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What to expect at Kmart’s Black Friday sale

<p>Kmart is bringing back Black Friday for the second year running - and there’s one item in particular that shoppers are dying to get their hands on.</p> <p>The discount department store will be launching Bright Friday - its version of Black Friday - from this Friday, with a select range of heavily discounted or limited edition items hitting shelves.</p> <p>Kmart is bringing back its extremely popular egg-shaped chair, with similar versions of the chair selling out almost instantly in the past.</p> <p>This year’s Bright Friday $199 version features cream cushions and rattan in a chic brown finish, making it perfect for both outdoor and indoor living spaces.</p> <p>Posts about the chair have started to pop up in different Kmart Facebook groups, with shoppers saying their “backyard needs this”.</p> <p>“Need this in my life,” one person commented, while another person said they would be getting it as a “Xmas present to myself”.</p> <p>But others have warned that the chair will most likely sell out “super fast” like other Kmart Bright Friday deals.</p> <p>Others were excited about Kmart’s other Bright Friday deals, which include a SodaKING maker slashed from $69.95 to $27, a Hollywood light mirror for $69, and a $49 sewing machine.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7FZ9ZHFY4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7FZ9ZHFY4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Anna | Melbourne Mum (@homeiswhereabargainis)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“This could be dangerous,” one person wrote on Facebook, while another joked: “I think I just wet my pants of excitement, I can’t wait!!!!!!”</p> <p>But some said they were “not even gonna try (to) go” claiming their local Kmart probably wouldn’t have stock.</p> <p>Kmart is urging customers to try shopping online with shoppers also being able to book a shopping slot during busy times to avoid queuing.</p> <p>Stores in NSW and Victoria will have extended trading hours, as well as mobile check-outs to help customers pay for their items faster.</p> <p>Kmart’s general merchandise general manager Callum Smith said that when it comes to Bright Friday, “once they are gone, they’re gone”.</p> <p>“Black Friday was incredibly popular and well received by our loyal customers last year. As a team, we had some learnings from the event and understanding of the types of products our customers love. We can’t wait for our customers to see what’s on offer this year,” he said.</p> <p>“Some of last year’s much-loved favourites have returned with a new twist as well as completely new lines never seen before.”</p>

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This $1 coin could get you thousands of dollars in return

<p>Australians could be hanging on to a $1 that could be worth thousands of dollars, and not even know it!</p> <p>A mother in Melbourne has posted on the Facebook group <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/melbournewithkidz/posts/3364153870285984" target="_blank" title="">Melbourne with Kidz </a>that she found a “mule” dollar coin from the year 2000.</p> <p>These coins were produced due to a technical error by the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/RoyalAustralianMint/" target="_blank" title="www.facebook.com">Australian Mint </a>in Canberra twenty years ago.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838803/sam-armytage-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8d47c8539c5a4a4793cb1713be19d0e3" /></p> <p>Mule dollars are slightly thicker than a regular $1 coin in appearance and also have a double rum around the Queen’s head.</p> <p>“It’s a small number of the year 2000 $1 coins that had been minted using the incorrect obverse die (heads side) and released into circulation by mistake and only discovered a year or two later,” the mum wrote after doing some research.</p> <p>“With just a 1.4 millimetre difference in diameter between the 10 cent and $1 coin, you can clearly see a double rim circle going around the edges of the coin.”</p> <p>The<span> </span>Daily Mail<span> </span>reported that there are just 6000 coins that were minted incorrectly.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838804/sam-armytage-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3b10ff7bf936450f8ce57b5b74502c87" /></p> <p>A few of these coins have been placed on eBay at a value ranging from $700 to $5000.</p> <p>“Check your change and empty out the kids piggy bank! You could be sitting on a winner,” the mum said.</p>

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Kevin Rudd caught up in Epstein donation scandal

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has been forced to address revelations that his think tank received $US650,000 in donations from sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.</p> <p>Epstein donated to the INternational Peace Institution, where Rudd is the chairman.</p> <p>Rudd has said he was "blindsided" by the information and also said that the "revelations were deeply disturbing".</p> <p>He has also convened a special meeting of the organisation's board to "ensure an equivalent sum was donated to sex assault victims".</p> <p>However, Rudd has insisted he had no dealings with Epstein.</p> <p>“I have no recollection whatsoever of ever meeting Epstein,” he said</p> <p>“I first learned of contributions from Epstein’s foundations to the IPI in November 2019 through reporting by the Norwegian press.”</p> <p>“Subsequent searches by IPI staff, made at the request of the Board, have identified donations totalling $650,000 that were received between October 2011 and May 2019.”</p> <p>“The source of these donations had not previously been disclosed to the board, nor to me as chair.”</p> <p>The story was broken by Norweigian business paper <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dn.no/politikk/jeffrey-epstein/kevin-rudd/international-peace-institute/think-tank-board-chair-kevin-rudd-breaks-silence-on-jeffrey-epstein-connections-i-am-deeply-disappointed/2-1-901840" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>DN</em></a>, who also revealed that the International Peace Insitute President, Norwegian diplomat Terj Rod-Larsen had a personal loan with Epstein to the sum of $US130,000.</p> <p>Rudd confirmed he was not aware of the loan and that “any significant engagement with someone as odious as Epstein must be taken ­seriously and investigated thoroughly.”</p> <p>The former PM added that he was “deeply disappointed that the board has had to learn about so much of this through the media.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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ALDI brings back popular Christmas-themed Special Buy

<p>Many are looking for the light at the end of the tunnel to an interesting year, and for some, that involves getting excited about an ALDI Special Buy.</p> <p>The discount supermarket chain has made sure that it's selling the $99 pre-lit Christmas Tree that has consistently sold out in previous years.</p> <p>The tree is 2.13 metres tall and has lights already attached, making it a bargain.</p> <p><img id="__mcenew" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838483/aldi-hero.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/dc2ed5ec068f49bf99bc4ec31fc7d62c" /></p> <p>The tree is set to hit stores on November 4th, but eager shoppers are already warning others that it'll sell out quickly.</p> <p>“I bought one 3 years ago and it is so so good. Better than my $400 one from David Jones that I had previously!” one person wrote in the Aldi Fans Australia Facebook group.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Others praised the tree’s quick set-up.</p> <p>“I’ve had it for 3 years and love it,” one person wrote. “It’s just a couple of pieces that link together, then you fold down the branches. There are so many branches that it actually looks decent even if you can’t be bothered unfolding / fluffing up the smaller branches.”</p> <p>Some shoppers are a fan of the light's colour changes, as you can change it from white, to multi-coloured or a mixture of both.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/home/aldi-special-buys-brings-back-popular-99-prelit-christmas-tree/news-story/558e9d6d70e1bba33d53bb3187eda42f" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">news.com.au</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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AusPost offers bizarre excuses for CEO's overspending

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Australia Post CEO Christine Holgate and her personal office have spent a shocking $275,000 on corporate credit cards since her appointment. There are now demands for a line-by-line disclosure on the spending from Parliament.</p> <p>The spending, which the bulk of it is "organisational spending" could be the key to Holgate holding onto her role of CEO, regardless of whether or not the spending was legitimate under Australia Post policies.</p> <p>Insiders say that the terms of inquiry were established with references to her "personal expenses" that "sets up" Holgate and asks that a judgement be made over Aus Post executives adhering to "high standards regarding the expenditure of money".</p> <p>Holgate has a personal corporate credit card for her own use that racked up a surprisingly low $88,100 since she was appointed to her role as CEO three years ago.</p> <p>However, it's the second relatively new card that's been used for $287,000 in this financial year alone that has caught the attention of the Labor government.</p> <p>Australia Post has offered odd excuses as to why a line-by-line breakdown of spending can't be provided, including the former "work from home" requirements in Melbourne.</p> <p>“Australia Post’s Melbourne Headquarters have been closed for several months, due to the COVID-19 lockdown in metropolitan Melbourne. As a result, Melbourne office staff have been working remotely and access to some records has been restricted,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>Labor Senator Kimberley Kitching told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/leaders/australia-posts-bizarre-excuse-for-refusing-to-disclose-corporate-credit-card-spending/news-story/bae8362ceba28161aece0718f4cfe06a" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a> that Australia Post’s explanation as to why it won’t provide an itemised list of spending does not make sense.</p> <p>“They should furnish the Senate with the credit card statements which I had already requested, but I was told that they couldn’t provide those statements because employees were working from home,’’ Senator Kitching said.</p> <p>After the previous chairman of Australia Post, John Stanhope, left the organisation in 2019, the "Office of teh CEO" took responsibility for any previous charges and the card that racked up the $287,000 bill was used to purchase flowers, catering, car hire as well as being used for travel expenses.</p> <p>“The Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director has not been issued with a travel charge card,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>“However, there is one credit card in the name of the ‘Office of the CEO’ used to pay for various organisational expenditure, including travel expenses. Organisational expenditure paid with this credit card totalled $287,063.44 for the 2019/20 financial year.</p> <p>“The credit card was used for a wide range of organisational expenditure, including in relation to the Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director, the Board Chair, the Executive Team, the Office of the CEO, and the Extended Leadership Team.”</p> <p>So far, Australia Post is refusing to provide a breakdown of expenses, saying it would involve an "unreasonable diversion of resources".</p> <p>“There is one credit card in the name of the Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>“An itemised breakdown of the charges over this period (almost three years) would involve an unreasonable diversion of resources.”</p> <p>A report will be provided to the Morrison Government within four weeks of the investigation commencing.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Cash handout: Thousands of Aussies urged to check eligibility for $500 boost

<p>Tens of thousands of Australians may not be aware they are eligible for an extra $500 from the federal government.<br /><br /><span>The new plan offers handouts for aged and disability pensioners, veterans, people on carer payments and family tax benefit recipients as part of the 2020-21 budget.</span><br /><br /><span>Commonwealth Seniors Health Card (CSHC) and pensioner concession cardholders will also be eligible for the cash.</span><br /><br /><span>Recipients will receive a $250 cash boost in December and another $250 in March 2021.</span><br /><br /><span>National Seniors Australia has urged self-funded retirees to check their eligibility too.</span><br /><br /><span>The group believe thousands of older Australians who are self-funded retirees may go without the cash boost, as they may be under the impression they don’t qualify for the CSHC.</span><br /><br /><span>Changes to deeming rates used as part of the CSHC income test has improved eligibility for the card.</span><br /><br /><span>This means there is also improved eligibility for budget stimulus payments.</span><br /><br /><span>To qualify for the CSHC, an individual must have reached the pension age, meet an income test, not be receiving any payments from Veterans Affairs and be an Australian resident living in the country.</span><br /><br /><span>To meet the income test, individuals or couples must earn below the following thresholds:</span></p> <ul> <li><span><span>$55,808 for singles</span></span></li> <li><span><span>$89,290 for couples</span></span></li> <li><span><span>$111,616 for couples who are separated by illness, respite care or prison.</span></span><span><span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span>“Self-funded retirees who are among the hardest hit by the COVID Financial Crisis (CFC) could really do with some extra cash in their pockets going into Christmas,” National Seniors Chief Advocate Ian Henschke said.</span><br /><br /><span>Australians have until November 27 to be eligible and receive the first $250 payment.</span><br /><br /><span>Those eligible are strongly advised to make sure their details are up to date on MyGov before the payments start flowing through.</span></span></p>

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Hugh Jackman scores big as iconic brand comes home to Australia

<p>Hugh Jackman is set to pocket a whopping $10 million after mining magnate Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest has purchased the iconic Australian bootmaker RM Williams.</p> <p>Dr Forrest's investment fund Tattarang has bought 100 per cent of the company, and it includes Jackman’s five per cent ownership as a minority shareholders.</p> <p>It is reported that the sale price was less than half the original asking price for $190 million.</p> <p>RM Williams had been up for sale for almost 18 months after its Louis Vuitton owned parent company, L Catteron, began seeking buyers.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838322/rm-williams.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/70076b780deb4555a34dc86144ebddc4" /></p> <p><em>Andrew Tiggy Forrest and wife Nicola Forrest.</em></p> <p>The Western Australian-based mining magnate said he is proud and humbled to be taking the iconic brand back in Australian hands.  </p> <p>“R.M. Williams is a quintessential Aussie brand with a long and proud history of high-quality Australian craftsmanship,” Dr Forrest said in a statement.</p> <p>“By bringing R.M. Williams back into Australian hands, we will ensure the Australian craftmanship continues to be loved and worn all around the world.</p> <p>“I've never forgotten the first time I pulled on a pair of RMs. To wear RMs is to wear the boots of the countless hard-working Australians that have come before us.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838320/hugh-jackman-rm-williams.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4a9d5e496eaf4498b9b1d4e016134513" /></p> <p>His wife Nicola Forrest added “Andrew and I want to continue the legacy of this great company, and that means continuing to employ and support the Australians that have built and grown the brand.”</p> <p>RM Williams chief executive Raju Vuppalapati said he hoped the business would grow under Dr Forrest's ownership.</p> <p>“The RM Williams team and I look forward to Andrew and Nicola's stewardship as we enter the next exciting phase of surprising and delighting our consumers with hand-crafted products made in Australia,” he said.   </p> <p>RM Williams was founded in Adelaide in 1932 by bushman and entrepreneur Reginald Murray 'RM' Williams.</p> <p>The iconic boots are a popular item both locally and overseas, and the brand has stores in New York, London, New Zealand, and Scandinavia.</p> <p>Jackman will remain involved with RM Williams as an ambassador.</p>

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Virtually unknown ALDI checkout rule confounds shoppers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Many shoppers at ALDI are confused about a virtually unknown rule that was shared on Facebook.</p> <p>Over the last week, several shoppers have shared their confusion over ALDI's refusal to allow shoppers to purchase alcohol if they have a minor with them.</p> <p>ALDI policy states that a customer can be denied the sale of alcohol if a child under the age of 18 is accompanying them or if a minor has handled alcohol they intend to buy.</p> <p>One shopper was unaware of the rule and claimed he was stopped from purchasing Vodka Cruisers for his wife as he had his teenage daughters with him.</p> <p>Another shopper said the same thing happened to her, as she was refused service after her 18-month-old toddler touched a bottle at the checkout.</p> <p>“I did and had my 18-month-old daughter with me,” said the shopper.</p> <p>“I was holding her on my hip and she leant over and touched the alcohol on the conveyer while I was loading other groceries on.”</p> <p>Another claimed she was denied service in the presence of her underage son.</p> <p>“I was refused because I was buying a carton and had my son carry it because I have a bad back,” the shopper said.</p> <p>The German supermarket has confirmed with <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/food/the-little-known-aldi-checkout-rule-that-has-many-scratching-their-heads-c-1390041" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>7News</em></a> that the policy of the supermarket is in line with Australian laws.</p> <p>“As a responsible retailer, ALDI Australia supports and adheres to all regulations for the purchase of alcohol including Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA),” said an ALDI Australia spokesperson.</p> <p>“Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998, it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 and for a person under the age of 18 to purchase or receive alcohol.</p> <p>“The sale of alcohol can be refused if a minor has handled alcohol that could be potentially purchased by an adult for the minor’s consumption.</p> <p>“This also extends to a minor accompanying an adult purchasing alcohol, even if the minor has not physically touched an alcoholic product.</p> <p>“It is the store’s responsibility to refuse any customer who presents a risk and ultimately it is at the discretion of the person serving alcohol to decline the sale should they have any doubts or concerns.</p> <p>“There are severe consequences for breaching laws and policies set in place by the Australian government involving the sale of alcohol.</p> <p>“As such, ALDI faces heavy penalties should we sell alcohol to any customer who supplied to a person under the age of 18.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Scott Morrison ignores Anthony Albanese's budget reply speech

<div class="body_text "> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison and other Coalition MPs have been slammed by high-profile Australians for disrespecting Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese during his budget reply speech.</p> <p>Albanese delivered his reply to the budget on Thursday night and outlined a range of ALP policies, including childcare reform.</p> <p>Almost immediately after Albanese began talking, attention shifted to the behaviour of his rivals as screenshots were shared on social media of politicians ignoring the Labor leader as he spoke.</p> <p>Morrison, for example, turned away from Albanese and fiddled with his phone as well as closed his eyes during the speech.</p> <p>Well-known Australian barrister Julian Burnside said that the Prime Minister's behaviour was a “disgrace”.</p> <p>Journalist Troy Bramston also called out the behaviour, sharing a photo which showed that the “only government MP looking at Albanese is Frydenberg”, while author, presenter and political commentator Jamila Rizvi said “Frydenberg is all eyes and ears on Albo but most of the frontbench (including the PM) are on their phones.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Politics aside, with big speeches like the budget and budget reply, I like seeing politicians listen to each other. Basic old fashioned principles of respect. Frydenberg is all eyes and ears on Albo but most of the frontbench (including the PM) are on their phones. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/budgetreply?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#budgetreply</a></p> — Jamila Rizvi (@JamilaRizvi) <a href="https://twitter.com/JamilaRizvi/status/1314128631262662656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Ordinary Aussies were quick to point out that it was "just plain rude".</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">These people have <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/no?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#no</a> respect for our democracy and are just plain rude. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/slobbyfromarketing?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#slobbyfromarketing</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/budgetreply?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#budgetreply</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a> <a href="https://t.co/IrqIhqEosV">pic.twitter.com/IrqIhqEosV</a></p> — Joe2 (@eatatjoe2) <a href="https://twitter.com/eatatjoe2/status/1314132734034374656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Am I wrong but I believe I saw our PM turned away from the budget in reply speech absorbed on his phone? If so I am disgusted at the lack of respect to our parliamentary process. Regardless of ideology or partisanship that was offensive and diminished our democracy. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a></p> — Lesley Howard (@adropex) <a href="https://twitter.com/adropex/status/1314130977841586177?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> </div>

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Unhappy customer slams Coles over Click and Collect

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A shopper in Canberra has been left furious over Coles Click and Collect during the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>She explained her situation on the supermarket's Facebook group, saying that previously she has been able to not have plastic bags included with her online shop.</p> <p>However, as coronavirus has taken over the globe, that option has been removed.</p> <p>She has questioned why she could not refuse the bags, especially with coronavirus cases at an all-time-low in NSW and the ACT.</p> <p>“I’ve been using your Click and Collect service in Canberra, and ALWAYS say no to the plastic bags,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Since Covid kicked off, however, I haven’t been given the option to say no to the bags. Given things are getting back to normal in the ACT, are you going to give us back the option to refuse the bags? I now have a pile of bags that I’ve paid for but never wanted in the first place.</p> <p>“I’m trying to reduce my plastic usage, not increase it.”</p> <p>Others were quick to say they think it's wasteful, saying that they have "kilos" of the bags.</p> <p>“I have kilos of them. To the point where I now have no option but to throw them out,” the customer commented.</p> <p>“What a waste of money."</p> <p>This isn't the first time Coles has had scandal over its use of plastic in online orders, with a woman in Melbourne complaining that one or two items were put in each bag.</p> <p>“It would be nice if there was a cardboard box option for delivery from Coles, even if it costs more they decompose and can be put in household recycling,” the woman said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Total fines revealed Victorian lockdown eases

<p><span>Melbourne’s tough lockdown curfew may have been lifted, but not before 2800 people were fined for breaching the rules.</span><br /><br /><span>At $1652 each, police have managed to hand out infringements that add up to a whopping $4.6 million.</span><br /><br /><span>Anyone who was caught out after 8 or 9 pm and before 5 am throughout the eight-week curfew was handed a fine.</span><br /><br /><span>One of the last of at least 2801 Melbournians caught breaking the curfew was a man who was intercepted in the early hours of Saturday morning on the Mornington Peninsula.</span><br /><br /><span>He claimed he was out looking for his phone which he had dropped earlier.</span><br /><br /><span>As the legality of the strict measures is being challenged in the state’s Supreme Court, Daniel Andrew says that the curfew played a vital role in limiting movement and driving down COVID-19 numbers.</span><br /><br /><span>“This strategy only works if we limit movement (and) if we want our police to be spending all their time having to move people on from Maccas car parks, where there are pop-up social gatherings that are not lawful – I’m going to have police wasting their time doing that,” Mr Andrews said on September 11.</span><br /><br /><span>“It is working. And if you don’t limit movement, you won’t limit the number of cases.”</span><br /><br /><span>Victoria Police Deputy Commissioner Rick Nugent also said last week that the curfew was reducing movement across the city and making criminals easier to identify.</span><br /><br /><span>One man was caught riding his bike in Dandenong, his explanation for police being that he had “fallen asleep” at a mate’s house.</span><br /><br /><span>Another pair received an infringement notice after they were caught in a ride share car at 4 am in Melton.</span><br /><br /><span>They claimed to be on their way to visit family.</span><br /><br /><span>Another man told police he had driven almost 50km from Dandenong to Moonee Ponds during curfew hours to buy a coffee.</span><br /><br /><span>Police said that many of the people who were caught out in public during curfew hours had left home to buy food and cigarettes from convenience stores.</span></p>

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3.5 million Aussies to get $300 pay cuts

<p>3.5 million Australians will lose $300 from their government funded $1,500 Job Keeper pay check from September 28.</p> <p>The new scheme was legislated earlier this month.</p> <p>As of now, Aussies receiving JobKeeper are eligible for $1,500 per fortnight.</p> <p>However, 28 September, those who are working more than 20 hours per week will receive $1,200 per fortnight.</p> <p>This is around 80 per cent of the minimum wage and is called Extension 1. </p> <p>The new system is two-tiered and those who work less than 20 hours per week will receive $750 per fortnight.</p> <p>"We are now extending and transitioning," Prime Minister Scott Morrison said.</p> <p>"Transitioning and looking to a day when Australian communities don't need JobKeeper and when Australians can then run their businesses and hold their jobs sustained by a vibrant and growing economy instead."</p> <p>The first extension period runs until 4 January, and Extension 2 will kick in from that date and last until 28 March 2021.</p> <p>This scheme will see those working more than 20 hours per week eligible for $1,000 per fortnight, and those working less than 20 hours per week eligible for $650 per fortnight.</p> <p>To be eligible for Extension 1, businesses will need to show that their actual GST turnover declined 30, 50 or 15 per cent (depending on the size of your business) in the September 2020 quarter compared to September 2019.</p> <p>Businesses will also need to have satisfied the original decline in turnover test unless they are enrolling in JobKeeper for the first time. </p> <p>To meet the criteria for Extension 2, businesses will need to show their actual GST turnover declined 30, 50 or 15 per cent (depending on the size of your business) in the quarter ending 31 December 2020.</p>

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Death tax: Seniors may be asked to sell family home

<p><span>Baby Boomers may be asked to sell their family property when they die in order to pay for aged care costs they accrued while living under a new plan for an effect on death tax on seniors to fund their care.</span><br /><br /><span>Former Treasurer Peter Costello has urged the Morrison Government to consider an expanded pensioner loans scheme while at the Royal Commission into Aged Care.</span><br /><br /><span>This new proposal would give seniors the option to sell their family home when they die or have other assets liquidated.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Costello has called for debate on expanding a pension loans scheme to use the family home as an asset.</span><br /><br /><span>Under this plan, the retiree’s home could be sold once they die to pay off any debts or costs.</span><br /><br /><span>“I mean, financial products that can allow people to raise accommodation bonds against the family home, which is generally their greatest asset, I think there’s a much more scope for them and I think the Government could assist there,” Mr Costello said.</span><br /><br /><span>“The Government has a thing called the Pension Loan Scheme which it says is available. The private sector has what is called a reversible mortgage or equity drawdown mortgages.</span><br /><br /><span>“But I do think, you know, this is a classic area where those people that do use residential care and do have assets should be asked to make a contribution and guaranteed a return of their deaths.”</span><br /><br /><span>However Mr Costello has stressed that informed consent was the key to the proposal.</span><br /><br /><span>He said that family members would have to understand the cost would ultimately come out of the estate.</span><br /><br /><span>“Even today, if you’re asked to put up an accommodation bond, you can raise that bond with your own house as security,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I mean, the point I’d make is that I think people should do it knowingly and in advance and there should be products that allow them to do that during their lifetime. If you come around and try to take their assets after they’ve died, I think you can expect to run into a lot of opposition there.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Costello pushed debate on the option as an extension of reforms he introduced during the Howard Government.</span><br /><br /><span>“I felt you were never going to be able to run residential aged care with the ageing of the population off the taxpayer alone and you had to get private money and we introduced what we then called accommodation bonds,” Mr Costello said.</span><br /><br /><span>The longest-serving treasurer did admit that the red tape and forms around aged care were extremely complex - too complex for even him.</span><br /><br /><span>“Now, the members of my family I have attempted to fill in these income and assets tests. You all ought to do them,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m reasonably financially literate. I had a lot of trouble filling it in. I don’t know how a person going into a nursing home would ever be able to fill it in.</span><br /><br /><span>“We’re talking about people who might be 80 or 90 years of age. How do they do this? My suspicion is that a lot of them just don’t.”</span><br /><br /><span>Former Treasury secretary Ken Henry told the inquiry he believes that a compulsory tax levy to fund aged care is necessary.</span><br /><br /><span>However he did echo the same concern and Costello had about the complexity of the system.</span><br /><br /><span>“My principal source of discomfort is that the system overall is horribly complex and it contains a very high level of uncertainty for people,” Dr Henry said.</span><br /><br /><span>“People who are elderly, people who are vulnerable, people who are suffering emotional and psychological stress, many, of course, unfortunately are mentally impaired to some extent, too many have little or inadequate family support and they confront the aged care system knowing nothing about it, knowing that they have no real option but to throw themselves into the system because it’s quite simply impossible for them to continue to look after themselves.</span><br /><br /><span>“And they’re bewildered. This system is unsustainable. It’s underfunded, it’s under resourced and it will not be tolerated. In particular, it will not be tolerated by the Baby Boomers themselves when they find themselves in this system.”</span></p>

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"They make you question yourself": Senior loses life savings in elaborate police scam

<p>Ann Miles had no idea what she would be getting herself into when she answered a call from what appeared to be the St George Bank fraud team.</p> <p>She was alarmed when the person told her over the phone that she had been scammed and although she was initially hesitant of their legitimacy, she ended up believing them after they gave her a number to call back on.</p> <p>“And the girl said to me 'St George bank fraud section can I help you?' It was how a business should operate,” she told A Current Affair.</p> <p>The scammer went on to convince Ms Miles that they needed her to play a role in an AFP operation that would catch a network of scam artists.</p> <p>"I love to help people, I'd do anything for anybody – and I thought, wow, to be able to help the AFP to bust up a scamming ring would be fantastic," Ms Miles explained.</p> <p>The scammer informed Ms Miles that she was involved in a highly confidential situation and that the details needed to remain top secret.</p> <p>Over the course of two weeks, he instructed her to attend St George branches and withdraw significant amounts of money from her account.</p> <p>The scammer then told Ms Miles that she had to drive to a bank and deposit the money into the account number they gave her.</p> <p>Each time, she was assured the deposits were catching thieves and con artists.</p> <p>All in all, Ms Miles was scammed out of $36,000 and she believed she was helping federal police the entire time.</p> <p>Ms Miles was devastated when she realised her mistake.</p> <p>“I just went to water, I just lost it then,” she said.</p> <p>Nick Savvides, Chief Technology Officer for APAC at Forcepoint told <em>A Current Affair</em>: "No bank is going to call you and ask you to be a part of a police sting.</p> <p>"They're not going to ask you to put your own money at stake, your own safety at stake and to help them catch a criminal."</p> <p>Mr Savvides says scammers have adapted their methods of scamming their victims, and one way is by encouraging people to take out their own money at atm’s and banks so no red flags are raised.</p> <p>"If you turn up to the bank and say I want $5000 of my own money and you have the right documents and identification verifications with you, they're going to give it to you,” he said.</p> <p>“It's your money after all."</p> <p>Mr Savvides has urged consumers to protect themselves by turning on two-factor authentication, signing up for SMS alerts, having a unique and complex password, hanging up on people who claim to be the bank and instead call them back on their website’s number or off the back of your card.</p> <p>"Don't call them from the details that are in that communications because the scammers controls those," Mr Savvides said.</p> <p>"Scammers understand human psychology. They know which buttons to push.</p> <p>"They create a sense of urgency and they make you question yourself, so you don't question them."</p>

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ALDI releases surprising comparison on cleaning buys

<p>ALDI has compared the prices of eight of its cleaning products to rival brands, with some surprising results.</p> <p>The supermarket giant featured its findings on the laundry, kitchen and bathroom buys in its latest catalogue.</p> <p>In it, the ad says shoppers will save over $40 - or 59 per cent - when purchasing similar products from ALDI.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 378.0918727915194px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837873/screen-shot-2020-09-15-at-120243-pm.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c299a2150e714d1882cfba8d2cfcd5d0" /></p> <p>The feature states the eight cleaning products will cost $27.52 at ALDI.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the same amount of items from “other supermarkets” will cost $67.70.</p> <p>The price comparison was conducted in late August.</p> <p>“[The comparison was] based on prices available from 10 stores in two major supermarket chains in the New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia regions on August 26, 2020,” wrote ALDI in the fine print.</p> <p>“The cheapest competitive price has been used for ‘other supermarkets’.”</p> <p>Included in ALDI’s haul were three Di San laundry items, which has attracted a cult following in the last few years.</p> <p>ALDI also included the Force Bathroom Cleaner, Force Mould Away, Force Anti Ban disinfectant spray, Force Protect ’N’ Clean disinfectant and Trimat Advanced laundry liquid in the comparison.</p> <p>But the results had some cleaning aficionados divided.</p> <p>While some said ALDI products were great value for money, others said they preferred the more well-known brands.</p> <p>“I’ve never bought the ALDI products a second time,” said one on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/mumswhoclean" target="_blank">Mums Who Clean</a> group.</p> <p>“They may be comparable but they aren’t as good. I haven’t tried the Glen 20 or disinfectant.”</p> <p>But another disagreed, saying: “I have used both branded and ALDI products. I have happily changed over to ALDI!</p> <p>“I don’t miss the branded ones at all and it’s better for my pocket!”</p>

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Coles VS Woolies VS ALDI: Who wins the supermarket price war?

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The pandemic has meant that people are looking for savings where they can, including their grocery shopping.</p> <p>One of the best places to save some extra cash is the supermarket, and consumer group <em>CHOICE</em> has confirmed whether Coles, Woolworths or ALDI offer the best prices with a survey of 152 products.</p> <p><em>CHOICE</em> found that ALDI was on average 20 per cent cheaper than Coles or Woolworths.</p> <p>“We were surprised that there was such a discrepancy,” says Margaret Rafferty, managing editor of CHOICE.</p> <p>“I think in some products you could save up to 50 per cent more by shopping at Aldi.”</p> <p>15 items were at least 35 per cent cheaper.</p> <p>ALDI was thrilled with the news.</p> <p>“From somebody as credible as CHOICE, it’s a great reassurance to us and our customers that we’ve got the best price,” said Andrian Christie, Aldi’s customer interactions director.</p> <p>ALDI also took out the most categories in <em>CHOICE's</em> home brand comparison last month, taking top spot for best tomato sauce and best tea.</p> <p>However, if you don't have an ALDI nearby, you can still save money at Coles or Woolworths.</p> <p>“There were a few (items) where Coles and Woolies were cheaper. It wasn’t universal,” Rafferty said.</p> <p>For example, sweet treat Clinkers cost $1.74 per 100g at ALDI but only $1.67 at Coles and Woolworths.</p> <p>The best advice to follow is to look at the cost per amount.</p> <p>“Just look at the unit pricing. Compare that and that will tell you if you’re getting the best price,” says Christie.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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"Fair" solution to ALDI Specials Buys problem

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The chaos of the weekly Special Buys deals by ALDI are well-known by frequent shoppers as they try and get their hands on a bargain.</p> <p>With reports of pushing and shoving in aisles as well as people buying special buys in bulk before others can get their hands on them, a mum was shocked to see a "fair" system implemented at her local store.</p> <p>She praised the solution to ALDI's biggest problem.</p> <p>“I was very impressed with ALDI Seven Hills this morning. I arrived at 7:50 am to find approximately 25 people in front of me,” the NSW woman wrote in the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/1034012533313136/permalink/3193450564035978" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink">ALDI Mums Facebook group</a>.</p> <p>“At around 8:15 a staff member came out and went down the line (in order) asking who wanted the Air Fryer.</p> <p>“He took everyone’s names and told us to line up near the registers and they would be handed out.”</p> <p>She thanked her store, saying: “Normally it’s a sh*t fight trying to get the specials, but today it was very civilised.”</p> <p>Despite ALDI having a nationwide policy of not limiting or restricting its weekly deals with customers, stores "do reserve the right to limit purchases to one per customer when they anticipate unusually high demand".</p> <p>Others were impressed and called on ALDI to introduce the system everywhere.</p> <p>“That’s amazing! Hopefully the other stores follow suit!” one said.</p> <p>“That is a great idea, all stores should do that,” another agreed.</p> <p>“Wow that’s so much better! And also fair,” someone else chipped in.</p> <p>The coronavirus pandemic has also thrown some spanners in the works as many try to social distance and get their hands on Special Buys.</p> <p>“It just seems like this style of shopping as it is, isn’t helping people social distance,” one mum wrote on Facebook recently, to much support.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Look out ALDI, Coles and Woolworths

<p>After locking in a massive new deal with British grocery giant Tesco, Australian discount retail specialists The Reject Shop are looking to grab a huge share of the market by offering up significant savings for shoppers – and the deal is timed perfectly to take advantage of the widespread effects that COVID-19 is having on household budgets across the country.</p> <p>The newly inked deal will deliver 300 of Tesco’s non-perishable grocery products to The Reject Shop stores across the country.</p> <p>The Reject Shop’s clear leverage here lies in the size of the bulk order, as it allows the chain to release a significant number of the 300 grocery items for significantly reduced prices compared to their ALDI, Coles and Woolworths counterparts.</p> <p>For example, items such as nappies will retail in bulk for under $10, and toothpaste will retail for as little as 50c – as will boxes of 100 bandages (also 50c).</p> <p>As Dani Aquilina, The Reject Shop's Chief Operations Officer, explained to <em>A Current Affair</em>: “What we do specifically that's different is we make sure we find the best-selling products, we buy them in big volumes so we can get the best prices and then we pass those savings onto our customers. It's everything from pantry staples – oil, vinegar, we've got things like rice pouches, snacks and treats – and then we've also brought in a great baby range so everything from formula to baby wipes and nappies.”</p> <p>“When Aldi came to Australia 15 years ago people said, ‘Why would you want to buy cheap food?’ and in 2009 when Kmart started its turnaround journey, they asked ‘Why would you want to offer cheap homewares and clothing, because people wouldn’t buy it,’” CEO Andre Reich said in a press briefing in late August.</p> <p>“But things have changed a lot. Australia is a very expensive place to live but we also want to have everything we need for a good life … so if you’ve only got a fixed income, you’ve got to find ways to save in certain areas.</p> <p>“It hasn’t been so cool or socially acceptable in Australia to shop down in a value store, but now people don’t worry as much where they shop as long as they save money.”</p> <p>The discount chain has also recently relaunched its website in a further bid to lure customers away from The Big Three of ALDI, Coles and Woolworths, and has commenced a $3billion expansion plan to add more stores.</p>

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