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“Dear tech”: IBM pens open letter to the tech industry

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">IBM is urging the tech sector to use technology for the good of humanity instead of its downfall in an open letter to the industry called “Dear Tech”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the firm, the world needs tech companies that can apply “smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise — not just for some of us, but for all of us”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the global tech giant held its annual Think summit in Sydney, it showcased the mindboggling ways that artificial intelligence is being used to tackle the world’s biggest problems, according to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/05/22/ibm-think-summit-2019/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily.</span></a></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9">  <iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gNF8ObJR6K8"></iframe></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stefan Harrer says that healthcare is ideal for the use of artificial intelligence (AI).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ultimately we want to be able to use and develop technology to improve peoples’ lives,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We want to build tech that can help improve the lives of people that suffer from a variety of diseases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That requires that we do cutting-edge research and develop the tech and think hard about how to translate it into trustworthy and impactful solutions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, as AI becomes more commonplace, it’s more important than ever that there are strict ethics in place around it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s as important to pay enough attention to getting the ethical framework right around AI as it is the technology,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This revolution will not look like the information revolution, it’s not move fast and break things.”</span></p>

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New study discovers sleep texting is a reality for users

<p>Sleeping is a time for your body to rest, repair and reprogram itself before the next day. Although for some people it can also be a time to eat, talk, walk and – a new study has discovered – text.</p> <p>The research was published in the <span><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07448481.2018.1499655?journalCode=vach20&amp;"><em>Journal of American College Health</em></a></span>, where 372 students were surveyed at two separate universities in 2013 on their quality of sleep and mobile phone usage as they slept.</p> <p>Researchers asked questions such as “how many hours do you sleep a night?” and “where do you keep your phone?” amongst other things.</p> <p>The results were astounding.</p> <p>More than 25 per cent of people surveyed revealed they texted in their sleep. 72 per cent of those sleep texters had no recollection of having sent the text until they looked at their phone the next day.</p> <p>The people who reported sleep texting were more inclined to say they experienced interrupted sleep and said they kept their phone in bed with them at night.</p> <p>The survey also included an open-ended question where the students could discuss how they coped with sleep texting.</p> <p>One student reported she went to the extreme length of wearing mittens to bed to prevent herself from texting as “moving the phone from being in my bed to next to the bed is not an option, I have to keep my phone with me.”</p> <p>The sleep texters revealed that the quality of their texts are not entirely comprehensible and are often just a bunch of random words with no meaning.</p> <p>The lead author of the study, Elizabeth Dowdell, began the research after several of her undergraduate students spoke about their sleep texting habits.</p> <p>Most of the students who sleep text are female and most check their phones first thing in the morning to see if they had texted in their sleep.</p> <p>“The majority were unwilling to turn off their phone at night,” Dowdell revealed.</p> <p><strong>What is the cause of this strange new sleeping habit?</strong></p> <p>Board-certified sleep medicine researcher and neurologist W. Christopher Winter, MD, of <span><a href="http://www.cvilleneuroandsleep.com/">Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine</a></span> as well as author of the book <em>The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep is Broken and How To Fix It</em>, provided insight into the situation during an interview for <span><a href="https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/new-study-claims-sleep-texting-actually-thing-203042694.html">Yahoo Lifestyle</a></span>.</p> <p>“A small percentage of these people probably have a parasomnia, which is an abnormal wakening during deep sleep. But instead of walking or eating things they don’t remember, they’re texting.”</p> <p>Another explanation included the delayed formation of memories once awoken from a deep sleep, “we can have automatic behaviour,” explained Winter, “that’s why you can have a conversation with your partner in the middle of the night, not remember the first part, and wake up when you’re already into the conversation.”</p> <p>Drinking alcohol can also influence the likelihood of sleep texting, Winter adding, “alcohol can absolutely influence both behaviours and having that sort of amnesia for what you’re doing.”</p> <p><strong>How to prevent sleep texting</strong></p> <p>Winter recommended not sleeping with your mobile in your bed and instead keeping it “really out of your proximity.”</p> <p>If you are someone who likes to keep your phone in your room, Winter suggested placing it across the room where you sleep so if you want to answer a text in the middle of the night your body is forced to go through multiple movements that should wake you up.</p> <p>Winter also recommended keeping your phone on silent so it doesn’t wake you with noise, and even getting a phone lock that requires solving a math problem or replicating a pattern which will be hard to accomplish while asleep.</p> <p>“Who controls technology? We control it. We’re the ones who turn it on and we’re the ones who turn it off,” reinforced Dowdell.</p> <p>“If you can’t turn it off, consider putting some boundaries around it like sleep mode or program it so that only certain people can text through at night. Also, don’t sleep with your phone in bed."</p>

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Pauline Hanson suspended from Twitter over controversial post

<p>Pauline Hanson has been temporarily banned from Twitter after suggesting electric cattle prods should be used on climate change protesters.</p> <p>Earlier this week, the One Nation leader published a video showing her holding a cattle prod and urging the Queensland government to use the tool to disperse protesters who disrupt the public.</p> <p>“When the farmers have trouble getting the cattle up off the floor of the trucks, or in the cattle yards, they just touch them with this and they’ll soon move; it doesn't matter how big the beast are, they will move with this,” Hanson said in the video.</p> <p>The senator went on to mention the Extinction Rebellion climate protests in Brisbane, which have led to road closures and traffic delays. “Let’s use one of these on them,” Hanson said before suggesting pitching the idea to Queensland premier Annastacia Palaszczuk.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FPaulineHansonAu%2Fvideos%2F406390323327102%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>According to the Twitter suspension notice, Hanson violated the platform’s rules against abuse and harassment by engaging in “the targeted harassment of someone, or [inciting] other people to do so”.</p> <p>The video has been removed from Twitter but is still available on Hanson’s Facebook page.</p> <p>On Thursday, Hanson said her suspension from the social media platform was “just a concerted effort by the left to once again push for the censorship of conservative politicians and commentators”.</p> <p>She said she has appealed the suspension with a statement claiming that “tasers and cattle prods were low voltage and non-lethal and only suggested their use on people who block traffic or airports”.</p> <p>The suspension comes as the state government is introducing new laws to give police <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/aug/20/queensland-police-to-get-new-powers-to-search-climate-change-protesters" target="_blank">new powers to search suspected climate change protesters</a>. Palaszczuk said the authorities will be able to search those “they reasonably suspect” of having devices with traps or lock-on features.</p> <p>“Every single minute our [emergency services] spend dealing with these types of protesters, is a minute they are spending not helping others,” Palaszczuk said on Tuesday in state parliament. “It will not be allowed to continue.”</p> <p>Earlier this month, more than 70 people were arrested and charged over climate change protests in Brisbane’s CBD for offences including breach of peace, obstruct police, obstruct traffic and contravene direction.</p> <p>Extinction Rebellion spokesperson Tom Howell defended the people’s right to demonstrate on the streets.</p> <p>“Every other form of dissidence has failed,” Howell told the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-06/extinction-rebellion-protest-brisbane-cbd/11384442" target="_blank"><em>ABC</em></a>.</p> <p>“We’ve had our petitions, we’ve had marches, the Government is not representing the people.</p> <p>“People are uncomfortable with disrupting other people’s lives, but it is the best option we have left to get people talking about the climate emergency, to get the Government responding to it and to kind of make the economy pay attention to it, because if people can't go to work then the economy can suffer.”</p>

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How to stop hackers from attacking your mobile phone while online shopping

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In new research revealed by Norton’s cyber safety insight report, about 30 per cent of shoppers have fallen victim to cybercrime in the past year at a cost of a shocking $1.3 billion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The report noted that 21 per cent of smartphone users had no idea that their device was able to be hacked.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cybercrime expert Julian Plummer agrees that users are laxer about mobile security compared to their laptops.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As mobile becomes increasingly de rigueur the security risk to consumers will only rise,” said Mr Plummer, who is the managing director of Midwinter Financial Services in Sydney.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are two ways that your smartphone is able to be hacked, which is phishing and over public wi-fi networks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As hackers are only getting smarter at duping their victims when it comes to phishing, sophisticated criminals are now impersonating big-name brands, including banks and other institutions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It used to be that seeing a padlock in the URL bar meant that the site was safe, but now hackers are ‘securing’ their sites using cheap security certificates to provide a false sense of security,” Mr Plummer warned to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/05/29/mobile-phone-cybercrime-safety/"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>The New Daily</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second way is via public Wi-Fi networks, which is surprisingly sophisticated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hackers use a ‘Wi-Fi pineapple’ to mimic a public wi-fi access point,” he explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Unfortunately, logging on to these malicious wi-fi access points allows hackers to intercept any unencrypted personal data. Always be very wary when connecting to an untrusted wi-fi network – especially overseas.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s easy to protect yourself from hackers though, according to Mr Plummer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The crucial thing for mobile phone users is to stop reusing passwords,” Mr Plummer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With a major security breach happening almost on a monthly basis, if hackers were to get your password from one shopping website, they then have access to all your online accounts if you re-use your password.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second way to keep your information safe might be tedious, but it’ll be worth it in the long run. It involves keeping your phone’s operating system up to date.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The main reason manufacturers provide updates is to close off security loopholes within their device,” Mr Plummer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hackers are well versed in any security bugs in your mobile device, so make sure you have automatic updates turned on for your mobile phone.”</span></p>

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Small-player phone plans continue to rise due to benefits offered

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The rise of the smaller player phone plans is inevitable. As many users around Australia get frustrated with coverage offered by the larger telcos, including Optus, Telstra and Vodafone, they’ve started looking elsewhere.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Plenty of people are happy with the other MVNOS available, which include ALDImobile, Amaysim and Woolworths.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MVNO stands for “mobile virtual network operator” and lease space off the larger telcos, but it’s not as smooth a process as consumers probably think.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Independent telecommunications analyst Paul Budde told </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/06/04/best-phone-deal-australia/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that the larger telcos aren’t happy to hand over their space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The telcos – the big boys like Telstra – are very reluctant to do deals with companies such as Aldi, as they compete with them indirectly,” he told The New Daily.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These MVNOs, such as ALDI and Amaysim and Boost, are always trying to get a better deal with the telcos, but they are basically prevented from that because it’s so difficult to deal with the telecommunications companies.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“From an industry perspective, ALDI and the other MVNOs are doing a great job trying to break that situation with the carriers and deliver a better price.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Australia is paying well above average if you look on a global scale for their mobile services. So it’s very important that we have these companies providing a more realistic mobile price.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the problem with these plans is that the user has to have their own phone before being able to take advantage of these deals.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s a range of offerings available for $30, but which one you choose greatly depends on your needs. For example, if you’re not that fussed about data but prefer calls to international countries, a phone plan that offers calls and texts overseas is more ideal for you.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, if you enjoy watching YouTube videos on your iPad, a phone plan with a larger data offering is more your speed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Being off the grid in regional areas of Australia can make things a bit trickier in terms of phone service, but you’re able to compare </span><a href="https://www.whistleout.com.au/MobilePhones/Guides/who-has-the-best-mobile-coverage"><span style="font-weight: 400;">coverage on this map.</span></a></p>

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This city is set to adopt “smart city” surveillance

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As part of Darwin’s new plan to transform the city into a “smart city”, the city’s council is installing hundreds of poles fitted with CCTV cameras, loudspeakers, sensors, Wi-Fi points and LED lights that can capture large amounts of real-time data and send it to the police.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Darwin Council CEO Scott Waters said that the police would use the data collected for crime prevention and that the council would use it to better understand how locals are using the city in order to identify areas of improvement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Naturally, academics are concerned about the potential for this invasive technology to take over the personal privacy of citizens going about their day-to-day activities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are 138 CCTV cameras and 912 LED lights so far being installed across Darwin’s CBD that feeds information back to police headquarters.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Due to the infrared capabilities of the lights, this allows police officers to “basically see in the dark”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Mr Waters says that there are results.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Crime in areas that attract anti-social behaviour has already reduced by 50 per cent since installing the cameras, Mr Waters told </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/06/07/darwin-smart-city/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Crime will happen, we understand that’s a part of society, but we want to create an environment where it is more difficult to commit a crime,” Mr Waters said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s all about planning, development, safety and communication,” Mr Waters said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We can look at vehicle movements and people movements… and be able to make better decisions and solve problems in our city based on the information we receive.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, senior business law lecturer John Garrick from Charles Darwin University says our right to privacy is going by the wayside thanks to this new technology.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There’s a very strong sales line about technology that has the seductive promise of greater protection from street crime,” Professor Garrick said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s a very powerful narrative, but we need to ask ourselves: where is this technology being imported from, and where will this data go? Who has control over it and who has access to this data?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">My Waters has defended the new technology saying that all data collected from citizens is anonymous.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We don’t have the ability to drill into an individual and find out who they are,” Mr Waters said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Privacy of the individual citizen is one of the most important elements of democratic society.”</span></p>

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The new changes in technology that could impact the way you shop

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Supermarkets are tipped to be unrecognisable in five years, with checkouts to be phased out and interactive smartphone apps to be introduced as a routine feature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Technology is rapidly becoming more personalised and utilised for a faster shopping experience for the Australian shopper.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Much of the technology is commonplace in the US and is likely to filter into Australia quickly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Developers are given flexibility in the United Kingdom, with some utilising augmented reality to steer a shopper’s experience, suggesting recipes and leading them to related ingredients.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Here’s a peek at what I’ve been working towards for the past few months. Introducing Retail AR, from Dent Reality. <a href="https://t.co/CpS0w3ZXYX">https://t.co/CpS0w3ZXYX</a> <a href="https://t.co/NZFZcjcQX1">pic.twitter.com/NZFZcjcQX1</a></p> — Andrew Hart (@AndrewProjDent) <a href="https://twitter.com/AndrewProjDent/status/981635577488519170?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 April 2018</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Food retailing expert Gary Mortimer from the Queensland University of Technology said that supermarkets were struggling to refresh and rejig the shopping experience to attract customers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/06/20/supermarket-future-changes-technology/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The challenge that the big supermarkets face is the constant requirement to be new and different,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They’re trying to transform a boring, mundane daily task in grocery shopping.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Companies offering same-day or two-hour deliveries in select areas is a step in the right direction.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When you buy a T-shirt or clothing online you expect to receive it in a few days,” Professor Mortimer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But when you buy groceries you really want it delivered on the same day, or within a few hours.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some stores are trialling checkout-less supermarkets in Australia and in the US, it’s predicted that they’ll disappear completely within ten years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Professor Mortimer also predicts that smartphones will be at the heart of augmented reality and artificial intelligence development for a customer’s personalised supermarket experience.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Beacon technology is linked to smartphone apps that pushes out notifications and messages whenever a user goes near a beacon’s “sensor”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“(The sensors will be) embedded in lights, so you’ll be walking down the pet food aisle – and Coles or Woolworths know that your favourite product is Dine – and as you’re standing there, you’re getting a push notification (on your phone) with an offer right for you for Dine,” Professor Mortimer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Augmented reality might take a little bit more time to arrive, but when it does, it will look like this: “You look down the phone’s camera at the grocery aisle and offers will pop up – your favourite cereal pops up with an offer just for you.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A lot of these advancements rely on customers handing over their data via loyalty programs and phones, which is something most customers feel uneasy about.</span></p>

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“Too smart to be scammed?”: The question the ACCC is asking regular Aussies

<p>With Australian consumers on track to lose more than half a billion dollars to con artists and scammers this year, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is urging people to refresh their ideas of a scam.</p> <p>As scams increase in sophistication, including emails that impersonate the tax office and communications from your bank, it can be harder to protect yourself against these scams.</p> <p>As part of National Scams Awareness Week (August 12 to August 16), the ACCC says people need to refresh their “scam protection and detection” skills.</p> <p>The campaign’s theme is “too smart to be scammed?” with evidence showing that those who overestimate their ability to detect a scam are putting themselves at risk.</p> <p>“Many people are confident they would never fall for a scam, but often it’s this sense of confidence that scammers target,” ACCC deputy chair Delia Rickard said to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/consumer/2019/08/12/scams-target-australians/" target="_blank">The New Daily.</a></em></p> <p>“People need to update their idea of what a scam is so that we are less vulnerable.’’</p> <p>More research has showed that not only do scams have a significant financial impact on the victim, it can also impact them emotionally.</p> <p>Nearly one in 10 Aussies have been scammed in the last year according to Westpac’s<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.westpac.com.au/about-westpac/media/media-releases/2019/12-august/" target="_blank">State of Scams</a></em><span> </span>report that was released last Monday.</p> <p>One in two scam victims were impacted emotionally, which included losing faith and trust in others.</p> <p>Two-thirds of victims were embarrassed to let those close to them know what happened, with victims of dating or romance scams being impacted the worse.</p> <p>“While we’re seeing record levels of financial loss to scams, it’s not just our wallets that are suffering,” Westpac head of fraud Ben Young said.</p> <p>“Our data shows that scammers are taxing our time, creating stress and taking a toll on our relationships.”</p> <p>Deakin University consumer behaviour expert Paul Harrison says that modern consumers are “conditioned” to be aware of “manipulative” marketing tactics.</p> <p>“The main issue is that it is easier to believe than not to believe,” Dr Harrison said.</p> <p>“You actually do have to exist in a world where you can trust institutions and trust brand. It’s quite rough on people to say you shouldn’t fall for scams – everyone falls for scams all the time.”</p> <p>“We like to think that if it happened to me, I wouldn’t fall for it,” he said.</p> <p>“But everybody is potentially a victim.”</p> <p><strong>How to keep yourself safe from scammers</strong></p> <ul> <li>Don’t click on links or open attachments from email addresses you don’t recognise</li> <li>Never provide your credit card or banking details over email</li> <li>Set up two-factor authentication</li> <li>Check the email addresses the suspicious email has been sent for</li> <li>Look out for obvious spelling mistakes in the email or text message</li> <li>Utilise Google to check that the number or email you’ve been provided is correct (for example, if the ATO is asking you to call them on a specific number, Googling the number could prove that the number is not from the ATO)</li> <li>Review your financial statements and report suspicious activity as soon as it’s noticed</li> </ul>

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Prince Andrew’s embarrassing blunder on Princess Beatrice’s birthday tribute

<p>Princess Beatrice turned 31 on August 8 and her family took to social media to wish her well.</p> <p>Her father, Prince Andrew, made a sweet post on Twitter where he shared a collection of photos with his oldest daughter, but fans were quick to notice something embarrassing.</p> <p>In the original tweet that has since been deleted, the doting father had shared a photo of Princess Beatrice’s sister Eugenie on her wedding day instead of the birthday girl.</p> <p>Naturally, the mistake was pointed out and it was swiftly rectified. You can see the updated tweet below.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Happy Birthday Princess Beatrice🎉<br /><br />Thank you everyone for the lovely birthday wishes!<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HappyBirthdayHRH?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HappyBirthdayHRH</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/yorkiebea?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@yorkiebea</a> <a href="https://t.co/WrBBbfaRG2">pic.twitter.com/WrBBbfaRG2</a></p> — The Duke of York (@TheDukeOfYork) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDukeOfYork/status/1159383428204322817?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 August 2019</a></blockquote> <p>There were four photos with the caption, “Happy Birthday Princess Beatrice. Thank you to everyone for the lovely birthday wishes!"</p> <p>Duchess of York and Beatrice’s mother, Sarah Ferguson, wished her a happy birthday via Instagram, sharing photos that many royal fans have not seen before.</p> <p>The tribute read, “Happy birthday dearest Beatrice” and had a variety of photos that showed Beatrice as a child with her mother and father, Beatrice playing in a sandpit as a child, as well as sitting outside with the family’s Norfolk terriers as an adult. The last photo in the Instagram post is a sweet one of the Duchess of York holding Beatrice in the snow.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05dv09F-3s/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05dv09F-3s/" target="_blank">Happy Birthday dearest Beatrice 🥳🥳 xx</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Aug 8, 2019 at 2:25am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Not to be outdone, her younger sister Eugenie added six photos of Beatrice and revealed the sweet nickname for her older sister in the caption.</p> <p>"You have been bossing it since before I was born and continue to be the most wonderful person, friend and big sister," she wrote.</p> <p>"Happy Birthday to you Beabea!! Xx"</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05gM4HlMi1/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05gM4HlMi1/" target="_blank">You have been bossing it since before I was born and continue to be the most wonderful person, friend and big sister... Happy Birthday to you Beabea!! Xx 😘 🎉🎊🥳</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/princesseugenie/" target="_blank"> Princess Eugenie</a> (@princesseugenie) on Aug 8, 2019 at 2:46am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The photos shared by her immediate family gave royal fans an insight into how Princess Beatrice spends her time as she doesn’t have a public Instagram account.</p> <p>As Beatrice has a unique birth date, as she was born on 8:18 pm on August 8th, 1988 or 8/8/88, many royal fans had remembered the unique date and flooded her family’s social media pages with well wishes.</p> <p>Beatrice was also given a birthday tribute from the official account for the Queen and Prince Philip.</p> <p>The tweet read, "Princess Beatrice is the first child of @hrhthedukeofyork and Sarah, Duchess of York, and fifth grandchild of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh. #HappyBirthdayHRH."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Wishing Princess Beatrice of York a Happy Birthday! 🎂🎉 <br />Her Royal Highness is the first child of <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDukeOfYork?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheDukeOfYork</a> and Sarah, Duchess of York and fifth grandchild of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HappyBirthdayHRH?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HappyBirthdayHRH</a> <a href="https://t.co/s903A3oW7D">pic.twitter.com/s903A3oW7D</a></p> — The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily/status/1159363100967145472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 August 2019</a></blockquote>

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“Unacceptable”: Consumers rage as they’re left without phone or internet for days on end

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Aussie users are fed up with the lack of service on their phones and internet services and have flooded Australia’s telco providers with nearly half a million complaints over just three months.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The data was found in a new report done by the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s </span><a href="https://acma.gov.au/theACMA/telecommunications-complaints-handling"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Telecommunications complaints handling report</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Telecommunications companies received 448,470 complaints between October and December last year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That number represents a 12.7 per cent increase in the amount of complaints made to telcos compared to the previous three months.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The average time it took for telcos to resolve complaints ranged from one to 13 days, with an average time of six days, ACMA said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) described the figures as disappointing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When people buy a product or service, they rightly expect it to work as promised,” ACCAN chief executive Teresa Corbin said to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/07/10/telco-consumer-complaints/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s simply unacceptable for the millions of Australians who are connected to essential communications services to be left waiting for days on end without the service they have paid for.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Consumers should have a right to reliability.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">RMIT university professor in network engineering Mark Gregory said that the figures show that Aussie consumers are being let down.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The number of faults and service interruptions experienced by Australian consumers remains far higher than what is reasonable and reflects the need for the telecommunications industry to do more to provide consumers with an improved experience,” Dr Gregory said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many complaints tend to be related to the NBN. Dr Gregory said that the government’s “failure” to roll out fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) is “costing consumers more and this operations and maintenance cost is expected to grow over time, making FTTP a far cheaper and more reliable technology in the short term,” Dr Gregory said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, a spokesman for the NBN said that the firm has made “significant investments to work with the telco industry to improve customer experience and we are starting to see the early signs of that”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But we are quickly learning how to improve our processes and customer experience, as acknowledged in the ACMA report which noted the rate of FTTC complaints over the September to December quarters fell 33 per cent”.</span></p>

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Samsung in deep water over water resistant phone claims

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Electronics giant Samsung are being taken to court for telling consumers that many of the four million Galaxy phones sold in Australia were water resistant while knowing they were not.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They have denied the claims made by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ACCC said that it had commenced Federal Court proceedings against Samsung for misleading and deceiving customers with claims about various Galaxy phones across more than 300 advertisements since February 2016.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There were a variety of advertisements across social media, online, TV, billboards, brochures and other media that depicted the phones as being water resistant and showed them being used at pools and beaches.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The phones were also advertised as being water resistant up to 1.5 metres for 30 minutes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Samsung showed the Galaxy phones used in situations they shouldn’t be to attract customers,” ACCC Commissioner Rod Sims said on Thursday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Under the Australian Consumer Law, businesses cannot mislead consumers about their products’ capabilities.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ACCC have said that Samsung did not sufficiently test its phones to back the advertised claims and denied warranty claims from users who said their phones were damaged in water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Samsung itself has acknowledged that water resistance is an important factor influencing Australian consumer decisions when they choose what mobile phone to purchase,” Mr Sims said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Samsung has issued a statement denying the allegations and saying that it “intends to defend the court proceedings brought by the ACCC.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Samsung stands by its marketing and advertising of the water resistancy of its smartphones,” the statement said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are also confident that we provide customers with free-of-charge remedies in a manner consistent with Samsung’s obligations under its manufacturer warranty and the Australian Consumer Law.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Customer satisfaction is a top priority for Samsung and we are committed to acting in the best interest of our customers.”</span></p>

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5G health risks: Should consumers be worried?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientists are working hard to quash the rumours of ill-effects to your health that could be linked to the rollout of 5G technology.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Potential health effects from 5G technology range from cancers to “allergies”. These are based around radiofrequency electromagnetic energy, which is how mobile phones send and receive information.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Ken Karipidis from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency told journalists that the fear “doesn’t hold weight”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“(Millimetre waves) don’t travel very far, so because of that there’s going to be a lot more base stations around and I think that’s one of the reasons why a lot of people are worried,” Dr Karipidis explained to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/07/16/5g-network-health-risks/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There is going to be a lot of infrastructure that’s near their house, for example.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Millimetre waves are already used in technology that has been around for sometime, with no proven health effects in the long or short term.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Sarah Loughran said that there is a misunderstanding around 5G technology. As it runs at a higher frequency, people assumes it also emits higher energy levels.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“While there will be more antennas and infrastructure needed to run the 5G network, it will run at a lower power level, and therefore its energy will not penetrate as deeply into the body as older technology,” Dr Loughran said, who is at the Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research out of the University of Wollongong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One thing the two doctors agreed on was that any energy penetration into a human body will only be skin deep. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Karipidis was involved in an Australian study that sought to compare any increase in brain tumour incidences over the past 30 years with the growing popularity of mobile phones.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Karipidis and his team found that there was no increase in brain tumour rates during this period as well as finding no link in the long or short-term between radiowaves and cancer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There are some people who believe they are sensitive to, or ‘allergic’, to electromagnetic energy,” Dr Loughan said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is actually a self-diagnosis … with no medical or scientific evidence,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 5G network has begun to be switched on in test sites around the country with a full complete roll out sometime next year.</span></p>

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"Dangerous": Kmart hack slammed for being an extreme fire hazard

<p>A Facebook group that is known to criticise people for their Kmart “hack” fails has gone into overdrive after the latest “hack” has proven to be an obvious danger.</p> <p>A photo shared on Wednesday showed a weird way a Kmart fan has repurposed the $25 Glass Base Lamp that comes with a white lampshade.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcleanyourdamnhouseBrenda%2Fphotos%2Fa.356323744881043%2F676242099555871%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="638" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The glass base lampshade is clearly a hit as Kmart “hackers” have taken to putting plants in the base.</p> <p>The image reads: “Kmart $25 lamps, plants from Bunnings”.</p> <p>Many were quick to point out that the plants inside the base probably won’t survive.</p> <p>“I bet the plant is enjoying the intense light and heat it’s subjected to every time the lamp comes on,” one user wrote.</p> <p>Someone saw the obvious risks with watering the plants and decided to make a pun.</p> <p>“It would be shockingly difficult to water them,” they said.</p> <p>Another user saw the immediate downside to having a plant in the glass base lamp.</p> <p>“Who wouldn’t want a lamp filled up with dirt?” they wrote.</p> <p>Another fan sent through a glass base lamp with a fish inside.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcleanyourdamnhouseBrenda%2Fphotos%2Fa.356323744881043%2F700397330473681%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="675" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>One fan was quick to point out that the fish is suffering from the risk of electrocution from being in the lamp.</p> <p>“I don’t care about the painting on the lamp or how they decorate their homes, don’t even care if someone is silly enough to mix water and electricity, but if any of the above results in the suffering of a fish or animal then yes it makes me angry.”</p> <p>Another asked if the people who make these designs “have a brain”.</p> <p>“I think I’m about to have a heart attack do these people not have a brain!!”</p>

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5 of the funniest tweets from actor Sam Neill

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actor and wine maker Sam Neill has taken to Twitter with ease, much to the delight of his fans and other celebrities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jurassic Park</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> actor frequently documents life on his farm with his animals that have names of celebrities as an “insurance policy”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It doesn’t always end well,” he told </span><a href="https://www.vulture.com/2019/07/sam-neill-farm-animals-interview.html">Vulture.</a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Meryl Streep was killed by a ferret recently … Hugo Weaving was another unfortunate end, but he died happy. He was a ram. He was doing what rams do — he fell off the back of a female sheep.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He also shares videos of his grandson, as seen below.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Sam playing with his grandson</strong></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">My grandson . Hilarious . Great kid . Don't worry ...picks himself up, laughs and back into it . <a href="https://t.co/cyuOOHfztO">pic.twitter.com/cyuOOHfztO</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1121741516031057920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">26 April 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a popular tweet by fans, but you have to watch until the end to really appreciate it. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Getting angry at James Corden for being a “murderer”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sam Neill played Mr McGreggor in the reboot of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Peter Rabbit</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, who met an unfortunate end thanks to Peter, who is voiced by Corden.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He let his anger be known in the tweet below, calling Corden a “murderer” and that he has “no idea why HE’S [Peter Rabbit] the hero &amp; not old Mr.McG.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Spent this morning listening to the excellent <a href="https://twitter.com/JKCorden?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@JKCorden</a> as Peter, voicing the Badger for <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PeterRabbit2?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PeterRabbit2</a>. I couldn't be Old Mr. McGregor again because ...well...he died . Peter Rabbit's fault. No idea why HE's the hero &amp; not old Mr.McG. Peter Rabbit MURDERER ! <a href="https://t.co/ubx5jV9U1A">pic.twitter.com/ubx5jV9U1A</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1151684396534996995?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p><strong>3. This selfie with a “random fan”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neill makes a point for his twitter feed to be humorous and refreshing as he “enjoys Twitter”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told </span><a href="https://www.thecut.com/2019/05/sam-neill-interview-about-twitter.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Cut</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how he got started on the platform.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They [co-workers in Two Paddocks office] told me that social media was important,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’d never heard of it. I started Facebook, but I didn’t like it at all. It filled me with existential dread.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But I found I enjoyed Twitter. The economy of 140 characters was really appealing; every tweet was like a lame haiku”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although he usually posts photos and videos of his farm animals, he made an exception for a selfie with a “random fan”. The fan just so happens to be Chris Hemsworth.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Yours truly plus random fan .<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ThorRagnarok?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#ThorRagnarok</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/TaikaWaititi?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TaikaWaititi</a> took this as best I remember. <a href="https://t.co/aU1nW1B8bI">pic.twitter.com/aU1nW1B8bI</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/917554962997035009?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 October 2017</a></blockquote> <p><strong>4. Singing with pigs</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Neill lives on a farm in Otago, New Zealand, he has “so many free-range animals that they’re almost feral”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He shared with his Twitter followers a “duet” with his pig.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Singing With Pigs. My old pig friend is always up for a duet . Its more his kind of song really . Took me years to learn Pigsong . It's paid off bigtime. <a href="https://t.co/a3mprZ6AMR">pic.twitter.com/a3mprZ6AMR</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1088972409229664256?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">26 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p><strong>5. Getting mistaken for Hugo Weaving</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although people might recognise Sam Neill from somewhere, it’s clear that not many know who he is.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neill documented an experience with a fan saying that he’s Hugo Weaving.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">LIFE IN THE CITY<br />Coming out of my local with a coffee this morning , a bloke with a dog yells "Are you an Actor ?'<br />"Yes' I say.<br />"Who are you then ? " he says <br />"Hugo Weaving" I reply<br />"That's right..apparently you're good"<br />"Not really" I mutter as I walk away <a href="https://t.co/00lt7jJBA2">pic.twitter.com/00lt7jJBA2</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1145886981722820608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">2 July 2019</a></blockquote>

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“Stuff the lot of them!”: Karl Stefanovic's harsh words

<p>Former <em>Today</em> host Karl Stefanovic has defended his Channel 9 colleague Deborah Knight after she revealed that she spends part of everyday “just dealing with trolls”.</p> <p>Knight was being interviewed by Stefanovic on radio station 2GB when she revealed just how bad the trolls are.</p> <p>“I don’t want to beat up the impact that the trolls are having on me because I’m a tough cookie and I’m in the public eye,” she started off.</p> <p>“I’ve got to work to make a living and I shouldn’t have to apologise for that. I’m flabbergasted that working hard is something that is considered a negative.</p> <p>“Mummy guilt is a vicious thing. I beat myself up about it enough as it is. I’d love to spend more time at home and not have to work to make a living.</p> <p>“But since when did working hard to create a future for my kids become something to criticise?” she finished.</p> <p>Stefanovic was in disbelief that his colleague had to deal with “mummy guilt”.</p> <p>“I can’t believe you have to deal with this," Stefanovic told her. “You are an incredible broadcaster, a great mum and a good person. Stuff the lot of them.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0e7hASBf3E/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0e7hASBf3E/" target="_blank">Rare to have the TV face on for radio.. in the chair for @steveprice7571 on @2gb873 and @newstalk4bc</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/deborah_knight/" target="_blank"> Deborah Knight</a> (@deborah_knight) on Jul 28, 2019 at 7:06pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Stefanovic said he had also felt the wrath of Facebook and Twitter trolls.</p> <p>“Sometimes it can get you at the wrong time of day, or you’re having a tough week and you take real offence to it,” he said on 2GB.</p> <p>“There are people out there who aren’t used to it who are really going to be bullied.</p> <p>“They’re called keyboard warriors, but I like to refer to them as keyboard cowards.”</p> <p>Knight agreed.</p> <p>“People who hide behind the keyboard need to lay off the pile on mentality. It’s so boring.”</p> <p>WSFM breakfast host and Channel 10 personality Amanda Keller came to Knight’s defence as well and said that she had been “triggered” by online abuse.</p> <p>“I get defensive when people say to me, ‘God, could you be any busier?’ or ‘When are you ever at home?’ because they’ve seen me on a show that was recorded in the middle of the day, two months ago,” she said on WSFM’s Jonsey and Amanda show yesterday morning. </p>

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The new device that charges your phone while you’re on the go

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researchers from Queen’s University in Canada have developed an energy-harvesting device that exploits the side to side movement of a backpack that will generate electricity while you walk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The trial version would be suitable for people who work or trek to remote areas and the device has enough power to deploy an emergency beacon or a GPS.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers experimented with seven different conditions for energy harvesting and found that a load of nine kilograms generated the optimum amount of power without any extra effort to the wearer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The nine kilograms would be made up of clothes, food, a stove, fuel, a sleeping bag and a tent which was packed for a long trek.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The weight of the device and the backpack adds another five kilos. The setup in total produces about .22 watts of electricity which is enough to power GPS and emergency beacons.</span></p> <p><a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.182021"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the paper</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the researchers Jean-Paul Martin and Qingguo Li calculate that adding more weight to the backpack will help it generate more power. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Modelling predicts that an increase in electrical power production could be achieved by increasing the weight carried,” they write.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If generating over (one Watt) of electrical power was desired for powering higher demand devices, such as talking or browsing the internet with a cell phone, our model indicates that over 20 kilograms of weight would need to be carried.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In total, you would be carrying 14 kilograms on your back to generate enough power for your GPS or emergency beacon.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although this might seem like too much weight for most people, it’s next to nothing for soldiers who are used to carrying at least 27 kilograms and as much as 45 kilograms on their back for long-haul missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.</span></p>

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Google Chrome security breach: Why your private passwords are at risk

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new hack has alarmed people who use the internet browser Google Chrome as it has been revealed that anyone can gain access to your online passwords with a few simple clicks. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All a hacker needs to do is just click in the right spots to gain access to your passwords.</span></p> <p><strong>How to unlock every password on Google Chrome</strong></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Open Google Chrome</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on the Menu (three dots icon in the top right corner of the browser window)</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click Settings</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Under Autofill, click on Passwords.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asterisked passwords pop up, click on the eye symbol</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the Username and Password bar, enter the computer login</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s really that simple. </span></p> <p><strong>However, there are a few ways that you can protect yourself</strong></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ensure no one knows your computer password</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Regularly change your password</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Avoid using password auto save or auto fill</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ensure your computer locks after inactivity</span></li> </ul>

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Trump’s big blow: Federal appeals court rules in favour of Twitter critics

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A federal appeals court has ruled that US President Donald Trump cannot legally block users on Twitter based on their political differences with him. This affirms a lower court decision.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The three-judge panel agreed with last year’s ruling by a federal judge that Trump was using “viewpoint discrimination”, which is in violation of the constitutional rights of people with opposing views.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/social/trump-cant-block-twitter-critics-federal-appeals-court-rules/news-story/fb2294bc60fa3fe2d97378945c2ed8f7"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the court sidestepped the question of the president’s free speech rights under the Constitution's First Amendment on a privately-owned internet platform. However, the court affirmed that Trump has created a public forum for official White House business.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The First Amendment does not permit a public official who utilises a social media account for all manner of official purposes to exclude persons from an otherwise-open online dialogue because they expressed views with which the official disagrees,” the judges wrote in a 29-page opinion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Trump’s legal response is that he’s not acting in his official capacity when he blocks users, but the court disagreed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The president and multiple members of his administration have described his use of the account as official,” the appeals court ruling said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We conclude that the evidence of the official nature of the account is overwhelming. We also conclude that once the president has chosen a platform and opened up its interactive space to millions of users and participants, he may not selectively exclude those whose views he disagrees with.”</span></p>

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Bill Gates gets candid about rival Steve Jobs: He “cast spells on people”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Microsoft founder Bill Gates, his rival Apple CEO Steve Jobs “cast spells on people” to keep Apple profitable during the dark days of the company.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both men are known for creating an intense workplace culture and being tough leaders. Gates realised that Jobs’ leadership style was a good example of “don’t do this at home”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates spoke to </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/08/tech/bill-gates-on-steve-jobs/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fareed Zakaria from </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">CNN</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about his relationship with Jobs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I have yet to meet any person who in terms of picking talent, hyper-motivating that talent and having a sense of design, of 'this is good, this is not good.' So he brought some incredibly positive things along with that toughness."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates reflected on Jobs and the way he “cast spells on people”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Steve is really a singular case where the company was on a path to die and it goes and becomes the most valuable company in the world with some products that are really quite amazing. There aren't going to be many stories like that."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates also admitted that his intense workplace culture went “too far”, especially in the early days of the company.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We had, to some degree, a self-selected set of people who were mostly males, I'll admit, and yes, we were pretty tough on each other," Gates said. "We counted on each other to work very long hours and I always wanted to set the best example of that. I think that intensity, even though a little bit it went too far, was great for my 20s, 30s, 40s."</span></p>

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Australia's Got Talent backlash: Manu Feildel hits back at online trolls about his new role

<p>Manu Feildel has been chosen as one of the judges for the reality TV show <em>Australia’s Got Talent</em>, but it has not come without criticism, with many Aussies disagreeing the chef has any qualifications to judge a talent show. </p> <p><span>The criticism got under Manu’s skin so much, he spoke to </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://tvtonight.com.au/2019/07/manu-puzzled-by-reaction-to-australias-got-talent-judging.html" target="_blank">TV Tonight</a><span> about the matter, and it’s clear that he thinks his three years of experience in the circus and 15 years of presenting on TV is enough.</span></p> <p>“A lot of people have asked me that question ['Why you?']  … and I say why not?” he told TV Tonight.</p> <p>“I was really chuffed Channel Seven would consider me for the role.</p> <p>“It doesn’t bother me, but I don’t understand why they’re asking the question. I get both ‘Oh my god, that’s amazing’ or ‘Why you?’ But my reply is, 'Why not?'</p> <p>“I’m a chef by trade, which I’ve done for 30 years but I’ve also done TV for 15.</p> <p>“I thought it would be a great chance for me and fun to do. It’s worked out well.”</p> <p><span>“A food critic has no experience in running a restaurant, cooked or carried a plate in a restaurant. What’s their background? How can they judge restaurants? A lot of actors in America write cookbooks and I find that funny,” he suggests.</span></p> <p>“I think we’re allowed to do what we want to be doing. You could be doing what I’ve done on AGT, I suppose, but people know me more than they know you, which is probably why I got the job.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0K-QGEAFkN/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0K-QGEAFkN/" target="_blank">The gang's all here and they're ready for you to witness the incredible talent Australia has to offer! 💯 #GotTalentAU Starts Sunday July 28 on @Channel7</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/gottalentau/" target="_blank"> Australia's Got Talent</a> (@gottalentau) on Jul 21, 2019 at 1:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, trolls have said that the panel is “scraping the floor under the barrel” by choosing Manu.</p> <p>“Can someone please explain to me why Manu is a judge on Australia’s Got Talent?” one Twitter user said.</p> <p>Another said, “Manu Feildel is one of the judges on the dead horse that is Australia’s Got Talent, because who knows more about the performing arts than a chef?”</p> <p>Others took a lighter approach, saying that “Manu will make at least 3 food references per episode of Australia’s Got Talent”.</p> <p>“No one in this country is better at identifying talent than a contemporary French Chef,” one user commented.</p> <p>Manu will be joining Pussycat Dolls singer Nicole Scherzinger, Australian actor Shane Jacobson and <em>Sisters</em> and musical theatre star Lucy Durack on the judging panel, while former<span> </span><em>Australian Idol</em><span> </span>star and singer Ricki-Lee Coulter will be hosting.</p>

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