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Good news: Facebook finally lets you ‘unsend’ messages

<p>For those of you who have sent a private message to the wrong person and wished for there to be a way to unsend it, you’re not alone. Facebook has listened to its users and added an ‘unsend’ feature to Messenger.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/5/18211255/facebook-messenger-unsend-delete-feature-sent-mark-zuckerberg">The Verge</a> has reported that if you have the latest version of Messenger for iOs (Apple) and Android, you will be able to delete messages that you were never meant to send. However, you only have 10 minutes to do so after sending the first message, otherwise the feature doesn’t work.</p> <p>The added feature comes after users demanded to have it implemented after seeing CEO Mark Zuckerberg being able to delete a message after sending it out. The feature was originally only for “higher ups” within Facebook, but after multiple sources noted that messages that they received from the CEO had disappeared, that was when news of the ‘unsend’ feature came to light.</p> <p>It took Facebook nine months to implement the ‘unsend’ feature for all users, but it’s finally here. Facebook also said that it would limit Zuckerberg’s use of the feature until everyone was able to use it.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7823677/messenger-unsend.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3205103eaf4249ada947ec6d0fb7c9cc" /></p> <p><em>Source: The Verge</em></p> <p><strong>How to use the feature</strong></p> <ol> <li>Press and hold on the message you want to delete. Note: <strong>Must be done within 10 minutes of sending the first message.</strong></li> <li>Tap ‘Remove’ when Messenger displays the ‘Copy’, ‘Forward’ etc section.</li> <li>You can then choose whether you want to remove for everyone and remove for you. If you choose ‘Remove for everyone, the people in the chat will be notified that you have removed the message.</li> <li>Choose your option and then click on ‘Remove’.</li> <li>It will show that you have removed a message in Messenger.</li> </ol> <p>Will you be using this feature? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Valentine’s Day online dating scam warning after Aussies lose $25 million

<p>Although Valentine’s Day for many is a time where they feel loved and appreciated by their loved ones, others think of it as a cash grab.</p> <p>This was the case for 4,000 Aussies who fell victim to online dating scams in 2018. This is a 20 per cent increase from 2017 and cost those who got stung by the trap over $24.6 million.</p> <p>With data revealing that women are four times more likely to lose money than men, females accounted for more than a total financial loss of $20 million.</p> <p>The data also revealed that people aged 45 to 64 are the main demographic that have been impacted by these scams, with social media being the preferred method for scammers to contact their victims.</p> <p>ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said that scammers are increasingly expanding to dating apps, such as Tinder.</p> <p>Losses from these apps have increased to more than 300 per cent over the last two years alone.</p> <p>“Scammers tend to go where people are, and in the dating world that increasingly means on social media and dating apps,” she said.</p> <p>With scammers slowly building a romantic relationship before asking for money, it’s clear that the people involved feel an emotional connection, which is why they deposit the money.</p> <p>Other common requests for money include to help cover costs associated with:</p> <ul> <li>Injury</li> <li>Business expenses</li> <li>Illness</li> <li>Customs fees or duty fees if they live overseas</li> <li>Legal costs</li> <li>Family expenses</li> </ul> <p><strong>A warning from the ACCC  </strong></p> <p>The ACCC has said that you should be wary of red flags whilst dating someone.</p> <p>“Be careful if someone you don’t know makes contact on social media and presents themselves as a ‘too good to be true’ catch. It’s likely they’ve done some research on you beforehand to find out things about you to create an instant bond,” Ms Rickard said.</p> <p>“On apps, it can be trickier as the whole point is meeting new people.</p> <p>“However, nearly all romance scammers will eventually reveal their intentions, which is getting your money.</p> <p>“If you’ve only ever known the person online or through an app, don’t give them money.</p> <p>“You may think you love them and want to help, but they’ll just break your heart, and deplete your bank account.</p> <p>“If you have any doubts about someone you have met online or through an app, doing a Google search on their name and pictures can often reveal scammers.”</p> <p>Has this happened to you or anyone you know? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Online shopping scams and how to avoid them

<p>In hindsight, there were some red flags. But the offers on the barbecue website bbqarena.com.au were too good to pass up – several hundred dollars off a Weber barbecue. Enticed by the large (but not too large) discounts on a range of reputable brands and the site’s apparent legitimacy, numerous buyers clicked through to the purchase button.</p> <p>They were then prompted to pay by bank transfer. Three weeks later, still no delivery. When they called to follow up, no one answered the phone and the website was ‘down for maintenance’.</p> <p>Like more than 1000 other Australians in the first eight months of 2017, the would-be barbecue owners had been scammed by a fake online shopping site posing as the real thing. “Please don’t make the same mistake I did,” wrote one in an online forum recently.</p> <p>“One important thing when buying online from an unknown (to you) seller is to ask on forums like this. More than likely someone else will have had some experience and advise a No Go,” wrote another.</p> <p>The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) receives more reports each year about online shopping scams than any other scams.</p> <p>Australians lost more than $700,000 this way in the first eight months of 2017 alone. While people of all ages are likely to fall victim – people aged 25 to 34 make up the largest category, with women more prone to being scammed than men.</p> <p>Executive director of the Australian Retailers Association, Russell Zimmerman, this number is set to rise as online shopping gains popularity. Australians now spend about $24 billion a year shopping online, representing about 7.5% of all retail turnover.</p> <p>Online shopping is predicted to increase to about 12% of turnover and then plateau. “Everybody is doing more online shopping – it means you don’t have to go out to get your goods,” Zimmerman says. “There are very strict guidelines in place for retailers in Australia, but often online you’re dealing with retailers from overseas.</p> <p>The only real way to protect yourself is to either deal with someone who has been recommended to you, or deal with an organisation that’s readily recognised.”</p> <p>The reality is, unlike face-to-face shopping, the very appeal of online shopping is its ease, and it’s this laid-back simplicity – and the lapse in caution that comes with it – that allows scammers to target and lure their victims into thinking they and their money are safe.</p> <p><strong>Avoid fake websites</strong></p> <p>The message is clear – online shopping scammers are successful thanks to their ability to hide behind fake websites. Using the latest technology, scammers can create a site that looks like a genuine online retail store. They will often advertise these sites on Google, so when you search for a product they will pop up at the top of your results page.</p> <p>More often than not, these online stores are replicas of large Australian stores that you’re familiar with, created using stolen logos, or they have sophisticated, high-end designs. They may have a ‘.com.au’ at the end of the address, but their ABN will be fake.</p> <p><strong>Keep an eye on trading sites</strong></p> <p>Fake sellers are having alarming success posing as genuine sellers on trading sites, often advertising prices much lower than everyone else. They might also approach you through social media or email with appealing offers and posts of pictures of the item they are purporting to sell (often copied from someone else’s genuine advertisement).</p> <p>The terms seem reasonable enough – pay up-front before receiving the item. Your suspicion isn’t aroused until you start getting excuses on why they can’t accept payment through the secure site – they say they are travelling or have moved overseas, for example – so they ask you to transfer funds directly to them.</p> <p><strong>Social media can be another scam</strong></p> <p>With its instant reach and availability, social media is driving another variation of online shopping scams. Buying beauty goods via social media has become particularly popular. When an online retailer called LuxStyle advertised its products on social media, people who were interested clicked through to their website, which would not display prices unless they entered their mailing and email addresses.</p> <p>The scammers then posted goods to customers – unsolicited – along with an invoice. Those who ignored the invoice received a string of subsequent demands for money.</p> <p>Others, like Hobart mother Asya Moussawi, sent the company an email querying the delivery, to which they replied by telling her to return the goods at her own expense.</p> <p>A few days later, they suggested she could keep the cosmetics at a 50% discount – a price less than the cost of the postage to return them. When Asya refused, she received a string of emails and threats that the debt collectors would be sent round.</p> <p>Have you been scammed? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p><em>Written by Helen Signy. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/online-shopping-scams-and-how-avoid-them">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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4 ways your computer password will get you hacked

<p>We have the secrets to why your secure account is more hackable than you think.</p> <div id="section"><strong>1. Your password is "password"</strong></div> <div> <p>Amazingly, "password" always ends up in a top spot of the most popular passwords, according to hackers who stole millions of them.</p> <p>Also popular: "123456" and its neighbour "12345678," "welcome," "letmein," and "jesus."</p> <p><strong>2. You didn't check its strength first</strong></p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.passwordmeter.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">Password Metr</a><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.passwordmeter.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">e</a> is a handy resource when setting up new accounts or changing your login info.</p> <p>It plugs your password into a formula and shows you exactly what its greatest strengths are (symbols) and weaknesses (sequential letters), thereby allowing you to tweak it to perfection.</p> <p><strong>3. Your security question is obvious</strong></p> <p>Sites will often ask you to provide a security question and answer for use when you forget your password.</p> <p>Try for something complex or personal so nefarious types can't figure out the answer with a simple Google search—<a rel="noopener" href="https://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/password-day" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">McAfee</a> suggests a question like, "How was your first kiss?" with a quirky answer only you would think of ("Rocked it like a hurricane!").</p> <p><strong>4. You didn't use a mnemonic device</strong></p> <p>Lifehacker <a rel="noopener" href="https://lifehacker.com/four-methods-to-create-a-secure-password-youll-actually-1601854240" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">suggests</a> using the Person-Action-Object (PAO) method to create an unbreakable password.</p> <p>Visualise a famous person doing a random act with a random object (say, Abraham Lincoln surfing with a gallon of milk).</p> <p>Now combine parts of that phrase to make a new word, like AbeLiSurfilk.</p> <p>Not only do you have a word that's too random for any hacker to crack, but you'll be the only person it makes sense to.</p> <p>Plus, our brains remember data better with visual cues (and especially with weird ones), so memorising it will be a cinch.</p> <p>Have you been hacked before? What did you do? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Damon Beres. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/9-ways-your-computer-password-will-get-you-hacked">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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6 search results that prove Google has a sense of humour

<p>Seems like the brains behind search engine Google have a pretty good sense of humour to include these hidden tricks and japes.</p> <div id="section"><strong>1. It can do a barrel roll!</strong></div> <div> <p>Type "do a barrel roll" into Google, click search, and your browser window will do a 360-degree spin.</p> </div> <div> <p>It's a geeky reference to Nintendo's Star Fox series, in which a wise old rabbit named Peppy (an intergalactic fighter pilot) advises your character to avoid enemy fire by pulling said maneuver.</p> <p>You can get the same fun Google tricks effect by typing "z or r twice" in reference to the controller buttons you'd press in the game. </p> <p><strong>2. It's a word nerd!</strong></p> <p>Google "anagram" and the search engine will suggest "nag a ram."</p> <p>Very cute.</p> <p><strong>3. It can read images!</strong></p> <p>Looking for something specific, but don't have the right keywords to describe it?</p> <p>This is one of the more useful fun Google tricks.</p> <p>You can "<a href="https://support.google.com/images/answer/1325808?p=searchbyimagepage&amp;hl=en" title="" data-original-title="">reverse image search</a>" at <a rel="noopener" href="http://images.google.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">images.google.com</a> by clicking the camera icon, uploading an image, and then getting results of pictures that look similar.</p> <p>(Make sure you're okay with your photos floating around the web first.)</p> <p><strong>4. It speaks secret languages!</strong></p> <p>On the top of your Google homepage, hit the nine squares at the top and go to My Account.</p> <p>Scroll to the bottom to find Language &amp; Input Tools under Account Preferences. </p> <p>You can change your language to fun ways of speaking like Muppets (Bork, bork, bork!), Elmer Fudd (Ewmew Fudd), Klingon, and pirate. For instance, with that last one you'll find "moorr" instead of "more."</p> <p><strong>5. It can boost brainpower!</strong></p> <p>ZDNet offers a handy <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.zdnet.com/photos/10-google-search-secrets_p10/6349203#photo" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">tip</a> to sift through university research: first type "site:edu" to limit the query to educational institutions, then try "intitle:" before your topic.</p> <p>For example, site:edu intitle:"American magazines" brings up results from Harvard, the University of Michigan, and more. You can also search get results from a specific website a similar way.</p> <p><strong>6. It likes to get specific!</strong></p> <p>Thought "once in a blue moon" was just a vague expression? Not according to Google.</p> <p>Search that phrase and you'll get a very specific frequency: 1.16699016 × 10-8 hertz.</p> <p>It's a play off the fact that blue moons happen every 2.71 years.</p> <p>Did you know these facts about Google? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Damon Beres. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/humour/19-search-results-prove-google-has-sense-humour">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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Fergie opens up about Meghan and Kate ‘feud’ in open letter: “It’s not acceptable”

<p>The Duchess of York has penned an open letter, saying that much of social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, “terrifies” her.</p> <p>Writing in <em><a href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/healthandbeauty/health-and-fitness/2019021167679/sarah-ferguson-online-bullying-hello-to-kindness-exclusive/">Hello!</a> </em>in support of their #HelloToKindness campaign, Sarah Ferguson, 59, explained:</p> <p>“We need to pay more attention than ever to what we're all being exposed to online. It's time to confront head on the fact that much of social media has become a sewer.</p> <p>“I'm on Twitter and Instagram, and I'm grateful for the fact that they allow me to communicate directly with people who are interested, promote my charitable causes and let people read my own words rather than someone else's slant on them.”</p> <p>She then goes onto say:</p> <p>“But the truth is, a lot about these sites terrifies me. I rarely if ever go 'below the line' on social media or news websites and read people's comments.”</p> <p>Fergie was not immune to media comparisons back in the day, with many people pitting her and Princess Diana against each other.</p> <p>“Women, in particular, are constantly pitted against and compared with each other in a way that reminds me of how people tried to portray Diana and I all the time as rivals, which is something neither of us ever really felt.</p> <p>“People feel licensed to say things online that they would never dream of saying to someone's face, and that encourages others to pile in. It's so ubiquitous that we've all become numb to what's going on.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820686/meghan-markle-kate-middleton.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c84b2dd301234839bf81377290f6eefa" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Duchess Meghan and Duchess Kate</em></p> <p>Fergie was previously married to Prince Andrew, and has said that the online harassment has to stop.</p> <p>“I believe that it’s time to take a stand. This isn’t about freedom of speech. The truth is, it’s not acceptable to post abuse or threats on social media or news sites, and it’s not acceptable to harangue other users simply because they disagree with you,” she wrote.</p> <p>“It’s not acceptable to pit women against one another all the time.”</p> <p>The letter and campaign from <em>Hello! </em>comes after reports that Kensington Palace staff have dedicated hours a day to monitoring negative and hateful comments on the Palace Instagram and Twitter pages about Duchess Kate and Duchess Meghan.</p>

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Cook tonight’s dinner in your dishwasher!

<p>Many of us use our dishwasher to, well, clean our dishes. Especially after a meal.</p> <p>But there’s a new trend on the horizon that involves the opposite of this.</p> <p>It’s called ‘dishwasher cuisine’ and it is not a joke.</p> <p>Many people have decided that their oven is no longer up to scratch and are opting to give their dishwasher a try.</p> <p>So far, the most popular dish seems to be salmon.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BsY73EHh4tn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BsY73EHh4tn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Verlasso Salmon (@verlasso)</a> on Jan 8, 2019 at 2:02pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The trick is wrapping your ingredients up in foil (so the food doesn’t get saturated by the water or have other bits of food ending up in the final meal) and letting the dishwasher do the rest.</p> <p>Consumer advocacy group <span><a href="https://www.choice.com.au/home-and-living/kitchen/dishwashers/articles/can-you-cook-dinner-in-your-dishwasher">Choice</a></span> has recommended that you put your ingredients that you want to cook in plastic zip lock bags so no extra food gets in there as well as loading up the dishwasher to keep the temperature stable.</p> <p>Keeping the temperature stable is ideal as this ensures your food is cooked properly.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/dZqjZdLZoE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/dZqjZdLZoE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Forget the grill, here's how to cook salmon in the dishwasher. #howto #dishwashercooking #yum #nprlife</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/mstarbard/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Maggie Starbard</a> (@mstarbard) on Aug 24, 2013 at 8:30am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, as a dishwasher can reach temperatures of up to 62 degrees in a cycle, smaller portions of protein and vegetables are best.</p> <p>Choosing food that has a bit of wiggle room when it comes to time and temperature being a little bit out is ideal, as again, you’re cooking food in a dishwasher.</p> <p>Experts have compared it to the sous vide method. This method is a French style of cooking which involves vacuum sealing food in a plastic bag, submerging it in a bath of warm water and waiting for it to cook over time.</p> <p>Some have found it to be a productive way of cleaning up the mess they’ve made while preparing the meal whilst also getting a meal out of it.</p> <p>Is this something you’re willing to try? Have you heard of it before? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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The new shark repellent technology that could curb attacks in Australia

<p>New Australian technology could be the key to preventing shark attacks in the Whitsunday Islands.</p> <p>Tourism operators are considering every option available before deciding whether or not to employ the Aussie-made devices to prevent further attacks.</p> <p>The Shark Shield technology is a shark repelling device that’s designed for usage with boats and is designed by a company called Ocean Guardian.</p> <p>The technology aims to repel sharks by using a large electrical field that aims to keep swimmers and snorkelers safe from sharks.</p> <p>The chief executive of Ocean Guardian, Lindsay Lyon, has said that the technology available creates a larger area that’s safer for people to swim in.</p> <p>“It creates an electrical field anywhere from 8m to 10m deep, and about 6m to 8m wide, so you can swim off the back of the boat without having to be fearful of sharks,” Mr Lyon said.</p> <p>“This could absolutely save lives. The technology is rock solid.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtWQc3wnbEf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtWQc3wnbEf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Launching soon via Indiegogo, our upcoming eSPEAR features a fully encapsulated electronic design with powerful lithium battery and induction charging dock ✔️ Click the link in our bio for more info and to sign up for special offers! #comingsoon #indiegogo #crowdfunding #eSPEAR #oceanguardian #sharkshield #sharkshieldtechnology #sharkdeterrent #spearfishing #scubadiving #snorkelling #snorkeling #diving</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/oceanguardian_sharkshield/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Ocean Guardian (Shark Shield)</a> (@oceanguardian_sharkshield) on Feb 1, 2019 at 9:36am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Lyon has also said that the new generation of shark-repelling technology could help stem the amount of attacks.</p> <p>“It’s extremely unfortunate what happened in the Whitsundays,” Lyon said. “It hasn’t happened for 50 years and all of a sudden there was a spate of attacks.</p> <p>“The reality is that the risk is low and if we can provide technology that is scientifically proven to work and give people the confidence to go back to enjoying the ocean without culling sharks, that’s a good thing.”</p> <p>Despite Lyon’s excitement that his technology will help save the lives of swimmers, Flinders University associate professor Charlie Huveneers, who leads the Southern Shark Ecology Group, has a warning about electrical fields and sharks.</p> <p>“Just because one device is working, it does not mean that all electric field-based deterrents will repel sharks,” Professor Huveneers said.</p> <p>“Any new device should be independently and scientifically tested prior to being commercially available. People might otherwise get a false sense of security and put themselves at greater risks.”</p> <p>But Professor Huveneers said it was “important to keep developing new means of reducing the risk of shark attacks”.</p> <p>“As long as people go in the water, there will always be some very small risks from sharks,” he added.</p> <p>Will this device make you feel safer when you’re in the water? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Greek tennis star Tsitsipas shares bizarre "naked" photo on Twitter

<p>Fans of Greek tennis star Stefanos Tsitsipas got into a frenzy after he shared a picture of himself to social media, causing a stir. The 20-year-old took to Twitter and Instagram last night to share a photo of himself with a rather peculiar caption. “I like me better naked,” he wrote. “I don’t mean that in a vain way… When you put clothes on, you immediately put a character on. Clothes are adjectives, they are indicators. “When you don’t have any clothes on, it’s just you, raw, and you can’t hide,” he finished.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I like me better naked. I don't mean that in a vain way... When you put clothes on, you immediately put a character on. Clothes are adjectives, they are indicators. When you don't have any clothes on, it's just you, raw, and you can't hide. <a href="https://t.co/LxkSaHBEBM">pic.twitter.com/LxkSaHBEBM</a></p> — Stefanos Tsitsipas (@StefTsitsipas) <a href="https://twitter.com/StefTsitsipas/status/1090857797368115200?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 31, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>However, what appears to be his words revealed itself to be words said almost 10 years ago by the American Top Chef host Padma Lakshmi, a social media user quickly pointed out. “Next time at least try to paraphrase,” the user wrote. “… or something.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Next time at least try to paraphrase ..<br /><br />or something. <a href="https://t.co/0m4vVPA7Tn">pic.twitter.com/0m4vVPA7Tn</a></p> — The I in THIEM (@oscwi1) <a href="https://twitter.com/oscwi1/status/1090877520508006401?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 31, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The Australian Open semi-finalist revealed in Melbourne his passion for videography and photography, and his social media accounts' large followings don’t just come from tennis. Fans replying to the post where Tsitsipas referred to himself “naked” were torn on what to think of the image. “I think you look better naked too!” a user commented. “What you smoking bro?” another wrote. The young tennis star was defeated in straight sets by Rafael Nadal in their Australian Open semi-final last month, receiving praise from the 17-time slam winner. “He has everything to make it happen – good serve, good shot from the baseline, he is brave, he goes to the net often,” Nadal said. “…when at that age he is in the semi-finals that says a lot of good things about him. “I hope to face him in important rounds in the next couple of years.” Did you watch Stefanos Tsitsipas play in the Australian Open? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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This worrying text message scam you need to know about

<p>Experts are urging mobile phone users to be aware of a new text messaging scam going around – warning others to not let it happen to them.</p> <p>Aussies are being warned to steer clear of dangerous motives online, through email or text message, by knowing the signs of what a fraudulent scam looks like.</p> <p>A woman who received a real text message from the Australian Tax Office (ATO) in November of 2018, reminding her to pay her income tax bill by the end of the month with details on how to pay, recently received a text message from the exact same number, <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/tax/worrying-texts-expose-new-spoofing-scam-technique/news-story/0650f590a63b24d393060f1f735897e2">news.com.au reports.</a></p> <p>This text message was a deceitful scam.</p> <p>“You are due to receive an ATO refund of $2675.51,” it reads.</p> <p>“Visit <a href="http://www.atorefund.com/">www.atorefund.com</a> and logon with your phone number and ATO pin to claim.”</p> <p>However, this text message the woman received was a crafty scammer using a calling line identification (CLI) to make themselves seem legitimate.</p> <p>A spokesperson for the ATO confirms that despite both the real and fake text coming from the same number, the department has not been hacked.</p> <p>“We’ve seen instances where scammers maliciously manipulate the CLI so the phone number that appears is different to the number from which the call originated,” the spokespersons said.</p> <p>“Malicious CLI overstamping allows a scammer to disguise their identity and location from the person being called or to make the number seem more familiar to the called party.”</p> <p>However, this is not the first time a hacker has attempted to use the ATO to steal money or the identity of an unaware Aussie.</p> <p>In July of last year, a phishing scam was alerted to Australians by the official Australian Taxation Office Facebook page, urging people to keep their “eyes peeled for [a] new ATO-themed scam email that requests… credit/debit card details.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fatogovau%2Fphotos%2Fa.257661790921141%2F1919442111409759%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="609" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The ATO advises if you believe you have been hit with a scam text message, phone call or email to not click any links sent to you, open attachments or respond to the fraudulence.</p> <p>If you receive an email you believe to be fake, the ATO advises you forward the entire email to <a href="mailto:ReportEmailFraud@ato.gov.au">ReportEmailFraud@ato.gov.au</a> and to delete the email from your account.</p> <p><strong>How to spot a scam</strong></p> <p>When spotting a deceitful ploy, you are urged to look out for these following signs</p> <ul> <li>Abusive language or threatening words</li> <li>Immediate payment</li> <li>Contact by email, text message or social media</li> </ul> <p>Remember, if it seems too good to be true then it most probably is.</p> <p>To learn more, please visit the <a href="https://www.ato.gov.au/general/online-services/identity-security/verify-or-report-a-scam/?=QC53447_Link2#CheckonorreportanATOimpersonationscam">ATO’s helpful website for more information.</a></p> <p>Has this ever happened to you? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Apple debuts new iPhone feature to stop texting while driving for good

<p>Around the world, nearly 1.3 million people die in road crashes each year – a shocking average of 3287 deaths a day. Roughly 40 per cent of all road accidents are caused by 'distracted driving' – with texting while driving making up a significant portion of that total.</p> <p>Now, Apple is taking a stand. While debuting the new iOS 11 earlier this month, the company’s Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi announced a groundbreaking feature: the “Do Not Disturb While Driving” mode, available for all iOS 11 users.</p> <p>Here’s how it will work: When DNDWD is turned on, your iPhone mutes all notifications and turns the lock screen completely black. (The phone can detect when you’re in a moving car through built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth settings.) If someone texts you, he or she will get two automatic texts back. The first says, “I’m driving with Do Not Disturb turned on. I’ll see your message when I get where I’m going.” The second is “If this is urgent, reply ‘urgent’ to send a notification through with your original message.”</p> <p>For drivers who take their eyes off the road just to check for messages, the feature could have a serious effect on how they drive. However, there are loopholes that could still pose potential issues. The DNDWD mode can be manually turned off by selecting the “I’m Not Driving” option. Apple considers this feature a way for people who are in cars but not driving to continue using their phones. Perpetual texters will likely see it as a way to keep up their dangerous habit, though it may slow them down or possibly keep their eyes off the road even longer than normal.</p> <p>But if this feature proves effective just for the eye-wanderers and can keep a small fraction of people alive who otherwise wouldn’t be, we’d call that a success.</p> <p>Would you use this feature? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p><em>Written by Claire Nowak. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/apple-debuts-new-iphone-feature-stop-texting-while-driving">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The iPhone keyboard has had a mouse this whole time

<p>If you have an iPhone with 3D Touch capability (i.e. the iPhone 6S, 6S Plus, 7, or 7 Plus), you’re in luck. Editing text on your phone just got a whole lot easier with this new hidden feature.</p> <p>When you’re typing away and look back on your message to see that you’ve made a mistake, your instinct is probably to tap the screen where you want to edit, or press and hold to create the magnifier tool and edit from there. But sometimes your finger gets right in the way of what you’re trying to edit, so you can’t fully see where the cursor is going, or it doesn’t register your click correctly.</p> <p>Luckily, Apple has remedied this issue with its latest batch of iPhones. Your keyboard now doubles as a mousepad, making edits easier and more precise than the tapping or magnifying manoeuvers.</p> <p>To activate the hidden mousepad, press firmly on any key until all of the keys turn blank and you feel a light tap on your finger from the screen, also known as the taptic feature. This turns the keyboard into a mousepad and your finger into the mouse.</p> <p>The keyboard tracks your fingers movement, making the cursor on the screen smaller and easier to navigate. It also solves the issue of blocking your edits with your finger, since it stays on the mousepad the whole time. </p> <p>You can also select groups of text with this feature for bulkier editing. First, make sure the trackpad is activated. Then ease the pressure your finger is applying to the screen without letting go, and press again firmly to activate the highlighter and move your finger to select what you want to edit.</p> <p>This new feature definitely takes some getting used to, as it is incredibly responsive to how much pressure you apply and much faster and more accurate than the old “tapping” methods. But once you get the hang of the iPhone’s handy new editing tool, you’ll be typing away all day with ease.</p> <p>Did you know about this secret mouse? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p><em>Written by Shannon Donohue. </em>This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/iphone-keyboard-has-had-mouse-whole-time">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The new Aussie Netflix scam you need to be aware of

<p>Aussie Netflix users are being warned to take extreme caution after it was found a sophisticated email scam has been sent across Australia.</p> <p>The high-quality email is being sent to unsuspecting Australians, one that tricks users into believing the scam emails come from the legitimate streaming platform.</p> <p>The scam looks to steal information from Netflix users by telling them their beloved online watching has been “temporarily suspeneded (sic),” only to be returned to them after their personal information is given to “verify” their details.</p> <p>The phishing email claims the user’s account has been “suspeneded (sic)” due to “issues in the automatic verification process”.</p> <p>“For this reason we suspended your account, until you verify all required informations (sic) and update your payment method,” the email explains.</p> <p>Despite the spelling errors and high intelligence of technology users, experts are warning people to be aware.</p> <p>MailGuard, an email security company, claims the email scam was alerted first on Monday evening.</p> <p>“Sent via a malicious sender, the emails use a display name of “NETFLlX” with a lower case ‘L’ character to replace the ‘i’,” the statement said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Marie Kondo your inbox by tidying up your emails and discarding anything like this, because this scam will not spark joy. ✨🙅🏻‍♀️<br /><br />Beware of a fake Netflix email scam that’s going around. If you get this email do not click on links or enter personal data.<br /><br />Image courtesy of 9 News. <a href="https://t.co/YyBA0Liq9c">pic.twitter.com/YyBA0Liq9c</a></p> — NSW Police Force (@nswpolice) <a href="https://twitter.com/nswpolice/status/1090103603165970432?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 29, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Clicking the “UPDATE YOUR DETAILS” link takes users to a fake Netflix login page that is incredibly similar to the official login by the streaming service.</p> <p>If an unlucky user is to put their details into the page, cyber criminals are then given access to information by victims. The information can be used for identity theft and fraud.</p> <p>MailGuard warns there are several indications that the email they might receive from ‘Netflix’ could be fake.</p> <p>“There are several grammatical and spelling errors within the body, such as the bolded ‘suspended’.</p> <p>“Spacing errors are also present throughout the email.”</p> <p>A Netflix spokesperson said the security regarding member accounts are taken under extreme safety measures, ensuring the company “employs numerous proactive measures to detect fraudulent activity.”</p> <p>If you receive an email like the one above, users are encouraged to delete it immediately.</p> <p>SEE MORE: <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/technology/are-you-too-smart-to-fall-for-an-online-scam-take-this-quiz">Are you too smart to fall for an online scam? Take this quiz</a></p> <p> </p>

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Could cochlear implants improve your cognitive function?

<p>Cochlear implants could be associated with improved speech perception and cognitive function in adults with profound hearing loss who are 65 years or older. Here is a comprehensive break-down of the associated options.</p> <p><strong>What is a cochlear implant?</strong></p> <p>It is a small electronic hearing device that provides a sense of sound to profoundly deaf patients by electronically stimulating the hearing nerve and bypassing damaged parts of the inner ear. It has both internal and external parts. The complex technology essentially emulates the function of an ear to receive, process and transmit sound waves.</p> <p>The external part of a cochlear implant is placed just above the ear and involves a microphone and sound processor, which selects and arranges sound. While the transmitter converts the signals from the processor and converts them into electric impulses. The impulses are sent to the internal part of the implant, which is put in place surgically under general anaesthesia. This internal part involves a receiver and magnet under the skin behind the ear and a series of electrodes placed in the cochlear. The electrodes collect the impulses and send them to different regions of the auditory nerve.</p> <p>A cochlear implant for someone who is considered deaf is a useful representation of sound in the environment and helps them to understand speech. It bypasses the damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulates the auditory nerve. Although it takes some time to learn or relearn, hearing by a cochlear implant allows the user to recognise warning signals, understand environmental noises and even have conversations.</p> <p><strong>Who needs them?</strong></p> <p>Cochlear implants are useful for children or adults who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. Many children who are deaf at birth receive cochlear implants from 12 months of age. However, adults who lose hearing later in life also frequently use the devices. These individuals are then able to associate the provided signals with sounds they remember, negating the need to learn lip-reading or sign language.</p> <p>According to the Australian Communication Exchange, three in every four Australians over 70 are affected by hearing loss. This is largely due to the damage we expose our ears to on a day-to-day basis. Loud or excessive noise damages the hair cells in the cochlear, which unfortunately don’t regrow. As well as gradual hearing loss, many people may also have incidents that cause them to suddenly lose their hearing, meaning they will also require the assistance of these devices.</p> <p><strong>Implantation</strong></p> <p>Use of a cochlear implant requires both a surgical procedure and significant therapy. Cochlear implantations are almost always safe, however, as with all surgical procedures there is always a small risk. Cochlear implants are quite costly, and the learning process is quite lengthy, however, the benefits are considered to be usually worthwhile.</p> <p><strong>Cochlear implant or hearing aid?</strong></p> <p>Hearing aids simply amplify sounds and can be easily fitted on the external part of the ear, requiring no surgical procedure. There are a variety of hearing aids available, which generally consist of a microphone, amplifier, miniature loudspeaker and battery. Hearing aids pick up and amplify surrounding sounds and help to make speech more intelligible. People with profound hearing loss or residual low frequency hearing will likely receive no benefit from hearing aids and will be considered for a cochlear implant.</p> <p><strong>Costs</strong></p> <p>Cochlear implants are an expensive piece of technology, possible adding up to around $40,000. Depending on your state Department of Health, funding is usually provided for a limited number of cochlear implants per year. Most Australian private health fund cover the costs of the implant and hospital expenses and holders of Gold Veteran Affairs cards are usually fully covered.</p> <p>As well as financial costs, time costs must also be taken in to consideration. The assessment period usually takes three months, and then there is usually a few week’s wait for surgery. After surgery, the MAP (the programming for the cochlear implant) will need to be adjusted to the needs of its user.</p> <p><strong>Benefits</strong></p> <p>Several studies have shown benefits. One that adult cochlear implant patients allow a more marked improvement physically, psychologically and socially than hearing aid patients. This means that cochlear implants can bring as much benefit to those with profound hearing loss as hearing aids bring to those with less severe hearing loss. Another found that cochlear implants vastly improve the quality of life of deaf patients over 50. Cochlear implants are found to be a cost-effective solution in this age group, due to their increase in health and emotional-related quality of life. Increases in speech perception scores showed a strong correlation with magnitude of health utility gains.</p> <p>More recent research which was published online by JAMA Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. This research indicates that cochlear implantation is positively associated with improved cognitive function and speech perception in adults 65 years and older with profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment correlates strongly with cognitive decline, and in cases where hearing aids are not sufficient, cochlear implantation is seen to be highly beneficial for older patients.</p> <p>This study also showed that cochlear implants not only improve speech perception – in both quiet and noise – however, they can also improve quality of life and show less incidence of depression. More than 80% of the 94 patients in the study with impaired cognitive function improved their brain function scores one year after implantation.</p> <p><strong>Who to see</strong></p> <p>If you have suddenly or gradually become profoundly hard-of-hearing, it is important to seek professional medical advice immediately. Help is available and seeking advice early could increase your quality of life.</p> <p>Options are to either visit an otolaryngologist, a doctor specialising in the diagnosis of ear, nose and throat diseases; an audiologist, who has specialised training in identifying and measuring the type and degree of hearing loss and recommends option; or a hearing aid specialist, who conducts and evaluate basic tests and offers counselling. Because cochlear implantation is for more serious hearing loss, you will need to see a specialist and then be referred to receive surgical treatment.</p> <p><em>Written by Greta Mayr. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/could-cochlear-implants-could-improve-your-cognitive-function.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to use Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

<p>Read any good tweets recently, posted a selfie on Instagram or shared a meme on Facebook? Sometimes it can seem like the world out there is speaking a foreign language.</p> <p>Technology has most definitely transformed the way we communicate, connect and socialise. If you feel out of touch but curious about what all the fuss is about, then read on – we have some tips to help you find your way around this brave new world. It’s easier than you think and you’re never too old to learn.</p> <p><strong>Social media use on the rise for adults 65 and over<br /></strong></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/04/03/older-adults-and-technology-use/" target="_blank">A new Pew Research Centre study</a> shows that 43 per cent of Internet users age 65 and over are now using social media sites like Facebook and Twitter – that’s up from 13 per cent in 2009. Those numbers suggest that it really is time to get on the bandwagon if you haven’t done so already.</p> <p>So what are your options for getting involved in social media and how do you get started? Let’s take a look at the more popular platforms.</p> <p><strong>Connect with friends and family on Facebook </strong></p> <p>Facebook has become a global meeting place to connect and share with others. It’s an easy and quick way to check in with family or friends to find out what they’re up to by looking at their “posts”. Posts allow the opportunity to share what you’ve been doing with others and vice versa. You can also post uploaded photos or videos, jokes, memes, website links, thoughts, opinions – anything.</p> <p>It’s also a great tool for keeping in touch with family and friends who live quite far or perhaps even overseas. You can search for old schoolmates, long lost relatives or business colleagues if you want to reconnect with them.</p> <p>You can do this by searching for their name on Facebook. If they’re using Facebook too, you can “send” them an invitation to be your “friend” on Facebook. If they accept your request, you can start communicating with them via Facebook or simply read each other’s posts.</p> <p>Facebook Messenger Stories allow you to share photos and videos for a short amount of time with your friends and family. You are able to do this by tapping on the 'Your Story'. You are then able to take a photo or video of whatever you like or upload a photograph you've taken earlier.</p> <p><strong>Twitter keeps you informed on what interests you</strong></p> <p>Twitter is an online social networking tool based around short text-based messages of 280 characters or less.</p> <p>Unlike the person-to-person nature of an email or posting messages on Facebook for your friends to see on, Twitter is more like a broadcast messaging service that lets you express your news, thoughts and opinions to anyone interested in the subject.</p> <p>Conversely, it lets you follow the messages of other Twitter users or see ‘tweets’ on news and issues that interest you.</p> <p>The focus of Twitter is the speed with which it can report an event – from the extraneous to the extraordinary – and its power to broadcast to a worldwide audience. No wonder it has revolutionised the way the world gets its news.</p> <p>Twitter lets you see what is happening in the world in real time, follow what your favourite movie or sports star is up to, see news breaking as it happens or stay across the latest information on any area of interest you might want to follow.</p> <p>In order to get the most out of Twitter, it’s good to get an understanding of the hashtag concept. A hashtag is basically a way of allowing you to label a tweet message in a way that will maximise its reach to people interested in a particular topic.</p> <p>On the flip side, it allows you to search and stay across subjects that interest you. For example, #mountains will show tweets that have the same hashtag, whether they're photos, tweets or videos.</p> <p><strong>Instagram is a photo-based social network</strong></p> <p>Just like Facebook, Instagram is a social networking service, but with a particular focus on sharing and connecting with friends through photographs. It allows you to post your own photos and see the photos of others who you choose to connect with. You can make your account public or limit it to who you’ve allowed to see your images.</p> <p>Instagram has been designed to make it super-easy to upload photos from your smartphone or tablet. You can even embellish your image instantly using some in-built artistic filters that let you put some personality into whatever you post. Some simulate the look of a Polaroid snap and some publish your pic in black and white.</p> <p>The real fun of Instagram is seeing photos uploaded by people in your network. Imagine seeing your grandchildren’s latest antics just after they have happened or the fish your brother has just caught on his interstate holiday. The more people you accept in your network of contacts, the more photos you will get to see. You can then interact with whoever is uploading by “liking” them or leaving a comment.</p> <p>Instagram Stories allow you to share photos and videos for a short amount of time with your followers. You are able to share with them by swiping to the left once you have the app open on the homepage. You are then able to take a photo or video of whatever you like or upload a photograph you've taken earlier. You are also able to see other people's stories who you follow as well.</p> <p><strong>Managing privacy </strong></p> <p><span>Privacy is a big concern for anyone starting out on social media. Fortunately, making your Instagram, Twitter or Facebook account limited to the level you want is simply done. When you create your account and set up your profile you can specify the level of privacy you want, so that your posts are limited to the family, friends and acquaintances that you are connected with. </span></p> <p><strong>5 top tips for social media etiquette </strong></p> <p>When it comes to deciding what to say in your posts and comments you can make on social media, there are a few ground rules to abide by to avoid social media faux pas, inadvertently offending someone or giving out too much information.</p> <p>1. Before you post, ask yourself: "Would I say this face-to-face to all my friends?"</p> <p>2. Don’t rush – stop and think about what you are posting before you post.</p> <p>3. If it is a personal one-on-one message, don’t post it for everyone else to see. Make it a private message or just email or call them.</p> <p>4. Don’t just talk about yourself and don’t treat social media just as a soapbox for your opinions.</p> <p>5. Be polite and respect others and always ask permission before posting photos or sharing other’s posts.</p> <p>Do you find social media useful or a struggle? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/getting-to-grips-with-social-media-how-to-use-facebook,-twitter-and-instagram.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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7 apps and gadgets for your pet

<p>If you have a cat or a dog, you probably already own all the basics: food bowl, leash, litter box, collar. However, there are plenty of apps and gadgets available that can make caring for your pet a lot easier — here are our favourites.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">1. Smart feeders</strong></p> <p>If you work long hours and your pet needs a meal during the day, it can be a tricky predicament to manage. If you put food out when you leave, your furry friend is likely to eat it immediately and be starving by the time you return in the evening.</p> <p>A smart feeder can solve that problem. Many allow you to set specific portion controls, have the feeder release food into your pet's bowl at a specified time, and make a noise to attract their attention.</p> <p>Others even have smartphone integration, allowing you to manually change feeding times on the go, and a remote camera so you can keep an eye on your pet while you’re away.</p> <p><strong>Price: $100-$250</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">2. PetCoach app</strong></p> <p>Sometimes it’s difficult to tell whether you need to take your pet to the vet to be checked out — especially if it’s a long trip in remote areas. While it’s always better to be safe than sorry, the<span> </span><span>PetCoach app</span><span> </span>provides a useful first step in making that decision.</p> <p>The app allows you to chat with professional veterinarians in real time — for free. If you have any niggling questions, you can easily get them cleared up, and all answers are publicly available, so you may find other people have had the same problem with their pet.</p> <p>The app also allows you to send photos to give the vet a better idea of any potential medical problems.</p> <p><strong>Price: Free</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">3. Pet trackers</strong></p> <p>While some pets are adept at wandering the neighbourhood and finding their way home, others (especially small dogs) are more likely to get lost if they get out.</p> <p>To save the heartbreak of a lost pet, a pet tracker such as the<span> </span><span>Petrek3G GPS Pet Tracker</span> can make your runaway much easier to find. The linked iPet app gives you a satellite view and a live location of your pet, so you can track them down, scoop them up, and bring them home!</p> <p><strong>Price: $279</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">4. Smart pet door</strong></p> <p>If you have a pet that likes to go walkabout, having a cat flap is a must. Unfortunately, it also creates a security risk for your home and can allow unwanted visitors, such as possums, inside.</p> <p><span>SureFlap</span> solves this problem with its range of smart pet doors that only open when they detect your pet’s microchip approaching. The linked app also allows you to remotely lock and unlock the door from anywhere, and keeps track of when your pet is using the door.</p> <p><strong>Price: $149-249</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">5. Self-cleaning litter box</strong></p> <p>Cleaning up after your furry friend isn’t the best part of pet ownership. Even if they are toilet trained, you’re still going to have to pick up and deal with your loveable fluffball’s less loveable droppings.</p> <p>A litter box is a must-have for any cat owner, but if you want to make things a little more sanitary, a self-cleaning option might be for you. These boxes automatically scoop your cat’s waste into a bin that you can easily dispose of without having to get your hands dirty.</p> <p><strong>Price: $100-$200</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">6. Automatic ball thrower</strong></p> <p>If you’re a little less mobile than you’d like to be and struggle to keep up with your dog’s energy, an automatic ball thrower could help you spend quality time with them, without exhausting yourself.</p> <p>The<span> </span><span>iFetch</span><span> </span>range of automatic ball launchers simply require you to drop the ball and they will shoot it out to a pre-programmable distance (options vary depending on the model). If your dog is well trained enough to drop the ball into the machine, it’s an easy way to keep their exercise levels up.</p> <p><strong>Price: $90-$400</strong></p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">7. 11pets app</strong></p> <p>If your pet has a medical condition that requires regular treatment or medication, caring for them can become a cause for concern — especially when you have to leave them with a pet sitter.</p> <p>The<span> </span><span>11pets mobile app</span><span> </span>allows you to keep all your pet’s medical records in one place, and manage their medications by logging the required doses and setting reminders.</p> <p>You can also track important appointments such as vaccinations, deworming, and grooming. The data in the app also means you can easily provide any relevant information to a vet if you have to take your pet in.</p> <p><strong>Price: Free</strong></p> <p>Do you have any recommendations for pet-related apps or gadgets?</p> <p><em>Written by Jamie Feggans. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/pets/7-apps-and-gadgets-for-your-pet.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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What’s it like to go indoor skydiving?

<p><span>Indoor skydiving is a fun way to experience what it is like to fly through the air with the greatest of ease.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Q. What is Indoor skydiving exactly?</strong><br /></span></p> <p><span>Indoor skydiving</span><span> </span>is where you simply lean forward inside a giant glass tunnel into a column of air and float effortlessly into flight guided by qualified instructors. There's no parachute, no jumping, and nothing attaching you to planet earth! It's just you, 'flying' in the air and getting an incredible adrenaline rush.<br /> <br /><strong>Q. Is indoor skydiving safe?</strong></p> <p>Yes. Every aspect of the wind tunnel design has been carefully considered to create a fully controlled environment that provides total safety. Certified and highly-trained instructors are with you at all times during your flight, to give guidance and reassurance.<br /><br /><strong>Q. Is it hard to breathe during the flight?</strong></p> <p>Not at all. It’s a similar sensation to sticking your head out of a car window when it’s moving. You’ll feel the wind rush over your whole body as it lifts you effortlessly upwards. Just breathe normally and enjoy the ride.</p> <p><strong>Q. How long is a flight?</strong></p> <p>Each flight within the wind tunnel lasts for almost 1 minute. That’s actually more freefall time than a skydive from 14,000 feet. Standard flight packages includes 2 flights, with an instructor helping you make the most of your time.</p> <p>You can also choose to add additional flights to your packages. The whole experience normally takes approximately 1.5 hours, however this will be dependent on your group size and how many flights you are doing. </p> <p><strong>Q. Is indoor skydiving scary?</strong></p> <p>It’s really exciting and challenging, but indoor skydiving isn't what we call scary. You don’t have to leap off anything and there’s no sensation of falling or anything that could make you feel motion sickness. Anyone can try it.<br /><br /><strong>Q. Do I jump in from the top?</strong></p> <p>No, you just step into the flight chamber at ground level with your flight instructor. First time flyers generally only fly a couple of metres above the net with your instructor beside you all the way.<span> </span><br /><br /><strong>Q. Who can fly?</strong></p> <p>There’s no experience required, so beginners, intermediates and experts can all fly. Of course, you need to be in good health and physical condition. If you’ve had a prior shoulder dislocation or back or neck problems, you need to contact the company before booking to discuss your suitability.</p> <p>Anyone with a hard plaster cast, who is pregnant or under the influence of alcohol or non-prescriptive drugs is also unable to fly. Facilities are wheelchair accessible and can fly people with certain physical disabilities, including amputation and paraplegia.</p> <p><strong>Q. How old do you have to be?</strong></p> <p><span>Flyers can be as young as 3 years old, with no upper age limit. Children under 18 years of age need to have a parent or guardian’s signature on their waiver. </span></p> <p>As indoor skydiving has taken off, there's bound to be a venue near you!</p> <p>Have you gone indoor skydiving before? What was it like? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p><em>Written by Editor. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/whats-it-like-to-go-indoor-skydiving.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Is the mobile phone a blessing or a curse?

<p><strong>“I can’t live without my mobile phone!”</strong><span> </span>is what I often hear people say as they lament about how mobiles have become an indispensable part of their lives. The blurring of personal and work lives brought about by the device are posing challenges to many.</p> <p>The all so common sight of heads bent, eyes staring intently at mobile screens and fingers busy tapping away repeats itself across major cities around the world. Whenever there is a moment to spare while on the train, taxi or waiting in a queue, people busy themselves with their mobile devices. Some even confess to checking in with their phones while out on a date!</p> <p>Such unhealthy obsession with mobile devices is disrupting how we appreciate the little things in life or miss the moments that matter. The truth is that technology overall should be seen as a tool to enhance our way of living and not as a backfill for the good things that we as humans naturally enjoy.</p> <p>Mobile phones have certainly made a significant impact on our lives, but I truly believe it’s for the better.</p> <p>It’s changed the way we communicate, whether for work or play. We are now less constrained by time and geographical location. With my mobile device, I can dial into conference calls while stuck in a traffic jam, or reply to urgent e-mails while on the go. I can send a text message or share photos and videos with friends who aren’t living in the same country. My phone calendar keeps my life organised, and even Facebook, Twitter, and instant messaging are now accessible from mobile devices!</p> <p>Smartphones are more than just a means to stay connected; they are also a key source of entertainment. The game of Snake was one of the first mobile games that I got hooked on way back in the 1990s. Today, the market’s flooded with mobile apps – we’re so spoilt for choice! And it’s not just games. There are apps to help you find your way around literally anywhere, apps that let you listen to your favourite music, apps to book cinema or concert tickets, and even apps that teach the alphabet to toddlers.</p> <p>The mobile revolution isn’t just changing the lives of urbanites like myself. I know of a young Bangladeshi woman named Shompa Akhter who has a passion for fashion and design. She dreamt about starting her own business and she did just that, opening a boutique in Kushtia featuring her own creations. Dealing with suppliers in different towns was a hassle for Shompa – purchase orders had to either be hand delivered or mailed out to suppliers. Shompa also found it tough publicising her business to potential customers outside her town.</p> <p>Before using a mobile phone, Shompa had never heard of e-mails! The technology intimidated her and she was sceptical about how a mobile phone and e-mail could help her business. But once she got the hang of it, she was hooked. Mobile e-mail is a blessing in her life. The 25-year-old entrepreneur now stays in touch easily with her suppliers.</p> <p>I hear inspiring stories like Shompa’s from so many other countries. Teachers, like Edna Cas and Imelda Pontejos from Ligao East Central School in the Philippines, have brought lessons to life in the classrooms by downloading multimedia content via smartphones using the Text2Teach programme and linking it to television screens to show to their students.</p> <p>Farmers, like Edi Sugara Purba in North Sumatra, Indonesia now have access to weather information critical to crops. With the information gained through his mobile phone, Edi can quickly decide how to best protect the coffee and oranges he grows. He also gets information on crop prices to help him negotiate better and decide on how to price his crops competitively.</p> <p>Who would have thought that mobility could effect such monumental change? It shouldn’t really be a surprise though. Information is empowering. Just ask Shompa, Edna and Edi.</p> <p>Still, close to six billion mobile phone users don’t own a smartphone. Another 3.2 billion people don’t own a mobile device at all. The mobile revolution is here but there are still many out there who have yet to experience its benefits. We’ve only just begun.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Neil Gordon. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/mobile-phone-blessing-or-curse">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here's our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p class="p1"><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Are you too smart to fall for an online scam? Take this quiz

<p>Millions of people fall for scam emails every day. To respond to this problem, Google has launched a new quiz to test your ability to identify phishing emails.</p> <p>Phishing – or attempts to steal your sensitive information such as passwords, account numbers and credit cards – is “the most common form of cyberattack”, according to Google’s Jigsaw product manager Justin Henck. “One percent of emails sent today are phishing attempts.”</p> <p>To raise awareness about phishing and cyber security, Google’s technology incubator Jigsaw created the quiz with the help of about 10,000 journalists, activists and political leaders across the world.</p> <p>The questions were designed to teach people to spot the techniques that hackers use to trick them as well as the telltale signs of phishing emails.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 210.9375px;" src="/media/7822956/jigsawgoogle.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a8fc76888e0c46a2b25768e69c87b13a" /></p> <p>Below are the tips that the quiz shares:</p> <ul> <li>Be cautious about attachments and hyperlinks, including URLs designed to look like popular websites, which may send you to fraudulent login pages.</li> <li>Read the sender’s email domain carefully to make sure the email comes from a legitimate/official source.</li> <li>When opening PDF attachments, make sure you trust the sender and use a browser or an online service to open them safely.</li> <li>Approve account access requests only if you trust the developer. You can check this by evaluating the domain that is displayed and clicking on it for more details.</li> </ul> <p>Apart from knowing the signs, Henck also recommended enabling two-step verification on your account. </p> <p>“When you have two-factor authentication enabled, even if an attacker successfully steals your password, they won’t be able to access your account,” said Henck.</p> <p>Take the quiz <a rel="noopener" href="https://phishingquiz.withgoogle.com/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p>Have you been the victim of any email scams? Share your story in the comments.</p>

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