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Husband criticises wife’s funeral outfit – describes it as “too much”

<p>When attending a funeral, everyone knows that it is essential to make sure your outfit is smart, modest and most importantly, black.</p> <p>However, one woman has asked for fashion advice after her husband complained about the dress she was planning to wear to a funeral.</p> <p>Sharing a photo of the dress on <a href="https://www.mumsnet.com/"><strong><u>Mumsnet</u></strong></a>, the woman’s black dress has divided the internet, with public opinion split on the outfit choice.</p> <p>In the post, she explained that she intended to pair the black dress with “black tights and black ankle boots with a small heel".</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 385.9223300970874px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7822310/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e823e93a7cb041a0b008129c810bb608" /></p> <p>She added that her 5-foot height also made the dress more modest as the hem sat at “practically knee-length” on her.</p> <p>But her husband didn’t believe the dress was suitable for the occasion.</p> <p>“I thought it was perfect but [dear husband] seems to think it’s ‘too much’. So [would it be unreasonable] to wear it?” she asked.</p> <p>After sharing her post, the woman was flooded with responses of varying opinions.</p> <p>Some said the dress was offensive as it is the sort of style one “would wear on a night out” and “a bit short”.</p> <p>Others suggested ways that she could make it less stylish.</p> <p>“Do you have a pair of black jeans or trousers you could wear underneath? That would be more suitable than tights,” one wrote. “Also could you wear a vest or crew neck t-shirt underneath?”</p> <p>However, others believed that everyone was overreacting over the dress.</p> <p>“Good grief. Please don’t wear it with trousers and a crew neck. You’re going to a funeral, not a nunnery,” one fired back.</p> <p>The woman has not yet revealed if she will wear the dress to the funeral.</p> <p>Do you think the dress is inappropriate for a funeral? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban's strict rule for daughters

<p>Despite the accolades and Academy Award, Nicole Kidman has proven that when it comes to raising her children, she’s just like us.</p> <p>Living in Tennessee with her husband Keith Urban, Nicole has revealed the one thing her children Sunday, 10, and Faith, 7, are not allowed to do.</p> <p>And that’s obsessing over the internet and television.</p> <p>To make sure this doesn’t happen, the 51-year-old has banned handheld electronic devices from their home.</p> <p>“We have a no-devices house. Their friends can’t bring devices over. The general rule is: play, hardcore and outside,” she told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/au" target="_blank">The Guardian</a></em>.</p> <p>“We have periods at home when we don’t turn on the TV and try to have a detox from it all,” she said.</p> <p>And she stands firmly behind her decision and says she would “recommend [it] to anyone” as she claims her children find entertainment through backyard activities and playing with animals.</p> <p>Growing up, Nicole belonged to a Catholic family and she still upholds the tradition of attending church.</p> <p>“We go to Catholic church, or sometimes we will go to a gospel church for the music. That singing and joy is so wonderful,” she told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/observer" target="_blank">The Observer</a>.</em></p> <p>But her father revealed he was an atheist when Nicole was a teenager.</p> <p>Recounting the memory of her father Antony, Nicole said: “He was a very gentle man, with a really strong social conscience. He told me he would still live by the Ten Commandments, but he was an atheist. And I said: ‘No, I want you to believe in God!’”</p> <p>“It was difficult for a child. I still go to church. I love the ritual. But that’s me and my choice.”</p>

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Princess Charlotte’s surprising royal lookalike

<p>While Princess Charlotte has been compared to Princess Diana and even the Queen, there is a new member of the Royal Family that fans believe the 3-year-old shares an uncanny resemblance with.</p> <p>Last week, Diana’s niece, Lady Kitty Spencer, shared a sweet throwback photo of herself as a child.</p> <p>Royal fans were quick to point out the resemblance between Prince William and Prince Harry’s cousin and Princess Charlotte.</p> <p>The 27-year-old daughter of Diana’s brother Charles Spencer and Victoria Lockwood captioned the photo: “First day of school #tbt”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqexQAQhkBd/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqexQAQhkBd/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">First day of school 🤓 #tbt</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kitty.spencer/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Kitty Spencer</a> (@kitty.spencer) on Nov 22, 2018 at 3:22am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The vintage snap shows a four-year-old Kitty wearing a gingham dress, white socks and black pumps.</p> <p>Some fans initially believed the photo was a shot of Charlotte.</p> <p>“I just thought palace released a new pic but then read the caption and name,” one user wrote.</p> <p>Another added: “Princess Charlotte has the Spencer genes. You look so similar on this”.</p> <p>On Charlotte’s first day at Wilcocks Nursery in January, she also wore the same style of shoes but in red.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7822109/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8707130fdf1541cfad85b9cadbf9b2d3" /></p> <p>Kitty has remained close to her royal cousins following their mother Diana’s passing, attending both William’s wedding in 2011 and Harry’s nuptials earlier this year. </p> <p>Do you think Princess Charlotte and Diana's niece Kitty look alike? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Bride replaces wedding vows with fiancé’s cheating text messages

<p>A heartbroken bride has confronted her fiancé at the altar of her wedding ceremony after finding out that he was cheating on her the night before their big day.</p> <p>Casey* was celebrating her final night of being unmarried with her bridesmaids when she received a text message from an unknown number, reported <a href="https://www.whimn.com.au"><strong><em><u>Whimn.</u></em></strong></a></p> <p>Casey was expecting a congratulatory message but instead received a series of screenshots from a conversation involving her boyfriend of six years, Alex*, and another woman.</p> <p>The conversations between Casey’s boyfriend and the ‘other’ woman, who she described as looking the “complete opposite of her”, went back months.</p> <p>The sender wrote to Casey: “I wouldn’t marry him. Will you?”</p> <p>The texts also included selfies of the pair and immediately Casey knew “there was no questioning the legitimacy” of the screenshots.</p> <p>Casey said every message was a “dagger to her heart”, but didn’t know what to do as the wedding would be taking place in a few hours and it was already paid for.</p> <p>So she hatched a plan for the next day. </p> <p>“I was going to go ahead with the wedding as expected, and ‘out’ him in front of our friends and family,” she said.</p> <p>After walking down the wedding aisle the following day, Casey announced there would be “no wedding” instead of reading her vows.</p> <p>“It seems Alex is not who I thought he was,” she told her guests, before reading out every single message he had sent to the other woman.</p> <p><em>"Your body is f***ing incredible. And s** do you know how to use it. I wish my GF (girlfriend) had half the skills you do."</em></p> <p><em>"I miss you so much…I’ve never had this kind of connection before."</em></p> <p>All colour left Alex’s face and Casey let her weeping eyes rise and meet his.</p> <p>The embarrassed groom didn’t have anything to say but walked out of the church in shame with his best man close behind him.</p> <p>“I love all of you and as horrible as this is, I’m glad you all are here,” Casey bravely told her guests.</p> <p>“There will not be a wedding reception today, but instead, there will be a celebration of honesty, finding true love and following your heart even when it hurts.”</p> <p>Although it was not the day Casey has planned, she said despite the heartbreak, the reception was “one hell of a party”.</p> <p><em>*Names changed for confidentiality </em></p>

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New phone scam trap: The chilling voicemail message you should never call back

<p>Thousands of Australians around the country have been victims of a new voicemail scam that once listened to, will stop you dead in your tracks.</p> <p>The voicemail is of a robotic-sounding voice threatening a lawsuit against the receiver and advising them to call back immediately.</p> <p>If the recipient chooses to ignore the call, the voicemail claims that an arrest warrant will be issued.</p> <p>But the chilling voicemail, which demands the victim to pay off their tax debt, has already racked up thousands of dollars from those who fell into the trap.</p> <p>According to authorities, those who are more susceptible to falling for the elaborate scam are elderly people as they are more likely to believe the voicemail, and once they call back, they are threatened by the fraudsters.</p> <p>“The reason behind this call is that there is a lawsuit case getting filed under your name,” says the computer-generated message.</p> <p>“The moment you get this message I want you to get back to me on my department division number. Now, if we don’t hear from you, we have to issue an arrest warrant under your name and get you arrested so get back to me as soon as possible. Thank you.”</p> <p>A reporter received a call on Wednesday with the number 08 6102 5755. But since then, the number is no longer in use by the scammers.</p> <p>Since July 1, the Australian Taxation Office has been alerted of 28,000 scam attempts, including this latest lawsuit phone call.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/the-scary-voicemail-message-you-shouldnt-return/news-story/db566be54f53036480ccc68e7f94199f" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, Kath Anderson, the ATO’s Assistant Commissioner, said those committing fraud are becoming smarter and are finding cunning ways to exploit those who are vulnerable.</p> <p>The phone numbers are always Australian numbers with this particular scam carrying Western Australia and Victoria area codes.</p> <p>But according to police, the scammers are most likely calling from overseas and using a call forwarding service to obtain Australian numbers.</p> <p>“Be wary if someone contacts you demanding payment of a tax debt you didn’t know you owed,” said Ms Anderson.</p> <p>“Our advice is simple – the ATO will never ask you to make a payment into an ATM or via gift or prepaid cards such as iTunes and Visa cards, or direct credit to be paid to a personal bank account.”</p> <p>While it’s assumed that the taxation office uses aggressive tactics to reclaim debt, Ms Anderson says the ATO never demands immediate payment of debts.</p> <p>“That’s just not how we do business."</p> <p>She adds, “If you have any doubts about the legitimacy of a call, hang up and call us on 1800 008 540.”</p> <p>The ATO also advises people to refrain from handing out personal details over the phone, as 6000 Australians have issued their tax file numbers and bank account details since July 1.</p> <p>“Your identifying information can be used by scammers to break into your life if they are compromised,” said Ms Anderson.</p> <p>“If you’ve received an unsolicited email or text, or if you have any doubts about whether any contact is legitimately from the ATO, don’t hesitate to get in touch with us to check.</p> <p>“Scammers have been known to impersonate tax agents too, so it’s recommended that you hang up and call your agent direct on a number you have sourced independently.”</p> <p>Have you received any strange phone calls as of late? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Why this mum isn’t going to tell her kids it’s Christmas Eve

<p>A mother has faced scrutiny over her controversial decision to not tell her children it’s Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Posting under the username “Mama Hechtick”, the mum asked for people’s opinions on parenting forum Mumsnet, as she explained that her reasoning behind not telling her children it’s Christmas Eve is, so they could have a good night’s sleep.</p> <p>“I have this idea, that for this year we won’t tell DC [Dear Children] it’s Christmas Eve,” wrote the mum. “We don’t do Christmas Eve boxes and they are usually disinterested in their advent calendars by mid-December so don’t really countdown as such.”</p> <p>According to the mum, her children, who are aged five and six, are unable to rest before Christmas day due to the sheer excitement. She plans to hide the fact that it’s Christmas Eve and wake them up early the next day and tell them it’s Christmas, as she believes that is more exciting.</p> <p>“I’m thinking that waking them up early and telling them it’s Christmas morning will be a far bigger and exciting surprise,” she explains.</p> <p>“Would I be unreasonable or mean for doing this,” she asks.</p> <p>“I think it’s the only year we’d get away with it. We don’t have any plans for Christmas Eve except a fairly quiet day with just us at home. Friends I’ve briefly discussed this with seem a bit off with it.”</p> <p>But her question had many parents disagreeing with the decision.</p> <p>“I wouldn’t,” said one mum. “The build-up is so exciting for children, don’t take that away from them.”</p> <p>“Waiting for Santa is half the fun,” says another. “I think it seems a bit mean.”</p> <p>“Don’t you put out milk and biscuits for Santa and a carrot for the reindeer, or track Santa online, watch a Christmas movie or read the night before Christmas?” asked one mum. “It’s not something I would miss out on but if you don’t do anything at all then why not?”</p> <p>“You can’t do that,” said another. “When I was a kid, I was so excited for Christmas Eve. Trying to stay awake to see Santa, the excitement of the next day, don’t take that away from them just so they get a good night sleep.</p> <p>“Kids aren’t kids for long, let them enjoy the build-up and don’t suck the fun out of it.”</p> <p>What do you think? Do you think the mum should keep Christmas Eve from her kids? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Internet is divided after woman claims it’s “too early” to celebrate Christmas

<p>A blogger has caused an uproar after she claimed that it was too early for Christmas decorations, as it’s only November.</p> <p>Beauty YouTuber Niomi Smart tweeted to her thousands of followers that it was too early to get into the festive spirit after she spotted a Christmas tree in someone’s window.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Just spotted a Christmas tree in someone’s window... a little early, no? 🎄</p> — Niomi Smart (@niomismart) <a href="https://twitter.com/niomismart/status/1060163205178245120?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">7 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The tweet has garnered over 2,100 favourites and 96 retweets but not everyone was supportive, as many disagreed with the popular blogger.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Never too early! Lol <a href="https://t.co/fOkAGszowk">pic.twitter.com/fOkAGszowk</a></p> — MacNC45 (@angelaraynell) <a href="https://twitter.com/angelaraynell/status/1060165920876847105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">7 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Clearly outraged, a few users claimed it is “never too early” to get into the Christmas spirit.</p> <p>“Not early at all. My decorations are going up this weekend,” said one user.</p> <p>“Just put mine up today! Season goes by too fast. It makes me happy,” wrote another.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Noooo never too early! Just done mine <a href="https://t.co/GDeZudgwr9">pic.twitter.com/GDeZudgwr9</a></p> — Clarey (@Clarey_82) <a href="https://twitter.com/Clarey_82/status/1061362344650006528?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>But despite the controversial claim, there were a few that agreed with Ms Smart.</p> <p>“Mine goes up the week before Christmas, and comes down on the Twelfth Night,” said a follower.</p> <p>One person said: “Agreed! In Canada, most of us wait until after Remembrance Day for any kind of decorations.”</p> <p>When do you start putting up Christmas decorations in your house? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Aussie woman's ridiculous list of rules for husband

<p>One wife is receiving backlash after sharing the list of rules she expects her husband to follow.</p> <p>Writing on the Facebook group “Get It Off Your Chest”, the woman by the name of “Rosiee” explained that she wanted feedback on the list of rules she wrote for her partner.</p> <p>Admitting that she re-drafted the rules because she was told the first lot were a bit “harsh”, she asked for “honest opinions” from online users.</p> <p>Rosiee shared the 10 commandments for her man, which included “no female friends”, “no social media” and “must work minimum 50 hours a week”.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 373.2612055641422px;" src="/media/7821932/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ca3850b4f57a43519afb00f137b48a67" /></p> <p>The wife also believes her husband should keep the house clean at all times and not go out without her present.</p> <p>Since sharing her rules, Rosiee has been flooded with criticism for her extreme policing of her husband.</p> <p>“You should just get a dog,” wrote one Facebook user.</p> <p>“This is your husband right?” asked another. “I don’t think he agreed to be your slave when you married him.”</p> <p>“I have guy friends that are married,” wrote one woman. “It’s no problem. My boyfriend has great female friends. Again, no problem. If you have mutual respect and true love, you don’t need these rules.”</p> <p>While the users don’t know Rosiee personally, they suggested that the strict rules were a reflection of her “insecurities” and fears that her partner would cheat.</p> <p>According to therapist Shannon Thomas, partners who are controlling develop into “toxic people”.</p> <p>Speaking to <u><a href="https://www.whimn.com.au/"><strong>whimn.com.au</strong></a>,</u> Thomas said: “Toxic people have the ability to affect all areas of our lives, and we are often blind to this.”</p> <p>“We make excuses for them. We believe and internalise the lies they feed us. And, in turn, that affects how we view ourselves and our worth. Toxic people receive pleasure from taking joy away from the things we once loved, such as work, friendships, hobbies, and even our love for ourselves.”</p> <p>Thomas said the best way to gauge if you are in a toxic relationship is to reflect on how they make you feel after spending time with them.</p> <p>“The best gauge is to see how you feel after interacting with someone – our physical and emotional reactions to people are our best indicators.”</p> <p>Many commenters on Rosiee’s post suggested that her husband should respond to her list of rules by doing one thing: “Run!”</p> <p>Have you ever been in a controlling relationship? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Bride receives upsetting "accidental" text from mother-in-law

<p>A bride-to-be was left speechless after being on the receiving end of a rather nasty text from her future mother-in-law that was supposed to be sent to someone else.</p> <p>Posting under the screen name Bamboo2u, the distressed woman took to internet forum Reddit as she sought advice for how to handle her future mother-in-law who was caught “talking sh*t” about her mum after a day spent wedding dress shopping.</p> <p>The woman recounted the day's events and claimed that during the hunt for a wedding dress, her mum suggested to keep her maiden name for work but take her husband's name for everything else. To which her mother-in-law agreed as she does the same.</p> <p>According to the poster, the day went smoothly, and her mother-in-law has never shown any hostility towards the bride’s mother before.</p> <p>“So later that night after we all parted ways, I get a text message that was ‘accidentally’ sent to me. It was from my fiancé’s mother. I made the mistake of reading it from my car with my fiancé in the car,” she wrote.</p> <p>“The text said the whole day was a sh*t show and that my mum advised me to not take my fiance’s name for career reasons.”</p> <p>The woman was “hurt and pissed” that her mother-in-law was talking badly about her mum behind her back and that she was concerned over what she has said about her to other people in the family.</p> <p>The mother-in-law also refused to issue an apology and wouldn’t look at her when they met after the incident.</p> <p>Most users on the popular forum sided with the bride, as they considered the mother-in-law to be out of line, with many saying she should be excluded from the rest of the wedding planning.</p> <p>“I think it’s hypocritical that she is passing judgement on your mum for the very thing she does,” said one user.</p> <p>Do you agree with the bride being upset with her mother-in-law? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Can you see what’s wrong with this photo of a crow?

<p>A photo of a crow is making users on social media do a double take as all is not what it seems.</p> <p>Originally posted on <a rel="noopener" href="https://imgur.com/JAW80Ee" target="_blank">Imgur</a> and <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/confusing_perspective/comments/9rsqo3/cat_shapes_like_a_bird/" target="_blank">Reddit</a>, the photo shows a black bird standing on its side on a tiled surface, but on closer inspection, you realise you’ve been fooled.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821788/cat.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6e0da6ec94074e8a8a7180490c13aa40" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/confusing_perspective/comments/9rsqo3/cat_shapes_like_a_bird/">Reddit </a></em></p> <p>Have you noticed it yet?</p> <p>The big reveal sent Twitter into a meltdown after it was revealed that the crow isn’t actually a crow, but it’s a black cat with his head tilted.</p> <p>The “bird’s” beak is the cat’s ear, and if you look closely, you’ll notice the cat’s second eye is on what is supposed to be the crow’s neck.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/5iragBms6W">pic.twitter.com/5iragBms6W</a></p> — Robert Maguire (@RobertMaguire_) <a href="https://twitter.com/RobertMaguire_/status/1056368608031444992?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 October 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/X2ktE7Qr86">pic.twitter.com/X2ktE7Qr86</a></p> — 🔊AudiO∇Owl 🦉 (@pheealzabub) <a href="https://twitter.com/pheealzabub/status/1056375861820166145?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>After people realised they were tricked, a few hilarious reactions ensued.</p> <p>One person posted, “Damn kitty you got me there,” while another said, “Holy crap, totally got me.”</p> <p>“Usually, once you see it, you can’t unsee it. But every time I look at it, I still see the bird,” wrote one user.</p> <p>How long did it take you to figure it out? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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The Block finale controversy: The 9 words Scott Cam said that angered viewers

<p class="p1"><span class="s1">Some off-the-cuff remarks made by The Block host Scott Cam during Sunday night’s finale have landed the popular Channel Nine personality in hot water, with accusations flying on Twitter of “casual sexism”.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">He made the comments to contestants Bianca and Carla during the auction of their apartment at this year’s renovation site, the Gatwick Hotel in St Kilda, as the bid for the apartment reached $2,982,500.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“Not bad for a couple of single girls, aye,” said Cam of the pair who made a healthy $301,000 profit after a final sale of $2,991,000.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“You will be on the market now. Or off the market. There are two million people watching this show. A couple of good sorts with plenty of cash.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"> </span><span class="s1">But some viewers watching the anticipated broadcast hit out at the 55-year-old, accusing him of being “sexist”.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Casual sexism from Scotty,what else do we expect🙄 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9TheBlock?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9TheBlock</a></p> — Proud Pie Jo (@joferguson9) <a href="https://twitter.com/joferguson9/status/1056479392367489026?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 28, 2018</a></blockquote> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">One viewer tweeted:</span><span class="s2"> </span><span class="s1">“Does Scott Cam always talk about Bianca &amp; Carla like it’s a miracle they can do anything because they’re two single women?!”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Another called the remarks “inappropriate jokes” about the women’s single status, and one viewer asked,</span><span class="s2"> </span><span class="s1">“What does their relationship status have to do with the result of their work, Scott Cam?”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Others branded the comments “casual sexism,” with one remarking that it was an attitude to be expected from the reality show host, known for his larrikin tradie persona.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">But some viewers disagreed, saying the criticism went too far and was unwarranted.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“What type of world are we living in now where PC tossers just whinge about anything!” tweeted one. “No one was whinging when he was taking the p**s out of the two country boys a few years back for their design skills.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">And one asked whether the contestants Bianca and Carla we’re actually offended.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">It was banter between the three of them..some may have taken offence if that banter was said to them but the girls didn’t, neither would I if it was said to me..no one needs to speak on my behalf or theirs I’m assuming..</p> — Janine (@maxandbella27) <a href="https://twitter.com/maxandbella27/status/1056729236357017600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 29, 2018</a></blockquote> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“We were actually fine with it,” Bianca told news.com.au. “We are always bantering with Scotty about a range of things, we had a lot of fun on the show and Scotty knows us well enough to know we wouldn’t be offended by that.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Do you think the comments were offensive? Let us know in the comments below.</span></p>

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CHOICE reveals: How long your appliances should really last

<p>As consumers we’re lucky that we have an abundance of appliance choices to choose from to suit every budget. With toasters starting at $20 reaching all the way up to $150, there is something out there for everyone.</p> <p>But just how long should you expect an affordable appliance to last in comparison to its higher-end counterpart? <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.choice.com.au/" target="_blank">Choice</a></em> has released new guidelines, showcasing the “reasonable” life expectancy of household appliances.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fchoiceaustralia%2Fposts%2F10156656490116163&amp;width=500" width="500" height="669" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>According to the consumer group, while your cheap toaster could die out within two years, you can expect your expensive fridge to last over 10 years.</p> <p>The results of the research were based around 1000 people who took part in the survey, along with in-house product testing and manufacturer feedback.</p> <p>“In most cases the lifetime for electrical appliances should go way beyond the one-to-two-year manufacturer’s warranty,” said spokeswoman for Choice, Nicky Breen.</p> <p>If a product turns out to be faulty, shoppers have the right to a full refund or replacement under Australian Consumer Law. The rule applies regardless of the consumer being within the official warranty period.</p> <p>But according to Ms Breen, it isn’t that simple as consumer guarantees tend to be a “little confusing”.</p> <p>“The law says you’re entitled to a remedy if a fault develops within a reasonable amount of time, but it’s not clear what that reasonable time is,” she said</p> <p>“You may buy a TV or fridge and it develops a fault within a year or two, you take it back to the retailer and there’s an impasse. What we’re doing is urging people to use these guidelines.”</p> <p>According to the results of the survey, a fridge should last around six to 13 years, while washing machines and dishwashers have a lifespan of five to 11 years. A laptop will give you four to eight years depending on how expensive it is, and a smartphone should last between three to six years.</p> <p>“Someone should start a GoFundMe to put this on billboards outside of Harvey Norman and The Good Guys,” said Facebook user, Kristen Hall.</p> <p>Others compared appliances today to the ones sold in the past. “Washing machines, the prehistoric ones, lasted and lasted, 25-plus years and still working,” said Helen Valen.</p> <p>“Had to replace them just because we got sick of waiting for them to fail and they didn’t look their best anymore. Same with stoves. So, it’s not the technology, it’s the design for failure/obsolescence business model."</p> <p>Naomi Agar pointed out that her mum’s fridge had to be replaced last year, after 47 years. “My microwave purchased in “’88 is still going”, she said.</p> <p>But not everyone was convinced as some pointed out the discrepancies in the survey results. “The mobile phone one is a joke,” Karla McClelland said. “The latest Samsung and Apple phones don’t last more than two years before something stuffs up.”</p> <p>Adam Scott questioned the life expectancy of a laptop saying, “Where did you get that figure? The life expectancy of a spinning drive is two years, three maximum,” he said.</p> <p>“The heat paste on the CPU will be chalk after a few years, leading to the CPU and GPU overheating. That’s if the power brick hasn’t died by then. Oh, and the battery will have well and truly died by then.” </p> <p>Do you agree with these results? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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The surprising ingredient found in Aussie banknotes

<p>Although Australia was the first country in the world to produce banknotes from plastic (polymer), one surprising ingredient has been confirmed by the Reserve Bank of Australia.</p> <p>Our currency uses tallow, which is rendered animal fat from sheep, pigs and cows, as a “slip agent” to prevent static and friction.</p> <p>The Reserve Bank of Australia confirmed that a tiny amount of animal fat is used.</p> <p>While the secret ingredient has been used since the mid-1990s, it only became known when Britain adopted the same technology to produce its £5 note last year, resulting in various protests.</p> <p>The use of tallow in banknotes has been slammed by vegans and some religions, including Hindus, Muslims, Jews, Sikhs and Jains.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FProjectNightfall%2Fvideos%2F2124531027609840%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=380" width="380" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>A recent video by social commentators Project Night revealed that tallow is used to make banknotes in 23 countries, such as Canada, Malaysia and Singapore.</p> <p>The video has since had 5000 shares and over 679,000 views on social media.</p> <p>After watching the video, one user wrote: “That is really horrible to hear. But, we can all limit cruelty of animals in our daily life by going vegan and using cruelty free products. It’s sooo easy.”</p> <p>“Hopefully spreading this video will help people know more about it!”</p> <p>However, others shared a different point of view.</p> <p>“Isn’t it better to just use natural animal parts rather than creating synthetic versions of it? We are part of this giant ecosystem, if we don’t eat animals, someone else / some other animals do.”</p> <p>One orthodox Jew said they found no issue with using tallow in money.</p> <p>They wrote: “As an orthodox jew … we are not allowed to EAT pork. We can touch it and use it. It being in money is not a problem at all.”</p> <p>Tallow is found in a number of household items including soap, candles, plastic bags, moisturisers and some fabric softeners.</p> <p>Animal by-products can also be found in some clothing and cosmetic lines.</p> <p>There has been no suggestion that there will be a revision of the production of banknotes.</p> <p>Do you think an alternative ingredient should be used in the production of banknotes? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Buckingham Palace left red-faced after Princess Eugenie blunder

<p>On Friday, Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank said “I do” in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.</p> <p>While the wedding was quickly overshadowed with the announcement that Prince Harry and Meghan are expecting their first child, a mistake by Buckingham Palace has added to the insult.</p> <p>The official Instagram account of The Royal Family made one disastrous blunder while announcing the sale of commemorative mugs marking last Friday’s nuptials.</p> <p>The post, which informed followers that the limited edition mugs were available “only till Saturday”, mistakenly referred to Princess Beatrice, rather than Eugenie.</p> <p>“This exclusive mug issued in commemoration of the wedding of HRH Princess Beatrice of York and Mr Jack Brooksbank is now available for purchase by following the link in the description,” the caption said.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 313px; height: 418px;" src="/media/7821438/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e5e178aa9c1e4366a095fb6c1e229f37" /></p> <p>Princess Beatrice is Eugenie’s older sister and was chosen to be her maid of honour on her wedding day.</p> <p>The post was quickly deleted and has been uploaded again with the correct details.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpBd3i5DdWB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpBd3i5DdWB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Available only till Saturday! This exclusive mug issued in commemoration of the Wedding of HRH Princess Eugenie of York and Mr. Jack Brooksbank is now available for purchase by following the link in the description! #RoyalWedding Purchase yours today!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/buckinghamroyal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@buckinghamroyal) on Oct 16, 2018 at 10:43pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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How to check if your Facebook account has been hacked

<p>Between September 14-27, 30 million Facebook accounts were hacked, and now the social media juggernaut has unveiled a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec" target="_blank">website</a> that will help you determine if your account has been compromised.</p> <p>“We're very sorry this happened,” it said of the incident. “Your privacy is incredibly important to us, and we want to update you on what we've learned from our ongoing investigation, including which Facebook accounts are impacted, what information was accessed and what Facebook users can do about this.”</p> <p>Facebook has made a move to assure its users, which according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/264810/number-of-monthly-active-facebook-users-worldwide/" target="_blank">Statista</a></em> amount to over 2.2 billion monthly active users worldwide, <span>that sensitive information like passwords and financial information were not accessed by hackers.</span></p> <p>“There's no need for anyone to change their passwords,” said the company.</p> <p>But other information was hacked, reported <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/can-check-facebook-account-hacked-042356675.html" target="_blank">7News</a></em>, such as phone numbers and email addresses, and in the case of 14 million accounts, the type of information that you can see on your friends’ accounts such as location, birthdate and relationship status.</p> <p>You can find out simply if your Facebook account has been hacked. On the Facebook advice website, scroll about halfway down to the question, “Is my Facebook account impacted by this security issue?” and you’ll have a notification there, specific to your account, if you have been affected.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 123.021px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7821357/facebook-notice.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94961eb42d334a35a773be434fdab00b" /></p> <p>You’ll also be provided with account-specific information if you are logged in to Facebook.</p> <p>One expert argues that in light of the hacks, Facebook should be offering users free “credit monitoring” in case sensitive financial information may be accessed.</p> <p>“Those personal details could very easily be used for identity theft to sign up for credit cards, get a loan, get your banking password, et cetera,” said Patrick Moorhead, founder of Moor Insights &amp; Strategy.</p> <p>“Facebook should provide all those customers free credit monitoring to make sure the damage is minimised.”</p> <p>Facebook has declined to say where the effected users are located, only saying the breaches were “fairly broad”. The company says it will contact those account holders who have been hacked.</p> <p>According Facebook, the hacks are currently being investigated by the FBI, but the Bureau requested it didn’t discuss the culprits behind it.</p> <p>You can find more information at the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec" target="_blank">Facebook advice site</a>.</p> <p>Did you find the Facebook advice helpful? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The palace bungles Princess Eugenie wedding tweet – can you spot the blunder?

<p>The official Royal Family twitter account was forced to delete one tweet about Princess Eugenie’s upcoming wedding because of a glaring error.</p> <p>The Queen’s granddaughter is set to say “I do” to her fiancé later today in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle – the same location as Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding earlier this year.</p> <p>Although it is the second royal wedding of the year, the error in the tweet led fans to question whether less attention is being given to Eugenie’s nuptials.</p> <p>Can you spot the mistake in this tweet?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 275.97402597402595px;" src="/media/7821307/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a6f0971ae6f14875a778ebcfa720ace4" /></p> <p>The tweet bungled the name of Eugenie’s partner, referring to him as Mr Jacksbrook rather than his correct surname, Mr Brooksbank.</p> <p>The account, which has 3.81 million followers, quickly received backlash for the typo.</p> <p>One person replied: “I believe “Bank Jacksbrook” is his super secret spy name.”</p> <p>Another said: “It’s Jack Brooksbank, or Jacksbrook to his rapper crew.”</p> <p>The tweet stayed on the account for 40 minutes until someone alerted the Royals to the error.</p> <p>The tweet was later reposted with the correct spelling.</p> <p>Eugenie, 28, will have a traditional church service which will be followed by the newlyweds embarking on a carriage ride through the streets of Windsor.</p> <p>Guests will then move to the Queen’s residence for an afternoon reception at Windsor Castle.</p> <p>In the evening, there will be a formal sit-down dinner at the Royal Lodge in Windsor, the residence of her parents Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.</p> <p>The following day, the newlyweds and their friends and family will be enjoying a festival-themed afternoon party.</p> <p>Princess Eugenie first met Jack when she was 20 years old while at a Swiss holiday resort in Verbier.</p> <p>Will you be tuning in to watch Princess Eugenie’s wedding tonight? Let us know in the comments. </p>

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Scam alert: AGL issues warning over fake email scam

<p>AGL Energy has issued a warning to its customers after a scam email that looks to be an electricity bill is making rounds to people’s inboxes.</p> <p>Taking to Twitter, AGL posted an image of the hoax email which shows a scammer posing as the power company.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">We have received reports of hoax emails in circulation with the subject line "AGL electricity bill” falsely claiming to be from AGL. Learn how to identify this hoax or scam email and what to do if you receive one here: <a href="https://t.co/v1vAeVdhA8">https://t.co/v1vAeVdhA8</a> <a href="https://t.co/RCYCT94s6m">pic.twitter.com/RCYCT94s6m</a></p> — AGL Energy (@aglenergy) <a href="https://twitter.com/aglenergy/status/1049462003390136320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 9, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The screenshot shows the sender's name as “AGL Energy” and displays a fake overview of the bill plus a date for when the payment is expected to be in by.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/agl-warns-customers-over-fake-bill-email-scam/news-story/8073698eb0abf00951f286de40874f76" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, the AGL General Manager of Technology Service and Risk, John Taylor, said that “emails like this are an industry-wide issue.”</p> <p>“It’s thought that hundreds have been targeted, including non-AGL customers,” said Mr Taylor.</p> <p>“This issue highlights why AGL is supporting Stay Smart Online Week to promote how people can protect themselves from cybersecurity threats such as hoax emails.”</p> <p>Mr Taylor has advised recipients of the email to delete it immediately and to not click on any links included in the copy.</p> <p>Emails from AGL should be sent from the email address <a rel="noopener" href="mailto:agl@energy.agl.com.au" target="_blank">agl@energy.agl.com.au</a> and included in the email would be the supply address and account number.</p> <p>Those who received the email or have clicked on links that they may be wary of should get in touch with the AGL Help Desk, which is a 24/7 service, on 131 AGL (131 245).</p> <p>It is also recommended to run an anti-virus software on your computer in case the links or email contained harmful content.</p> <p>For more information on how to spot a scam email, visit the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/" target="_blank">Scamwatch</a> website. </p>

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Warning: WhatsApp voicemail scam gives hackers access to your account

<p>A worrying new WhatsApp hack allows cyber criminals to access victim’s accounts via their voicemail inbox.</p> <p>According to <a href="https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2018/10/08/attackers-use-voicemail-hack-to-steal-whatsapp-accounts/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Naked Security</u></em></strong></a>, a blog run by British security company Sophos, scammers are attempting the attacks at night so they can take advantage of the app’s six-digit verification code.</p> <p>The attacks have become so prevalent that Israel’s National Cyber Security Authority issued a nationwide warning.</p> <p>Hackers start the scam by installing WhatsApp on their own phone using a legitimate user’s phone number.</p> <p>To verify the login attempt, WhatsApp sends a six-digit verification code via text message to the victim’s telephone.</p> <p>However, hackers are carrying out this scam at night, so victims are most likely sleeping rather than checking their phones.</p> <p>WhatsApp then allows the hacker to send the six-digit verification code via phone call with an automated message.</p> <p>As the victim is not on their phone, the message ideally goes to voicemail.</p> <p>The cyber criminal then exploits a security flaw in many telecommunication networks which allows customers to use a generic phone number to call and retrieve their voicemails.</p> <p>For many mobile phone owners, only a four-digit pin is required to access their voicemails – which if they haven’t changed is commonly 0000 or 1234 by default.</p> <p>Hackers will then enter the password and gain access to the victim’s voicemail inbox, allowing them to retrieve the WhatsApp message containing the six-digit code.</p> <p>Once the scammer enters the code into their own phone, they have complete access to the victim’s WhatsApp account.</p> <p>To avoid being hacked, it is recommended that users turn on two-factor authentication on their account, adding an extra layer of security.</p> <p>“Using application-based 2FA ... mitigates a lot of the risk, because these mobile authentication apps don’t rely on communications tied to phone numbers,” Sophos researchers explained. </p> <p>This can be done by navigating to Settings in WhatsApp, then tapping ‘Account’.</p> <p>Users must then press on ‘Two-step verification’ and tap ‘Enable’.</p> <p>Experts also encourage users to have a strong PIN on their voicemail inbox.</p> <p>Have you encountered this WhatsApp scam? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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How to take action against pesky telemarketing calls

<p>There is nothing more frustrating than being in the middle of something important, only to have a telemarketer claiming to be from an insurance company blow up your phone.</p> <p>Even after you have rejected their advances and given every indication that you are not interested, they still have a special talent of keeping you on the phone until they’re able to squeeze every detail out of you.</p> <p>But while it seems like a never-ending cycle, and something you think you’ll have to deal with for the rest of your life, there are ways to avoid those pesky phone calls.</p> <p>Telemarketers target over 1000 Australians per day, as they blow up their phones in order to sell what they’ve been told to. Most people don’t want to hear from them and now that landlines cease to exist in many homes, they now contact you on your mobile phone instead.</p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.donotcall.gov.au/consumers/check-your-numbers/" target="_blank">Do Not Call Register</a>, run by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is a list of numbers that telemarketers are legally not allowed to contact. If the law is breached, the telemarketer company is then given a hefty fine.</p> <p><strong>So, how do you get on that list?</strong></p> <p>Simply visit their <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.donotcall.gov.au/consumers/check-your-numbers/" target="_blank">website</a> and register your details, including your mobile phone number. Once that is complete, telemarketers are then notified, and the calls should stop.</p> <p>According to consumer rights organisation, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.choice.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>Choice</em></a>, only 14 per cent of Australian’s have registered their mobile numbers to the Do Not Call Register.</p> <p>ACMA’s general manager of content consumer and citizen division Jennifer McNeil describes the online register as a “do not disturb sign out on your hotel door, but it’s for your phone.”</p> <p>She does point out that it “won’t stop all calls.”</p> <p>“There are some entities that can still call you by law,” she said. Such as Government organisations, education institutes, and registered charities just to name a few.</p> <p>But there are still rules that apply, as they cannot contact you before 9 am or after 8 pm on a weekday and if they’re wanting to call on a Saturday, then it can only be between 9 am and 5:50pm. They are not allowed to call you at all on a Sunday.</p> <p>Here are a few other ways you can avoid telemarketing calls:</p> <p><strong>1. Block their number</strong></p> <p>While it may seem like the obvious thing to do, many people aren’t aware that you’re able to block numbers through your smartphone.      </p> <p>“If you get a pesky number calling all the time, and you recognise it, just block it through your phone settings,” says Ms McNeil.</p> <p>“There are also products available that allow you to screen landline calls.”</p> <p><strong>2. Always be aware of what you’re signing up for</strong></p> <p>So, while none of us ever read the terms and conditions, because let’s face it, who has time for that? Turns out it’s actually important in this case.</p> <p>If you ever wonder how telemarketers get your number in the first place, it’s most likely because you made an account on an online store and that specific store has passed along your information to other research companies.</p> <p>While it seems unethical and a serious breach of privacy, it would be clearly stated in the agreement form which is why it’s important to go through it.</p> <p>“There will usually be a special box in the terms where, if you’re not careful, you will end up giving your permission to be contacted by anyone for marketing purposes,” Ms McNeil says.</p> <p><strong>3. Don’t hang up</strong></p> <p>Our first instinct when we hear a telemarketer on the other line is to hang up, but according to <em>Choice</em>: “If you simply hang up on a telemarketer, your number could stay on their calls list, so you may be hassled again.</p> <p>“The best way to ensure they don’t keep calling is to ask them to remove your number from their list,” said the consumer company.</p> <p>It’s recommended to give a firm but polite response letting them know you aren’t interested and to remove your number from their contacts list.</p> <p><strong>4. Lodge a complaint</strong></p> <p>If you’ve tried all of the above and the calls just won’t stop, then it’s time to go straight to the top and lodge a complaint with ACMA. Ms McNeil says that those frustrated with constant calls can complain about companies who are being non compliant and a thorough investigation will be conducted.</p> <p>“It’s through these sorts of complaints that we are able to issue infringement notices and stop relentless and unnecessary calls,” she says.</p> <p>“It’s very important to make a record of when the call was made and the name of the business who called you, so we can investigate properly.”</p> <p>In 2017, ACMA received over 12,600 complaints in the last four months of the year and 890 businesses were needed to be reminded of the legal rules they need to abide by.</p> <p>Will you be trying out any of these tips and tricks? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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