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"Racism is taught": Heartwarming video of toddlers hugging each other goes viral

<p>A video of two toddlers running down the street to give each other a hug has gone viral, garnering headlines across the globe.</p> <p>The video, posted by Michael Cisneros to social media last week, shows his two-year-old son Maxwell running towards and hugging his best friend Finnegan after unexpectedly spotting him on the New York street.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FMichaelDCisnerosNYC%2Fvideos%2F10217659556234176%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>Cisneros told <em>CBSN New York</em> that the two boys hug every time they see each other.</p> <p>The father said the video has attracted thousands of views and shares online because of the growing racial tensions in the US and around the world.</p> <p>“Honestly, I think it has gotten so big because of the race issue in our country and also around the world,” Cisneros said.</p> <p>“Racism is taught. Hatred is taught. These two boys don’t see anything different within each other. They love each other for who they are and that’s exactly how it should be.</p> <p>“We just want to raise loving, caring boys, and I think the world likes to see a little bit of hope.”</p> <p>Cisneros said Maxwell and Finnegan first became friends when their parents met at a restaurant a year ago.</p> <p>He added that today the toddlers celebrate their birthdays together and are always “super excited to see each other, even if they’ve only been apart for a day or two”.</p>

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10 conversation starters that make you instantly interesting

<p><strong>1.Perfect conversation starters</strong></p> <p>Whether you’re working up the courage to talk to an attractive stranger of feeling awkward at a social or business event, the conversation topics will get you off to a winning start</p> <p><strong>2.Conversation Topic: Ask for a helping hand</strong></p> <p> “Helping questions are great conversation starters because when a person helps you it forms natural bonds. When you help another person to figure what an item is on the buffet or locate the bathroom, it lowers your defences. For example, if you’re at the supermarket, ask ‘Do you know how to tell if this fruit is ripe?’ It makes you look open to learning more and will help the conversation flow naturally.” – Dawn Maslar, MS, author of <em>Men Chase, Women Choose: The Neuroscience of Meeting, Dating, Losing Your Mind, and Finding True Love</em>.</p> <p><strong>3.Conversation Topic: Compliment something other than someone’s looks</strong></p> <p> “Instead of complimenting something generic like their eyes, highlight something that shows their personality, like their purse or a book. This is simple, elegant and great if you are interested in someone or anytime you want to boost their likeability toward you for business or social reasons.” – Paul DePompo, PsyD, ABPP, psychologist</p> <p><strong>4.Conversation Topic: Bring up a shared interest</strong></p> <p> “Many people think they have nothing in common with a stranger but if someone is at a supermarket, restaurant or bar they are there for a reason – one which is likely similar to yours. You’re both there so you both share a common interest. Ask questions to find out what that interest is. For instance, ask about what their experience at that venue has been like or why they chose it.” – Shannon Battle, licensed professional counsellor</p> <p><strong>5.Conversation Topic: Go simple… yet bold</strong></p> <p> “Give a genuine smile and say, ‘Hi.’ It sounds too simple but people are so used to other people staring at their phones that a simple smile and hello can be a very bold move. It shows the other person that you’ve noticed them and you’re interested in getting to know them better. And you’ll almost always get a hello back. (If you don’t, let it go. You don’t want to date a rude person anyway.)” – Suzanne Casamento, dating expert and the creator of Fantasy Dating</p> <p><strong>6.Conversation Topic: Ask for their honest opinion</strong></p> <p> “Asking ‘I’ve been really thinking deeply about something and wondering if I can share it, and get your feedback?’ shows your interest in the other person and solicits new and interesting information that is fun to discuss. Pretty much anyone will want to share their opinions with an interested party and they will think you are nice and fun to be with, as well.” – Melissa Orlov, therapist and author of <em>The Couple’s Guide to Thriving With ADHD</em>.</p> <p><strong>7.Conversation Topic: Tell a bonding joke</strong></p> <p> “Jokes work well because they are disarming and work on a biological level. If a woman laughs at a man’s joke, he feels assured that she has a level of comfort with him. For her, laughing releases oxytocin, the ‘bonding hormone.’ These two things together create an opening for more conversation.” – Dawn Maslar</p> <p><strong>8.Conversation Topic: Give an out-of-the-blue compliment</strong></p> <p> “I always tell my clients to try out a compliment. It breaks the ice and these days it’s completely unexpected! You can test out doing this by just giving people walking down the street a compliment and see their reaction, most times people will give you a smile and possibly engage in more conversation. After all, who doesn’t like to be complimented?” – Stef Safran, a matchmaking and dating expert in Chicago and owner of Stef and the City.</p> <p><strong>9.Conversation Topic: Get (pop) cultured</strong></p> <p> “Make a comment or joke about something big in pop culture that most people would be familiar with – something light, NOT political. If you need ideas look at what’s trending or are hot topics on Twitter or Facebook.” – Stef Safran.</p> <p><strong>10.Conversation Topic: Ask a fake favour</strong></p> <p> “People love to help so asking for a small favour is a great conversation starter. If you don’t have a favour to ask for, just make one up. Ask the person you find attractive to help you reach something on a high shelf or hold something while you look through your wallet. At the very least you’ll end up with a fun story to tell your friends.” – Suzanne Casamento</p> <p><em>Written </em>by <em>Charlotte Hilton Andersen.</em> This<em> article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/37-conversation-starters-that-make-you-instantly-interesting/"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a><em><u> </u></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Sneeze with Ease!

<p>Over 200 million people worldwide live with incontinence, and in Australia alone 1 in 4 people have some form of incontinence which is even higher for older members of the community.</p> <p>The onset of menopause, prostate issues, pelvic surgeries, hysterectomies or even just having children can lead to bladder and bowel control problems, which can be difficult to deal with.</p> <p>Despite its prevalence, the reality is no one plans for a future with incontinence and coming to terms with this condition can be challenging. Developing the right routine and learning to manage your needs, or the needs of another you care for, can often take time and feel frustrating. An important element of this is finding the right product solution, and with many factors to consider such as ongoing cost, comfort, convenience and product bulkiness this can prove overwhelming.</p> <p><strong>The Challenges of Buying Continence Management Products</strong><br />The traditional route used by many is to head to the supermarket or local pharmacy, only to be faced with a personal care aisle full of products that vary greatly in style, size, features and degrees of absorbency. It can prove both difficult and confronting to stand in front of rows of products trying to figure out what will work best.</p> <p><strong>A Smarter Way</strong><br />One Australian company offering a better way is <em>ConfidenceClub</em>, innovative, Australian business with a genuine interest in the lives of people who live with this common condition. Founded by two online retailing veterans in collaboration with one of Australia’s leading experts in continence management products, <em>ConfidenceClub</em> offers a focused range of quality products that are discreetly delivered to your door with no fuss.</p> <p>“We really wanted to make life easier for those who live with incontinence” said Gavin Basserabie, co-founder of <em>ConfidenceClub</em>. “With the evolution of online shopping and the convenience of fast and discreet national delivery, we felt we could improve the experience while providing better products and savings. And if you are one of the roughly 50 percent of <em>ConfidenceClub</em> customers who are buying for someone else, we offer a great way to save you time that can be better spent with your loved one.”</p> <p><strong>Saving Time and Money</strong><br />By going direct to the consumer,<em> ConfidenceClub</em> offers great performing products at significantly cheaper prices than other well-known brands. Orders can be placed on the phone or online and are quickly delivered straight to your door in discreet packaging.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/sneeze-with-ease"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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“Devastated”: AFL coach Danny Frawley’s family release statement about his death

<p>The devastated family of Danny Frawley have spoken out about his shock death yesterday after the tributes flowed in for the AFL legend.</p> <p>The 56-year-old St Kilda Hall of Famer died at the scene of a car crash near Ballarat in Victoria on Monday.</p> <p>He was the only person in the car when it crashed into a tree at around 1:30pm, in what Victorian Police have described as a “significant collision scene”.</p> <p>The world of AFL was left reeling from the passing of a legend of the game and yesterday, the family released their first statement.</p> <p>“On Monday Danny was taken tragically from us,” the statement read.</p> <p>“The Frawley family are devastated, but full of love and pride for a remarkable man who touched the lives of many.</p> <p>“To some he was known as an AFL footballer, coach and media figure, but to his wife Anita and their three daughters; Chelsea, Danielle and Keeley, Danny was a loving husband and a devoted dad. Danny adored his family.</p> <p>“The Frawley families are totally shocked and devastated by his passing, but Danny provided us with strength, good humour and unwavering support during his extraordinary life, memories which will be cherished and help us cope with his tragic death.”</p> <p>“We would like to sincerely thank everyone for the outpouring of love and kindness at this time. We are overwhelmed by the messages of support following his death. We are humbled, proud and incredibly touched,” the statement continues.</p> <p>“His legacy and love of his family will never be dimmed. Forever in our hearts.”</p> <p>Tributes have flowed for the Hall of Famer, with Fox Footy having dedicated their Monday night to remember the legacy that Danny has left behind.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Tributes have flowed today for Danny Frawley after his tragic death yesterday. <br /><br />“People got to tell their Danny stories today. I was amazed how many people had a single, fleeting encounter with Danny, that was lasting.” - Gerard <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AFL360?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AFL360</a> <a href="https://t.co/J2Fnk4YWCt">pic.twitter.com/J2Fnk4YWCt</a></p> — FOX FOOTY (@FOXFOOTY) <a href="https://twitter.com/FOXFOOTY/status/1171362353293561858?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>AFL CEO Gillon McLachlan has detailed how the league plans to honour the memory of Danny, as two games will take place during the weekend with both games holding a moment of silence. All players, umpires and match officials will be wearing black armbands.</p> <p>“Danny was a friend to everyone in footy and his passion for the game, from the elite to the grassroots was unmatched,” he said to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/sport/afl/petition-for-the-afl-to-honour-danny-frawley-with-award-keeps-growing/news-story/30d0c706d30a003246bc631677f87517" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“Whether you knew him as the St Kilda Captain, the Richmond Coach, or the loveable guy on the TV or radio who always made you smile, the acknowledgment this weekend is a way for everyone to pay tribute to the man we all knew and loved.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Danny Frawley will be acknowledged with a moment of silence at this weekend’s Toyota <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AFLFinals?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AFLFinals</a> Series matches. All playing clubs along with the umpires &amp; match officials will wear black armbands as a mark of respect to the former player, coach, administrator &amp; media personality. <a href="https://t.co/Yg9dSoKPKX">pic.twitter.com/Yg9dSoKPKX</a></p> — AFL (@AFL) <a href="https://twitter.com/AFL/status/1171312804348850176?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>A <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.change.org/p/afl-make-the-golden-fist-a-proper-afl-award-in-honour-of-danny-spud-frawley" target="_blank">change.org petition</a> has also been started, calling for an award to recognise the AFL’s best defender. The petition has 57,754 signatures at the time of writing.</p> <p>Danny was unofficially recognised with the “Golden Fist” segment on Fox Footy show “Bounce” since 2012, but petition starter Alex Baggio says this isn’t enough.</p> <p>“Danny ‘Spud’ Frawley was an AFL legend, and made the Golden Fist segment on Bounce something widely recognised across the AFL community,” petition starter Alex Baggio wrote.</p> <p>“In honour of his passing, the AFL should introduce the Danny Frawley Golden Fist award for the best defender on Brownlow night.”</p>

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Ellen DeGeneres reveals fascinating new details about baby Archie

<p>Since he was born in May and made headlines around the world for being the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's first child, the public hasn’t been able to see much of baby Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor. </p> <p>While we have seen a few portraits of the family, both Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan have been particular about what information and photographs to share with the world. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNGOrbAldR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNGOrbAldR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by 𝐀𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 🇬🇧 (@babysusexroyal)</a> on May 8, 2019 at 7:19am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Well, we’ve just gotten our rare dose of baby Archie from none other than TV show host Ellen DeGeneres. </p> <p>On the latest episode of <em>The Ellen Show, </em>the host revealed she and wife Portia de Rossi got some cuddle time with Archie while on a trip to Europe and the UK. </p> <p>"I just want to say, it was an honour for them to meet me," DeGeneres joked.</p> <p>"Seriously, they are so amazing."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">This summer I got to meet Prince Harry and Meghan’s son Archie in England. Would you like to see the picture? <a href="https://t.co/gdNpYwrsXv">pic.twitter.com/gdNpYwrsXv</a></p> — Ellen DeGeneres (@TheEllenShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/1171116512108670976?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The couples both divulged into an in depth conversation about wildlife conservation and the work Duchess Meghan and hubby Prince Harry had been undertaking in Botswana and Rwanda. </p> <p>“They were the most down-to-earth, compassionate people. Imagine being attacked for everything you do, when all you’re trying to do is make the world better,” she added. </p> <p>Ellen made clear it wasn’t the only topic they talked about however. </p> <p>The 61-year-old admitted she didn’t feel right asking the couple for a picture of little Archie, so instead took to drawing him. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 280.87986463620985px;" src="/media/7830577/image.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4818a677ba884bbe881f92a6c8e08ef8" /></p> <p>"I can't tell you how sweet [Harry and Meghan] are, but the most important thing is I got to hold little Archie. I fed Archie, I held Archie," DeGeneres said.</p> <p>"He does have a body, but I just did the face for y'all. He has a perfectly circular head," she joked. </p> <p>"He looks just like Harry, and he had more hair than I did at the time."</p> <p> </p>

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“This is childhood cancer”: Mum pens powerful post about the realities of deadly illness

<p>A US mum has been praised for her candid post about the realities of living with a member who has childhood cancer.</p> <p>Her son has been diagnosed with leukaemia and has opened up on the ways that the diagnosis in 2015 has impacted the whole family.</p> <p>Kaitlin Burge has documented her son Beckett’s cancer experience on Facebook and has shared a heartbreaking image of her other child Aubrey comforting Beckett during a bout of nausea.</p> <p>"My two kids, 15 months apart, went from playing in school and at home together to sitting in a cold hospital room together," the mum writes.</p> <p>"My then four-year-old watched her brother go from an ambulance to the ICU.</p> <p>"She watched a dozen doctors throw a mask over his face, poke and prod him with needles, pump a dozen medications through his body, all while he laid there helplessly.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbeatitlikebeckett%2Fposts%2F3305533652820876&amp;width=500" width="500" height="764" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Kaitlin explained that her daughter Aubrey struggled to understand what was happening to her brother.</p> <p>"She wasn't sure what was happening. All she knew was that something was wrong with her brother, her best friend."</p> <p>"He never wanted to play. She didn't understand how he was able to walk before this, but now he can't even stand unassisted," the post continues.</p> <p>"Why couldn't they go to their favourite trampoline park anymore? ... Why didn't he have to go back to school, but she did?"</p> <p>Kaitlin said that Aubrey never left her brothers side, which is something that Kaitlin strongly supported.</p> <p>"She spent a fair amount of time, by his side in the bathroom, while he got sick. She stuck by him," she continues.</p> <p>"She supported him and she took care of him, regardless of the situation. To this day, they are closer. She always takes care of him.</p> <p>"Vomiting between play sessions. Waking up to throw up. Standing by her brother's side and rubbing his back while he gets sick ... This is childhood cancer. Take it or leave it."</p> <p>The comment section was flooded with supportive messages from other families who praised Kaitlin for shining a light on childhood cancer.</p> <p>"You are highlighting an often overlooked fact that cancer affects the entire family, especially childhood cancer," one writes.</p> <p>"Your daughter has a loving and compassionate heart and is showing that by the way she is helping her brother."</p> <p>"My other two children are much older but they break down watching their sister go through the motions. I can definitely relate," another says.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Beckett and his sister on his journey through childhood cancer. </p>

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Smart things healthy people do before 10 am

<p>Try these expert tips on how to enjoy a healthier start to every morning.</p> <p><strong>Start your day right with these tips</strong></p> <p>Early birds get the worm. You know how the old adage, but do you know how to put it into practice? Here, experts share what healthy people do before 10 am… every single day.</p> <p><strong>They meditate</strong></p> <p>Before you roll your eyes at the thought, remember that meditation doesn’t have to be a lengthy, drawn-out process to be effective. As Dr Lillie Rosenthal, explains, setting your intention for your day helps you connect your mind and body, allowing you to reset and reboot your central nervous system. “Upon opening your eyes in the morning, instead of racing to put on the coffee, take a brief pause,” she recommends. “Do some gentle breathing, breathing in for four counts in and breathing out for eight counts, taking in the ‘good’ and letting out ‘negative’ feelings.”</p> <p><strong>They take a break from their phones</strong></p> <p>It’s not enough to pause before hopping out of bed. Bryce Kennedy, life coach, says the healthiest of people avoid their phone as long as possible. In fact, prioritizing your time without distractions is essential. “Nothing or no one is allowed to enter that space. It is a time for reflection, writing, brainstorming, and flow. It is a small window that is open and needs to be caught in order to be used. Once the phone is turned on, emails checked, news read, texts replied to, etc. the window is closed,” Kennedy says.</p> <p><strong>They take a shower</strong></p> <p>Bad news if you prefer to rinse off before you go to bed at night, according to immunologist Dr Tania Elliott, it’s a healthier tactic to hop in the shower in the a.m. Not only does it help you feel extra alert and more awake, but when you add eucalyptus or peppermint you help stimulate your level of concentration via your nasal passages. (Add a drop of an essential oil to a diffuser near your tub.) Clean and ready to impress your boss? Yes, please!</p> <p><strong>They read something inspiring</strong></p> <p>Consider the last book you read or article you clicked on via Facebook that left you smiling once you paged through it. Life coach Dr Cali Estes says healthy people continuously seek sources of inspiration to keep them in the right frame of mind. “Spend ten minutes reading any article that will help you obtain your goals. This can be business, personal, self esteem-related or anything that will give you tips and tricks you can apply throughout the day,” she suggests.</p> <p><strong>They connect with others</strong></p> <p>While having “you” time is necessary to regenerate and refocus, Jeana Anderson Cohen, founder and CEO of the wellness and fitness media company A Sweat Life says spending time with others – especially those who lift you up and support you – is essential to your daily health. “Your family, your friends, your children, the groups you dedicate your time to – those connections are shown to be the greatest determinant of happiness. And happiness is not so surprisingly tied to your health. Try sending a text or an email to one person you miss in the morning with the intention to join them for a coffee or lunch in the near future,” she says.</p> <p><strong>They stay positive</strong></p> <p>Did your mother ever nudge you to talk to yourself as you would to your best friend? Probably so – and it’s worth applying that logic as an adult. Sonia Satra, life coach, says many people harp on the reasons they’re not measuring up, from not sleeping enough to contributing enough and the list goes on. “The best way to combat those ‘not-enough’s’ is to shift your focus by asking questions that will give you helpful, powerful answers,” she suggests. For example, ask yourself: What do I have enough time for? What am I already doing well? What am I grateful for? What do I want today to look like?</p> <p><strong>They practice gratitude</strong></p> <p>Even though the practice of gratitude is something that’s been trendy lately, Kien Vuu, MD and motivational speaker, says the benefits of being thankful are timeless. That’s why starting each day focusing on your blessings maintains your health in a long-term way. “Writing down things you are grateful for every morning releases feel-good hormones that prime your body for health and wellness. The emotion of gratitude cancels out fear and stress as well as reduces the production of cortisol, aka the stress hormone. This is a great emotional priming technique that allows you to better handle any stressors that may arise during the day,” he says.</p> <p><strong>They exercise</strong></p> <p>While hitting snooze once (or twice or three times) is a tempting prospect when you didn’t catch quite enough Zzzs, Dr Rosenthal says starting your day with movement does wonders for your health. “It gets you out of your heads and into your body. It stimulates the neurotransmitters in the brain and keeps you physiologically younger and more agile,” she notes. When you put a good workout on your priority list, you strengthen your cardiovascular health, curb your appetite, increase your consciousness, build muscle, and boost your overall happiness.</p> <p><strong>They eat breakfast at 10 am</strong></p> <p>Believe it or not, there’s a big benefit to fasting, according to Dr Rosenthal. When you go without food for ten or more hours, your blood sugar normalizes and your metabolism is restarted. This is why the healthiest of people wait to eat breakfast until 10 am, when enough time has passed from their midnight snack. A doughnut, of course, won’t do your body good though, which is why Dr Rosenthal recommends focusing on nutritious options, including unprocessed foods, such as oatmeal or a homemade smoothie with fruit and vegetables.</p> <p><strong>They hydrate</strong></p> <p>Considering our bodies are mostly made of water, it’s likely no surprise that continuously chugging this natural wonder is a must for a long life. Dr Rosenthal says the majority of us wait to chug water until we feel thirsty, and by then, it’s too late. She recommends drinking at least 350 to 475 millilitres of water right after you wake up and drinking a minimum of two litres total throughout the course of your day. “Try adding lemon to water which is alkaline and adds a favourable PH balance to the body. Do your best to avoid sugary drinks and diet drinks which are heavy on artificial sweeteners and chemical additives which the body processes as sugar anyway,” she adds.</p> <p><strong>They keep their space clean</strong></p> <p>Technically this is a task that should be completed before you tuck yourself in for the night, but Kennedy stresses it’s a must in order to start off your day on the right foot. Clearing off your workspace might not seem like such a big deal, after all, it’s just a few papers and a coffee cup, but it’s more about the mental message it sends your brain and confidence. “When the mind sees clutter, it elicits shame, guilt, and anxiety, creating confusion and chaos,” he explains. “If your desk is clean and you sit down to that first thing in the morning – Wow! – a completely different feeling. There is a sense of empowerment, a clean slate, and a new beginning.” He suggests removing papers, pictures, office supplies, corporate nonsense, books, and whatever else you may store to make room for more creativity.</p> <p><em>Written by Lindsay Tigar. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/smart-things-healthy-people-do-before-10-am"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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"Protect yourself": Michael Clarke's grave warning after health scare

<p>Aussie cricket legend Michael Clarke has urged people to be careful when they’re under the sun after he had surgery to remove skin cancer from his forehead.</p> <p>The former Aussie test cricket captain posted a photo on Instagram that showed the stitches from his surgery.</p> <p>"Another day, another skin cancer cut out of my face... youngsters out there make sure you are doing all the right things to protect yourself from the sun," Clarke wrote on his Instagram page.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2FrqQNJ5c4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2FrqQNJ5c4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Another day, another skin cancer cut out of my face... youngsters out there make sure you are doing all the right things to protect yourself from the sun ☀️🕶🎩</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/michaelclarkeofficial/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Michael Clarke</a> (@michaelclarkeofficial) on Sep 6, 2019 at 4:49pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Australian swimmer Grant Hackett was among many to comment on Clarke's post.</p> <p>"You have made me book an appointment bro," Hackett wrote.</p> <p>Former Miss World Australia, Erin Holland, also commented on the post.</p> <p>"Awesome message MC.. We need to be so vigilent [sic]," she wrote.</p> <p>Clarke's wife Kyly also commented on the sportsman's post, sharing two "fist pump" emojis.</p> <p>Clarke was first diagnosed with skin cancer back in 2006 and has been an ambassador for the Cancer Council since 2010.</p> <p>As Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, many Aussies aren’t as vigilant as they should be when it comes to staying safe in the sun.</p> <p>According to the Cancer Council, 1,960 people died from skin cancer in Australia in 2016.</p>

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Rare moment as funnyman Peter Helliar is brought to tears on The Project

<p>Regular viewers of<span> </span>The Project<span> </span>may be used to seeing other co-hosts including Carrie Bickmore, break down during emotional segments - however this time it was funnyman Peter Helliar who had a moment on air. </p> <p>After a heartfelt story on the Channel Ten program, the comedian couldn’t help but shed a few tears when the camera panned to his face. </p> <p>The 44-year-old had an emotional momwnt after a segment telling the story of 18-year-old Ella Saunders who is recovering from a risky brain surgery to remove a dangerous tumour.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">In a week filled with negative news, it’s always nice to have a mid-week perk up! <br /><br />Today <a href="https://twitter.com/BickmoreCarrie?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@bickmorecarrie</a> and Tommy had the chance to really make a very special young woman’s dream come true. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheProjectTV?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheProjectTV</a> <a href="https://t.co/L2TfFD3KbH">pic.twitter.com/L2TfFD3KbH</a></p> — The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1169182562335514624?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 4, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Ella has been on a lengthy road to recovery involving therapy and physiotherapy, with the help of her mother Tam. </p> <p>Carrie and Tommy Little took it upon themselves to give Ella a little surprise as she is a superfan of Taylor Swift. </p> <p>The singer was said to have been a great comfort during her difficult time. </p> <p>The teen was flown to Melbourne by the Channel 10 hosts, under the false pretense of having the opportunity to be apart of the audience of a show’s episode. What happened next was an incredible surprise for Ella - tickets to see Taylor Swift in Paris with her mum and three best friends. </p> <p>“You are so strong and resilient,” Carrie said to an ecstatic Ella.</p> <p>“We also know that your family loves you very much. And that we couldn’t have done this surprise without one really important person in your life. Your mum.</p> <p>You are not going to see a show tonight … you are going to Paris. You’ve bloody earnt it.”</p> <p>At the end of the segment, a tearful Peter remarked: “Must be the first good news (all week).”</p> <p>Tommy Little piped up: “I mean, it is such a gorgeous thing to do. It was so emotionally exhausting at work today, and you’ve just experienced it tonight.”</p> <p>Despite the teary red eyes, Peter, who is a father-of-three could not resist the urge to crack a good joke. </p> <p>“The seats are pretty average. No, great seats! What an amazing young woman,” he said.</p>

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How can we protect our grandchildren to be safe from online predators?

<p>Many teenagers use mobile phones and social media <a href="https://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/09/teens-social-media-technology-2015/">almost constantly</a>. And children are <a href="https://www.pewinternet.org/2010/12/01/is-the-age-at-which-kids-get-cell-phones-getting-younger/">gaining access</a> to these devices and platforms at increasingly younger ages.</p> <p>This is a challenge for grandparents who need to keep up with their children’s use, the evolution of devices, and how this changes how they have to parent.</p> <p><a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2818048.2819928">Studies show</a> carers feel anxious and lack sufficient knowledge about their children’s use of devices.</p> <p>They’re worried about their children being exposed to <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">sexual images</a> and messages online. They’re anxious their children could provide <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321630824X">personal information</a> to a stranger or, worse, <a href="https://d1e2bohyu2u2w9.cloudfront.net/education/sites/default/files/tlr_component/common_sense_education_digital_citizenship_research_backgrounder.pdf">develop a relationship with a stranger online</a> whom they might meet in person.</p> <p>When grandparents try to restrict their children’s online interactions, children usually find a way around it. Instead, we should have conversations with children from a young age about cybersecurity. This will help them develop the skills they need to be safe online.</p> <p><strong>What are children exposed to?</strong></p> <p>Social networking – which includes interactions through gaming, as well as texting and social media – brings with it exciting opportunities and unique risks.</p> <p><a href="https://variety.com/2018/gaming/news/roblox-little-girl-avatar-raped-1202865698/">Online gaming</a> presents unique dangers because user-generated games (where content is developed by gamers on platforms such as <a href="https://www.roblox.com/">Roblox</a>) are not regulated. This means children can be exposed to inappropriate sexualised and violent content.</p> <p><a href="https://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/kids-on-social-media-and-gaming/index.html">Children</a> are vulnerable when they interact with other users on social media, in chat rooms and within gaming. This could involve <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022427815599426">grooming</a>by a sexual predator either to meet in person or send <a href="https://esafety.gov.au/parents/big-issues/unwanted-contact">sexually explicit images</a>.</p> <p>A report, <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/esafety-corporate/research/esafetyresearchparentingdigitalage.pdf">Latest Research: Parenting in the Digital Age</a> by the <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/about-the-office/research-library">Office of the eSafety Commissioner</a>, found 24% of 8-17-year-olds met someone in real life after initial online encounters.</p> <p>While the study by the eSafety Commissioner found children and teenagers usually attempted to assess the danger of meeting someone unknown face-to-face, such as by looking for similar interests and ensuring there was no sexual content in the online communication, sexual predators use deceptive tactics to lure their victims into meeting in person.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/documents/corporate-office/youth_and_gaming_doc.docx">Australian study</a> found half of children played online games with someone they didn’t know. Boys were more likely to do so than girls.</p> <p><strong>How do children deal with online situations?</strong></p> <p>Research has been mixed on how young people manage cybersecurity risks.</p> <p>One <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00909882.2016.1248465">study</a> found that children who are at least 11 years old seem to have some awareness of the consequences of online interactions. They use safety measures including removing comments, tags and images and blocking and deleting content when interacting online. They also rarely use photos of themselves and disable their geolocations to protect their identities.</p> <p>But children also engage in risky behaviours such as <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/state-of-play-social-media-usage">sharing passwords</a>and contacting strangers. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2016.1181210">Some findings indicated</a> the more teens use social media sites, the more they tend to disclose personal information.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/26273881">one US study</a>, researchers asked nearly 600 students aged 11-13 about cybersafety. The results indicated 40% accepted friend requests from people they do not know, and they were more concerned with protecting their personal information from grandparents than strangers online.</p> <p>Several studies found children think parental restrictions are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2016.1261169">intrusive</a>and invade their privacy. This includes teens feeling <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-030-21905-5_1">disrespected</a> and even stalked by their parents, which leads to a loss of trust.</p> <p><strong>What can we do?</strong></p> <p>Restricting children’s online use is unhelpful. Parents should talk to their children about healthy and age-appropriate online interactions.</p> <p>This includes avoiding disclosing personal information (real name, date of birth, phone number, address, school, or pictures that reveal such information). Parents should provide guidance and explain the consequences of online dangers to their children in a way that does not instil fear but explains their concern.</p> <p>Parents should talk to their children about online risk and safety behaviours from a <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">young age</a>, as soon as they start using online games and engaging on social media sites, to help them build a stronger foundation for their <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">transition to adolescence</a>.</p> <p>They’re worried about their children being exposed to <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">sexual images</a> and messages online. They’re anxious their children could provide <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321630824X">personal information</a> to a stranger or, worse, <a href="https://d1e2bohyu2u2w9.cloudfront.net/education/sites/default/files/tlr_component/common_sense_education_digital_citizenship_research_backgrounder.pdf">develop a relationship with a stranger online</a> whom they might meet in person.</p> <p>When parents try to restrict their children’s online interactions, children usually find a way around it. Instead, parents should have conversations with children from a young age about cybersecurity. This will help them develop the skills they need to be safe online.</p> <p><strong>What are children exposed to?</strong></p> <p>Social networking – which includes interactions through gaming, as well as texting and social media – brings with it exciting opportunities and unique risks.</p> <p><a href="https://variety.com/2018/gaming/news/roblox-little-girl-avatar-raped-1202865698/">Online gaming</a> presents unique dangers because user-generated games (where content is developed by gamers on platforms such as <a href="https://www.roblox.com/">Roblox</a>) are not regulated. This means children can be exposed to inappropriate sexualised and violent content.</p> <p><a href="https://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/kids-on-social-media-and-gaming/index.html">Children</a> are vulnerable when they interact with other users on social media, in chat rooms and within gaming. This could involve <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022427815599426">grooming</a>by a sexual predator either to meet in person or send <a href="https://esafety.gov.au/parents/big-issues/unwanted-contact">sexually explicit images</a>.</p> <p>A report, <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/esafety-corporate/research/esafetyresearchparentingdigitalage.pdf">Latest Research: Parenting in the Digital Age</a> by the <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/about-the-office/research-library">Office of the eSafety Commissioner</a>, found 24% of 8-17-year-olds met someone in real life after initial online encounters.</p> <p>While the study by the eSafety Commissioner found children and teenagers usually attempted to assess the danger of meeting someone unknown face-to-face, such as by looking for similar interests and ensuring there was no sexual content in the online communication, sexual predators use deceptive tactics to lure their victims into meeting in person.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/documents/corporate-office/youth_and_gaming_doc.docx">Australian study</a> found half of children played online games with someone they didn’t know. Boys were more likely to do so than girls.</p> <p><strong>How do children deal with online situations?</strong></p> <p>Research has been mixed on how young people manage cybersecurity risks.</p> <p>One <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00909882.2016.1248465">study</a> found that children who are at least 11 years old seem to have some awareness of the consequences of online interactions. They use safety measures including removing comments, tags and images and blocking and deleting content when interacting online. They also rarely use photos of themselves and disable their geolocations to protect their identities.</p> <p>But children also engage in risky behaviours such as <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/state-of-play-social-media-usage">sharing passwords</a>and contacting strangers. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2016.1181210">Some findings indicated</a> the more teens use social media sites, the more they tend to disclose personal information.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/26273881">one US study</a>, researchers asked nearly 600 students aged 11-13 about cybersafety. The results indicated 40% accepted friend requests from people they do not know, and they were more concerned with protecting their personal information from parents than strangers online.</p> <p>Several studies found children think parental restrictions are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2016.1261169">intrusive</a>and invade their privacy. This includes teens feeling <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-030-21905-5_1">disrespected</a> and even stalked by their parents, which leads to a loss of trust.</p> <p><strong>What can parents do?</strong></p> <p>Restricting children’s online use is unhelpful. Parents should talk to their children about healthy and age-appropriate online interactions.</p> <p>This includes avoiding disclosing personal information (real name, date of birth, phone number, address, school, or pictures that reveal such information). Parents should provide guidance and explain the consequences of online dangers to their children in a way that does not instil fear but explains their concern.</p> <p>Parents should talk to their children about online risk and safety behaviours from a <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">young age</a>, as soon as they start using online games and engaging on social media sites, to help them build a stronger foundation for their <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">transition to adolescence</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Marika Guggisberg. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/children-can-be-exposed-to-sexual-predators-online-so-how-can-parents-teach-them-to-be-safe-120661">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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Why do we cry?

<p>As you know, crying is something everyone does sometimes. Sometimes we get teary because our bodies are trying to clean a bit of dirt out of our eyes. But that’s not really crying, is it? Crying has something to do with our emotions.</p> <p>There’s a connection between the part of our brain that feels emotions, and the ducts in our eyes where tears come out - so when we have a big feeling, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17363076">we cry</a>.</p> <p>Doctors of medicine could tell you more about that. But I’m a doctor of another subject – the history of emotions. I learn about why people cry for different reasons, and it’s my job to compare today with a long time ago.</p> <p>In Australia today, most kids cry when they’re feeling sad, whether they’re boys or girls. But once those kids become teenagers, boys <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/per.386">seem to cry less</a> often than girls do. This isn’t because boys have different brains or tear ducts than girls. It’s mostly because many Australian boys think crying is a bit embarrassing.</p> <p>Maybe they’ve been told boys don’t cry, or <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/01650250143000058">teased by their friends</a> if they cry at school.</p> <p>In fact, it is very normal for boys to cry. And crying hasn’t always been seen as embarrassing or uncool.</p> <p><strong>The history of crying</strong></p> <p>About 500 years ago in England, crying was seen as really cool! One of the most famous stories at the time was about <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1251">King Arthur</a>.</p> <p>He was a great hero, and a lot of boys wanted to be like him. According to books and poems written at the time, <a href="https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/heavenly-dew-crying-in-the-middle-ages/">King Arthur cried a <em>lot</em>.</a> Crying showed everybody he had very strong, true feelings. Back then, people thought this made him a great man, and the lords and ladies in his court cried in public too.</p> <p><strong>Crying around the world</strong></p> <p>Why we cry can also depend on <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1069397111404519">where we live</a>, and what our family is like.</p> <p>If you live in a country where it’s normal to express a lot of feelings in public, such as America, you are more likely to cry about things.</p> <p>If you live in a country where people don’t usually make a big show of how they feel, you probably won’t cry as much, even if you’re feeling sad on the inside.</p> <p>For example, in Japan, for a long time people tried not to cry. But lately in Japan, people are <a href="https://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570240.001.0001/acprof-9780198570240">changing their minds</a> about crying. Books and movies that are very sad are becoming popular. There are even <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/05/crying-it-out-in-japan/389528/">crying clubs</a>, where you can watch a sad movie with other people, have a good cry, and go home feeling better because you let out a lot of big feelings!</p> <p>The same goes for <a href="https://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570240.001.0001/acprof-9780198570240">families</a>: if everyone at your house likes to share how they’re feeling, and isn’t embarrassed about crying or laughing or shouting or dancing, then you’ll probably cry whenever you feel like it.</p> <p>But if the people in your family don’t usually show how they feel, then you will also learn to keep your feelings inside and not let them show by crying.</p> <p><strong>We cry to show our feelings</strong></p> <p>As you can see in these examples, crying isn’t just something we do by ourselves. Quite often, crying is a way for us to show other people how we feel.</p> <p>When you cry, your parents, teachers or friends know that you’re having a big feeling. Then they can help you feel better with a hug, or a talk about your feelings.</p> <p>So why do we cry?</p> <p>Well, partly because our bodies are made that way. But also because crying is how people around us show their feelings, and we learn to show our feelings the same way. Crying helps us share and care.</p> <p>And I think that’s a wonderful thing.</p> <p><em>Written by Carly Osborn. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-we-cry-119814"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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Second Australian state moves one step closer to legalising assisted death

<p>Western Australia is one step closer to legalising voluntary euthanasia for terminally ill adults after the state parliament’s lower house passed proposed government laws on Tuesday.</p> <p>44 of the 59 lower house MPs voted in favour of the bill, but the vote in the upper house later this month is expected to be tighter.</p> <p>Should the upper house pass the proposed legislation, WA will become the second state in Australia to adopt assisted dying laws, after Victoria.</p> <p>The first vote came as hundreds of euthanasia supporters rallied at the parliament house to urge MPs to back the bill.</p> <p>The proposed laws would allow terminally ill adults who are likely to die within six months – or one year if they have a neurodegenerative condition – to take a drug to end their lives or ask for medical assistance to do so.</p> <p>“This bill will protect vulnerable people in ways that do not exist now,” Health Minister Roger Cook said.</p> <p>“This is a watershed moment. We must have the courage and confidence to uphold these freedoms for the most vulnerable in our society.”</p> <p>Rex Tion, one of the rally’s attendees, said his late grandfather was a “strong advocate” for assisted dying.</p> <p>“He expressed numerous times that he wanted his way out,” Tion told <em><a href="https://www.watoday.com.au/politics/western-australia/hundreds-rally-at-parliament-as-wa-euthanasia-laws-clear-first-hurdle-20190903-p52nm1.html">WAtoday</a></em>.</p> <p>“Unfortunately he never got his way, but I’m hopeful that when my time comes, I’ll at least have a choice.</p> <p>“Judging from what I’ve seen, there are a number of safeguards in place and I’m confident that there’s enough checks and balances to ensure that people are not being taken advantage of.”</p> <p>Some critics said the bill should have more safeguards in place, including a requirement for the patients to undergo a psychiatric assessment before they could access the option.</p> <p>“There exists the very real [opportunity] for abuse,” said Labor MP Michelle Roberts. “The fact that we need safeguards means there is something inherently worrying about the principle.”</p> <p>Roberts also said doctors may make mistakes in estimating life expectancy, citing the case of former Labor MP Batong Pham who unexpectedly survived a stroke. “No-one can tell me doctors don’t make mistakes.”</p>

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Karl Stefanovic “tests” man with clown phobia in the most confronting way possible

<p>Former<span> </span><em>Today<span> </span></em>host Karl Stefanovic has dressed up as a clown to test whether or not a man had a phobia on<span> </span><em>This Time Next Year</em>.</p> <p>The 45-year-old put on a red nose, a colourful wig and rode a mini bicycle as guest Scott Cunningham spoke about his intense phobia of clowns.</p> <p>The father-of-two from NSW pledged to overcome his fear.</p> <p>Scott mentioned that his fear came from watching Stephen King’s movie IT as a child.</p> <p>“It's not just scared, but it's even more than that,” Scott revealed.</p> <p>“I actually have a different type of fear where I don't run away, I actually get quite violent and attack the clown.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Phobias are serious and anyone can be affected. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TTNY?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TTNY</a> <a href="https://t.co/35bbK5qi0r">pic.twitter.com/35bbK5qi0r</a></p> — This Time Next Year (@TTNY) <a href="https://twitter.com/TTNY/status/1168485501998792705?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 2, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Scott said that when he sees a clown, he “gets anxiety straight away, my heart pounds and I get short of breath.”</p> <p>Scott also said that he wants to get over his fear of clowns so he can take his children to the circus.</p> <p>After 12 months of receiving therapy treatment from psychologist John Malouff, Scott returned back to<span> </span><em>This Time Last Year</em><span> </span>to update the show on his progress.</p> <p>“I've completely overcome my fear of clowns,” Scott said, as he revealed that he'd taken his wife and children to the circus and even got a tattoo of a clown on his leg.</p> <p>Karl put on a red nose, colourful wig and rode a bike on stage to test whether Scott had really dealt with his fear.</p> <p>“Any anxiety?” Karl asked the father-of-two as he put on his costume. </p> <p>“None whatsoever, you just look a bit silly,” Scott laughed.</p> <p><em>This Time Next Year<span> </span></em>is on Channel Nine at 8:40 pm on Monday night.</p>

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Does anyone have a pad? TV is finally dismantling the period taboo

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Recently, a menstrual pad brand Libra launched their Blood Normal commercial in Australia, running it during prime time television shows including The Bachelor, The Project, and Gogglebox. Australia is a little late to the party: Blood Normal first ran in the UK and Europe in October 2017 and won the </span><a href="https://adage.com/article/special-report-cannes-lions/libresse-s-blood-normal-takes-glass-lions-grand-prix-cannes/313993"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grand Prix at Cannes</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in 2018 for its de-stigmatised depiction of menstruation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Breaking new ground in menstrual product advertising terms, the ad has received most attention for </span><a href="https://www.vcg.emitto.net/index.php/vcg/article/view/114"><span style="font-weight: 400;">showing menstrual blood as red</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and on the inside of a woman’s thigh, rather than as the bizarre blue liquid we’ve seen for decades being squirted onto a pad by someone in a lab coat.</span></p> <p><strong>Busting period stigmas</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ad bombards us with a rapid fire array of stigma-busting micro-dramas featuring fashionable young people (some of whom are well-known European cultural influencers). A hip boyfriend (Swedish fashion blogger Julian Hernandez) buys pads in the local supermarket; a young woman (French activist Victoire Dauxerre) stands up and asks “Does anyone have a pad?” across a dinner table of hipsters; a university student walks into a public toilet carrying a wrapped pad openly in her hand; a woman’s fingers type: “I am having a very heavy period and will be working from home today”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unpacking the ad reveals a combination of the old and the new in menstruation ad-land. There is the tired old trope of the menstruating woman engaging in boisterous and fun physical activity, echoing the freedom message of women dressed in (improbable) white, riding horses and motorbikes in ads from the 1960s on.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Blood Normal though, the notion that a menstruating woman can do anything is taken into more intimate territory, with a scene of a couple having (gentle) period sex. A woman shown at the swimming pool looks serene and thoughtful, more as if she is taking time out for self-care than trying to prove menstruation doesn’t make any difference in her life and that she is as non-cyclical as a man.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The modern-day stance that menstruation should be suppressed emerged from the second wave feminist need to assert women’s equal rights within a still-masculinised world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Where Blood Normal really breaks ground is by presenting all the moods and moments of the menstrual experience, including the pain and the turning inward. It also does a brilliant job of showing the sweetness of getting and giving support within a sisterhood and brotherhood, in an idealised setting in which everyone is menstrually-aware.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This vision may be nearer than we might think: the characters in Blood Normal are in their teens and 20s and recent reports indicate this generation is rapidly shifting in terms of menstrual norms. Young women are reporting much higher interest in </span><a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/how-periods-became-big-business-txldjd9gq"><span style="font-weight: 400;">menstrual cycle awareness</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">and it is now one of the “</span><a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/mindful-menstruation-sound-bathing-and-meditation-raves-these-are-the-biggest-wellness-trends-for-autumn-9wc2pqs5t"><span style="font-weight: 400;">biggest wellness trends</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Australia, talkback radio reflected this shift, picking up on suggestions of </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/hack/should-we-have-paid-period-leave/10090848"><span style="font-weight: 400;">menstrual leave</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Celebrity Yumi Styne’s book for first-time menstruators </span><a href="https://www.hardiegrant.com/au/publishing/bookfinder/book/welcome-to-your-period-by-yumi-stynes/9781760503512"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Welcome to Your Period</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was published this month.</span></p> <p><strong>Menstruation is big business</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite this ad being touted by its makers as a public service, we cannot forget the corporate </span><a href="https://www.rienner.com/title/Capitalizing_on_the_Curse_The_Business_of_Menstruation"><span style="font-weight: 400;">profit-driven self-interest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">involved in menstrual product ad construction. Recent </span><a href="https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/05/20/1828964/0/en/Global-Feminine-Hygiene-Products-Market-2018-2019-Forecast-to-2023.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">valuations</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> of the “global feminine hygiene product” market (of which around 50% is menstrual pads), vary from US$20.6 billion (A$30.5 billion) to US$37.5 billion (A$55.5 billion), with projections of US$52 billion (A$77 billion) by 2023.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">High profit margins along with environmental devastation are contained within those figures. Disposable products use up resources, clog landfill sites, and pollute oceans. In the past, manufacturers have been less than honest about product safety, such as in the infamous Rely tampon </span><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Toxic-Shock-Social-History-Biopolitics-ebook/dp/B07C5G1YD3/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=toxic+shock+sharra+vostral&amp;qid=1566531841&amp;s=books&amp;sr=1-1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Toxic Shock Syndrome scandal</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Menstrual product advertising has been shown to increase </span><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23293691.2018.1556428"><span style="font-weight: 400;">self-objectification</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and has cynically exploited and added to anxiety surrounding leaks and smells.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s a massive gulf between the sweet and loving world of the Libra ad and the uncomfortable reality of the disposable menstrual product industry.</span></p> <p><strong>More work to do</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, why now? Why has it taken the disposable menstrual product industry almost a hundred years to talk about menstruation as normal and in terms that actually match lived experience, rather than as an unspeakable problem that their products will absorb and conceal, allowing the menstruator to “pass” as a </span><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Under-Wraps-History-Menstrual-Technology/dp/0739113852"><span style="font-weight: 400;">non-menstruator</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The answer partly lies in the process of cultural change: things take time, and menstrual stigma was a big chunk of patriarchal power relations for feminism to tackle. It also lies in the influence of the new “femtech”: new cycle tracking apps, and reusable pads, period underwear, and menstrual cups made using new technologies. These innovations are reshaping menstrual experience in ways that disrupt self-objectification based on stigma, while replacing it with new forms of control through data collection.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blood Normal is a great ad campaign, and yes, menstrual stigma is being dismantled. But we’re not there yet. When all women have access to reusable, sustainable menstrual products; when menstrual self-care becomes a cultural norm in homes, schools and workplaces; when women feel free not only to jump around when bleeding, but to live with the cycle rather than against or in spite of it … then we’ll be there.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Lara Owen. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://theconversation.com/does-anyone-have-a-pad-tv-is-finally-dismantling-the-period-taboo-122258"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Conversation.</span></a></p>

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Mick Schumacher hugs F2 driver Anthoine Hubert’s family after tragic death

<p>Motorsport is mourning the death of Formula Two driver Anthoine Hubert, who was killed in a heavy crash during a race at the Belgian Grand Prix on Saturday.</p> <p>Drivers observed a minute’s silence in memory of Hubert alongside the late French racer’s mother and brother with heads bowed in the Spa-Francorchamps paddock on Sunday.</p> <p>Mick Schumacher, son of F1 legend Michael Schumacher, embraced Hubert’s family before they stood in silence to honour the young sportsman.</p> <p>Schumacher was taking part in the same F2 qualifying session when Hubert’s collision occurred. He joined other racing drivers in paying their respects to the Frenchman.</p> <p>“Fate is brutal. The loss is endless. Anthoine, we miss you already,” Schumacher wrote on Twitter.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Fate is brutal. The loss is endless. Anthoine, we miss you already.</p> — Mick Schumacher (@SchumacherMick) <a href="https://twitter.com/SchumacherMick/status/1167870176613715969?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 31, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Mick Schumacher, Anthoine Hubert family, Belgian Grand Prix tragedy <a href="https://t.co/zBtkn8YR7P">https://t.co/zBtkn8YR7P</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sports?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#sports</a></p> — THE PRESS (@pres5ar) <a href="https://twitter.com/pres5ar/status/1168150008069316608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 1, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Five-time Formula One world champion Lewis Hamilton, who led a minute’s silence ahead of the Grand Prix, shared a tribute on his Instagram account.</p> <p>“Yesterday a great young talent passed away here. Let’s remember him today,” he wrote on Sunday. “Rest in peace Anthoine Hubert.”</p> <p>Ferrari F1 driver Charles Leclerc said Hubert’s death was “a big shock”. “We lose someone on track, a track where you need to race the day after. It’s obviously quite challenging to then close the visor and go through the exact same corner [where the crash happened].”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B11gQn0oWAI/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B11gQn0oWAI/" target="_blank">I can't believe it. Rest in peace.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/charles_leclerc/" target="_blank"> CHARLES LECLERC</a> (@charles_leclerc) on Aug 31, 2019 at 10:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Hubert died at the age of 22 after his car collided with 20-year-old US driver Juan Manuel Correa’s car at an estimated speed of 160mph (257kph).</p> <p>Correa suffered fractures to both his legs and a minor spinal injury, and is recovering in intensive care at the CHU Liege hospital.</p>

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Hamish Blake shares hilarious Father’s Day “report card” from his son Sonny

<p>Comedian Hamish Blake has received a hilarious yet touching Father’s Day card from his five-year-old son, Sonny.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram, the 37-year-old shared a snap of the card, which answered multiple questions, including “Why do you love your dad?”</p> <p>Hamish captioned the post: “Dads all over Australia will be getting the kinder Father’s Day card over the next few days and I’ve come to realise now it’s basically like getting a parental report card.”</p> <p>He continued: “Even though this year I’m portrayed as an ice cream-loving booze hound who’s a bit of a pushover when it comes to requests for hot chocolates and chips.</p> <p>“I guess I can’t say that’s entirely inaccurate, so all things considered I got out OK. B minus!”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1vqOuFF591/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1vqOuFF591/" target="_blank">Dads all over Australia will be getting the kinder Fathers Day card over the next few days and I’ve come to realise now it’s basically like getting a parental report card. Even though this year I’m portrayed as an ice cream loving boozehound who’s a bit of a pushover when it comes to requests for hot chocolates and chips, I guess I can’t say that’s entirely inaccurate, so all things considered I got out ok. B minus!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/hamishblakeshotz/" target="_blank"> Hamish Blake</a> (@hamishblakeshotz) on Aug 29, 2019 at 3:33am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In answer to the question, “What’s dad’s favourite thing to do?”, Sonny said: “Go to the beach. He likes ice cream. His favourite drink: alcohol.”</p> <p>The next question was, “If you had a million trillion dollars and could buy dad anything in the whole wide world, what would you buy?” Sonny wrote: “Six scoops of ice cream!”</p> <p>The card also talks about the close bond the father and son share, with Sonny writing that his father “makes sure that I’m OK when I hurt myself,” and “doesn’t care when I wake up early.”</p> <p>He also wrote that Hamish “gives me lots of kisses and cuddles.”</p> <p>Hamish and his wife, author and beauty entrepreneur Zoe Foster-Blake are parents to Sonny and daughter Rudy Hazel Blake, two.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see all the adorable photos of Hamish with his kids.</p>

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Cat makes incredible transformation after heartbreaking abuse

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">WARNING: Disturbing images</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Little Muffin, who was found just moments from death has made an incredible transformation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The cat, who was too weak to fight any resistance, was gently picked up by a kind Samaritans when they noticed his back legs were completely “dead” because whipper snipper cords had been tied around his legs and had since cut off circulation. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830123/eg-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6e3518b1e8d7486cb65e7c3e6570a52c" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Muffin also had burns on his tummy that vets suspected to be cigarette burns. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alexus, the man who found the feline, said there is no doubt in his mind Muffin had been tortured. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This was a serial killer or sociopath in the making,” Mr De Latora told </span><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/cat-found-near-death-after-being-tortured-in-western-sydney-125250392.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia. </span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[It was] evil beyond evil”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After Muffin was rushed to a nearby vet in Western Sydney, images captured of the suffering animal was widely shared across social media. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830124/eg-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7fd9d7b0080940d8b4a83c0e9120a6d1" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The young cat’s leg has since been amputated and was handed to a Sydney-based pet rescue, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cat Rescue 901. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">His vet bills were covered by the help of wonderful donors. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the heartbreaking torture Muffin faced, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cat Rescue 901’s </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">co</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">-</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">founder Jenny Storaker said the cat has a sweet demeanour. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Muffin is absolutely divine and such a perfect pet,” she told </span><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/amazing-recovery-of-cat-who-lost-leg-after-being-tortured-104728538.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia. </span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[He’s] super-duper affectionate. [All he wants is] to sleep in someone’s arms.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Muffin has since been adopted into a loving home where he is spoilt “silly.”</span></p>

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Engagement ring sparks fury: Too small or just right?

<p>For many years, there has been debate surrounding the importance of an engagement ring’s size and value. </p> <p>While some are adamant they would prefer to choose their own ring, others believe it doesn’t have as much importance as many would think.</p> <p>One bride-to-be took to social media to slam her fiance for proposing with a “tiny” engagement ring, and since then the post has gone viral. </p> <p>The anonymous woman shared a snap of the band online and asked if she was being “shady” and “materialistic” for not wanting to wear a ring with a “little a**” jewel. </p> <p>“We been together for eight years and talking about getting married for almost three,” the bride-to-be wrote. </p> <p>“This the ring he said he saved up to buy me. Am I being shady or materialistic if I tell this mf I don’t want this little a** ring? [sic].”</p> <p>The photo showed a delicate gold band with a small diamond attached. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830112/jackie-o-home-8.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9e33f73d409e48949349363abceaff68" /></p> <p>A screenshot of the post has since attracted thousands of comments and reactions, with mixed opinions. </p> <p>One user agreed with the woman’s stance, writing: “I’m not materialistic when it comes to things like this but if my man proposed with THAT I would be full on insulted.</p> <p>“He went out of his way to find the cheapest possible option; which to me says that he’s probably like that in every aspect of the relationship and will probably be like that in every aspect of their marriage.”</p> <p>Another added: “Honestly, I’m with her on this. You can get affordable rings that don’t look like they came out of the little dispenser machine next to the stickers and gumballs at Cici’s Pizza.</p> <p>“Even with a small budget he could have gotten something that won’t immediately snap if it gets snagged, and I wouldn’t trust that jewel setting to last more than a week with everyday wear.”</p> <p>However, a few came to the boyfriend’s defence and thought the woman was being harsh. </p> <p>“I’d much rather have just a plain band than the diamond chip,” one person argued. “Because what I care about is him wanting to spend his life with me, not a diamond.”</p> <p>“I kinda like her ring. It's very modern and sleek looking. I'd wear that in a heartbeat,” another added.</p> <p>The minimalist style ring has become an increasingly popular option for those looking for delicate additions to their wardrobe, albeit not for engagement rings. </p>

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