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Aussies have more than $8 billion worth of phones in their homes unused

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to new research, mobile phone industry product steward MobileMuster has estimated that there are 25 million mobile phones going unused and taking up space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/mobile-phones/australians-have-more-than-8-billion-worth-of-mobile-phones-gathering-dust/news-story/013dedc0b0bdb3046fb699efcaeda9e0"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, that's enough phones for each person in the country.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The research found that one in three Aussies also have trouble parting with their old phone, even though almost three-quarters will never use it again.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It can be handy to have a spare, but figures from online marketplace eBay has suggested that those who aren’t selling their old mobile phones are missing out.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More than 70,000 phones have been sold on the site this year, which equates to one every 68 seconds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With almost 90 per cent of all Australians owning a phone, many of us are holding onto the devices for longer due to price hikes and decreases in innovation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to combat the amount of waste that can be left by mobile phones, MobileMuster is offering a range of collection points around the nation.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can also hand in your old phone for recycling at the Salvation Army stores in your local area.</span></p>

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The Aussie suburbs where your car is more likely to be stolen from

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With a car being stolen every 12 minutes in Australia, it’s important to know where vehicle hot spots for theft are so you can remain vigilant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New data from the Australia Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and CarSafe has been analysed by Finder.com.au to show the states and suburbs where your car is more likely to be stolen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The research shows that more than 55,000 vehicles were stolen in Australia over the last financial year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This means that one in every 400 cars is stolen, according to Finder’s insurance specialist Taylor Blackburn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For those living in high risk areas, there are a few things you can do to stay safe. Blackburn said to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/motoring-news/the-australian-suburbs-where-your-car-is-more-likely-to-be-stolen/news-story/788fe26a3b438128c8871481fd220f51"><em>news.com.au</em></a>:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Parking your car in a driveway if possible, making sure it is locked, installing an alarm, and hiding your valuables out of sight can help deter thieves.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite Victoria taking the lead in volume with almost 13,000 cars going missing, it appears that Brisbane has recorded more thefts than any area in the country.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The research also showed what car model is likely to be targeted by criminals. The Holden Commodore was at the top of the list, due to sheer volume of numbers. The Toyota Hilux was next on the list, following the Nissan Pulsar.</span></p> <p>Top 10 car theft hot spots</p> <ol> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Brisbane, QLD - 2,195</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Gold Coast, QLD - 1,562</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Logan, QLD - 1,176</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Hume, VIC - 942</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Moreton Bay, QLD - 933</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Casey, VIC - 784</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Townsville, QLD - 702</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Greater Dandenong, VIC - 633</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Blacktown, NSW - 614</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Whittlesea, VIC - 578</span></li> </ol> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source: CarSafe</span></em></p>

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Russian man sues Apple for “turning him gay”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Russian man has filed a lawsuit against tech giant Apple for moral harm claiming that an iPhone app has made him gay, according to a copy of the complaint seen by </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/mobile-phones/russian-man-sues-apple-for-turning-him-gay/news-story/4761700ec65dde1f603acdb8781c2cda"><span style="font-weight: 400;">AFP</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The man has filed a suit in a Moscow court, asking for one million rubles (AUD$ 22,800) after an incident this summer delivered him a cryptocurrency called “GayCoin” instead of the Bitcoin he had ordered.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His lawyer Sapizhat Gusnieva insisted the case was “serious,” telling AFP that her client was “scared, he suffered”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The GayCoin cryptocurrency arrived with a note saying, “Don’t judge until you try,” according to the complaint.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I thought, in truth, how can I judge something without trying? I decided to try same-sex relationships,” the complainant wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Now I have a boyfriend and I do not know how to explain this to my parents … my life has been changed for the worse and will never become normal again,” he added.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Apple pushed me towards homosexuality through manipulation. The changes have caused me moral and mental harm.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His lawyer says that Apple “has a responsibility for their programs”, despite the exchange taking place on a third-party app.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Homophobia is rampant in Russia, where reports of rights violations and attacks on LGBT people are common.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Moscow has also introduced a law in 2013 against “gay propaganda”, which bans the “promotions of non-traditional lifestyles to minors”, but effectively outlaws LGBT activism.</span></p>

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Protect your online digital privacy by learning about “fingerprinting”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ad tech industry is always trying to find ways to monitor your digital activities as the more they know, the more money ends up in their pockets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This has led to the rise of “fingerprinting”, which has security researchers worried.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although it sounds harmless, “fingerprinting” involves looking at the many characteristics of your mobile device or computer, such as the screen resolution or operating system.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to </span><em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/03/technology/personaltech/fingerprinting-track-devices-what-to-do.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New York Times</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, as soon as they have enough details, they can use this information to pinpoint and follow your online habits, such as how you browse the web and use applications.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once enough device characteristics are known, the theory goes that the data can be assembled into a profile that helps identify you the way a fingerprint would.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Get enough of those attributes together and it creates essentially a bar code,” said Peter Dolanjski, a product lead for Mozilla’s Firefox web browser, who is studying fingerprinting. “That bar code is absolutely uniquely identifiable.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The bad news? The technique happens invisibly in the background in apps and websites, which makes it harder to combat.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As it’s a new way of discovering your web habits, the ways to protect yourself are limited as proper solutions are still in development.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Apple users have protections in Safari for computers and mobile devices, which makes your device look the same to a website by sharing the bare minimum of information that the site needs to load properly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For Android and Windows users, the safety recommendation is to use the Firefox web browser, as Mozilla introduced fingerprint blocking in its browser this year. However, the feature can prevent some content from loading on certain websites.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unfortunately, if you’re a Google Chrome user, Google hasn't announced any defence system as of yet, but it has plans to release protections in the future. </span></p>

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How Australia can catch up digitally

<p>Australia’s ability to compete with other nations in a technology-enabled world is declining, according to a<span> </span><a href="https://www.ceda.com.au/News-and-analysis/Media-releases/Australia-digital-competitiveness-slips">report</a><span> </span>recently released by the Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA).</p> <p>In 2019 Australia dropped to 14th on the global league table of digital competitiveness, down from 13th last year and ninth in 2015.</p> <p>The results, from the<span> </span><a href="https://www.imd.org/wcc/world-competitiveness-center-rankings/world-digital-competitiveness-rankings-2019/">World Digital Competitiveness rankings</a><span> </span>compiled by the Swiss-based International Institute for Management Development, show that Australia is becoming complacent in areas such as science education, information and communication infrastructure, and digital literacy.</p> <p><strong>What is digital competitiveness?</strong></p> <p>Digital competitiveness is a standardised measure of a country’s ability to develop cutting-edge digital technologies as well as its willingness to invest in research and development (R&amp;D) and promote digital literacy training to create new knowledge, all of which are key drivers for economic development.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CPbT8umgaTY"></iframe></div> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"> <p>Proactive countries put money and effort into this process, regarding it as nation-building that hedges against future uncertainty. These countries score highly in the rankings. Countries further down the list tend to be reactive, sitting back and letting others go first.</p> <p><strong>In what areas are we behind?</strong></p> <p>The overall digital competitiveness score has three components: knowledge, technology, and future readiness.</p> <p>Australia’s<span> </span><a href="https://www.ceda.com.au/CEDA/media/ResearchCatalogueDocuments/PDFs/2019_AustraliaDigitalCompRanking.pdf">scores</a><span> </span>across these categories show we need to try much harder in future readiness. Our scores are also falling in the sub-categories of adaptive attitudes, business agility, and IT integration.</p> <p>In a field of 63 countries, Australia comes 44th on current digital and technological skills and employers’ willingness to train their staff in these areas.</p> <h2>Which countries are doing it right?</h2> <p>The top ten countries in 2019 are the United States, Singapore, Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland, Netherlands, Finland, Hong Kong, Norway, and South Korea.</p> <p>Looking at the strategic approach of the top five, all emphasise knowledge generation, but beyond that there are different approaches to digital competitiveness. The US and Sweden put equal emphasis on knowledge generation, creating a conducive environment for technology development, and fostering a willingness to innovate. Singapore, Denmark and Switzerland each place heavier emphasis on one or two of the factors.</p> <p><strong>More STEM graduates</strong></p> <p>At 53rd place, Australia ranks abysmally in the proportion of our university graduates in science and mathematics - the people who do research and development now and will continue to do it in the future. Our universities are among the best in the world, so that is not the problem. If jobs for these graduates existed, universities would be meeting the demand.</p> <p>Australia’s information and communication technologies, including internet infrastructure, also score very poorly at 54th. This will not surprise the many Australian businesses and individuals who put up with slow, patchy internet connections. With more computing services and data moving into the cloud, fast internet is essential.</p> <p>The news is not all bad though. Australia rates highly as a desirable destination for international students. It also scores well on digital access to government services, and ease of starting a business.</p> <p><strong>Why is Australia slipping?</strong></p> <p>Australia has grown complacent in certain areas, and we have been unwilling to invest sufficiently in building our digital capability in the areas mentioned. “Sufficient” is the key word. The fact that we are falling behind other countries means we cannot say we are investing enough.</p> <p>The CEDA report indicates that one key reason for the investment shortfall is the disparity between the public’s and employers’ perspectives on how much it is needed. Industry sees a greater need than the general public does, but government policy tends to align with public sentiment for electoral reasons.</p> <p>Funding is limited and there are many voices competing for a share of government spending. It is the squeaky wheel that gets the oil.</p> <p><strong>Building digital capability</strong></p> <p>Nation-building projects at scale need a coordinated approach across public and private sectors. Building the physical infrastructure to meet future needs is no different in principle to building the nation’s digital capabilities, which includes creating the communication technology, the means to develop new knowledge and ways of applying it to good effect. This is no less important than roads, power stations and hospitals for the nation’s future.</p> <p><strong>A national conversation</strong></p> <p>Australia needs to have a long conversation in national, state and local forums about the importance of investing in our digital future. We need to talk about all the ways R&amp;D can benefit the Australian community, and why businesses need to embrace cutting-edge technology.</p> <p>If we don’t get consensus on staying competitive we will fall further and further behind as more proactive countries accelerate their efforts. In time the economy will suffer, unemployment will rise and quality of life decline. It is no legacy to leave our children.</p> <p>We are indeed a lucky country with our resources, but that will take us only so far in the 21st century. For the sake of future generations we have to make a new kind of luck and level up our digital game.</p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/australias-digital-competitiveness-is-slipping-heres-how-we-can-catch-up-124430">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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“Nerd” or “wrongdoer”: How artificial intelligence will label you in the future

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tabong Kima logged onto Twitter one morning and saw a hashtag that said #ImageNetRoulette.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The site allows users to upload photos and artificial intelligence would analyse each face and describe what it saw.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One photo pegged a man as an “orphan” where another photo, where the person was wearing glasses, was labelled a “grind, nerd, wonk and dweeb”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kima, an African American, didn’t like what he saw when he uploaded his photo.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The site tagged him as a “wrongdoer” and an “offender”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I might have a bad sense of humour,” he </span><a href="https://twitter.com/TabKim2/status/1174330442385907712?s=19">tweeted</a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, “but I don’t think this is particularly funny”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ImageNet Roulette is a digital art project that’s intended to shine a light on the unsound and offensive behaviour that can creep into artificial intelligence technologies.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Artificial intelligence technology is rapidly infiltrating its way into our everyday lives, including the facial-recognition services used by internet companies and police departments.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ImageNet Roulette, designed by American artist Trevor Paglen and Microsoft researcher Kate Crawford, aims to show the depth of this problem.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We want to show how layers of bias and racism and misogyny move from one system to the next,” Paglen said in a phone interview from Paris.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The point is to let people see the work that is being done behind the scenes, to see how we are being processed and categorised all the time.”</span></p>

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New research shows baby boomers are less threatened by technology in the workplace

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New research commissioned by technology leader </span><a href="http://links.erelease.com.au/wf/click?upn=5eYQ-2B9hvLjY4F2EakWBi1ZLO7jaULuWnZBmbjF1-2FN2Awx-2F-2FA9sj0-2BQL-2BinGrP-2BrI_hfIqhjxrH5PXl2rHT1sLDTWyF1R6hGp8veDS2OqJRfJ2gqdnaHEljBkVvra9aGlx4VjSVUbKFpLRdZf3fB2LscCpfNHBZj472Ly9XaNbOKGSrO9w0nJWn8lTtojc5Iz41jlOpJCekIRYEVTulwB977Q2DlfgspDP1rDMixltb-2FDHmXx8SrNCmjiIToeB0EoXDNalY9E7KRn64YmdzVzUef-2B6t6bZP3-2FzMJbnfRI54eK0ZKR120HaEiYqQz5nWbnR"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Genesys</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has shown that older generations are significantly more positive towards artificial technology in Australia and New Zealand.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new research also suggested that older generations are more comfortable with the implementation of modern workforce tools as opposed to younger respondents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">70 per cent of respondents aged 18-38 years believe there should be a minimum requirement of human employees over AI/bots compared to 59 per cent of respondents aged 55-73 years. The younger respondents appear to be more cautious of the implementation of this technology compared to more senior respondents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All age demographics have reported seeing the benefit of advanced technology in the workplace, with an average of 87 per cent stating that it has a positive impact.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, 23 per cent of respondents aged 18 – 38 reported feeling threatened by new technology in the workplace. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gwilym Funnell, Vice President of Sales and Managing Director for Genesys in Australia and New Zealand said, “Older generations are valuable members of our workplace, and these results dispel the myth that they are averse to technology. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The evolution of business is calling for greater adaptability; this is when experience can be leveraged for greater success.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The survey also uncovered another key difference between the generations, which was the perception of the impact of technology on social interactions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">44% of respondents aged 55-73 years report technology does not inhibit social interactions at all, while those aged 18-38 years report it does – 7% more than their older peers.</span></p>

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New designs have been revealed for an incredible hotel in space

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Californian company known as </span><a href="https://gatewayspaceport.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Gateway Foundation</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has released plans for the </span><a href="https://gatewayspaceport.com/von-braun-station/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Von Braun Station</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which is a cruise ship-style hotel that floats among the stars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The aim is to get the hotel off the ground by 2025 and fully operational for travel in 2027.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tim Alatorre, senior design architect at the Gateway Foundation, says that the rotation wheels would create a simulated gravity, which would likely be the first commercial space construction project in history.</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vTNP01Sg-Ss"></iframe></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The station rotates, pushing the contents of the station out to the perimeter of the station, much in the way that you can spin a bucket of water -- the water pushes out into the bucket and stays in place," he tells </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/space-hotel-designs-von-braun-station-scn/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">CNN Travel</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, getting to space is an expensive journey. The Von Braun hotel is hoping to make the journey into space and a stay at the hotel the equivalent of “a trip on a cruise or a trip to Disneyland”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The station is aiming to sleep 352 people and has a maximum capacity of 450, with plenty of recreational activities on board.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We're going to have a number of different recreation activities and games that'll highlight the fact that you're able to do things that you can't do on Earth," says Alatorre. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Because of the weightlessness and the reduced gravity, you'll be able to jump higher, be able to lift things, be able to run in ways that you can't on Earth."</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2uwMJPDU1d/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2uwMJPDU1d/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Soon, you could vacation in space 🌌 The Gateway Foundation released plans for the Von Braun Station, a cruise-ship-style hotel floating among the stars. The aim is to get the hotel off the ground by 2025 and make it fully operational for travel by 2027. The hotel will initially cater to those with money to blow, but the foundation is hoping to eventually make the cost equivalent to a trip to Disneyland. (📸: Courtesy Gateway Foundation)</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/cnn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> CNN</a> (@cnn) on Sep 22, 2019 at 3:37pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The goal of the Gateway Foundation is to create a “starship culture” where people eventually want to live and work in space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"People will want to go and experience this just because it's a cool new thing and they've never done it before," he admits.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"But our goal -- the overall goal of the Gateway Foundation -- is to create a starship culture where people are going to space, and living in space, and working in space and they want to be in space. And we believe that there's a demand for that."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And if you’re more environmentally conscious, you can relax on a trip in space as everything will be recycled.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"On the station itself, it's going to be about the most environmentally friendly vacation you'll ever have. Because we're recycling everything," says Alatorre.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"There's no amount of water or trash or waste that is going to be discarded, everything will be recycled, reused, stored, converted to some other form.”</span></p>

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“World will be changed forever” as Amazon Music is launched in US

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Amazon have launched their better-than-CD quality audio streaming plan called </span><a href="https://music.amazon.com/home"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Amazon Music HD</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The streaming service starts at $12.99 a month and offers over 50 million tracks in either CD or 24-bit quality.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The way that this service differs from other streaming services such as Spotify, Apple Music and Google Play music is that those services only offer compressed files.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Amazon is one of a handful of companies that are able to offer high-quality FLAC streams.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Musician Neil Young, who launched the Pono player several years ago is excited that Amazon is embracing lossless audio.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Earth will be changed forever when Amazon introduces high quality streaming to the masses," Young said in a statement. "This will be the biggest thing to happen in music since the introduction of digital audio 40 years ago."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The service costs $USD 12.99 a month for Prime members and $USD 14.99 a month for regular Amazon customers, or an additional $5 a month for current subscribers. Current memberships start at $7.99 a month. It's not yet offered in Australia or New Zealand.</span></p>

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NBN tries to lure new customers with lower prices and faster speed

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The company whose in charge of building the National Broadband Network has decided to open the door to cheaper and faster internet plans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It comes after abandoning an earlier and unpopular proposal that wanted to charge users more to stream videos.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">NBN Co called it a “Netflix tax” on streaming video that was using up capacity on the network, but due to the backlash from customers has quickly distanced itself from this plan.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The NBN has indicated shifting its focus to maintaining reliable performance during peak periods as well as making higher speed tiers more affordable.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The majority of respondents in the first round of consultation highlighted streaming video as an important application driving the need for higher download speeds and more capacity inclusions,” NBN Co chief customer officer Brad Whitcomb said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Currently, NBN Co sells internet plans to retail service providers on a wholesale basis but providers have been complaining about the wholesale pricing is too high. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A bundle that was offered earlier in the year that offered up to 50-megabit-per-second downloads and up to 20 mbps uploads surged in popularity once the NBN lowered the price to $45 a month.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A number of respondents stated that a discount to the entry level wholesale bundle would help them to maintain an affordable retail broadband plan in a market with uncapped data inclusions,” Mr Whitcomb said.</span></p>

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Skype users warned after Microsoft could be “listening” to calls

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new investigation done by tech website </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Motherboard</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has revealed that Microsoft workers could be “listening in” on your Skype conversations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It has been revealed that some employees occasionally have to review real video chat that has been processed by translation software in order to check the quality of translations, according to </span><em><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/9680295/microsoft-caught-secretly-listening-to-skype-calls/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Microsoft spokesperson told Motherboard that Microsoft collects voice data to improve features on Skype.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They said: “We also put in place several procedures designed to prioritise users’ privacy before sharing this data with our vendors, including de-identifying data, requiring non-disclosure agreements with vendors and their employees, and requiring that vendors meet the high privacy standards set out in European law.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Paul Bischoff, a privacy advocate from Comparitech.com, told </span><em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/microsoft-could-be-listening-to-some-skype-calls/news-story/d92ee2c5f713af3a7252be645004a365"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">: “Microsoft clearly states that recordings and transcriptions are analysed to verify accuracy and make corrections.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The fact that humans are performing that analysis might make users uneasy, but I don’t think there’s much risk to end users.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That is, unless a contractor steals recordings and gives them to a Vice reporter. Microsoft ought to take steps to ensure this can’t happen in the future.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I recommend users refrain from revealing any identifying information while using Skype Translation and Cortana. Unless you identify yourself in the recording, there’s almost no way for a human analyst to figure out who you are.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Skype is an online video chat and voice call service that also provides an instant messaging platform.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Javvad Malik, a security awareness advocate at KnowBe4, said: “This latest revelation goes to show more needs to be done to ensure consumer data is being protected when customers use such services.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In this instance, there needs to be a clear level of transparency and honesty about the entire call-recording process to give people a true understanding of what they are signing up for.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There is a fine line between invading someone’s privacy and collecting data for business purposes; a line that if crossed, can lead to serious breaches of data privacy.”</span></p>

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Big 5G problem haunting the iPhone 11 launch

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As tech giant Apple unveiled three new iPhone models that promised faster performance, increased battery life and new camera technology, industry experts are warning consumers that the product is missing a key component.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That component is known as 5G.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The next generation mobile network has already been rolled out in Australian capital cities and it’s expected in other parts of the country in the next couple of years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The lack of 5G is disappointing, according to Finders money expert Angus Kidman, as there’s a considerable price tag on the new iPhone 11 models.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“People always want their phone to be faster because we’ve rapidly gone from just making calls to watching video,” Mr Kidman told </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/technology/iphone-11-launch-big-5g-problem-plaguing-the-new-apple-phone/news-story/49a0a31684d5833733c24d8e598ff948"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We want high speed connection and I think there’s an expectation that if you’re going to pay $1900 for a phone then you should get premium service from it and, in network terms, that’s not going to be the case.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Past research has shown that Aussies tend to upgrade their phones once their two-year phone contract is up, but research from Finder shows that consumers are now holding onto their devices for more than three years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’d be saying to anyone buying a new phone now make sure you get something that’s 5G capable because it’s going to give you better functionality for longer,” Mr Kidman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Samsung was probably the first major brand to come out with 5G, there are some LG models out there as well.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“At the moment, very few people have a 5G phone but the expectation is that the next premium device you buy, you’d want 5G built into it.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">EFTM tech commentator Trevor Long has said that Apple have avoided 5G for a reason, which is simply that 5G hasn’t matured enough for the tech giant to consider adding it to their phones.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It feels like that would be something Apple would want to avoid. They don’t want a disappointed customer buying a phone with a feature they simply can’t use,” Mr Long told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It needs to mature more; we need to wait another year before 5G is getting a little better and that’s when it would make sense to have a 5G phone.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Photo credits: Picture: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images/AFPSource:AFP</span></em></p>

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Apple TV+ finally has a launch date and the price it’s set at will surprise you

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple has finally released the launch date and price of the anticipated streaming service, Apple TV+.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The streaming service will go live in more than 100 countries on November 1</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">st</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, so mark that date on your calendars.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s surprisingly affordable at $7.99 a month for Australians and if you’re on the fence about getting the service, there’s a seven-day free trial, which is considerably less than Netflix’s 30 day free trial.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’ve bought a new iPhone, iPad, Apple TV console, iPod touch or Mac, you’ll get a free one-year subscription to Apple TV+ as a sweetener.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s also family sharing enabled, which allows you to share the account with six other people.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The streaming service is launching with nine original programs on its first date, including Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston’s media drama </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Morning Wars</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and a futuristic dystopian show called </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">See</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which features Jason Momoa and Alfre Woodard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll be able to download the original programs for offline viewing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple launched the Apple TV+ app in anticipation of the service and have also signed a deal with Samsung so that those with Android phones don’t miss out on the streaming service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is rare as Apple usually like to keep apps within their own app ecosystem.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple TV+ comes out on November 1</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">st</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and will cost Australians $7.99 a month.</span></em></p>

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Google helps Australia crack down on piracy by tweaking search results

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google has joined Australia in the fight to stop Aussies from getting their hands on downloading or consuming pirated content.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The search engine giant has voluntarily agreed to remove sites that facilitate copyright infringement from its search results.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the </span><em><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/from-enemies-to-allies-google-removes-piracy-websites-from-search-results-20190510-p51m55.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sydney Morning Herald</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, Google has reached a voluntary agreement with Australian Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and content rights holders to de-index sites that have been blocked by internet providers under recent laws.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This means that content rights holders won’t have to take Google to court to force the company to remove offending sites from search results.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It also means that pirated content on websites will be harder to find if you’re using Google as a search engine.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Back in 2015, the Federal Government passed legislation that paved the way for court-ordered blocking of websites that hosted material in breach of copyright.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By 2018, the Federal Court had ordered 65 piracy sites to be blocked and more than 378 related domains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google confirmed to </span><em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/piracy/google-joins-australias-piracy-crackdown-by-tweaking-search-results/news-story/3825f9a6831f8672ee84342faed36a46"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that they have joined Australia in the fight against piracy.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Google supports effective industry-led measures to fight piracy,” a company spokesperson said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Graham Burke, the chairman of Creative Content Australia and outgoing chief executive of Australian film distribution company Village Roadshow had previously been vocal about Google as he believed it was “complicit” in piracy.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, due to the backing from the search engine giant, he has changed his tune. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve gone from being enemies to being allies … because I believe Google is doing the right thing by Australians,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Pirates’ business model is robbing and scamming people, they have sophisticated ways to take your information. Google has come down on the side that is right.”</span></p>

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Facebook announces new “dating services” for its 2 billion users

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook has launched a new dating service for singles.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The company announced that Dating, its new matchmaking service, has launched in the US. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook users are able to link their Facebook and Instagram posts and create a separate profile using the Dating feature. This new profile allows them to connect with Facebook’s 2 billion users around the world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Facebook Dating allows you to match with friends of friends and/or people not in your friend circle,” said a blog post from Nathan Sharp, head of the project.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Facebook Dating won’t match you with friends, unless you choose to use Secret Crush and you both add each other to your list,” Mr Sharp said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Secret Crush, which is one of the features, allows people who are friends to connect if they both secretly express an interest in each other.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve been really slow, actually, with this rollout,” Charmaine Hung, a product manager at Dating, told </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/09/05/tech/facebook-dating-launches-in-us/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>CNN Business</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “We really wanted to make sure we got it right because dating is so personal.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Any Facebook mobile user over the age of 18 is able to take advantage of the service, and Facebook has slowly been rolling it out over the world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The release in the US marks the 20</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> country to be given access to the service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The other 19 countries that it has been released in include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Singapore, Suriname, Thailand, Uruguay and Vietnam.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is no word yet as to when the service will be launched in Australia and New Zealand.</span></p>

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Keep an ear out for these phone scams

<p>Don’t fall victim to a telephone scam – educate yourself on the latest tricks to get you to part with your money.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams"><strong>Whatsapp scam</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams"> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>The Singapore Police Force issued a warning just last month about a scam that causes victims to lose access to their Whatsapp accounts.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Victims would receive Whatsapp messages from people on their contact list asking for their Whatsapp account verification codes.</p> <p>Once the victims send the codes over, the scammers control of the accounts.</p> <p>They would then use these compromised accounts to con people on the contact list into purchasing gift cards and sending over the passwords for the cards. The cards would then be sold online.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Don’t entertain unusual requests via Whatsapp, even if they come from someone on your contact list, as the account may have been compromised.</p> <p>Speak with the person to verify their identity.</p> <p>You can also protect your Whatsapp account by enabling the “Two-step Verification” feature.</p> <p><strong>Impersonation scam</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>There are several variations of this ruse, with the scammers pretending to be all manner of officials, from police officers to bank staff. The latest iteration in Malaysia involves scammer pretending to be postal couriers.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Scammers will call their victims, impersonating any of the above-mentioned positions.</p> <p>They inform the victims that they have broken the law and will be in trouble if they do not pay a fine, which is to be transferred to an account number they provide.</p> <p>The scammers also tell their victims that the conversation is being recorded and that they must not tell anyone about it or they’ll get in further trouble.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>These scammers use Caller ID spoofing technology to divert the phone numbers from the relevant agencies so it looks like you’re getting a call from the police, for example.</p> <p>But it’s important to note that government agencies will never conduct business in this manner, so this is clearly a scam. Hang up and make a police report.</p> <p><strong>Wangiri scam</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>This scam has been around for the better part of a decade but it does pop up now and again in a slightly different form, so it’s important to always be alert.</p> <p>Wangiri means “one ring” and “cut” in Japanese, where the victim receives a call from an overseas number that gets cut off after just one ring.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Getting the call is not the problem, returning the call is. If you return the call, you will likely hear an advertisement for a subscription chat line or internet service, and you will be charged for the call.</p> <p>The latest variation involves receiving a Whatsapp message with a contact attachment – you will be charged for calling the contact.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Never return the call, especially if you don’t know anyone living in the country from where the call originates. Block the number and Google it to see if there are any reports of scammers using it.</p> <p><strong>Kidnapping scams</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>This is another scam that’s making its rounds in Singapore again, with local police reporting that they have received numerous reports about it last month.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Scammers send text messages to victims claiming that they have kidnapped the victims’ loved ones and will harm them if they do not transfer a large amount of money to a bank account.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Remain calm and contact your loved ones immediately to ensure they are safe. Don’t transfer the money or respond to the text message, and be sure to block the number. Make a police report.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Yes, you can unsend that text and here's how

<p>Oops, wrong number! D’oh, stupid autocorrect! Gah, why did I think texting my ex was a good idea?!</p> <p>We’ve all had our share of cringe-worthy texts that we regret the moment we send them.</p> <p>In the past, you haven’t had too many options: send a quick apology, hope the other person will gloss over your oversight, or block that contact and delete all evidence of your lapse in judgment. Thankfully, that all ends today.</p> <p><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.onsecondthought.co/" target="_blank">On Second Thought</a><span> </span>is an app that lets you take back your texts after hitting send. It syncs with your usual texting program to let you message everyone on your contact list as usual, just in a different app—and with some nifty “unsend” features that prevent endless embarrassment.</p> <p>The app lets you choose a “grace period” of up to 60 seconds after you hit send when you can delete the message. Even if the other person doesn’t have On Second Thought, you can either recall the text to edit it, or delete it completely. Either way, your almost-recipient will be none the wiser, and you get to save face.</p> <p>If you have a habit of sending unfortunate texts that you regret the next day, On Second Thought has another solution. During periods of time when you don’t quite trust yourself to make great texting decisions – say, when grabbing drinks with that pot-stirring friend who always convinces you to call out your ex – the app can set up a “curfew.”</p> <p>Any texts you try to send during that time will be held until morning. In the morning, when your head is clear, you can decide whether you want to follow through with sending them.</p> <p>The unsend app isn’t available on the Apple App Store yet, but you can<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.onsecondthought" target="_blank">download it</a><span> </span>from Google Play.</p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/yes-you-can-unsend-text-and-heres-how" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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What to do if your data has been hacked

<p>Unless you’ve been staying offline – in which case you won’t even be reading this piece – chances are you’ve got some information stored online.</p> <p>From basic ones like your name and address to something more personal like your health data, date of birth or credit card details.</p> <p>It’s become so common that we sometimes don’t even think twice about keying in these bits of info whenever we start a new account.</p> <p>Unfortunately, that means there’s a fair bit of data about us that can be stolen online, sometimes through no fault of our own.</p> <p>Take, for example, the recent SingHealth breach in Singapore where the hackers accessed the information of 1.5 million people, including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.</p> <p>And then there’s the Facebook fiasco earlier this year where the data of 87 million people around the world was improperly shared with British political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica.</p> <p>Having your data stolen is the digital equivalent of losing your wallet – and will give you an equally big headache.</p> <p>As long as there is information about you available online, you are vulnerable.</p> <p>The concern is, we never quite know in what way our data will be used against us down the road once it gets in the hands of hackers.</p> <p>If you’ve ever had your data stolen, here are 5 things you should immediately do in order to minimise the damage:</p> <p><strong>1. Find out what was stolen</strong></p> <p>You will be informed via email, mail or text message if your data was stolen and what was likely accessed.</p> <p>Is it just your login credentials or did the thieves get away with your credit card and identity card info?</p> <p>Take note, however, that scammers can also take advantage of situations like these and send you a phishing email or text message to try and get your personal information.</p> <p>These can look and sound like they come from the official company but are actually fraudulent.</p> <p>To be safe, don’t clink on any links provided.</p> <p>Just head straight to the company’s website to find out how you can get help.</p> <p><strong>2. Change your login information</strong></p> <p>Change your login credentials, such as your username and password, for the affected site.</p> <p>Then log in to other sites that use the same login information and change those too.</p> <p>Hackers will use the same login information across different websites to try and gain access as many people tend to reuse usernames and passwords.</p> <p><strong>3. Change your security questions</strong></p> <p>If you’ve provided the answers to several security questions, such as your mother’s maiden name, make sure to change these questions and answers as well.</p> <p>If a hacker has access to that compromised information, he can reset your passwords.</p> <p><strong>4. Check your credit card accounts</strong></p> <p>If your credit card information is one of the details that has been stolen, call your bank and let them know.</p> <p>You may want to be safe and ask to cancel the card and get a new one.</p> <p><strong>5. Update all your other online accounts</strong></p> <p>Use this opportunity to update all your logins and passwords for your different accounts. It’s best to use different passwords for different sites and services, so if information on one account has been compromised, it can’t be used to access other services.</p> <p>You don’t have to come up with completely different passwords, just a slight variation. Consider using a passphrase. For example, your password could be “ihtsosin2018”, which stands for “I have to stop online shopping in 2018”<em>.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/what-do-if-your-data-has-been-hacked">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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How to have a healthier relationship with your phone

<p>If you find yourself checking your phone several dozen times a day, don’t worry, it’s not quite your fault.</p> <p>Lots of apps and programs, especially social media apps, have been designed to capture your attention and make it difficult for you to put your phone down.</p> <p>Unfortunately, though, there’s a down side to all this connectivity.</p> <p>A study released last year showed that people with a longer average screen time, and those who used their phones close to bedtime, had poorer sleep quality.</p> <p>Another recent study, released in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the use of your phone in the wee hours of the morning, could increase the chances of developing psychological issues such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.</p> <p>While the phone is undoubtedly important in our daily lives, we can all agree that we shouldn’t have to pay such a steep price for it in terms of compromising our health. It’s time to take some steps to cultivate a healthier relationship with our phones.</p> <p>Here are a few dos and don’ts:</p> <p><strong>DO: Turn off app notifications</strong></p> <p>Every time a notification goes off, it serves as a trigger for us to immediately pick up our phones.</p> <p>Turning off notifications will ensure that we don’t constantly feel pressured to check what’s going on.</p> <p>If you must, just leave notifications on for chat functions so you don’t miss important messages.</p> <p><strong>DO: Go greyscale</strong></p> <p>Setting your phone to greyscale can help you reduce the number of times you check it.</p> <p>This piece of advice comes from Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who co-founded The Center for Humane Technology.</p> <p>The reason behind this is that certain colours used by the apps, such as red and bright blue, subconsciously excite us and entice us to check our phones.</p> <p>By going greyscale, you lose such triggers.</p> <p><strong>DO: Leave your phone behind</strong></p> <p>Spend some time physically apart from your phone.</p> <p>Start small by first leaving your phone in your bag when you work out at the gym, and work towards leaving your phone at home when you have a jog around the neighbourhood.</p> <p>After a while, you may get more comfortable with the idea of spending more time apart.</p> <p><strong>DON'T: Charge your device in the bedroom</strong></p> <p>Alternatively, make sure your phone is out of reach or placed at the other end of the room.</p> <p>This makes sure that you don’t check it first thing in the morning before even getting out of bed.</p> <p><strong>DON'T: Place your favourite app shortcuts on your home screen</strong></p> <p>With such quick access to these apps, you’ll be tempted to constantly check in.</p> <p>Instead, keep only important tools on your home screen and relegate the other apps to the back pages.</p> <p>This way, you have to type the app name and do a search whenever you want to launch it, which just might be enough to discourage you from using it.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/have-healthier-relationship-your-phone">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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