Money & Banking

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Big winners from the impending tax cuts

<p>Despite the overwhelming rise in the cost of living, it is well-off Australians who will get the biggest tax break.</p> <p>Anthony Albanese has promised to push ahead with tax cuts that disproportionately benefit high income earners.</p> <p>The Prime Minister has already warned of the pain to come as he admitted the government will have to place a strict cap on spending when it hands down its first budget, while also fulfilling commitments Labor made at the election.</p> <p>The Stage Three tax cuts are by far the biggest piece of spending, costing a whopping $15 billion per year. This will benefit higher-income Australians.</p> <p>Mr Albanese said Labor will push ahead with the implementation of already-legislated income tax cuts in 2024 which will create a flat rate of 30% for those making between $45,000 and $200,000.</p> <p>Those earning over $120,000 who are now taxed at 37% are set to benefit the most. With workers who are making $90,000 a year saving $1,125 and those on $200,000 will be over $9000 better off.</p> <p>Mr Albanese confirmed there will be another federal budget handed down on October 25th, 2022, just months after Scott Morrison’s government delivered a budget in March.</p> <p>Mr Albanese also warned of some tough decisions in the October budget.</p> <p>“We’re going to have to really put the brakes on some of the spending which is there,” he said. “There are a range of things we would like to do that we won’t be able to do in our first budget.</p> <p>He said election commitments like cheaper childcare, setting up Jobs and Skills Australia and climate change would be honoured, as would the tax cuts for high-earners.</p> <p>Professor Ben Phillips, an expert in welfare and cost of living said the cost of the tax cuts dwarfs the cost of Labor’s key promises and benefits a group of Australians who are already doing well for themselves.</p> <p>“These cuts blow everything else out of the water in terms of costs, so that’s where the biggest problem is going to come from in terms of balancing the books,” he said.</p> <p>“They could instead give more assistance to low-income areas like JobSeeker recipients – that’s where relief should be targeted because middle and higher income earners are doing OK.”</p> <p>Unemployed Australians receiving Centrelink payments will get no extra money after Labor ditched plans to review the rate of JobSeeker. A single person currently earns $642.70 a fortnight or $46 a day.</p> <p>Millions to benefit from minimum wage increase</p> <p>Millions of low-earning Australians will however benefit from a rise to the minimum wage.</p> <p>Roughly 2.7 million minimum wage and low-paid workers on awards are receiving a wage increase of up to 5.2%, the most generous in 16 years.</p> <p>From July 1st, this will see the lowest paid receive $812.60 a week, an increase of $40, and $21.38 an hour, up $1.05.</p> <p>Labor will also honour the abolition of the Low and Middle Income Tax Offset.</p> <p>Income earners on up to $126,000 have received the lower and middle income tax offset worth up to $1080 a year each financial year since 2018-19.</p> <p>The offset was due to end when stage two tax cuts came into play but was extended for two more years after the cuts were brought forward to 2020 due to the pandemic.</p> <p>The end of the rebate means that Aussies earning up to $126,000 will pay up to $1500 more income tax in 2023 than this year.</p> <p><em>Image: Skynews</em></p>

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Which Centrelink payments are going up from July 1

<p>From July the 1st, over 1.4 million Australian families will benefit from an increase to their Centrelink payments.</p> <p>The federal government has announced increases to the Family Tax Benefit (Part A and B) to keep up with the rising cost of living.</p> <p>Under the Family Tax Benefit Part A, payments for families with a child aged under 13 will increase up to $204.40 over 2022-2023.</p> <p>The payments will also increase by a maximum of $255.50 for families with a child 13 years and older.</p> <p>For those receiving Family Tax Benefit Part B, there will be an increase of as much as $164.25 per year where a family has their youngest child under 5.</p> <p>For those families on Family Tax Benefit Part B with a youngest child aged between five to eighteen will receive up to $116.80 more per year.</p> <p>The changes are expected to impact more than 1.4 million families, Social Services Minister Amanda Rishworth said.</p> <p>It was also announced that the amount of income or assets an Age Pension, Disability Support Pension or Carer Payment recipient can have before their payment is affected will increase.</p> <p>“Social security and family payments have a built-in safeguard where they are automatically indexed at regular intervals to help them maintain purchasing power,” Rishworth said.</p> <p>Those who receive other family payments, such as Multiple Birth Allowance and Newborn Supplement are also set to receive an increase.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Could this be the cheapest wedding dress in history?

<p>A TikToker from the US has scored herself the ultimate find - a beautiful wedding dress for AUD $5.40 (USD $3.75).</p> <p>Sounds too good to be true? Jillian Lynch shared a video from her wedding in May, where she wore the $5 find and a pair of vintage heels she scored for AUD$11.80. This means her entire outfit was purchased for under AUD $20.</p> <blockquote class="tiktok-embed" style="max-width: 605px; min-width: 325px;" cite="https://www.tiktok.com/@jilly_lynch/video/7097733859286027563" data-video-id="7097733859286027563"> <section><a title="@jilly_lynch" href="https://www.tiktok.com/@jilly_lynch" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@jilly_lynch</a></p> <p> </p> <p><a title="♬ Put Your Head On My Shoulder - Paul Anka" href="https://www.tiktok.com/music/Put-Your-Head-On-My-Shoulder-6696831635129649154" target="_blank" rel="noopener">♬ Put Your Head On My Shoulder - Paul Anka</a></section> </blockquote> <p>In the comment section, Jillian shared the alterations came to roughly AUD $158, which is still a huge bargain – with your traditional wedding dress usually costing thousands of dollars.</p> <p>The savvy bride explained that as an avid thrift shopper, finding an op-shop dress for her wedding was always the plan. “I never even considered going to a bridal shop” she said. Jillian also didn’t plan on looking for a traditional wedding dress, sharing she wanted something white which wasn’t “too formal”.</p> <p>The lucky op-shop find is valued around AUD $317 (USD $220) and is by designer Camilla Coelha, sold on the popular online store Revolve. We love a good bargain!</p> <p>Congratulations to the thrifty bride on her gorgeous find.</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

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Electricity retailer tells customers to leave

<p dir="ltr">A small electricity retailer has told its customers to leave and find another company as they expect their prices to soar. </p> <p dir="ltr">Victorian energy supplier Electricityinabox expects its prices to increase by a whopping 95 per cent on July 1.</p> <p dir="ltr">CEO Morgan Duncan sent out a letter to all customers telling them that "only the lazy or crazy would stay" with the company. </p> <p dir="ltr">The letter begins with a straightforward statement telling customers “you need to find a new electricity provider today".</p> <p dir="ltr">"You need to be aware that smaller low price high value retailers are exiting this market. Four have already exited, some of them closed their doors," it continues.</p> <p dir="ltr">The company will continue to provide certain services but is expected to leave the electricity sector due to the increasing demand making it expensive. </p> <p dir="ltr">Energy companies ReAmped, LPE, Discover, Elysian and Future X have told customers to look elsewhere, while Momentum, Simply, Mojo, CovAU and Nectr have stopped accepting new customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">The news comes just a week after Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) called on Aussies to reduce their electricity consumption. </p> <p dir="ltr">Australian Energy Regulator (AER) and Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) have warned retailers not to take advantage of the situation.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Is it legal for businesses to slap on a holiday surcharge?

<p dir="ltr">It’s almost expected that when you walk into a cafe or shop on a public holiday or long weekend there is a sign indicating a certain surcharge on all bills. </p> <p dir="ltr">Have you ever wondered if it's legal? Can shop owners do this on normal weekends? </p> <p dir="ltr">With the cost of living increasing and just recently the minimum wage rising – which will no doubt be passed on immediately to consumers – the last thing anyone wants to be hit with is an unnecessary surcharge. </p> <p dir="ltr">But the surcharge on bills is in fact legal as long – as the customer is aware beforehand. </p> <p dir="ltr">So! That little sign you see at the till of the expected surcharge is your due notice that the extra levy will be in effect. </p> <p dir="ltr">Being open on public holidays and weekends costs business a lot more due to the penalties that apply and it's up to the business on how they want to tackle that extra cost. </p> <p dir="ltr">The surcharge could be placed on the overall bill, or on all items on the menu. Otherwise, the business can just decide to cop the surcharge themselves and not put it on the customer. </p> <p dir="ltr">Regardless, it is always up to the business to decide how much they charge and whether or not prices change, as long as the customer is made aware. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has also made it illegal for businesses to hide those surcharges. </p> <p dir="ltr">"Restaurants, cafes and bistros that charge a surcharge on certain days do not need to provide you a separate menu or price list or have a separate price column with the surcharge included," the watchdog says. </p> <p dir="ltr">"However, the menu must include the words 'a surcharge of [percentage] applies on [the specified day or days]' and these words must be displayed at least as prominently as the most prominent price on the menu."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nine News</em></p>

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The good and bad of what's coming in the new financial year

<p>The  new financial year is almost upon us, meaning a huge string of changes are right around the corner.</p> <p>Kicking off on July the 1st, it’s an important mid-year milestone. From that date onwards, we will see major changes including: new laws and regulations, fees and charges, and taxes and benefits.</p> <p>Here’s what you need to know before July the 1st, 2022.</p> <p><strong>Centrelink shake up</strong></p> <p>A huge Centrelink overhaul is coming, meaning big changes ahead for those on the JobSeeker program.</p> <p>From July 1st, recipients who are required to complete the process of mutual obligations in order to receive welfare payments will be moved onto a points-based activation system (PBAS).</p> <p>Those impacted will have to receive 100 points and do a minimum of five job searches per month to secure payment.</p> <p>There is a list of more than 30 tasks and activities that each carry their own individual points value, with attending a job interview worth 20 points and a completing a job application worth five.</p> <p>The PBAS will replace the current system where jobseekers are required to apply for 20 jobs every month.</p> <p><strong>Power costs to surge</strong></p> <p>Millions of families will see their electricity costs rise next month after the energy industry watchdog jacked up prices by hundreds per year.</p> <p>The Australian Energy Regulator (AER) will pass on hefty increases to the benchmark power price – which means bills will skyrocket by 18.3% in NSW, 12.6% in Queensland and 9.5% in South Australia in July.</p> <p>Comparison site Finder urged Aussies to shop around before July 1st to avoid bill shock.</p> <p>“You have two different types of energy plans on the market: Those that offer fixed rates for a certain period (such as 12 months) or others that have variable rates,” Finder energy expert Mariam Gabaji said.</p> <p>“If you don’t like switching electricity plans often in search of the cheapest variable rates, you’re likely to benefit from a fixed-rate plan instead.”</p> <p><strong>Super changes</strong></p> <p>From July 1st, the percentage rate for the Super Guarantee will increase from 10% to 10.5%, which means employers will need to contribute extra cash into their staff super accounts.</p> <p>Next month, the $450 monthly minimum wage threshold to qualify for employer Super Guarantee contributions will also be scrapped, which means all workers – except under-18s who work less than 30 hours per week – must receive super payments, no matter how little they happen to earn.</p> <p>In July those aged 60 and over will be able to make contributions of up to $300,000 per person or $600,000 per couple into their super account using the so-called “downsizer measure” as long as they are eligible.</p> <p><strong>Major governmental changes</strong></p> <p>In the wake of Labor’s election win, a range of departmental and administrative changes will come into effect.</p> <p>From the 1st of July, a new Department of Employment and Workplace Relations will be created to deliver the government’s workplace relations, jobs, skills and training agenda.</p> <p>A new Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water will also be created, while the Department of Health will be renamed the Department of Health and Aged Care and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications will be renamed the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development, Communications and the Arts.</p> <p>The Department of Finance will gain responsibility for data policy, including the Digital Transformation Agency, as well as deregulation, and the Department of Home Affairs will gain responsibility for natural disaster response and mitigation, including the National Recovery and Resilience Agency.</p> <p>The Attorney-General’s portfolio will also gain responsibility for criminal law enforcement and policy, including the Australian Federal Police.</p> <p><strong>Immigration</strong></p> <p>Short-term Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) subclass 482 visa holders who worked in Australia during the pandemic will have access to a new Australian permanent residency pathway from July 1st.</p> <p>From then, TSS visa holders will be able to apply for permanent residency through the Temporary Residence Transition (TRT) stream of the Subclass 186 Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa.</p> <p>Applicants must have been in Australia between February 1st<br />2020 and December 14th, 2021 for at least one year, as well as meeting all other nomination and visa requirements for the TRT stream of the ENS visa.</p> <p><strong>Free medication</strong></p> <p>From July, the PBS Safety Net threshold for concession card holders will be lowered to $244.80.</p> <p>That means concession card holders will receive their PBS medicines for free when they reach the lowered threshold.</p> <p><strong>Car prices jump</strong></p> <p>Changes to the Luxury Car Tax threshold mean that next month, the threshold for fuel-efficient vehicles will be increased by 6.6% cent to $84,916.</p> <p>For all other vehicles it’s up by 3.9% to $71,849.</p> <p><strong>Childcare Relief</strong></p> <p>Aussie families with more than one child aged five years or younger will receive a higher rate of Child Care Subsidy for second and subsequent children from July 1st.</p> <p>They may also receive backpay from Services Australia for any higher subsidy they were eligible for between March 7th and June 30th this year.</p> <p><strong>Telstra customers squeezed</strong></p> <p>From next month, Telstra’s mobile plan prices will increase in line with the Consumer Price Index.</p> <p>That means the cost of basic and essential plans will rise by $3 per month, while premium plans will jump by $4.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Centrelink changes spark uproar

<p dir="ltr">A change to Centrelink that’s due to start next month has been described as “the Hunger Games crossed with Black Mirror” and has prompted concerns for what could happen for those not capable of meeting the new requirements for welfare payments.</p> <p dir="ltr">From July 1, the current system of mutual obligations, tasks, activities, job searches and interviews a person has to complete to receive their payments will be removed, with the points-based activation system (PBAS) taking its place, per <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/careers/uproar-over-new-pointsbased-system-for-welfare-recipients/news-story/150a60503a14f7a8559c249b5f60d242" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though some are happy to see the mutual obligations system come to an end, there are concerns about the problems the new PBAS - which requires recipients to earn 100 points and do at least five job searches a month - could bring.</p> <p dir="ltr">Welfare recipients can complete any of more than 30 tasks and activities from the system’s list, with each task carrying their own points value.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though programs like PaTH Internship, the National Work Experience Program, and Launch Into Work are worth 25 points - enough to reach 100 points in total - others like full-time Work for the Dole, the Adult Migrant English Program and Skills for Education and Employment are worth just 20 - requiring recipients to take on extra tasks to make up the remaining 20 points.</p> <p dir="ltr">Five points are also earned for every five hours of paid work, 20 are received for attending a job interview, and being part of the Defence Force Reserves can earn recipients 10 points, with relocating for a job being the only task worth the full 100 points.</p> <p dir="ltr">If individuals earn more than their monthly 100 points, up to 50 can be banked for the following month.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, welfare recipients have been warned their payments could be suspended and they could receive a demerit if their points target or job search minimum aren’t met.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Australian Unemployed Workers’ Union (AUWU) said the new system dialled mutual obligations “up to 11” and that it was “the Hunger Games crossed with Black Mirror”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Using technology to ‘gamify’ starvation points (score them or lose your payment) is morally offensive to basic human decency,” the organisation said in a statement.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This is not the design of a human welfare system - this is the design of a digital workhouse set up to brutalise people in desperate economic need and push them out of the system and onto the street.”</p> <p dir="ltr">With concerns raised about some people’s ability and capacity to meet these requirements, the Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) has advised that these requirements could be reduced, the value of some tasks could increase, or additional activities could be created as an “activity bonus” based on personal circumstances.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, there is also confusion about how these changes - and which provider welfare recipients will be reporting to - will play out when it is introduced in less than a month, with the AUWU fearing another “robodebt-style disaster”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The AUWU advocacy team is receiving a large number of reports from members telling su the system has not been properly explained to them,” advocacy coordinator Racquel Araya said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We are trying to get a handle on this system so that we can advise those reaching out, and we still do not have clarity from the department on how exactly the reporting will work, how problems will be handled or resolved and whether Centrelink has the appropriate capacity to deal with the increased call centre inquiry volume.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-167c7d7d-7fff-bb3f-73f5-bb3ceae7f2c2"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Prince William spotted out on the streets selling copies of The Big Issue

<p>Prince William has stunned Londoners by hitting the streets to sell copies of the Big Issue.</p> <p>The future king was spotted near Westminster selling the magazine, which offers homeless and unemployed people the opportunity to earn an income through its sale to the public.</p> <p>Photos of the royal outing were shared on social media by multiple people, including a retired police officer whose family member saw the 39-year-old attempted to sell the mags.</p> <p>“My brother-in-law was in London today and saw a celebrity, so he took a photo at a distance,” Matthew Gardner wrote on LinkedIn.</p> <p>“The celebrity saw the ‘covert surveillance’ effort and crossed the road to investigate further,” Gardner continued.</p> <p>He explained that was when his brother-in-law met the second in line to the British throne.</p> <p>“What an honour to have a private moment with our future king, who was humble and working quietly in the background, helping the most needy,” Gardner continued.</p> <p>“These ‘silent gestures’ often go unrecognised.”</p> <p>In a funny twist, Gardner said William asked his brother-in-law if wanted to buy a magazine, to which he replied “I have no change”.</p> <p>“At this point William produced a mobile card machine… you cannot teach that!</p> <p>“Priceless, or should I say ‘Princely’.”</p> <p>The Duke of Cambridge has been passionate about the plight of homeless people since his late mother Princess Diana took him to meet rough sleepers when he was younger. He is royal patron of initiative the Passage and the Centrepoint homeless charity.</p> <p>William’s charity outing came as the royal family resume their duties after the Queen’s platinum jubilee weekend.</p> <p><em>Image: LinkedIn</em></p>

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Scam alert: Kmart customers targeted in bargain hunting Facebook groups

<p>Kmart customers have been warned about a new scam circulating in bargain hunting Facebook groups.</p> <p>They have been warned to watch for advertisements offering Nintendo Switches for $2.95.</p> <p>The fake Facebook post has been circulating in parents' groups online and has already fooled a number of Aussies into handing their card details over.</p> <p>The post includes a photograph showing a doctored Kmart price tag displaying that the gaming device has been reduced from $379.86 to $2.95.</p> <p>It also claims that the lower price point is due to a contract dispute between Kmart and Nintendo.</p> <p>Not only is this is factually incorrect, but it is one of the first signs something is obviously fake, as it is too-good-to-be-true.</p> <p>“Kmart broke its contract with Nintendo and is giving away a Nintendo Switch game console to every Australian for $2.95,” the caption on the scam post reads.</p> <p>One shopper claimed her friend had lost $700 after falling for the scam, as the fraudsters took her bank details and withdrew money.</p> <p>“BEWARE. Another scam page going around, also there is a Dyson one,” she said.</p> <p>“Do not fall for it. Friend did and has lost around $700. They just keep taking from your bank. Can't stop it unless you email them and threaten with lawyers.”</p> <p>“Unfortunately I was one of those people who thought it was real,” another woman said.</p> <p>Some believe the advertisement is so fake it's the consumers fault that they fell for it in the first place.</p> <p>“Phishing messages are designed to look genuine, and often copy the format used by the organisation the scammer is pretending to represent, including their branding and logo,” ACCC's Scamwatch website said.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Readers Respond: How much did you pay for your first home?

<p dir="ltr">House prices have never been this high and it’s insane to see the cost of living continue to soar.</p> <p dir="ltr">The government has promised to help with the cost of living and to help first home buyers to  enter the property market, but not much has been done in regards to the cost of houses. </p> <p dir="ltr">Despite this, OverSixty warily asked their audience about how much they paid for their first home. </p> <p dir="ltr">Your responses were so shocking it immediately made the millennials in the office burst into tears.</p> <p dir="ltr">Read below to see how much some of you paid for your homes.</p> <p dir="ltr">Cheryl Martin - $38,000 and still here.</p> <p dir="ltr">Maria Michailidis - $14,000 in 1972 for a run down place in inner western suburb of Sydney. Sold for twice the amount five years later. Now worth well over $1 million.</p> <p dir="ltr">Glenda Porter - $14,500 and that was a new house.</p> <p dir="ltr">Leonie Stockdale - We built it ourselves so was a lot cheaper and hard work about $60,000 in 1970.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kris Flynn - For our first home we paid $12,500 and it came with the furniture!! Then six years later we sold it for $30,500.</p> <p dir="ltr">Annette McDonnell - $7,000 back in 1971 in Auckland. Was a 2 bedroom bungalow.</p> <p dir="ltr">Suzanne Stovel - $185,000 in 1993.</p> <p dir="ltr">Christine Whyte - $48,000 way back in 1974.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sandra Thomas - $15,000 back in 1971.</p> <p dir="ltr">Diane McIlvena - $28,000 back in 1974</p> <p dir="ltr">Dianne Robinson - first house Sydney $13,500 in 1970. The second house was in rural NSW 1975 for $2,000. </p> <p dir="ltr">Andrea Barwick - $9,600 in Lenah Valley, Tasmania.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you would like to share the cost of your new home, click <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtys/posts/pfbid0FkwjrSxqNWEWWAyHN9o8YbWpy5SZirCVPdaD9MPoyuzQGSm73pzdWqimAefk5sKil" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Turia Pitt hits back at partner accusing her of sabotage

<p dir="ltr">Turia Pitt has hit back at her <em>Celebrity Apprentice Australia</em> partner who accused her of trying to sabotage him and the competition. </p> <p dir="ltr">The motivational speaker was part of Team Collaborate with Ronnie Caceres who was constantly telling her to “pull her weight in” and saying he would not hire her to work for him.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair were taken to the Boardroom during Sunday night’s where things went to a whole different level. </p> <p dir="ltr">Turia felt that her and Ronnie’s time was up on <em>Celebrity Apprentice Australia</em> when she was accused of trying to get him fired. </p> <p dir="ltr">"To say that I'm trying to sabotage an event is absurd and it's preposterous,” Turia said. </p> <p dir="ltr">"I know in the real world I wouldn't have you working for me because I'd be looking over my back all the time," Ronnie snapped back.</p> <p dir="ltr">This then led to Turia to talk about the exchange between her and Ronnie on her podcast <a href="https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/celebrity-apprentice-and-something-i-want-to-get-off/id1579973740?i=1000565295551" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Turia Pitt is Hard Work</a>. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CeezpighnPw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CeezpighnPw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Turia (@turiapitt)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">"This whole experience has had me reflecting on a lot of big things, right? Like how we conduct ourselves in our workplaces," she said. </p> <p dir="ltr">"It's pretty easy to respect someone. You learn their name, you are kind, you're considered, you're gracious.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If you don't agree with them, you're gracious when you're letting them know that you don't agree with them. All of those really basic, easy ways to show someone you respect them."</p> <p dir="ltr">She then reflected on how people act towards others is a clear indication of lack of respect and that it needs to change. </p> <p dir="ltr">"If you yell at someone, if you berate someone publicly, if you intimidate someone...I think all of those are ways in which you show that you don't respect someone.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Turia went on to discuss how she acts within her own business and how sometimes it does reach the point where you “get bogged down by it all”. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, she said that she tries her best to understand the situation and work together with others to rectify the situation. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I feel like, no matter what happens, no matter how difficult or insurmountable your challenges seem or my challenges seemed at the time, I feel like I was the bigger person and I'm really proud of that."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram/Nine</em></p>

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$3,000 bonus for one group of workers

<p dir="ltr">The NSW government has announced a one-off $3000 payment for health workers to thank them for their ongoing efforts during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p dir="ltr">NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet announced the decision on June 6, adding that the state’s health workforce would see a major boost of over 10,000 staff over the next four years, per <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/3000-cash-bonus-to-one-group-of-workers-for-efforts-during-covid19-pandemic/news-story/2f5b90844a5a495e0eae05881e6b8dec" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I want to pay special tribute to our health workers who over the past two years have done an outstanding job,” Mr Perrottet said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Paramedics and nurses will also be receiving a boost to their annual wage increases, with the wages of all public service workers being lifted from a 2.5 percent to a 3 percent increase this year, followed by a 3.5 percent increase in the next financial year.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-48fdc0b7-7fff-1c2a-c5b8-f9c6cf3944bc"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“That’s up to 6.5 percent pay increases for our public servants over the next two years,” Mr Perrottet said.</p> <p><iframe style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=314&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FHealthServicesUnionNSW%2Fvideos%2F551732946613372%2F&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=560&amp;t=0" width="560" height="429" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p dir="ltr">The increase comes as an addition to natural progression within the public sector and will apply to new industrial agreements made from July 1, 2022.</p> <p dir="ltr">The one-off payment will be available to permanent staff employed by the NSW Health Service, including paramedics, midwives, and cleaners.</p> <p dir="ltr">Between now and 2026, the government will spend $4.5 billion on bringing new doctors, nurses, paramedics and other health staff into the system.</p> <p dir="ltr">The NSW Health Services Union welcomed the influx of staff that has come as a result of ongoing “pressure” placed on the government, which has followed calls from many in the industry for better pay and working conditions.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’ve been fighting nonstop for two years: fighting an international pandemic; fighting for recognition; fighting for what we’re worth,” the organisation wrote on Facebook.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Significant staffing increases will be welcomed by tired HSU members, but we’re not taking the pressure off. We need real pay rises from this government.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c53f3ca8-7fff-3205-a036-3c2b6d6d4996"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: NSW Health Services Union (Facebook)</em></p>

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Covid tests to be tax deductible – with a catch

<p dir="ltr">The end of the financial year is just around the corner and the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) has announced something extra we can claim.</p> <p dir="ltr">Understandably, as Australia tried to get back to normal as possible, some workplaces required their employees to undergo RAT tests - either at their own expense or the company’s. </p> <p dir="ltr">The ATO’s Assistant Commissioner Tim Loh said people who were required to buy RAT tests to ensure they can go to work can claim it on their tax return from July 1.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We know that many have faced significant challenges," he said. </p> <p dir="ltr">A receipt must be provided showing proof of payment for the test, otherwise the ATO will also accept a bank or credit card statement with documentation from employers as evidence. </p> <p dir="ltr">People who were reimbursed by their employer will not be able to claim their tests on tax.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Loh also said that the tax deduction is only acceptable for work-related purposes. </p> <p dir="ltr">“If you purchased a COVID-19 test for a trip with your mates, you can’t claim a deduction.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Other items workers will be able to claim as deductions include protective uniforms. </p> <p dir="ltr">“If you’re spending your working day in close proximity to customers and at risk of contracting COVID-19, you may be able to claim a deduction for protective items such as gloves, face masks, or sanitiser.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The federal COVID-19 disaster payment will not be taxed and does not need to be included in returns.</p> <p dir="ltr">Otherwise, JobSeeker and Pandemic Leave Disaster payments are taxable and do need to be included.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Woman awarded $131,000 after not being invited to work drinks

<p dir="ltr">A waitress has been awarded a whopping $131,000 after not being invited to work drinks. </p> <p dir="ltr">Rita Leher said that she felt “shunned” by her colleagues at a London casino when they didn’t invite her to a cocktail bar.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 51-year-old, who is older than her colleagues and has worked at the casino for 10 years, took stress leave after hearing the plans being discussed in front of her and not receiving an invite. </p> <p dir="ltr">Rita, who also happens to be of African descent, issued a complaint to the employment tribunal on the basis of race and claimed the victimisation was due to her age and ethnicity.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We unanimously agree that being excluded from discussions at work about a social occasion amongst colleagues when one would normally be included would subject an employee to a detriment at work," Employment Judge Sarah Moor said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"A reasonable employee would consider that such exclusion was to their disadvantage because they had lost the opportunity to bond with colleagues on that social occasion.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The occasion was sufficiently linked to work by the fact that it was amongst work colleagues and was discussed at work, and would provide the opportunity for team bonding.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Rita was subsequently awarded £74,113.65 ($131,000) in compensation on the basis of injury to feelings and loss of overtime and financial loss. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Kochie sledged over his salary live on-air

<p>Kochie has jokingly threatened to never have a guest on the breakfast show again after being ‘sledged’ over his salary.</p> <p>The Sunrise co-host was speaking to Carsales Editor-in-Chief Mike Sinclair on Thursday morning when the funny moment went down.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">The <a href="https://twitter.com/kiaaustralia?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@KiaAustralia</a> Sportage has been named 2022's best mid-size SUV by <a href="https://twitter.com/carsales?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@carsales</a> 🚙 <a href="https://t.co/h4gKr09Av3">pic.twitter.com/h4gKr09Av3</a></p> <p>— Sunrise (@sunriseon7) <a href="https://twitter.com/sunriseon7/status/1529613494395584513?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 26, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>Sinclair were showcasing a Kia Sportage after the vehicle was named the car website’s best mid-size SUV for 2022, when he took a crack at the well paid tv presenter.</p> <p>“What are they asking for it?,” Kochie asked, before receiving the eyebrow-raising response.</p> <p>“The Sportage range starts just under $40,000 and this one, which is the top of the range called the GT Line, this one is I think about $53,000.</p> <p>“So Kochie, I think somebody of your abilities, with your inflated pay packet, I’m sure you could afford it,” he teased.</p> <p>The stunned Sunrise star responded by firing back: “Oh, OK mate. I prefer the MG actually, that’s way better value.”</p> <p>‘What? He was sledging me, so I’m going to sledge him back,” he told colleagues Natalie Barr and Mark Beretta as they burst into laughter.</p> <p><em>Images: Sunrise</em></p>

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Man accused of stealing $16,000 from wedding functions

<p dir="ltr">A man has been accused of allegedly gatecrashing eight weddings and stealing a total of $16,000 and other gifts. </p> <p dir="ltr">The 24-year-old Melbourne man pretended to be a wedding guest at eight events from between April 2 and May 22.</p> <p dir="ltr">He allegedly stole $16,000 cash, jewellery and gift cards from at least three of the events.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bride Kellee Pace said she felt violated when she found out that the man had allegedly stolen some of her and her husband’s gifts and even wrote in their guest book.</p> <p dir="ltr">"It was the best wedding he'd apparently ever attended and he was feeling awesome and lucky on the night, three quarters of our wishing well was missing," she told Nine News.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We definitely felt really violated, we were mingling with people and he was downstairs drinking in the bar and we had no idea he was even there."</p> <p dir="ltr">The wedding industry shared his photo around before he was spotted at a Macedonian wedding by wedding planner Jasmine Arapovic.</p> <p dir="ltr">"My dad then put him in a bit of a headlock to make sure he didn't try and escape before I could have a chat with the venue manager to get them to put him in a room."</p> <p dir="ltr">Police arrested the man and he was slapped with 27 charges, including aggravated burglary, burglary, theft and going equipped to steal.</p> <p dir="ltr">Police will allege they found jewellery and gift cards when they searched a property on Tuesday.</p> <p dir="ltr">He has been granted bail and will appear before Melbourne Magistrates' Court on October 18.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Nine News</em></p>

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Sean Connery's personal James Bond Aston Martin on sale for first time ever

<p>A piece of Hollywood history has gone up for sale, with car enthusiasts everywhere dying to get their hands on it. </p> <p>Sean Connery's personal 1964 Aston Martin DB5 is being offered for sale through <a href="https://www.broadarrowauctions.com/vehicles/009/1964-aston-martin-db5" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Broad Arrow Auctions</a>, with the iconic vehicle expected to fetch between $US1.4 million and $1.8 million ($AU1.9-2.5m).</p> <p>The car boasts a Snow Shadow Grey colour, as per it's appearance in the Bond movie <em>Goldfinger</em>, over a show-stopping red leather interior.</p> <p>The vehicle was delivered brand new to its original owner in the UK in 1964, where it remained until Connery bought it in 2018 and relocated it to his property in Switzerland. </p> <p>It is worth noting that the car was originally black, and Connery had it painted to match his famous on-screen co-star.</p> <p>The Snow Shadow Grey colour was limited to the prototype DB5 used in the James Bond films, and was replaced by Silver Birch as the 'factory' DB5 colour.</p> <p>The car is on sale for the first time, with the lucky owner also receiving driving training from Formula One World Champion Jackie Stewart.</p> <p>Many of the proceeds from the sale benefitting the Sean Connery Philanthropy Fund, a charity supporting young people of Scotland.</p> <p>The auction for the car will take place on August 17th 2022. </p> <p><em>Image credits: drive.com</em></p>

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