.</p> <p>“Other than his family, no one came to see him or us. We were standing there thinking ‘something must happen now’, you don't just park a patient and don't tell somebody.</p> <p>“His notes were just plonked on the end of the bed and that's when I saw the terrible truth.”</p> <p>Hayes said it was then that she found out that her father - who had a heart condition - hadn't been given his prescribed blood thinner tablets, Apixaban, for eight days. </p> <p>“Dad's medical notes states that the doctor from the private hospital came to the emergency department to advise that he hadn't been given the critical medication,” she said. </p> <p>“If that hadn't had happened to dad I feel confident he wouldn't have suffered that stroke and he would still be here.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 309.93690851735016px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837832/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/406d1749fb634835bbcf0956b0aea298" /></p> <p>“I can't believe something that simple could go wrong,” she said through tears.  </p> <p>“Of all the medications not to give him, that was the most important medication for him to have.”</p> <p>Hayes then shared a video she took on the day her dad passed away, as she sat by his side while he laid in bed.</p> <p>“This is my dad. We were to take him home today, but we're not, because of what's been called ‘an error’,” she told the camera. </p> <p>“Dad is now dying because of some terrible mistakes that were made with his medication.”</p> <p>The hospital launched an investigation which resulted in discovering the doctor had prescribed the wrong medication when he was admitted.</p> <p>Hayes then decided to look into the matter herself, and discovered the rural hospital only had one doctor on the ward.</p> <p>“Doctors were brought in often from outside of the area. And when the lights went out, so too did the doctor,” she said. </p> <p>“On the night of dad's stroke, the doctor on duty wasn't actually in the hospital - but was on call.”</p> <p>Hayes said investigating her father's horrific death was like experiencing “a very personal trauma”.</p> <p>“You're trying to walk through this pool of grief but there's a journalist always inside you going ‘this is just wrong’,” she said.</p> <p>Hayes revealed that after launching her own investigation, dozens of doctors came forward saying they wanted to expose the state of the hospital but were afraid of the consequences.</p> <p>NSW Shadow Minister for Health Ryan Park said rural public hospitals are begging for more resources. </p> <p>“This is Australia in 2020. We should pride ourselves on having universal access to healthcare,” Park said. </p> <p>“At the moment, a postcode is determining the level of access to healthcare that you get, and that's simply not right.</p> <p>“If some of these stories were coming out of a major Sydney hospital, there'd be a riot on the street and there would be action within the day.”</p>

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Are Morrison and Murdoch scrambling to hide the climate cause of the bushfires?

<p>Most Australians will remember that our supreme leader Scott Morrison disappeared for a Hawaiian holiday last summer as the nation grappled with bushfires on a scale that the government was unprepared for, despite long-term warnings coming from experts.</p> <p>As Greenpeace’s <a href="https://www.greenpeace.org.au/wp/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Dirty-Power-Burnt-Country_Report_FINAL.pdf">Burnt Country report</a> tells it, when Morrison did arrive back in Australia to assume his position as prime minister, he set about downplaying the role that climate change had in the unprecedented crisis.</p> <p>The 2019/20 Black Summer bushfires burnt <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/chomsky-declares-morrisons-australia-amongst-top-three-climate-criminals/">20 percent</a> of Australian mainland forest to the ground, over a billion animals were killed, thousands of homes were destroyed, and between 650 million and 1.2 billion tonnes of carbon emissions entered the atmosphere.</p> <p>Released in mid-May, Burnt Country describes the coordinated tripartite campaign on the part of the Morrison government, the Murdoch press and the fossil fuel industry to plant seeds of doubt in the public sphere about global warming being the true cause behind the megafires.</p> <p>However, the nationwide mass mobilisations demanding climate action that took place over the summer were an acknowledgement that rising numbers don’t buy the climate denying falsehoods being propagated by these forces.</p> <p>Not fit for purpose</p> <p>The Greenpeace report outlines three responses that came from the Morrison government in relation to the climate link to the massive blazes that took place over what turned into an almost nine month-long bushfire season.</p> <p>The first response was the PM’s favourite chestnut, denial. Federal cabinet ministers were queueing up to reinforce that the fires were a natural part of this continent’s climate cycles.</p> <p>And NSW deputy premier John Barilaro went as far as to call talk about climate change during the bushfires a “bloody disgrace”.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, as smoke coverage in cities and the accompanying wearing of facemasks became an everyday occurrence, demonstrations calling for an honest government approach to not only the fires, but their underlying cause began escalating with <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/we-will-never-back-down-80-000-strike-in-sydney-over-climate-change-20190920-p52tet.html">record numbers turning out</a>.</p> <p>“In response, the government changed tack,” the Greenpeace researchers outline. “Whilst it was no longer feasible to deny the role of climate change, the government instead began to minimise it, emphasising it was one of just many factors that led to the bushfires.”</p> <p>The prime minister remarked just days before he snuck off to his Hawaiian retreat that the ongoing drought in the south east of the nation was the major factor behind the fires and that climate change was also a contributor.</p> <p>However, he failed to note the climate link to the water shortage crisis.</p> <p>Other factors leading to the bushfires that were cited by government included a lack of hazard reduction burning, too much fuel load remaining in national parks, restrictive land clearing laws and arson.</p> <p>And the final position taken by the Morrison government was talk of adaptation. No longer was it denying changing climate as a cause of the fires, but rather it acknowledged it as something humans should adapt to, which in turn removed any impetus in regard to practically cutting emissions.</p> <p>The fake news agenda</p> <p>Australia’s largest media corporation News Corp was complicit in the spreading of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/when-false-accusations-lead-to-tragedy/">falsehoods</a> and fake news over the last summer. Murdoch’s company published 79 percent of articles denying a climate link to the bushfires, while it only published 46 percent of all articles on the fires and climate.</p> <p>“News Corp consistently produced more articles attributing the bushfires to a lack of hazard reduction burning and arson than other” outlets, the report continues, adding that the evidence doesn’t point to arson, but rather lightning strikes and a dry landscape being the real culprits.</p> <p>Indeed, News Corp’s sustained disinformation agenda sparked an even larger online social media campaign, #ArsonEmergency, which propagated the same lies.</p> <p>According to the Greenpeace analysis, the arson emergency hashtag first appeared in a late November tweet. But its use really took off in the early days of January. And the researchers claim that this was in part due to a coordinated campaign to make it go viral.</p> <p>A Queensland University of Technology study found there was an ongoing campaign that pushed the hashtag coming from 300 Twitter accounts, many of which turned out to be bots: fake accounts. And peaks in the use of the hashtag coincided with the publication of News Corp arson articles.</p> <p>In its pocket</p> <p>As for the fossil fuel industry’s actions during the crisis, it didn’t need to do much, as it had already carried out major groundwork running back decades that ensured the Australian government and the Murdoch media simply did its bidding.</p> <p>The fossil fuel lobby has its tentacles extending all the way into the PM’s office. And the industry has long been able to use the nation’s laxed political donation laws, so it can simply buy the support of politicians, many of whom have, or later will, work amongst its ranks.</p> <p>Greenpeace’s <a href="https://act.greenpeace.org.au/dirtypower">2019 Dirty Power report</a> exposed the way that fossil fuel players and News Corp insiders freely move back and forth between employment in their industries as well as key positions in federal government.</p> <p>At present, Scott Morrison’s chief of staff is the former deputy CEO of the Minerals Council of Australia John Kunkel, while his senior advisor on international trade and investment is former Minerals Council CEO Brendan Pearson.</p> <p>The prime minister’s speech writer Matthew Fynes-Clinton is the former editor and chief of staff of New Corp’s Courier Mail, and his press secretary, Andrew Carswell, is the former chief of staff of Murdoch’s Daily Telegraph.</p> <p>Business as usual</p> <p>The Burnt Country report also lists a number of fossil fuel projects that were greenlighted by various Australian governments between last December and March, while much of the country burned to the ground.</p> <p>This included the approval of two new gas power plants – one in Queensland and the other in Victoria – permitting Shenhua to begin exploratory drilling for coal in northern NSW, and the opening up of 7,000 square kilometres of new land for coal, gas and oil exploration in Queensland.</p> <p>And as the last fires were still ablaze <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/as-the-climate-ails-fossil-fuel-addled-politicians-call-for-more-coal-and-gas/">in February</a>, the PM appointed uranium-backing MP Keith Pitt to the position of resources minister. The Liberal Party member promptly set about announcing that his vision for the nation is more investment in coal, gas and uranium to lift standards of living.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Gregoire. Republished with permission <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/morrison-and-murdoch-scrambled-to-hide-the-climate-cause-of-the-bushfires/">of Sydney Criminal Lawyers</a>.</em></p>

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Major warning signs your grandchild is a bully

<p>With one out of every four children getting bullied, it's a growing epidemic. But what if your child is the bully? Experts share the signs that indicate your child might be the one causing the trouble.</p> <p><strong>They justify bad behaviour</strong></p> <p>Bullies may attempt to shift blame to the victim rather than themselves. Licensed professional counsellor Jay Clark says a behaviour that tends to correlate with bullying is when a child fails to recognise their actions may be contributing to a problem. Emotions may quickly escalate in intensity in a child with bullying tendencies, and they feel justified in treating another child badly. They may feel the other child ‘has it coming’.</p> <p><strong>They have friends who act aggressively</strong></p> <p>Children who bully often don’t have a shortage of friends. In reality, they usually have a large network of friends and a smaller, intimate group that encourages bullying behaviour, according to the Pacer Centre. No parent wants to find out their child is ill-behaved towards other students. However, if your child’s friends are mean towards other kids, or if they engage in some other type of bullying, your child might be participating in bullying as well.</p> <p><strong>They have difficulty sleeping</strong></p> <p>A 2011 study by the University of Michigan, published in the <em>Sleep Medicine</em> journal, revealed children with aggressive or bullying tendencies were twice as likely to exhibit sleep-disordered breathing problems like snoring or daytime sleepiness. While this study doesn’t prove sleep disorders actually cause bullying, it does show a possible link between sleep problems and contentious behaviour. A lack of sleep impairs mood and decision-making. If you think your child has sleep issues, a visit to the doctor might be a beneficial step to curb potential bullying.</p> <p><strong>They get in trouble at school</strong></p> <p>When Tori Cody received a call from the assistant director of her son’s preschool telling her she needed to talk to her son because he was “messing” with another boy, she felt shocked, saddened and embarrassed. “How could my four-year-old be a bully?” she asked. Realising she needed to take his aggressive behaviour seriously, she sprang into action. She began frequent talks with her son challenging him to consider how he would feel if someone behaved towards him in the same manner he behaved towards his classmate. Though it’s a work in progress, Cody has seen an improvement in her son’s actions at school.</p> <p><strong>They have behavioural problems</strong></p> <p>“Certain behaviours, if elevated, tend to correlate with bullying,” says Clark. Children who are hot-tempered, easily frustrated, impulsive, prone to fighting, and lack empathy towards others have a higher risk of being bullies. Some children may even brag about handling conflict by fighting.</p> <p><strong>They live in a violent home</strong></p> <p>If a child is in a home where they’re seeing violence, or they too are victims of violent behaviour, they are more likely to react violently in pressure situations.  Frustration builds up in kids who experience violence, Clark says. When an explosion of anger is modelled in the home, similarly, they might be inclined to take out their own anger on other children.</p> <p><strong>They have experienced bullying first-hand</strong></p> <p>Occasionally, children who have been the target of bullying will become bullies in an effort to regain some control over their lives. This was the case for Mischa van Loder, whose seven-year-old daughter began getting in trouble after she was the victim. Van Loder credits encouraging her daughter into friendship groups with positive role models as a key to curtailing her daughter’s behaviour. “Parental presence is everything in this situation,” she says. “Without support, love and lots of investigation, the problem is difficult to solve.”</p> <p><strong>They act aggressively towards their siblings</strong></p> <p>Clark suggests if you have more than one child, monitor how they’re treating the other siblings. If they display aggression towards their siblings, it’s likely they may also demonstrate aggression towards their peers.</p> <p><strong>They spend a lot of time online</strong></p> <p>With cyberbullying on the rise, Clark cautions parents to monitor their child’s internet use. There’s a level of anonymity that occurs online, allowing children to say things they might not otherwise say to another child face-to-face.</p> <p><strong>They’re intolerant towards children who are different</strong></p> <p>Licensed clinical social worker Carmen Berzinski says some children she works with show a lack of ability or willingness to accept kids who are different (diverse ethnic backgrounds, gender, disabilities, sexual orientation, etc). In an attempt to exert some control over these differences, a bully might engage in name-calling, sending harsh messages via text or social media, and fighting. For parents, Berzinki has this advice, “Nurture empathy and create opportunities for your child to do good. Reward your child for the positive steps forward they take.”</p> <p>Written by  Jenny Lelwica Buttaccio. This article first appeared in Reader’s Digest. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Jenny Morrison's impassioned plea during Women's Health Week

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison's wife Jenny has begged Australian women to look after their health and get checked for cancer.</p> <p>"Women are putting off their health checks, pap tests, mole checks, mammograms and so much more,” the former nurse said sitting in Kirribilli House alongside family dog, Buddy.</p> <p>"This week is Women’s Health Week, and it’s a chance for women across Australia to remind themselves about getting up-to-date with all of those tests and their health.”</p> <p>"So call the doctor. Book that appointment. Don’t let it be the year where we say 'I’ll put that off'.</p> <p>"Because your health is so important to you and those around you.’</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CE7jXsghGQI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CE7jXsghGQI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">An important message from Jen for Women's Health Week this week. As Jen says, this has been a crazy year but it’s really important we don’t put off our regular health check-ups and tests. #WomensHealthWeek</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/scottmorrisonmp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Scott Morrison</a> (@scottmorrisonmp) on Sep 9, 2020 at 2:15pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>She explained that doctor rates and test rates have dramatically fallen due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>"During this time we’ve all been trying to do the right thing," she said.</p> <p>"We’re wearing our masks, we’re washing our hands and maintaining our distance to keep ourselves and others healthy.</p> <p>"But there’s some things that we might have put off that are really important as women. And that’s something we all need to pay attention to."</p> <p>Experts are worried that there will be an increase in advanced cancer diagnosis due to people not getting tested during the pandemic.</p> <p>"In Australia we are lucky to have such great screening processes - but there is a concern there will be many undiagnosed cancer cases due to the pandemic," Morrison said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Patients with COVID-19 shouldn’t have to die alone: Here’s how a loved one could be there at the end

<p>While the number of new COVID-19 cases in Victoria continues to trend downwards, we’re still seeing a significant number of deaths from the disease.</p> <p>The ongoing outbreaks in aged care, and the fact community transmission is continuing to occur, mean it’s likely there will be many more deaths to come.</p> <p>As a result of strict infection control measures restricting hospital visitors, tragically, many people who have died from COVID-19 have died alone. Family members have missed out on the opportunity to provide comfort to the dying person, to sit with them at their bedside, and to say goodbye.</p> <p>But it doesn’t have to be this way. We have cause to consider whether perhaps we could do more to preserve the patient-family connection at the end of life.</p> <p><strong>Get your coronavirus updates from health experts.</strong></p> <p><strong>Who can visit?</strong></p> <p>There’s some variation between Victorian health-care facilities in how visitor restrictions are applied. Some allow visitors to enter hospitals for compassionate reasons, <a href="https://monashhealth.org/patients-visitors/coronavirus/visitor-restrictions/">such as when a person is dying</a>. But visitors are not permitted for patients <a href="https://www.epworth.org.au/who-we-are/coronavirus-update">with suspected or confirmed COVID-19</a>.</p> <p>The latest figures show <a href="https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/victorian-coronavirus-covid-19-data">20 Victorians</a> are in an intensive care unit (ICU) with <a href="https://www.covid19data.com.au/hospitalisations-icu">13 on a ventilator</a>. This indicates their situation is critical.</p> <p> Despite hospitals, and particularly ICUs, being adequately prepared and resourced to provide high-level care for people diagnosed with COVID-19, patients will still die.</p> <p>Family-centred care at the end of life in intensive care is a <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27623165/">core feature of nursing care</a>. So in the face of this unprecedented global pandemic, we realised we needed to navigate the rules and restrictions associated with infection prevention and control and find a way to allow families to say goodbye.</p> <p><strong>Our recommendations</strong></p> <p>We’ve published a set of <a href="https://www.australiancriticalcare.com/article/S1036-7314(20)30253-8/fulltext">practice recommendations</a> to guide critical care nurses in facilitating next-of-kin visits to patients dying from COVID-19 in ICUs. The Australian College of Critical Care Nurses and the Australasian College for Infection Prevention and Control have jointly endorsed this position statement.</p> <p>The recommendations are evidence-based, reflecting current infection prevention and control directives, and provide step-by-step instructions for facilitating a family visit.</p> <p>Some of the key recommendations include:</p> <ul> <li>family visits should be limited to one person — the next-of-kin — and that person should be well</li> <li>the visitor must be able to drive directly to and from the hospital to limit exposure to others</li> <li>they should dress in single-layer clothing suitable for hot machine wash after the visit, remove jewellery, and carry as few valuables as possible</li> <li>on arrival, staff should prepare the visitor for what they will see when they enter, what they may do, and what they may not do (for example, it would be OK to touch your loved one with a gloved hand)</li> <li>a staff member trained in the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) should assist the visitor to put on PPE (a gown, surgical mask, goggles and gloves) and after the visit, to take it off, dispose of it safely and wash their hands</li> <li>where possible, the visitor should be given time alone with their loved one, with instructions on how to seek staff assistance if necessary.</li> </ul> <p>We also highlight the importance of intensive care staff ensuring emotional support is provided to the family member during and immediately after the visit.</p> <p><strong>Tailoring the guidance</strong></p> <p>It’s too early to know the full impact a loved one’s isolated death during COVID-19 may have on next-of-kin and extended family. But the effect is likely to be profound, extending beyond the immediate grief and <a href="https://www.jpsmjournal.com/article/S0885-3924(20)30207-4/fulltext">complicating the bereavement process</a>.</p> <p>These recommendations are not meant to be prescriptive, nor can they be applied in every circumstance or intensive care setting.</p> <p>We encourage intensive care teams to consider what will work for their unit and team. This may include considerations such as:</p> <ul> <li>whether there are adequate facilities in which the visitor can be briefed and don PPE</li> <li>whether social distancing is possible with current unit occupancy and staffing</li> <li>whether an appropriately skilled clinician is available to coordinate and manage the family visit</li> <li>each patient’s unique clinical and social situation.</li> </ul> <p>Rather than just using a risk-minimisation approach to managing COVID-19, there’s scope for some flexibility and creativity in addressing family needs at the end of life.</p> <p><em>Written by Melissa Bloomer and Stephane Bouchoucha. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/patients-with-covid-19-shouldnt-have-to-die-alone-heres-how-a-loved-one-could-be-there-at-the-end-145324">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Boy climbs UK's tallest mountain after being told he’d never walking again

<p><span>A seven-year-old boy with cerebral palsy has overcome huge adversity after climbing Britain’s tallest mountain for charity, even though his parents were told he’d never walk again. </span><br /><br /><span>Caeden Thomson, from Corby, Northamptonshire, was born 12 weeks premature, and has undergone intense physiotherapy to walk again. </span><br /><br /><span>Despite doctors' claims that he would never properly take his first steps, Caeden nor his family gave up. </span><br /><br /><span>On his JustGiving page, his mother Lisa said he wanted to be able to "give something back", because "he was so lucky for all the things he has had in his life".</span><br /><br /><span>At just seven, he hiked the 1,345 metres to the top of Ben Nevis in the Highlands on Saturday, and managed to raise more than £8,000 for his local NHS trust and disability equality charity, Scope.</span><br /><br /><span>The group began to make their way up the massive mountain at 9am. </span><br /><br /><span>Together, they would reach the summit at 5.30pm, before returning to the bottom five hours later.</span><br /><br /><span>Caeden said: "My body hurts a lot but I'm OK. It was really, really hard.</span><br /><br /><span>"I felt sick and exhausted at the top, and I felt exhausted but happy at the bottom!"</span><br /><br /><span>His mum says her son is "an absolute legend". </span><br /><br /><span>To say it was a “massive challenge” was an understatement for the group, who said it was “much, much harder than any of us expected".</span><br /><br /><span>She said: "There were many hard times along the way. From three-quarters of the way up, the pathway is just massive boulders and very hard to climb, and even at the top we didn't think he would make it down.</span><br /><br /><span>"There were danger areas where carrying was very difficult, so Caeden did have to walk down a lot of it too.</span><br /><br /><span>"The temperature dropped hugely and many climbers said they were turning back. But we made it!</span><br /><br /><span>"We are all super-proud of him, he deserves a medal.</span><br /><br /><span>"Last night no-one could move or celebrate, so today we are resting up and will celebrate tonight.</span><br /><br /><span>"We all love Caeden so much and can't believe his passion for getting to the top."</span></p>

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Unsolved medical oddities that still mystify doctors

<ol> <li><strong> The girl who never aged</strong></li> </ol> <p>Brooke Greenberg died at the young age of 20 in 2013. But she didn’t look like your average 20-year-old because her body stopped developing at the age of five. Her hair and nails were the only parts of her body that continued to grow year by year. Despite being born premature, doctors remained perplexed as to why she stopped ageing. Numerous DNA studies showed no abnormalities in her genes associated with ageing. Nor did her parents have a history of abnormal development. Plus, all her sisters were normal and healthy. Scientists continued to refer to her condition as Syndrome X, a metabolic syndrome. Yet, her unusual condition remains unexplained by science.</p> <p>On the other hand, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/13-unsolved-mysteries-easily-explained-by-science" target="_blank">here are 13 unsolved mysteries easily explained by science.</a></p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Mermaid syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>Sirenomelia is a birth defect that partially or completely fuses the legs together, similar to how a mermaid looks, thus the alternative name “mermaid syndrome.” Most newborns don’t survive for long with this anomaly but some children defy the odds like Shiloh Pepin who lived until she was ten or Tiffany Yorks, the oldest known survivor of the condition, who died at age 27 in 2016. But the exact cause of sirenomelia is still unknown in the medical world because most cases occur randomly for no reason. Due to this randomness, researchers believe a new mutation or environmental factors may play a role in the development of the disorder.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Highly superior autobiographical memory </strong></li> </ol> <p>If you give Jill Price a date, she can easily tell you what day of the week it fell on and what she did that day. Price was reported as the first known case of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) in 2006. Since then, more adults and even children have been identified as having this ability. People with HSAM can recall almost anything from their memories in minute detail from events in their life to conversations they’ve had. The true mystery is why some people have this superhuman brainpower and others don’t. Brain images of people with HSAM have shown researchers that some parts of their brain structure are different from people who have a typical memory. But it’s not yet known if these brain differences cause HSAM or if they occur because the person uses areas of the brain associated with memory more.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/15-scientific-mysteries-boffins-cant-figure-out" target="_blank">Here are 15 more mysteries that have scientists perplexed.</a></p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Water allergies </strong></li> </ol> <p>Fewer than 100 people in the world have been diagnosed with aquagenic urticaria, a rare condition where people break out in hives or rashes every time they’re exposed to water. However, researchers have not found an underlying cause for the condition. Some scientific theories suggest that the hives are caused by an allergen in the water or an interaction between the water and a substance found in or on the skin that generates a toxic material, which causes hives. Some doctors recommend patients only bathe in or drink purified water (that is, if the condition is allergen-based), but an effective treatment still has yet to come to fruition due to limited data on this rare condition.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Stiff person syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>This rare, progressive syndrome known as stiff person syndrome (SPS) can cause people to experience extreme stiffness, rigidity and painful spasms in their muscles. Sometimes, these muscle spasms are so strong they can even fracture bones. When the central nervous system, specifically in the brain and spinal cord, has decreased inhibition, it can cause a person’s muscle activity to increase, which can result in SPS. Scientists think the syndrome may have an autoimmune component and research has indicated that it may occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks the brain and spinal cord. Although scientists are on the cusp of discovering what could cause this disabling disorder, they still have yet to understand everything about SPS.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/6-myths-about-human-body-quashed" target="_blank">Here are 6 myths about the human body quashed. </a></p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Disembarkment syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>You know that feeling you get when you feel wobbly after you disembark a boat? You’ve probably heard someone say you’re “getting your land legs back.” For most people, this feeling of being in constant motion usually goes away after a few minutes or hours. But some people suffer from disembarkment syndrome, a condition where their bodies and brains can never shake that feeling of swaying and rocking. Unfortunately, it’s a hard condition to treat and usually goes away within a year. And it’s not just limited to being out on a boat either; riding in planes, trains, cars, even elevators can cause it too. Unfortunately, doctors still aren’t sure what really lies behind disembarkment syndrome. People who get migraines and women ages 30 to 60 are more likely to get it, but experts are uncertain if hormones play a role or how migraines could be linked.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Morgellons disease </strong></li> </ol> <p>People with this skin condition typically feel like something is stinging or crawling all over their skin. Unfortunately, Morgellons disease is an uncommon skin condition, characterised by small fibres or particles emerging from skin sores, that modern medicine still doesn’t understand. Some doctors think the condition is all in the patient’s head and try to treat them with cognitive behavioural therapy, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs or counselling, while others in the medical field think the fibres could be caused by an infection from the bacterium Agrobacterium, commonly found to cause tumours in plants. As researchers attempt to study the cause of this mysterious disease, there’s still no official guidelines on diagnosis and treatment.</p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> The boy who doesn’t feel hungry</strong></li> </ol> <p>In October 2013, Landon Jones, a 12-year-old boy from Iowa, U SA, suddenly woke up without an appetite or thirst. It only took a year for the boy to go from a healthy 47kg to a meagre 30kg. Doctors were baffled by his condition after countless brain scans, psychiatric evaluations and medical evaluations for digestive problems or eating disorders showed nothing. Some doctors wonder if he suffers from a rare brain dysfunction, particularly in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls hunger and thirst. In 2014, his parents reached out to the National Institutes of Health to help evaluate Landon and possibly treat him for this rare disease. But there’s been no news to-date to say if doctors have determined a diagnosis.</p> <p><em>Written by Ashley Lewis. This article first appeared on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/8-unsolved-medical-mysteries-that-still-stump-doctors" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p> </p>

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Mum reunited with newborn baby after separation across border

<p>A NSW mum has finally been reunited with her newborn baby after the two were separated on opposite sides of the Queensland border due to COVID-19 restrictions.</p> <p>Chantelle Northfield was told she couldn’t see her newborn son Harvey who was rushed to Brisbane for lifesaving medical treatment after being born with breathing difficulties.</p> <p>Despite Ms Northfield and her husband Glen being granted permission from NSW and Queensland authorities to travel north to visit Harvey, the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital told them they were too “high-risk” and would need to quarantine for 14 days.</p> <p>But today, Ms Northfield finally had her baby in her arms again after he was brought back to hospital in Lismore.</p> <p>“At 1.20 pm today Harvey was brought back to the nursery at Lismore Hospital and came straight into my arms after a long 4 days,” Ms Northfield said on Facebook.</p> <p>“We will forever be grateful to Lismore Base Hospital and how they did everything they could and tried their hardest to help get both Glen and I across the border to be by Harvey’s side. “We also hope that Qld allows more exemptions under medical circumstances to prevent all this from happening to any more people.”</p> <p>Ms Northfield said Harvey was “doing well” but will remain in hospital for the next day or two.</p> <p>Due to breathing difficulties, the newborn was sent to the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital for “extensive” medical treatment.</p> <p>“I obviously wanted to go with him, but unfortunately with the coronavirus pandemic, we were not able,” Ms Northfield said, 7 News reported.</p> <p>She and her partner were told they couldn’t come in the helicopter as there was no room, but were able to come by car.</p> <p>After receiving the necessary permissions from NSW Health and Queensland Police, the hospital deemed them as “too high-risk”.</p> <p>“Harvey was sent to a Brisbane Hospital via helicopter Friday night as he was having trouble breathing and needed further treatment then the amazing workers at Lismore could do,” Ms Northfield said in an earlier post on Facebook.</p> <p>“Due to the coronavirus pandemic and the closure of the Qld border, Glen and I were refused entry to the hospital until after 14 days mandatory quarantine in a hotel.</p> <p>“We would have been more than willing to do that if there was a guarantee that Harvey would be there for that long but no one is 100 per cent sure and the second he no longer needs such extensive treatment he will be flown back to Lismore.</p> <p>“Any parent can understand the stress and the heartache of being home without your baby whilst they’re in a hospital and you’re not allowed to visit.”</p> <p>Ms Northfield said she was relying on video calls to see Harvey, the little brother of the couple’s one-year-old son Lloyd.</p> <p>“FaceTime’s just not the same because I can’t even lay a finger on him,” she told 7 News through tears on Monday.</p> <p>“All I want are both my boys with me, happy and healthy. But one is going to be in Brisbane where we can’t see him.</p> <p>“I just want him to know how much I love him.”</p>

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10 perfect arguments that make mask wearing a no-brainer

<p>Many people understandably feel powerless against the invisible but very real threat posed by the coronavirus. But we don’t need to resign ourselves to merely hoping it goes away.</p> <p>Wearing a face mask is one of the most powerful steps we can take – along with keeping our hands clean and maintaining social distance – to quash the spread of coronavirus in our communities, says Dr Andrew Pekosz, professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.</p> <p>“These things together provide a high degree of protection,” he notes. If you’re not already on board with masks (and 65 per cent of us are, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey), the following facts should convince you.</p> <ol> <li><strong> Masks of all types are effective</strong></li> </ol> <p>Masks unquestionably reduce the spread of droplets from the nose and mouth, says Pekosz. Researchers recently demonstrated this fact when they recorded high-speed video of people uttering a simple phrase both when wearing and not wearing cloth masks. A slightly damp washcloth prevented nearly all of the speakers’ droplets from passing through. Another study concluded that “the odds of developing an infection with a coronavirus were reduced by 78 per cent when wearing any mask.”</p> <p>Even at less than 100 per cent effectiveness, “you don’t throw up your hands,” Dr Peter Chin-Hong, an infectious disease specialist. “That’s silly. Nobody’s taking a cholesterol medicine because they’re going to prevent a heart attack 100 per cent of the time, but you’re reducing your risk substantially.”</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Coronavirus stats are lower where masks are required</strong></li> </ol> <p>A recent study compared death rates in countries where people were required to wear masks with those in countries where masks were optional, and the differences were stark. The mortality rate increased by an average of 43 per cent weekly in countries where people were not required to wear masks, compared with a 2.8 per cent increase in countries where people were wearing masks.</p> <p>In the United States, similar disparities have been seen. In a review of the first 15 states to require masks in public (between April 8 and May 5), researchers found “a significant decline” in the daily growth of cases once masks were mandated, and the effect increased each day after the orders were signed. The researchers concluded that up to 450,000 cases may have been averted due to these mandates by May 22.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Masks prevent transmission from people who don’t know they’re sick</strong></li> </ol> <p>It takes an average of five days (but sometimes as long as 14 days) for people infected with COVID-19 to show symptoms. In addition, up to 18 per cent of people who have the virus never develop symptoms at all but can still pass it on to others, according to an article from the BBC. In fact, nearly half of all people who develop COVID-19 are infected by people who do not show any symptoms.</p> <p>If those asymptomatic people had worn masks – even though they felt fine – they could have prevented this transmission, Pekosz says. “That’s part of our critical defence against this virus,” he explains. “It’s people spreading this virus before they show symptoms who are really driving this infection.” Researchers still don’t understand why some people remain asymptomatic while others develop full-blown symptoms. That’s just one of the coronavirus mysteries that still can’t be explained.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Wearing masks could help the economy</strong></li> </ol> <p>A study by the financial firm Goldman Sachs estimates that up to 25 per cent more people would wear masks if governments introduced a national mask mandate. That, in turn, would substantially reduce the rate of infection growth, allowing businesses to remain open and saving 5 per cent of the gross domestic product.</p> <p>Wearing masks would also protect the people who work in those businesses, thereby helping their community thrive.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> If we all wore masks, kids’ schooling may not be as disrupted</strong></li> </ol> <p>Educators, parents, and students largely agree that the remote-learning options most schools put into place earlier this year have been fundamentally disastrous, especially for disadvantaged students. Learning and social skills have fallen by the wayside, while parents scramble to juggle their own work-from-home schedules with those of their kids, and teachers adapt to new methods of instruction.</p> <p>“If you can control the spread of the virus in the community, then schools can be opened up in ways that allow kids back in the classroom and allow them to have interactions with their teacher and peers, and go forwards in some way,” Pekosz says. One thing is certain, though: Education won’t be the same.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Masks protect people with underlying conditions</strong></li> </ol> <p>The teenager working on the supermarket checkout might have Type 1 diabetes. The toddler on the bus might have a heart defect. The man in line in front of you might be caring for his wife who has MS. The truth is, more than half the people you encounter on a daily basis probably have an invisible underlying condition, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. A Canadian study found that 54 per cent of workers do. And the evidence is clear that people with underlying conditions are at the highest risk for severe complications from the coronavirus. Managing a chronic illness is difficult enough in the best of times. We can extend kindness by not making it harder. Donning a mask in public keeps everyone safe.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Masks are an easy, low-tech preventive measure until we have a vaccine</strong></li> </ol> <p>Until a vaccine for the novel coronavirus becomes available, our only options for prevention are handwashing, physical distancing, and wearing masks. Even when a vaccine has been tested and determined to be both safe and effective, it will take some time before it’s widely available. “Even if you just focus on the United States, you’re talking about immunising 300 million people. It may be that these vaccines are going to need two doses to work – an initial shot and a booster dose. That’s an awful lot of vaccinations that have to take place to get a large percentage of the population immunised,” says Pekosz. “This won’t be a light switch. It will be a process, based on the logistics.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> Masking up is a moral issue, not a political one</strong></li> </ol> <p>The Right and Left on the political spectrum alike endorse wearing masks in public were community have spikes in infections. Even those who initially resisted wearing them now are doing so. One American commentator Karen Hughes, wrote in an op-ed that not wearing a mask is “an incredibly selfish act that puts other people’s lives at risk. Like yelling ‘fire!’ in a packed theatre or brandishing a loaded gun in a crowd, failing to don a mask greatly increases the risk that one person will endanger others.”</p> <p>And wearing a mask doesn’t infringe on individual liberty any more than wearing a seat belt in the car or refraining from smoking in public places does. “There are limitations we accept to avoid hurting people in our community,” says Jeremy Howard, distinguished research scientist and founder of #Masks4All. “It’s reasonable, kind, and respectful to take some actions to reduce the risk of hurting others.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="9"> <li><strong> Wearing a mask is a sign of strength</strong></li> </ol> <p>Men are more likely than women to believe that “wearing a face covering is shameful, not cool, a sign of weakness, and a stigma,” according to recent research. Howard emphatically disagrees with that perception. “Wearing a mask is a strong behaviour,” he says. “It actually takes strength to do something that is awkward and uncomfortable to protect jobs, protect the economy, protect lives. Weak people take the easy way out – they’re too scared to do something that’s new or different.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong> Masks can serve other purposes</strong></li> </ol> <p>Masks have come to the rescue on more than one occasion, like when a cold sore or pimple pops up. Thanks to the mask, no one need ever know it’s there. Ditto that for hiding an uncontrollable smirk in a serious discussion and for keeping your coffee breath to yourself. You’ll also save money on lipstick, since there’s no need to make up the bottom half of your face. And finally, masks are available in such a wide range of designs that there’s sure to be one that expresses your sense of fashion, your personality, or your viewpoint.</p> <p><em>Written by Laurie Budgar. This article first appeared on </em><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/10-facts-that-will-convince-you-to-wear-a-face-mask">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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Vic aged care patient’s leg found infested with ants

<p><strong>WARNING: Graphic content.</strong></p> <p>Victoria’s aged care nurses are being overworked and understaffed during the coronavirus, and that was shown quite clearly through the horrific living conditions some elderly residents are being left in.<br /><br /><em>The Guardian</em> reported on Sunday that one woman had been left in bed with a bloodied bandage on her leg, which soon became overrun with ants.<br /><br />The 95-year-old nursing home resident known as Milka succumbed to her injuries and passed away on Sunday morning.<br /><br />Milka is just one of many who missed out on the care she desperately deserved and needed due to the COVID-19 pandemic completely annihilating Melbourne’s aged care system.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837385/covid-cases-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3d1e698a228448439dbd9f54792e044a" /><br /><br />The footage and photos of Mila’s leg were taken inside a private residential aged care home in Melbourne on Tuesday.<br /><br />Two weeks earlier, a staff member at the facility had contracted COVID-19.<br /><br />The virus quickly spread through the facility, and it resulted in some residents being left without food or water for 18 hours.<br /><br />It was also revealed that faeces remained on the floor as staff rushed from one critically ill patient to another.<br /><br />On some days, there were only two staff members looking after 68 residents.<br /><br />Most staff members had been sent home sick.<br /><br />In a press conference on Monday morning, Premier Daniel Andrews acknowledged the terrible conditions in which Milka died.<br /><br />“I have not seen the footage but I have been briefed on it, that is just shameful and would be very distressing for everybody concerned,” he said.<br /><br />“That footage relates to a particular facility which we have now taken over.<br /><br />“Hospital nurses have gone and taken over in a number of these situations and I think they have taken over for good reasons.”<br /><br />Milka’s family told <em>The Guardian</em> they do not blame the nursing home.<br /><br />They say until COVID-19 swept through the aged care centre, she was provided with amazing care.</p>

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1 in 10 women are affected by endometriosis – so why does it take so long to diagnose?

<p>Endometriosis is a debilitating, chronic condition that affects <a href="https://www.endometriosisaustralia.org/research">1 in 10 women</a> worldwide. It occurs when tissue <a href="https://www.endofound.org/endometriosis">which has similar properties to the womb lining,</a> ends up in the body and attaches to organs, forming a patch of tissue called a <a href="https://www.jeanhailes.org.au/health-a-z/endometriosis/symptoms-causes">lesion</a>.</p> <p>The condition can cause chronic pelvic pain, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and pain during sex. Painful symptoms can often make it hard for women to work or study, which has long-term socioeconomic impacts.</p> <p>Unfortunately, women with endometriosis can wait up to <a href="https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/27/12/3412/650946">10 years</a> for a diagnosis. But why does it take so long?</p> <p><strong>Diagnosis is difficult</strong></p> <p>Endometriosis can only be diagnosed through surgery, and in Australian public hospitals it is common to have to wait <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-data/myhospitals/sectors/elective-surgery">up to a year</a> for this procedure. This is partly because surgery for endometriosis is classified as category 3 - the lowest-priority elective surgery in Australia.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>To diagnose the condition, lesions need to be surgically removed and analysed by a pathologist. The operation is performed by keyhole surgery, but it can have significant financial and health impact on sufferers.</p> <p>Surgery costs are covered in public hospitals, but long wait times mean women who can afford it <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/chronic-disease/endometriosis-prevalence-and-hospitalisations/contents/table-of-contents">are more likely to use private hospitals for endometriosis surgery</a> than for other diseases.</p> <p>Then, to have a pathologist analyse the lesions removed during surgery and provide a diagnosis <a href="https://www.medibank.com.au/health-support/hospital-assist/costs/laparoscopy/">can cost A$5,546</a> with only <a href="http://www9.health.gov.au/mbs/search.cfm?q=endometriosis&amp;Submit=&amp;sopt=S?">a fraction covered by Medicare</a>, leaving patients out of pocket.</p> <p>Non-invasive imaging by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can often detect lesions on the ovary (endometrioma), and deep lesions that invade the bowel or bladder. But while this <em>indicates</em> endometriosis, lesions analysed by a pathologist are still considered the gold standard for a formal diagnosis.</p> <p>Ultrasounds and MRIs also can’t detect lesions that are on the surface of organs (superficial) and are thought to be an early stage of the disease.</p> <p>A prior lack of endometriosis research funding in Australia has hampered progress towards developing non-invasive screening tests. But newly developed tests may incorporate emerging evidence that endometriosis has several <a href="https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1471-0528.15894">distinct subtypes</a>, each with a specific diagnostic and treatment profile. Recognition of distinct subtypes has <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fonc.2011.00012/full">improved and informed the treatment of breast cancer</a>, and this might also be true for endometriosis.</p> <p>Until such tests are developed, some clinicians are advocating for a <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2018.12.039">diagnosis based on symptoms instead of lesions</a>, but this hasn’t been standardised or validated yet.</p> <p><strong>“It just comes with being a woman…”</strong></p> <p>Normalisation of period pain means women often wait <a href="https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/27/12/3412/650946">two to three years</a> from the onset of symptoms before seeking medical help. And public awareness of endometriosis and its symptoms are low. This explains why only <a href="https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/27/12/3412/650946">38% of women</a> with suspected endometriosis present to their GP each year.</p> <p>Even if a woman does present to her GP with symptoms, a lack of education in GPs and general gynaecologists can result in late referral and misdiagnosis. This can add more than <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2018.09.006">two years</a> to a diagnosis journey. While Australian data is lacking, European women with suspected endometriosis have <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rbmo.2016.02.003">very low rates of GP referral</a> for diagnostic testing (12%) or to a gynaecologist (44%).</p> <p><strong>Biases come into play</strong></p> <p>In the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis gender, race and socioeconomic biases come into play.</p> <p>If a man reported to his general practitioner (GP) with severe pelvic pain, he would likely be sent for tests immediately. This is because there probably isn’t a “normal” underlying reason for his <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5845507/">pain</a>. But in cases of endometriosis, pelvic pain can be confused with menstrual cramps, resulting in delays for further tests.</p> <p>A woman’s annual salary may impact her diagnosis time too. Those who can afford private healthcare can access specialist gynaecologists quickly, and can avoid the long waiting lists for diagnostic surgery.</p> <p>In fact,<a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/a4ba101d-cd6d-4567-a44f-f825047187b8/aihw-phe-247.pdf.aspx?inline=true">65% of endometriosis hospitalisations</a> in Australia are either self-funded or funded by private healthcare. But even with private healthcare, women with endometriosis pay, on average, <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0223316&amp;type=printable">$3,670 a year in out-of-pocket expenses</a> for tests, treatments and surgeries.</p> <p>Despite a having a similar disease incidence, <a href="https://obgyn.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1471-0528.15692">women of colour</a> are less likely to be diagnosed than Caucasians. In fact, <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/a4ba101d-cd6d-4567-a44f-f825047187b8/aihw-phe-247.pdf.aspx?inline=true">Australian Indigenous women</a> are 1.6 times less likely to be admitted to hospital for endometriosis. This may be due to difficulty accessing health care, the costs associated with treatment, and cultural differences in health-seeking behaviour.</p> <p><strong>Hope for the future</strong></p> <p>The Australian government’s <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/national-action-plan-for-endometriosis">National Action Plan for Endometriosis</a> outlines a roadmap to overcome many of these diagnostic hurdles.</p> <p>It was developed in consultation with the <a href="https://www.acendo.com.au/">Australian Coalition for Endometriosis</a> and includes public health campaigns and educational resources for both the general public and GPs. It also supports research into the innovation of new diagnostic tools and the development of centres of excellence for diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis. These centres will enable early access to specialised care and appropriate screening and diagnosis.</p> <p>Though the current research investment for Australian endometriosis research is only 0.2% of the annual cost of endometriosis in Australia it’s an important start to transform endometriosis patient outcomes.</p> <p>The Action Plan was accompanied by the greatest investment to date in Australian endometriosis research by <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/chronic-conditions/what-were-doing-about-chronic-conditions/what-were-doing-about-endometriosis">Australian</a> and <a href="https://hudson.org.au/latest-news/us2-07-million-awarded-to-tackle-endometriosis/">international</a> funding bodies.</p> <p>The current research investment (totalling A$14.55 million) for Australian endometriosis research is only 0.2% of the annual cost of endometriosis in Australia (A$7.4 billion). But it is an important start to transform endometriosis patient outcomes.</p> <p><strong>Steps to take if you think you have endometriosis</strong></p> <p>1. Know the many and varied <a href="http://endometriosis.org/endometriosis/symptoms/">symptoms of endometriosis</a>. Period pain that cannot be relieved by over-the-counter anti-inflammatories such as naprogesic is not normal. Nor is painful sex</p> <p>2. document your menstrual cycle and symptoms – several apps are available, but a diary also works</p> <p>3. ask your GP for a referral to a specialist endometriosis gynaecologist</p> <p>4. if a pelvic ultrasound is needed, ensure it is done by a sonographer who specialises in detecting deep infiltrating endometriosis</p> <p>5. if your concerns are not addressed, seek a second (or third) opinion.</p> <p><em>Transmen and non-binary people can also be affected by endometriosis. This community already experiences delays to healthcare, often exacerbated when they seek help for conditions not matching their outward gender.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Caroline Gargett, Caitlin Filby and Fiona Cousins. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/1-in-10-women-are-affected-by-endometriosis-so-why-does-it-take-so-long-to-diagnose-141803">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Woolworths praised for latest move in COVID fight

<p>Woolworths will announce its first chief medical officer today in a bid to protect staff and customers from coronavirus - with his first task focused on the issue of masks.</p> <p>The decision comes after the supermarket “strongly encouraged” its customers to cover their faces while shopping in NSW, ACT and parts of Queensland this month.</p> <p>Coles and Kmart have also followed suit and made the same recommendation to residents of NSW.</p> <p>But now Woolworths is taking it a step further, announcing on Friday that Dr Rob McCartney will take on the role of its first ever Chief Medical Officer.</p> <p>He will directly communicate with Woolworths board executives and create policies around the ongoing safety of Woolies shoppers and employees as the country continues to deal with the COVID-19 crisis.</p> <p>His first task is to educate staff on the importance of covering your face, and the proper way to do so.</p> <p>Other responsibilities include speaking with regulatory authorities, state and federal health departments, and educating staff.</p> <p>“There is a plethora of medical information and advice to consider in the planning and implementation of a COVID-safe workplace. This appointment ensures we have an internal expert, with a grounding in medical advice, to help make well-informed, long-term decisions on the safety and wellbeing of our teams and customers,“ Brian Long, general manager of group safety, health and wellbeing at Woolworths said.</p> <p>According to Dr McCartney’s LinkedIn profile, he is a physician who has specialised in occupational and environmental medicine for over two decades.</p> <p>He is also the founder of Resile, an occupational health service and consulting business that helps protect workers against the coronavirus.</p> <p>“My ambition is to assist these in maximising the health, wellbeing, safety and productivity of their workforce,” he said.</p> <p>“I have extensive experience in the prevention and management of occupational injury and illness, as well as helping people return to the workforce after experiencing health problems.”</p>

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