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The odd detail you probably never noticed about Duchess Kate

<p>Although the Duchess of Cambridge is known for her sense of style, she can sometimes be seen sporting a less than appealing accessory with some of her outfits.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bp8sP56AtjO/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bp8sP56AtjO/" target="_blank">The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge attend the 6th Annual Tusk Conservation Awards 💙 8 November 2018</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/katemiddletonphotos/" target="_blank"> Kate Middleton</a> (@katemiddletonphotos) on Nov 8, 2018 at 9:44pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Can you see it?</p> <p>It’s a band-aid on her hand.</p> <p>It’s not the first time she’s been spotted in public with a plaster on her hand either.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BNJGeeQj70Q/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BNJGeeQj70Q/" target="_blank">Catherine, Duchess of Cambridges arrives at the National History Museum to join Oakington Manor school for a special tea party to say goodbye to Dippy, The Natural History Museum’s world famous Diplodocus before he embarks on a nationwide two-year tour on Nov 22,2016.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/katemiddletonphotos/" target="_blank"> Kate Middleton</a> (@katemiddletonphotos) on Nov 22, 2016 at 10:14pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Duchess Kate was spotted wearing one when she arrived at the National History Museum back in 2016.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu6HOBYHEYM/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu6HOBYHEYM/" target="_blank">The Duchess of Cambridge visits the Henry Fawcett Children’s Centre on March 12, 2019 in London,England.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/katemiddletonphotos/" target="_blank"> Kate Middleton</a> (@katemiddletonphotos) on Mar 12, 2019 at 5:19am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, it’s not all the time. This was just the other day on May 12, 2019.</p> <p>Buckingham Palace has refused to comment on the issue, especially when <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/kate-wear-many-plasters-duchess-9521028" target="_blank">The Mirror</a> </em>reached out and inquired about the plasters.</p> <p>Buckingham Palace insisted: “We have no comment on the plaster.”</p> <p>For now, many tend to believe that the regular wounds that have appeared over the years is due to the Duchess of Cambridge’s well-established green-thumb. This has been highlighted with her Back to Nature Garden in the RHS Chelsea Flower Show in London that begins this week.</p> <p>“I believe that spending time outdoors when we are young can play a role in laying the foundations for children to become happy, healthy adults,” she said in a statement.</p>

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Samantha Armytage’s incredible weight loss transformation

<p><em>Sunrise </em>host Samantha Armytage has tackled her health goals and now looks fantastic after four months of hard work.</p> <p>However, the morning show personality says it was never her intention to lose weight but instead to maintain a healthier lifestyle.</p> <p>Recently, the Aussie journalist has taken on a new role as a WW ambassador – formerly known as Weight Watchers – after losing an incredible 10 kilograms in just four short months.</p> <p>“It’s not just about losing weight, it’s about a holistic approach to life and about maintaining weight which is the hardest thing for me to do as a shift worker,” Armytage explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/fitness/inspiration/sunrise-host-samantha-armytage-reveals-10kg-weight-loss/news-story/ab78940b55ea00dbc9016d90bcb5602d" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au.</em></a></p> <p>“I feel great, absolutely fantastic — don’t forget I get up at 3.15 am so being a bit lighter and having more energy throughout the day really helps. It’s a nice feeling and I want to keep going.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bxx0QDnnXWg/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bxx0QDnnXWg/" target="_blank">Thrilled to announce I’m joining forces with @ww as their newest ambassador!🎉 Very excited about this modern, holistic company, which is now all about WELLNESS rather than just weight loss (although losing a few kg’s has been a nice bonus😂👍) It’s such a simple, fun program... &amp; you don’t have to go without anything (🥓🍰🍾🍪🍿🥖!!! 😜) Join me on my new journey &amp; let’s have positive body image for all! Remember; it’s not about being skinny, it’s about being healthy &amp; strong! 🏃‍♀️💪🏻👯‍♀️👯‍♂️ xx. @ww_aunz #wwaunzambassador #wellnessthatworks 🙋🏼‍♀️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sam_armytage/" target="_blank"> Samantha Armytage ⭐️</a> (@sam_armytage) on May 22, 2019 at 1:33pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>WW is the new name for Weight Watchers – a weight management program which helps people shed kilos, eat healthier and move to a better lifestyle.</p> <p>However, the brand completely redirected their shift to focus primarily on healthy eating and a better lifestyle – a change that attracted the breakfast show host to partner with them.</p> <p>“If it was one of the many other weight loss companies I probably wouldn’t be interested, but it’s not. I really like this new version where it’s all about wellness,” she said.</p> <p>Armytage has received negative flack in the past over her body, something she admits was a struggle to deal with.</p> <p>“Why would people attack you for being a size 12? I just think that’s ridiculous,” she said.</p> <p>Refreshingly, the Sunrise host opened up about their being “stages in my life where I did need to lose a few kilos, I was not healthy.”</p> <p>“Losing a few kilos was important but joining WW was also about feeling stronger and healthier, both physically and mentally,” Armytage said.</p> <p>Changing her lifestyle wasn’t sudden, it was instead a decision to help make better choices every day, the morning show host revealed.</p> <p>“I go (to the gym) for boxing. I don’t know what I ever did without it,” she revealed, explaining she also walks her Labrador every day and undertakes weight training as well.</p> <p>“The beauty of it is you can still eat everything — I can still have a glass of wine, I can still eat a piece of cake; you just eat it in moderation, so if you have a piece of cake in the morning maybe you don’t have a slice of bread at lunch time and I think that’s been really good for me to understand.”</p> <p>The Channel 7 star says despite potential backlash for supporting WW, she is prepared.</p> <p>“There’s always going to be people in the cheap seat who criticise and that just comes with the territory. It comes with life unfortunately, whether you are high profile or not,” Armytage shared.</p> <p>“I’ve lost 10(kg) since January and I am very happy and still going.”</p>

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Health check: Why do we get motion sickness and what’s the best way to treat it?

<p>Motion sickness can be mild, but in some people it’s debilitating, and takes the fun out of a holiday.</p> <p>We think it’s caused by <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">temporary dysfunction</a> of our brain’s balance centres.</p> <p>The perception of motion of any sort can bring on <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/motion-sickness">symptoms of travel sickness</a>. These include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, excessive saliva, rapid breathing and cold sweats.</p> <p>The good news is, there are strategies and medicines you can use to <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">prevent motion sickness</a>, or to help you ride it out.</p> <p><strong>Ears and eyes disconnect</strong></p> <p>As we move through space, multiple sensors in our middle ear, limbs and eyes feed information to our balance centre in our brains to orientate us. It’s when these sources of information are in apparent conflict that we may experience motion sickness.</p> <p>For example, in those who are particularly susceptible, watching certain movies can induce motion sickness as our eyes indicate we are moving, although other sensors confirm we are stationary.</p> <p>A boat trip in rocky seas or a car trip on winding roads means our head and body will be moving in unusual ways, in two or more axes at once, while sensing accelerations, decelerations and rotations. Together these are strong stimuli to bring on an attack of motion sickness.</p> <p><strong>Motion sickness is common</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430.long">Around 25-30% of us</a> travelling in boats, buses or planes will suffer – from feeling a bit off all the way to completely wretched; pale, sweaty, staggering, and vomiting.</p> <p>Some people are extremely susceptible to motion sickness, and may feel unwell even with minor movements such as “head bobbing” while snorkelling, or even <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">riding a camel</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">Susceptibility</a> seems to increase with age, while women are more prone to travel sickness than men. There is a <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">genetic influence</a> too, with the condition running in families. It often co-exists with a history of migraines.</p> <p><strong>Preventing motion sickness</strong></p> <p>Sufferers quickly work out <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/hi-res/afp20140701p41-t2.gif">what to avoid</a>. Sitting in the back seat of the car, reading in a car or bus (trains and planes are better), facing backwards in a bus or train or going below deck on a boat in rough conditions are all best avoided if you’re prone to travel sickness.</p> <p>Medicines that control vomiting (antiemetics) and nausea (anti-nauseants) are the <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">mainstay of medicines</a> used for motion sickness and are effective. But as there are unwanted side effects such as drowsiness, it’s reasonable to try behavioural techniques first, or alongside medicines.</p> <p>More time “on deck”, keeping an eye on the horizon if there’s a significant swell, and focusing on other things (for example looking out for whales) are <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">good examples</a>.</p> <p>Desensitisation or habituation also <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">work for some</a>. For example, increasing experience on the water in relatively smooth conditions in preparation for longer and potentially rougher trips can help.</p> <p>There tends to be a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077501">reduction in symptoms</a> after a couple of days at sea. Medicines can then be reduced and even stopped. Symptoms often return when back on dry land, usually for just a day or two.</p> <p>Chewing hard ginger has been <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=3277342">claimed to work</a> for naval cadets, but other studies have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2062873">not confirmed</a> its effectiveness.</p> <p>Some people find wrist bands that provide acupressure to be effective, although when these have been studied in controlled trials, <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">the proof is lacking</a>.</p> <p>Glasses with a built-in horizon to combat motion sickness were <a href="https://patents.google.com/patent/US20190079314A1/en">patented in 2018</a>, so watch this space.</p> <p><strong>How medications work</strong></p> <p>Travel sickness medications are more effective when taken pre-emptively, so before your journey begins.</p> <p>Antiemetics and anti-nauseants act on the brain and nervous system. Medicines used to prevent and treat travel sickness most commonly are either sedating antihistamines or anticholinergics. They block the effects of neurotransmitters (molecules that transmit information) such as histamine, acetylcholine and dopamine in our <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165017394000049">balance control centres</a>.</p> <p>But these sorts of medicines are not very specific. That is, they block the effects of acetylcholine and histamine wherever these neurotransmitters act throughout the body. This explains <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">unwanted side effects</a> such as sedation, drowsiness, dry mouth, constipation and confusion (in older, vulnerable people).</p> <p>Drowsiness is more likely to reach dangerous levels if other central nervous system depressants are taken at the <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/consumers/understanding-drug-interactions">same time</a>. This includes opioids (morphine, oxycodone, codeine), alcohol, sleeping pills and some antidepressants.</p> <p><strong>So what’s the best option?</strong></p> <p>A <a href="https://www.cochrane.org/CD002851/ENT_scopolamine-for-preventing-and-treating-motion-sickness">comprehensive review</a> of clinical trials in 2011 compared the medicine scopolamine as a preventative with other medicines, placebos, behavioural and complementary therapies.</p> <p>Most of the 14 studies reviewed were in healthy men serving in the Navy with history of travel sickness. Women have rarely been subjects, and there are no studies in <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/preventing-motion-sickness-in-children">children</a>.</p> <p>Although scopolamine was found to be marginally more effective than the alternatives, there’s not much to go on to recommend one travel medicine over another.</p> <p>If you’re somebody who experiences motion sickness, speak to your doctor or pharmacist. Most medicines for motion sickness are <a href="https://ajp.com.au/news/travel-health-pharmacy/">available over the counter</a>. You may need to try a few different medicines to find the one that works best for you, but always follow dosage instructions and professional advice.</p> <p>Once motion sickness is established, the only option is to ride it out. Lying down where possible, getting fresh air and focusing on the horizon can all help alongside appropriate medications. Importantly, for prolonged episodes, try to keep your fluids up to avoid dehydration (especially if vomiting occurs).</p> <p>If you experience motion sickness for the first time, and if it’s associated with a migraine-like headache, you should seek the advice of a doctor to rule out other neurological conditions.</p> <p><em>Written by Ric Day and Andrew McLachlan. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-we-get-motion-sickness-and-whats-the-best-way-to-treat-it-112861"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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“Is this excessive?”: Woman sparks online debate over toilet paper rolls

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>An anonymous woman has caused an online forum to go into a spin after asking an innocent question.</p> <p>She wanted to know whether or not her housemates’ toilet paper use was excessive and what was considered a normal amount.</p> <p>“Three adults in my house, two male, one female. I buy a pack of nine a week and we are using 90 per cent of it … honestly I think someone is eating it! What do you use? Is this excessive?” she asked.</p> <p>As soon as the question was asked, people were quick to give their answers.</p> <p>“We have two adults and two children and we use two to three toilet rolls max a week. We’d probably use a lot less if the kids didn’t use half a bog roll every time they had a poop,” one woman said.</p> <p>“Far too much. Maybe change diet lol,” another joked.</p> <p>“Two adults, one child (4yr old) we use around four rolls a week. A nine pack last just over two weeks. I’m super efficient with wiping …” another revealed.</p> <p>Some were quick to point out that the amount of men and women in the home is a factor.</p> <p>“I think the amount of girls v boys makes a massive difference. You surely go through more if you have girls. We’re a family of seven, is females vs my husband. Youngest two are still in nappies so there’s me, hubby and three girls, and we go through a 24 pack probably every month,” a mother said.</p> <p>Others were curious as to what type of toilet paper was bought.</p> <p>“I think it does depend on what toilet paper you buy. I buy the dear stuff and it lasts ages, it’s thick and quilted. I’m assuming the cheaper rolls are thin so you’d need more paper,” another said.</p> <p>One commenter was just glad the topic was being brought up.</p> <p>“There’s seven of us and the toilet roll use is ridiculous,” she explained.</p> <p>“I can walk in the bathroom and there’ll be half a roll then the next time you go it’s gone. I buy a pack of six on a Monday come Friday/Saturday, I’m buying more,” another said.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Thinking of going into a nursing home? Here’s what you’ll have to pay for

<p>This week at the <a href="https://agedcare.royalcommission.gov.au/hearings/Pages/default.aspx">aged care royal commission</a> hearings, the <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/news/call-to-change-way-aged-care-is-funded">CEOs of three aged care providers</a> called for a change in the way residential aged care is funded to improve the quality of care.</p> <p>This followed a <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/federal-election-2019/labor-s-promise-to-fix-aged-care-would-cost-billions-peak-body-20190513-p51mt4.html">plea from Aged Care Services Australia</a> for the government and opposition to address what it called a “crisis in residential aged care funding”.</p> <p>But while <a href="https://theconversation.com/nearly-2-out-of-3-nursing-homes-are-understaffed-these-10-charts-explain-why-aged-care-is-in-crisis-114182">most</a> residential aged care funding comes from government, residents also have to contribute. So how does this complicated payment system work?</p> <p><strong>Who is eligible for subsidised care?</strong></p> <p>In July 2014, the government introduced several changes to the residential aged care accommodation and care fees rules. These were part of <a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/aged-care-reform">wider reforms</a> to the aged care system initiated under the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2013B00043">Aged Care (Living Longer Living Better) Act 2013</a>.</p> <p>One of the biggest changes was the introduction of <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/costs/aged-care-homes-costs-explained/income-and-assets-assessment-aged-care-home-costs">means testing</a>. Many residents of aged care facilities are now expected to pay a portion of their care and accommodation costs themselves, but whether and how much they contribute is determined by an assessment of their personal financial circumstances.</p> <p>A person who receives a full age pension and has just a small amount saved in a bank account, for example, <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/fee-estimator/residential-care/form">will likely have</a> their accommodation and care costs fully subsidised by the government – aside from a daily care fee, which is a proportion of the pension.</p> <p>Someone who receives a higher income and owns significant shares and investments may need to pay some or all of their accommodation and care costs.</p> <p><strong>Costs of aged care</strong></p> <p>There are four main costs associated with residential aged care:</p> <p><strong>1. <u>Daily care fee</u></strong></p> <p>This fee covers living costs such as meals, cleaning, heating and power. All residents of an aged care facility pay this fee, which is fixed at 85% of the age pension.</p> <p><strong>2. <u>Daily means tested care fee</u></strong></p> <p>Some residents also need to pay an additional contribution towards the cost of their care. The Department of Human Services conducts an income and assets assessment to work out whether people need to pay this fee, and if so, how much it is.</p> <p><strong>3. <u>Accommodation costs</u></strong></p> <p>This includes the cost of the room and other physical amenities provided by the aged care facility. Some residents have their accommodation paid for fully or partly by the government, while others need to pay accommodation costs privately.</p> <p><strong>4. <u>Additional services fees</u></strong></p> <p>Some facilities offer extra services such as newspaper delivery, hairdressing and cable TV. Fees for these additional services only apply if the resident agrees to pay them.</p> <p><strong>Accommodation costs get really complicated</strong></p> <p>Out of these costs, accommodation costs are often the highest as well as the most confusing.</p> <p>Those who need to pay all or some of their accommodation costs have a couple of different <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/costs/aged-care-homes-costs-explained/paying-accommodation-aged-care-home">payment methods</a> to choose from:</p> <p>Refundable accommodation deposit (RAD) or refundable accommodation contribution (RAC)</p> <p>RADs and RACs are lump sum payments for a resident’s accommodation. They work like an interest free loan paid to the aged care provider, who is then able to invest this amount, for example in improvements to the facility and services, and earn interest on it.</p> <p>The lump sum amount is refunded to the resident or their estate if they move or pass away, and is <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/costs/aged-care-homes-costs-explained/accommodation-refunds">guaranteed</a> by the government even if the provider goes bankrupt.</p> <p>Daily accommodation payment (DAP) or daily accommodation contribution (DAC)</p> <p>DAPs and DACs work like a rental payment. Residents pay the aged care provider the daily rate of lost interest on what the lump sum amount would be for their room. The interest rate is <a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/12_2018/schedule_of_fees_and_charges_for_residential_and_home_care.pdf">set by the government</a> and is currently 5.96%.</p> <p>You can also pay through any combination of these methods, such as 60% RAD and 40% DAP. For example:</p> <p>Linda agrees on a RAD price of A$320,000 for her room, and wants to pay this amount in a lump sum. When she leaves the facility, the RAD amount will be refunded to her or her estate.</p> <p>Gary also chooses aged care accommodation with a RAD price of A$320,000, but he wants to pay the daily amount rather than make the full payment upfront. Gary’s DAP is calculated from the RAD amount for his accommodation, and comes to about A$52 per day.</p> <p>Maria wants to pay some of her accommodation costs as a lump sum RAD and the rest via a DAP. If her accommodation is also priced at A$320,000 and she pays A$192,000 as a part RAD, her DAP for the remaining amount is about A$21 per day.</p> <p><strong>Is the accommodation payment system fair?</strong></p> <p>The answer depends on where you stand on broader issues around fiscal responsibility and intergenerational equity.</p> <p>Governments have argued the reforms implemented since 2013 are necessary to sustain the aged care system into the future, particularly given a rapidly ageing population and growing budget deficit.</p> <p>In terms of the payment options themselves, there are some significant advantages to paying an accommodation lump sum if you are in a financial position to do so. It can help preserve your estate and age pension eligibility, as the RAD or RAC amount is refunded and is exempt from the pension income and asset tests.</p> <p><strong>The DAP and DAC payments are not refundable.</strong></p> <p>But given that the <a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/08_2018/acfa_sixth_report_2018_text_fa3.pdf">average value</a> of RADs and RACs held by providers in 2017 was A$283,499, a rental-style payment may be the only option for many people.</p> <p>There are <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/costs/fees-annual-lifetime-caps">annual and lifetime caps</a> to the means-tested care fee, but not for accommodation payments, so this daily cost will stack up over time.</p> <p>Keep in mind, however, that the <a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/08_2018/acfa_sixth_report_2018_text_fa3.pdf">average length of stay</a> in permanent residential aged care was just under three years in 2017, and many people pass away or leave the facility after a stay of just three, six or 12 months.</p> <p>Some recent reforms aim to make the system easier to navigate and more transparent, such as the introduction of the <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/">My Aged Care</a> gateway and the requirement for aged care providers to make their accommodation pricing public.</p> <p>But the system is still highly complex, and the onus is on government and care providers to provide accessible information.</p> <p>A consumer-led system will only work if consumers are informed. This requires investment in education and awareness campaigns to promote greater knowledge of aged care policy, fee structures and options, as well as affordable sources of financial and legal advice.</p> <p><em>Written by Laura Davy. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/so-youre-thinking-of-going-into-a-nursing-home-heres-what-youll-have-to-pay-for-114295"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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5 misleading foods that claim to be healthy

<p>Food gives us the nutrients we need to survive, and we know a balanced diet <a href="https://www.who.int/behealthy/healthy-diet">contributes to good health</a>.</p> <p>Beyond this, many people seek out different foods as “medicines”, hoping eating certain things might prevent or treat particular conditions.</p> <p>It’s true many foods contain “<a href="https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/bioactive-compound">bioactive compounds</a>” – chemicals that act in the body in ways that might promote good health. These are being studied in the prevention of cancer, heart disease and other conditions.</p> <p>But the idea of food as medicine, although attractive, is easily oversold <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4404/How-cloves-garlic-guard-cancer.html">in the headlines</a>. Stories tend to be based on studies done in the lab, testing concentrated extracts from foods. The effect seen in real people eating the actual food is going to be different to the effects in a petri dish.</p> <p>If you do the maths, you’ll find you actually need to eat enormous amounts of particular foods to get an active dose of the desired element. In some cases, this might endanger your health, rather than protecting it.</p> <p>These four foods (and one drink) show the common healing claims around the foods we eat don’t always stack up.</p> <p><strong>1. Cinnamon</strong></p> <p>Cinnamon, which contains a compound called cinnamaldehyde, is claimed to <a href="https://www.ibtimes.sg/cinnamon-your-best-companion-fight-obesity-study-suggests-side-effects-20788">aid weight loss and regulate appetite</a>.</p> <p>There is evidence cinnamaldehyde <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24019277">can reduce cholesterol in people with diabetes</a>. But this is based on studies of the chemical in large doses – not eating the spice itself.</p> <p>These studies give people between 1 and 6 grams of cinnamaldehyde per day. Cinnamon is about <a href="http://www.orientjchem.org/vol30no1/extraction-of-essential-oil-from-cinnamon-cinnamomum-zeylanicum/">8% cinnamaldehyde</a> by weight – so you’d have to eat at least 13 grams of cinnamon, or about half a supermarket jar, per day. Much more than you’d add to your morning porridge.</p> <p><strong>2. Red wine</strong></p> <p>The headlines on the health benefits of red wine are usually because of a chemical in grape skins called resveratrol. Resveratrol is a <a href="https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/79/5/727/4690182">polyphenol</a>, a family of chemicals with <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-the-untrue-story-of-antioxidants-vs-free-radicals-15920">antioxidant</a> properties.</p> <p>It’s been <a href="https://theconversation.com/resveratrol-in-a-red-wine-sauce-fountain-of-youth-or-snake-oil-12743">claimed resveratrol</a> protects our cells from damage and reduces the risk of a range of conditions such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart disease.</p> <p>There is some limited evidence that resveratrol has benefits in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942868/">animal models</a>, although studies done in humans <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article/71/12/822/1833632">have not shown a similar effect</a>.</p> <p>It varies by wine, but red wine contains about 3 micrograms (about 3 millionths of a gram) of resveratrol <a href="https://www.ajevonline.org/content/43/1/49">per bottle</a>. The studies that have shown a benefit from resveratrol use at least 0.1 grams per day (that’s 100,000 micrograms).</p> <p>To get that much resveratrol, you’d have to drink roughly 200 bottles of wine a day. We can probably all agree that’s not very healthy.</p> <p><strong>3. Blueberries</strong></p> <p>Blueberries, like red wine, are a <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf034150f">source of resveratrol,</a> but at a few micrograms per berry you’d have to eat more than 10,000 berries a day to get the active dose.</p> <p>Blueberries also contain compounds called anthocyanins, which <a href="https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/2/1/1/4591636">may improve some markers of heart disease</a>. But to get an active dose there you’re looking at 150-300 blueberries per day. More reasonable, but still quite a lot of fruit – and expensive.</p> <p><strong>4. Chocolate</strong></p> <p>The news that dark <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1114811/high-blood-pressure-diet-foods-dark-chocolate-lower-reading">chocolate lowers blood pressure</a> is always well-received. Theobromine, a chemical in chocolate has been shown to lower blood pressure in doses of about <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20823377">1 gram of the active compound</a>, but not at lower doses. Depending on the chocolate, you could be eating 100g of dark chocolate before you reached this dose.</p> <p>Chocolate is a discretionary food, or “junk food”. The <a href="http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/resource/australian-dietary-guidelines-standard-serves">recommended serve for discretionary foods</a> is no more than 600 kilojoules per day, or 25g of chocolate. Eating 100g of chocolate would be equivalent to more than 2,000kJ.</p> <p>Excess kilojoule consumption leads to weight gain and being overweight increases risk of heart disease and stroke. So these risks would likely negate the benefits of eating chocolate to lower your blood pressure.</p> <p><strong>5. Turmeric</strong></p> <p>Turmeric is a favourite. It’s good in curries, and recently we’ve seen hype around the tumeric latte. Stories pop up regularly about its healing power, normally based on <a href="https://theconversation.com/science-or-snake-oil-can-turmeric-really-shrink-tumours-reduce-pain-and-kill-bacteria-76010">curcumin</a>.</p> <p>Curcumin refers to a group of compounds, called curcuminoids, that might have some health benefits, like reducing inflammation. Inflammation helps us to fight infections and respond to injuries, but too much inflammation is a problem in diseases like <a href="https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/inflammatory-arthritis/">arthritis</a>, and might be linked to other conditions like <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.CIR.0000129535.04194.38">heart disease or stroke.</a></p> <p>Human trials on curcumin have <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261561413002501">been inconclusive</a>, but most use curcumin supplementation in very large doses of 1 to 12 grams per day. Turmeric is about 3% curcumin, so for each gram of tumeric you eat you only get 0.03g of curcumin. This means you’d have to eat more than 30g of tumeric to get the minimum active dose of tumeric.</p> <p>Importantly, curcumin in turmeric is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918523/">not very bioavailable</a>. This means we only absorb about 25% of what we eat, so you might actually have to eat well over 100g of turmeric, every day, to get a reasonable dose of curcumin. That’s a lot of curry.</p> <p><strong>What to eat then?</strong></p> <p>We all want food to heal us but focusing on single foods and eating mounds of them is not the answer. Instead, a balanced and diverse diet can provide foods each with a range of different nutrients and bioactive compounds. Don’t get distracted by quick fixes; focus instead on enjoying a variety of foods.</p> <p><em>Written by Emma Beckett and Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/these-5-foods-are-claimed-to-improve-our-health-but-the-amount-wed-need-to-consume-to-benefit-is-a-lot-116730"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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What are the major parties promising on health this election?

<p>The major parties’ manifestos for the 2019 federal election present voters with starkly contrasting health policies. These policies are shaped and constrained by the overall themes presented by the party leaders, but have some unique elements.</p> <p><strong>Liberal – money in your own hands</strong></p> <p>The Liberal campaign has two main messages: standing on the government’s claimed record as good economic managers, and offering significant tax cuts in the long-term. The tax cuts are marketed as giving people the power to make their own choices about how the money should be spent.</p> <p>In health care, this spending-light approach has led to a focus on re-announcing existing policy, and spending down the <a href="https://beta.health.gov.au/initiatives-and-programs/medical-research-future-fund">Medical Research Future Fund</a> with research announcements popping up every other day.</p> <p>The Future Fund announcements have attracted good publicity for the government, even though they do not represent any increase in research funding, just a change in how the available funding is to be used.</p> <p>The re-announcement approach can probably best be seen in the Liberal’s policy on <a href="https://www.liberal.org.au/our-plan-youth-mental-health-and-suicide-prevention">youth mental health and suicide prevention</a>, where the five-page policy concludes:</p> <p>The Coalition’s plans for youth mental health and suicide prevention will not place additional costs on the Budget.</p> <p>Throughout his term as health minister, Greg Hunt has highlighted new drugs being added to the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in formulaic ministerial media releases such as <a href="https://www.greghunt.com.au/breast-cancer-and-rare-skin-cancer-medicines-on-the-pbs/">new listings of drugs for cancer</a>, <a href="https://www.greghunt.com.au/10-million-for-adhd-medicine-on-the-pb/">attention deficit hyperactivity disorder</a>, and <a href="https://www.greghunt.com.au/thousands-to-benefit-from-spinal-arthritis-medication-listing-on-pbs/">spinal arthritis</a>.</p> <p>He has sought to contrast the Coalition’s approach – where the advice of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee about listing a new drug has always been followed – to that of the previous Labor government, which <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-04-12/pharmamilne/55694">deferred some listings after the global financial crisis</a>.</p> <p>Minister Hunt has continued this focus during the campaign. In a unique approach, he used much of his time in the <a href="https://www.npc.org.au/speakers/the-hon-greg-hunt-mp-the-hon-catherine-king-mp/">National Press Club health debate</a> last Thursday to tell stories about new Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme listings. It is an old political aphorism that “<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_politics_is_local">all politics is local</a>”. Minister Hunt was presenting the message that all politics is personal.</p> <p>The personal stories and the real impact a new listing can have were quite touching, helping to humanise the minister and presenting the government as really caring for individuals in need.</p> <p>Of course, drugs being listed on the PBS is part of the routine business of government, and Labor has committed to listing the same drugs. The difference is in the way the government chose to inject these stories into the political debate. The message was: vote for us and we will look after your individual needs and care for you as an individual, because we are the party that supports innovation in pharmaceuticals.</p> <p>This focus on individuals is very much in the Liberal tradition, harking back to <a href="http://www.liberals.net/theforgottenpeople.htm">the “forgotten people” meme of the Menzies era</a>.</p> <p>The only significant spending announcement by the Liberals in this campaign was to <a href="https://www.liberal.org.au/latest-news/2019/05/02/strong-economy-provides-millions-australians-cheaper-and-free-medicine">reduce the co-payment thresholds for the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme</a> from 60 to 48 scripts for pensioners and health care card holders, and from an annual cap of A$1,550.70 to A$1,470.10 for other patients.</p> <p>This is a good policy which Labor has now matched.</p> <p><strong>Labor – cost of living needs to be addressed</strong></p> <p>Labor’s campaign on health is quite different from the Liberals. A key overarching theme is the cost of living. The Labor message is: wages have flat-lined, but prices keep going up, and Labor will fix that.</p> <p>Labor’s policies on childcare and minimum wages fit within this general theme. So does shadow minister Catherine King’s approach to health policy.</p> <p>Labor has made health a centrepiece of its campaign, with five big announcements.</p> <p>The first big announcement was to promise billions of dollars to <a href="https://theconversation.com/labors-cancer-package-would-cut-the-cost-of-care-but-beware-of-unintended-side-effects-114979">reduce out-of-pocket costs for people with cancer</a> and to <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/federal-election-2019/labor-promises-to-end-hospital-funding-wars-with-2-8-billion-package-20190413-p51dvj.html">expand funding for public hospitals</a>.</p> <p>The cancer announcement played extremely well, tapping into concerns that opposition leader Bill Shorten had picked up in his “listening tour” of dozens of <a href="https://theconversation.com/view-from-the-hill-bill-shorten-at-ease-in-town-hall-type-forum-116555">town hall meetings</a>throughout Australia since the last election.</p> <p><strong>The cancer policy includes:</strong></p> <p>new items on the Medicare Benefits Schedule to encourage bulk billing by cancer specialists</p> <p>a guarantee that new drugs will be listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme</p> <p>expansion of cancer outpatient services in public hospitals.</p> <p>The second big-ticket health promise was to restore the share of the cost of public hospital funding growth met by the Commonwealth to 50%, up from 45% now.</p> <p>The cut from 50% to 45% was announced in Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s 2014 budget. Labor has identified the impact of that cut on every public hospital in the country.</p> <p>The third big promise was to reduce the out-of-pocket costs of dental care. As the 2019 <a href="https://grattan.edu.au/report/filling-the-gap/">Filling the Gap Grattan Institute report</a> showed, more than 2 million Australians miss out on dental care each year because of cost.</p> <p>The promised Labor scheme is for seniors only. Importantly, though, the policy commits Labor to introducing a universal dental care scheme in the long-term.</p> <p>The fourth big health promise, announced during the official campaign launch on Sunday, was extra funding for <a href="https://theconversation.com/money-for-hospital-emergency-departments-in-shortens-campaign-launch-116577">public hospitals to improve emergency services</a>.</p> <p>A fifth health initiative does not involve specific spending but also addresses cost of living — a <a href="https://theconversation.com/labors-2-cap-on-private-health-insurance-premium-rises-wont-fix-affordability-91232">cap of 2% on private health insurance premium increases</a> for the next two years while the Productivity Commission reviews the private health sector.</p> <p>Together, these policies will not only help address cost of living pressures; they will reshape the health sector significantly.</p> <p>The dental announcement especially is transformative, addressing a major gap in Australia’s public funding of health care.</p> <p>The new bulk-billing item for cancer care could also have a major effect.</p> <p>And the Productivity Review of private health could lead to a major shake-up of that sector.</p> <p>The bill for Labor’s health policies is big: <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6106154/health-focus-for-shortens-campaign-launch/?cs=14264">more than A$8 billion</a> over the next four years.</p> <p><strong>Where’s the money coming from?</strong></p> <p>Labor’s answer is to close what it calls <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/mar/05/labor-to-crack-down-further-on-tax-loopholes-and-concessions-bowen">tax loopholes for multinationals and wealthy people</a>; taking from the very rich to give to ordinary Australians.</p> <p>Different prescriptions</p> <p>Health policy was a significant feature of the 2016 election, when Labor’s so-called <a href="https://theconversation.com/labors-mediscare-campaign-capitalised-on-coalition-history-of-hostility-towards-medicare-61976">Mediscare campaign tapped into voter concerns</a>.</p> <p>This time Labor is front-footing health policy, fitting neatly into its overall campaign meme of addressing cost of living pressures.</p> <p>The Liberal campaign is not a big spending one, and so re-announcements of previous commitments and an innovative personalisation of the benefit of new drugs are being used to present the Liberals’ health credentials.</p> <p><em>Written by Stephen Duckett. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/what-are-the-major-parties-promising-on-health-this-election-116427"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p> </p>

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Body language expert explains: Why did Hamish always fidget with this wedding ring on Lego Masters?

<p>Channel Nine’s Lego Masters finally wrapped up its first season on Tuesday.</p> <p>While there are many highlights from the show, one thing the viewers could not help but notice was the way host Hamish Blake regularly fiddled with his wedding ring while presenting.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826866/hamishring.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9aa98ce2fab242db87635391f50701ae" /></p> <p>According to a body language expert, the 37-year-old’s habit might be due to “nerves” on set.</p> <p>“A wedding band is often an item of comfort, familiarity and fond memories – when this is the case, in a setting where one might feel nervous,” body language expert Holly Bartter told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-7029561/Why-does-Hamish-Blake-fiddle-wedding-ring-Lego-Masters-Body-language-expert-reveals-reason.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail Australia</em></a>.</p> <p>“It’s a habit that likely Hamish isn’t even noticing himself.”</p> <p>Bartter also said the ring might serve as a “grounding item” that helped Hamish focus during shootings. </p> <p>“A wedding band will immediately link Hamish back to his loved ones, so it's a grounding item which also may help him to refocus while he shoots,” said Bartter.</p> <p>Another possible explanation is that the ring was uncomfortable in the filming studio. </p> <p>“Under hot studio lights, Hamish’s ring might simply feel a little uncomfortable when his hands are warmer,” said Bartter.</p> <p>“It’s likely he’s rearranging his ring without even thinking about what he’s doing.”</p> <p>Hamish has been married to author and entrepreneur Zoë Foster Blake for seven years, with the pair sharing two children – son Sonny, 5, and daughter Rudy, 1.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BplvQEeAw-W/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BplvQEeAw-W/" target="_blank">A post shared by ZOË FOSTER BLAKE (@zotheysay)</a> on Oct 31, 2018 at 12:48am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>On her Instagram account, Zoë shared that her husband gave her a special gift every time he returned from filming. </p> <p>“Hamish made me a little Lego thingy each time he went to set,” the 38-year-old mother wrote alongside a clip of a constructed toaster-shaped toy.</p> <p>On Tuesday night, Henry and Cade were crowned as the show’s first winners after building a diorama of Poseidon battling a sea serpent. Alongside a Lego trophy, the pair also took home $100,000 in prize money.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">We're catching up with our winners <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HenryAndCade?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HenryAndCade</a> for a quick Q&amp;A, let us know your questions or send them your congrats! 🧱🏆 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LEGOMastersAU?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#LEGOMastersAU</a> <a href="https://t.co/VcDYqsZxOS">pic.twitter.com/VcDYqsZxOS</a></p> — LEGO Masters Australia (@LegoMastersAU) <a href="https://twitter.com/LegoMastersAU/status/1128397159194296321?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 14, 2019</a></blockquote>

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Grant Denyer reveals how his daughters saved him during his “worst times”

<p>Grant Denyer has been put through the wringer as of late, after sustaining a back injury on his property in Bathurst.</p> <p>This injury aggravated an older injury, where Denyer broke his back, and intense physiotherapy and rehab has been needed in order to get Denyer to where he is today.</p> <p>At the moment, the 41-year-old is three hours away from his wife Chezzie, and their daughters Sailor, eight and Scout, three, and it’s been tough.</p> <p>He revealed to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/celeb-news/grant-denyer-emotional-recovery-55663" target="_blank"><em>Now To Love</em></a> what the last few months have been like.</p> <p>"I'm not one that copes very well when the handbrake gets pulled on my life," he revealed. "It's a very miserable thing to have happen and it's horrible not knowing what the outcome could be."</p> <p>Denyer also shared how emotional it’s been saying goodbye to his daughters after they come visit him in hospital.</p> <p>"They are the sunshine in any darkness, which is magical," he said.</p> <p>"And they would chatter to me on the phone like crazy [during the hospital stay]. But there were always a few tears at night between us and then the lights would go out in the hospital and I couldn't help but occasionally lose it after watching an emotional movie or something like that."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BweBHkll4r5/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BweBHkll4r5/" target="_blank">A beautiful reunion today. Hope you’re not too sore tomorrow @grantdenyer We love you and we miss you! ❤️❤️❤️❤️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/chezzidenyer/" target="_blank"> chezzidenyer</a> (@chezzidenyer) on Apr 20, 2019 at 12:30am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Not being able to hold the girls for such a long period of time, as well as not knowing what the future will hold for him after his injury took a toll on Denyer.</p> <p>"They are very sweet and very patient girls but it's really hard when you are unable to pick your children up," he revealed.</p> <p>"We love wrestling and we climb on each other and cuddle like crazy - but when you can't pick your own children up it's really hard. It was horrific and I couldn't do that forever because the best part of being a dad is being able to pick your children up, throw them in the air and give them bear hugs."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw82DJeHhOn/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw82DJeHhOn/" target="_blank">I’m home!! Nothing compares to sleeping in your own bed.. and these smiling faces! So good to be home after what feels like an eternity away, in and out of hospitals, injured and in pain. Big thanks to Dr Mark Haran from Arcadia Physiotherapy Hospital for looking after me this past week and a bit. Also want to say thanks to Dr Anton Mechtler for his advice &amp; guidance during this crap period.. And neurosurgeon Dr Richard Parkinson of course helping me back on my feet again. I’ve had the best in the biz helping me.. and I’m eternally grateful. Now I get a few days rest, hugging the hell out of my family before heading back to work on @2dayfmbreakfast next Monday! 🎉</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/grantdenyer/" target="_blank"> Grant Denyer</a> (@grantdenyer) on May 1, 2019 at 11:49pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"It was hard, when you're a dad you want to be around your family, and I wasn't around my family. It was hard to bare."</p> <p>Despite his recovery, the ordeal isn’t over for Denyer just yet.</p> <p>"It was a horrible scenario and situation to go through but it was a very common one and 80% of men in particular will have this kind of injury to a degree but it's awfully painful and debilitating but the good news is with the right amount of patience and physio, we can get back on track."</p> <p>However, in classic Denyer style, he’s staying positive.</p> <p>"I think it might have been the universe telling me to slow down a little bit for starters. It was the perfect storm of three things all landing at the same time. I had <em>Dancing With the Stars</em>, <em>Celebrity Name Game</em> had just started filming plus doing radio. It wasn't ideal, it was just an accident that all three projects began to overlap, and I got an injury right in the middle."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxHbo0tHUAX/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxHbo0tHUAX/" target="_blank">Sweet new digs!! Your fav new gameshow is just ONE WEEK AWAY 🎉 @celebnamegameau is a hectic fast-paced, name-dropping, celebrity-filled spectacular... where Australia’s funniest &amp; finest team up to help people win big money 💰 It’s a flat out giggle-fest at 6pm to watch &amp; play along. If you want something super dooper FUN at 6pm... grab the family, crank it up &amp; crack a rib laughing... weeknights at 6pm on Ten.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/grantdenyer/" target="_blank"> Grant Denyer</a> (@grantdenyer) on May 6, 2019 at 2:30am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"I've been in this position before when something like this happens and you've got to be a little bit kinder to your body and to yourself so you can get your life back into a state of balance."</p> <p>"I think it's about letting things drop off," he added.</p>

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The diet secret that keeps Princess Mary fit

<p>The timeless Australian-born beauty is approaching the age of 50 soon, yet Crown Princess Mary has maintained a stunning figure and glowing skin.</p> <p>The question begs: How does she do it?</p> <p>While there are many who believe the royal member follows strict and rigorous diets to keep her slim and toned figure, others suggest she may just lead a healthy lifestyle and take time to get plenty of exercise.</p> <p>When living in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, a Scandinavian diet is very different to our eating habits at home.</p> <p>While there are a number of Danish pastries to gorge yourself on, the Danes take in a much lower intake of carbs, and higher intake of protein and good fats.</p> <p>If you are looking to live life a little simpler, a little healthier and a little better – try out some of these foods to eat like a Dane and maybe even lose a little extra weight you might be carrying and keen to shed.</p> <p><strong>Black bread</strong></p> <p>Unlike westerners, a Scandinavian diet gorges on heavy slabs of Rye and black bread which is a better alternative to white bread, rice and pasta.</p> <p><strong>Omega 3 rich fish</strong></p> <p>Fish is a popular source of nutrition in Scandinavian countries, especially deep sea cold fish including herring, mackerel and sardines, which boost the omega 3 intakes.</p> <p>Fish can be eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner is a delicious source of nutrition that can help with weight control and helping you feel fuller.</p> <p><strong>Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Potatoes can be fatty and unhealthy, but they are a firm staple food in the diets of Danes for their delicious taste and the high fibre, high nutrients and fewer carbs than a plate of pasta.</p> <p>Potatoes can make a delicious meal in stews, soups and casseroles.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>See more here:</strong></span></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/sausage-tomato-and-potato-soup" target="_blank">Sausage tomato and potato soup</a></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/crispy-potato-roast" target="_blank">Crispy potato roast</a></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/potato-and-crispy-bacon-soup" target="_blank">Potato and crispy bacon soup</a></p> <p><strong>Goats milk and cheese</strong></p> <p>Keeping your gut healthy means eating healthy, nutritious foods and cultured yoghurts and drinks can be an exceptionally good type of food to implement into your diet.</p> <p>While Danish dairy yoghurts are more sour than sweet, they are much better for you as they are higher in protein and low in sugar.</p> <p><strong>Nuts, fruit and seeds</strong></p> <p>Apart from Danish pastries, unhealthy foods like processed snack bars, biscuits and cakes are not as common a sight in Scandinavian countries. Instead, healthy fruits, nuts and seeds are a popular snack.</p> <p>In particular, nuts and seeds are low in carbohydrates and can add a dose of protein.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Mary's fit and healthy figure at 47.</p>

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The quick and easy way to treat vaginal atrophy

<p>In 2015, Sarah Livingstone was diagnosed with breast cancer.</p> <p>The moment was one that can only be described as terrifying, but thankfully, due to a bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction, Sarah was able to fight the disease that consumes so many women’s lives each year.</p> <p>But despite the success, the treatment gave Sarah adverse side effects, and she went into an early and sudden menopause. While hot flashes and mood swings are common symptoms of menopause, many fail to discuss how the process effects their relationships and sex life due to what happens in the vaginal region.</p> <p>The perioperative nurse found sex to be incredibly painful, so in an attempt to get her life back on track, she participated in a trial involving the MonaLisa Touch laser treatment.</p> <p>The rest was history.</p> <p>Her symptoms improved dramatically, so Sarah partnered up with Dr Sally Lyttleton to start <a href="https://www.thejaderoom.com.au/frequently-asked-questions/#1510536264685-931bc0b4-7547">The Jade Room</a>. A private and safe environment for women to undergo vaginal rejuvenation and restoration.</p> <p>The Jade Room treats vaginal atrophy with the use of laser, which is not only effective, but quick and long lasting.</p> <p>To find out more, watch Sarah and Dr Sally’s interview with Edwina Bartholomew below.</p> <p style="text-align: center;" class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/335282740" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; fullscreen" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p>

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11 years on: What Biggest Loser winner Sam looks like now

<p>It’s been 11 years since Sam Rouen went on the <em>Biggest Loser</em><span> </span>and left with a whopping 71kg of body fat gone.  </p> <p>The then 19-year-old star won the show's third season in 2008 and since then has managed to maintain his incredible physique.</p> <p>The 30-year-old took to Instagram last week to open up to his followers on how he works on strong mental health and keeps on track with his health journey.</p> <p>“Eleven years ago today, I stood on a stage and realised that I committed to something. It was one of the first times in my life that I put my mind to something, gave it my all and achieved what I wanted,” Sam wrote in a heartfelt message to his supporters.</p> <p>When he first went on the show, Sam’s weight started at 154kg, and in the last episode wowed the trainers, contestants and the public sitting at home when it was revealed he had lost a staggering 71kg.</p> <p>“In the weeks leading up to 29.04.08, I was running up to 60km a day and eating to a timetabled schedule. I was disciplined,” he said in his post.</p> <p>“I proved to myself that I COULD do what I put my mind to.”</p> <p>He admitted that although he faced challenges throughout his time on the show, he left feeling empowered after he took out the win.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7826713/sam2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bb68fe816c2c4a668ac61763f2005b8c" /></p> <p>“I hope that everyone has that opportunity to reflect on themselves (sic), and realise how amazing they are, what they can achieve, and what they are worth.”</p> <p>Just over 11 years later, Sam has proven how far hard work and dedication can get you as he has gone on to become a firefighter – even appearing twice in the annual fireman’s calendar to show off his washboard abs and toned body.</p> <p>“The shoot went extremely well but stripping down and jumping in front of a camera isn’t second nature to me,” Sam explained to <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>The </em></a><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>Daily Telegraph</em></a> on his 2017 photoshoot.</p> <p>“The photographers and entire team at the calendar went above and beyond to make the experience as painless as possible and helped to overcome insecurities and confidence issues.”</p> <p>Sam said he has developed an addiction towards training.</p> <p>“I definitely love running and working out with my brother. I play a bit of sport to stay in shape and also work out in the gym.”</p>

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This viral hack on how to eat pineapple is shocking the internet

<p>Hey pineapple fans, turns out you’ve been eating the fruit wrong your entire life.</p> <p>What you’re about to witness is something that you most likely have never seen in your life, and it’s how you should have been eating pineapple a long time ago because it’s pure genius.</p> <p>Taking to social media, Dillon Roberts shows a pineapple with the top cut off on his dining table.</p> <p>Then, in an act of sorcery, he grabs a pineapple knob and pulls it from the fruit.</p> <p>The result is a perfect section of pineapple ready to be devoured.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">We tried the pineapple thing <a href="https://t.co/cHNd0lBSSV">pic.twitter.com/cHNd0lBSSV</a></p> — The Huffington Poes (@janaaier) <a href="https://twitter.com/janaaier/status/1103560586275753984?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">7 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>We’ve all been there – using all of our upper body strength to cut through the tough exterior of the berry (yes, pineapples are berries). But we suck it up and put in the hard yards since the inside is worth it.</p> <p>Some prefer to eat it in rings, while others choose to consume it in cubes, either way, it’s delicious.</p> <p>It didn’t take long for the video to gain traction, as 21-year-old UK student Lewis McCluskey tweeted the video complete with the caption: “I’m sorry but what the actual f***”.</p> <p>The rest is history, as the video was retweeted over 43,000 times and liked by more than 130,000 people.</p> <p>But despite the enormous success, some weren’t impressed saying the technique is common practice amongst traditional islander communities.</p> <p>“Ya’ll should have visited the islands before bugging out with this pineapple peal trick,” wrote one user.</p> <p>Whether you’re someone who is discovering this hack today, or have been doing for years, it’s pretty impressive, nonetheless.</p>

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Julie Bishop struts the red carpet in daring red gown – and debuts new hairstyle

<p>Julie Bishop, former foreign minister, has stunned onlookers as she attended the<span> </span><em>InStyle</em> magazine Women of Style Awards on Wednesday night.</p> <p>Bishop stepped out in a fitted, asymmetric ruby red dress, as well as sporting a new hairstyle.</p> <p><span>Bishop was there to present an award to the winner of the Style Vanguard award at the event, which went to P.E. Nation designers Pip Edwards and Claire Tregoning.</span></p> <p>She spoke to the<span> </span><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainment/sydney-confidential/julie-bishop-and-camilla-franks-the-standouts-at-instyle-awards/news-story/f3103151a78e91f207b814e36cbfc22e"><em>Daily Telegraph</em></a>'s Sydney Confidential about her new hair, as well who she thinks will win the federal election.</p> <p>“New career, new hair. Short hair, don’t care”, she said.</p> <p>“I would never write off the Coalition, that would be a very big mistake. I’m looking forward to the Coalition winning the election.</p> <p>“It’s good to be able to stand back and watch it as I’m moving into my post-political career.”</p> <p>The star-studded event was also attended by a range of celebrities, including <em>Sunrise </em>host Samantha Armytage, personal trainer Michelle Bridges, <em>The Daily Edition</em>’s Sally Obermeder,<span> </span><em>The Morning Show </em>host Kylie Gillies, <em>Sunday Night</em>’s Melissa Doyle and <em>Studio 10</em>’s Angela Bishop.</p> <p>To see more fashionable moments from the star-studded evening, scroll through the gallery above.</p>

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5 tips for conquering eczema this winter

<p>Does your eczema – or your child’s – tend to play up at this time of year? The freezing cold combined with the effects of indoor heating and warm clothing make this a dangerous season for flare-ups. For top tips on managing eczema this winter, who better to turn to than pharmacist Julia Simmonds?</p> <p><strong>1. Moisturise, moisturise and then moisturise again</strong></p> <p>“With eczema, the skin is usually dry, which makes it an attractive home for bacteria to live,” says pharmacist Julia Simmonds, who founded <a href="https://itchybabyco.com.au/">Itchy Baby Co</a> after her own child battled the condition. “The skin also does not function as it would normally as a protective barrier. Regularly moisturising the skin keeps it well hydrated, which stops bacteria living on the skin’s surface and causing infection. Moisturising will also provide a surface barrier to prevent allergens and triggers irritating the skin’s surface and causing itching and redness.” </p> <p><strong>Are all moisturisers for eczema the same?</strong> <br />“Thick ointments are generally more effective for eczema. This is because, unlike creams – which can be made up of up to 50 per cent water – ointments do not contain water. Water evaporates quickly from the skin, taking hydration with it. Creams are also more likely than ointments to contain harsh preservatives, which can more easily irritate eczema skin. <br /> <br />“The best time to moisturise is straight after the bath and while the skin is still a bit damp, because this is when the pores of the skin are open and can absorb the most hydration from moisturising. You should also moisturise at least two to four other times during the day.” </p> <p><strong>2. Bath time</strong></p> <p>“Keep bath time short; no longer than ten minutes, as having a long bath will dehydrate the skin. Test the water and make sure it is only lukewarm. Warmer water will raise the body’s core temperature and make the skin itchy.” <br /> <br /><strong>Why is bath time important for managing eczema?</strong> <br />“Bath time washes triggers away from the skin and also prepares the skin for moisturising after. Use this opportunity to use bath products that moisturise the skin, such as bath soaks and bath oils. Avoid soap and bubbles as these dry out the skin and strip the skin of its’ protective barrier. Changing towels regularly is also important to minimise the chances of infection from skin bacteria.”</p> <p><strong>3. Keep cool</strong></p> <p>“The most common eczema trigger is heat. Warm weather, warm clothing and warm bedding can all cause eczema to flare up. This is because children with eczema cannot cool themselves down as quickly as those who do not have eczema. Dressing your child in cotton clothing that allows the skin to breathe is best for eczema. Rather than dressing your child in heavy jumpers and outerwear, try to layer their clothes to make it easier to regulate their body heat. Check on what bedding you are using for your child and choose cotton sheets and light cotton blankets instead of doonas and duvets.”</p> <p><strong>4. Be prepared to act fast</strong></p> <p>“Once your child’s eczema has flared up, treating it quickly will reduce distress, uncomfortableness, sleepless nights and the chance of infection. Seek your doctor’s advice. Steroid ointments can be applied to the skin before using your regular moisturiser when treating a flare-up, and follow-up with your doctor if your child’s flare-up is not improving.”</p> <p><strong>5. Commit to a skincare routine</strong></p> <p>It’s important to understand the necessity of keeping to a skincare routine which you do every day for your child, even when they are not showing any signs of eczema. Basic skincare routines will include bathing daily using a skin-hydrating product in the bath, followed by applying a thick moisturiser immediately after the bath. Finding products which are effective is often a case of trial and error but once you have found them, and you are using them routinely, your child’s eczema will be better managed and flare-ups reduced.”<br /> <br />As always, if you are concerned about your own or your child’s skin, please see your healthcare professional for advice.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/beauty/skin/5-tips-conquering-eczema-winter"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Health check: What causes constipation?

<p>Most people have experienced being blocked up from time to time, whether it’s while travelling, after taking painkillers, or when you’ve let your diet go.</p> <p>But some people will experience constipation more often, and for longer periods. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17464377">Chronic constipation</a> is generally defined as a problem that has persisted for six months or more. It can mean you have hard or lumpy stools that you’re straining to pass, or are passing fewer than three stools per week – or both.</p> <p>Constipation is sometimes related to the rate at which food moves through the colon in order to be expelled as poo. This process is known as <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11894-015-0471-z#CR20">colonic transit</a>.</p> <p>Some people have normal colonic transit, but become constipated because of other factors, such as harder stools. This is called functional constipation.</p> <p>Others have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170709/">conditions of the rectum</a>, such as narrowing or tearing or an inability to relax the anal sphincter, that make it difficult to evacuate the waste.</p> <p><strong>What is the ideal poo form?</strong></p> <p>Poo should ideally be in a sausage form with cracks, or a smooth sausage form. Using the Bristol stool chart, this is type three or four.</p> <p>But if this doesn’t describe your usual poo, don’t worry: a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1379343/">good proportion of people</a> don’t pass these stool types regularly and are perfectly healthy.</p> <p>In terms of how easy it should be to pass, the goal is to prevent undue straining. Passing stools in the <a href="https://theconversation.com/whats-the-best-way-to-go-to-the-toilet-squatting-or-sitting-63991">squatting position</a> or with an elevated foot rest may make it easier.</p> <p>At the extreme end of the spectrum, some people with rectal evacuation disorders find it so difficult to empty their bowels, they often need to resort to digital manual evacuation. This <a href="https://www.health.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0034/429586/lmn-bowel-management.pdf">involves</a> using a gloved, lubricated finger to remove the stool.</p> <p>So what are the key factors that affect the consistency of our stools?</p> <p><strong>Water</strong></p> <p>Our stools are made up of around <a href="https://theconversation.com/your-poo-is-mostly-alive-heres-whats-in-it-102848">75% water</a>. Once the water content <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9558028">falls below 75%</a>, any slight decrease in water content can lead to quite a large increase in the thickness of that stool. And the thicker the stool, the more difficult it will be to pass.</p> <p>An experiment in pigs found a decrease in the water content of stools by just 20% resulted in a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9558028">240-fold increased thickness</a> of that stool.</p> <p>The amount of water in our stool, however, is regulated by the gut. An average person consumes around one to two litres of fluid a day. But this represents <a href="http://pathwaymedicine.org/gi-water-and-electrolyte-absorption">a small fraction</a> of the daily volume of fluid handled by the gut. Most fluid is reabsorbed by the small intestine and colon, resulting in an average stool fluid volume of <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/1601907">around 100mls</a>.</p> <p>It’s important to drink more water when you’re <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15654804">dehydrated</a> – and this will reduce constipation. But drinking additional water when you’re already well hydrated <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9916661">doesn’t improve</a> the consistency of your stools.</p> <p>Be mindful of how frequently we can become mildly dehydrated. When travelling, for example, you might drink more coffee and alcohol than usual, which can lead to dehydration and constipation.</p> <p><strong>Fibre</strong></p> <p>Fibre can hold onto water and is therefore able to soften stools that are too hard.</p> <p>A high-fibre diet leads to a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6269944">quicker colon transit time</a> – the time it takes to digest food and poo out the waste – while a poor-fibre diet is associated with constipation.</p> <p>A high-fibre diet is helpful for patients with normal colonic transit. But people with slow transit constipation generally find their symptoms <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8995945">aren’t improved</a> with dietary fibre.</p> <p>Excessive fibre consumption doesn’t change colonic transit and can <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7912305">even worsen symptoms</a>.</p> <p>But for most of us, there’s certainly room to improve our daily fibre intake. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986479/">recent Australian population survey</a> found more than one in two children and more than seven in 10 adults didn’t consume enough fibre.</p> <p><strong>Exercise</strong></p> <p>People who don’t get enough physical activity are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23977327">more likely</a> to have problems with constipation.</p> <p>On the flipside, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30843436">one review</a> found that exercise, and particularly aerobic exercise, was helpful for constipation. Although the authors acknowledge more research needs to be done in this area.</p> <p>But interestingly, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30642148">a study</a> evaluating Youtube exercise videos marketed as improving bowel problems found they were not all that good at improving constipation.</p> <p><strong>Ageing, pregnancy and periods</strong></p> <p>Constipation is <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2015/0915/p500.html">far more common</a> in older people, often <a href="https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12876-015-0366-3">due to</a> low-fibre diets, dehydration, lack of adequate physical activity, major medical conditions and the use of medications.</p> <p>Constipation occurs <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3206560/">more often</a> in women than in men. Women often report constipation just before and during their periods, which <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11227952">may be due</a> to the effects of the hormone progesterone.</p> <p>Young women in particular are more likely to experience <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1433176/">slow transit constipation</a>, where there’s a delay in digested food passing through the body and being expelled. Symptoms often present around puberty but can develop at any age. People with this condition often have very infrequent bowel motions and rarely feel the urge to poo, even if weeks have gone by without a bowel motion.</p> <p>And constipation is a common problem during pregnancy. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8047482">British study</a> of more than 1,500 women found 39% of pregnant women reported constipation at 14 weeks.</p> <p>This is due, in part, to a surge in progesterone, which slows the body’s ability to digest food and expel the waste. During pregnancy, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418980/">water absorption from the gut increases</a>, which can make stools drier. In late pregnancy, an <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17889809">enlarging uterus</a> can also slow the forward movement of poo.</p> <p><em>Written by Vincent Ho. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-what-causes-constipation-114290"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Grant Denyer opens up about family troubles upon returning to work

<p>Grant Denyer is back in action since suffering a severe back injury while working on his farm in Bathurst, NSW in March.</p> <p>After six weeks, the TV show host and radio presenter returned to his breakfast radio hosting gig on 2DayFM on Monday, opening up about the emotional toll his injuries have taken on his wife, Chezzi and two daughters, Sailor and Scout.</p> <p>“That amount of time away from the family is not good for anybody and it has been incredibly difficult for Chezzi because she's been a sole parent,” the 41-year-old explained.</p> <p>Grant took to the <em>Dancing With The Stars</em><span> </span>stage last month for the grand finale episode, however, was left in a “significant amount of pain” and checked into a sports physiotherapy hospital straight afterwards to recover.</p> <p>The pain left the media personality in such agony that he couldn’t entertain his children either.</p> <p>“When I did get home or when they came to hospital, the kids couldn't jump on me or be thrown up in the air,” he said to radio co-hosts, Ash London and Ed Kavalee.</p> <p>Just last week, Denyer was released into the arms of his family, where he is continuing to recover. The hospital for him eventually felt like a prison, he explained live on air humorously.</p> <p>“It almost gets to the point where it is like a prison – you're asking, ‘What are you in for?’,” he joked.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw82DJeHhOn/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw82DJeHhOn/" target="_blank">A post shared by Grant Denyer (@grantdenyer)</a> on May 1, 2019 at 11:49pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>While in hospital, Denyer says he slowly began to learn how to turn his muscles back on after being almost paralysed following his injury.</p> <p>“When you're in that much pain, your whole body just locks up – you're one giant trunk that doesn't move,” he explained.</p> <p>The Logie award winner suffered an annular fissure (commonly known as a torn disc) in his lower back in March.</p> <p>The injury occurred while Denyer had been hammering stakes into the ground for trees he was in the process of growing on his farm.</p> <p>The 2DayFM host explained on air he had felt a “twang” in his lower back, which became debilitating and forced him to be admitted to hospital.</p> <p>While the TV host was forced to miss the Easter holidays on the coast with his wife, Chezzi and two daughters, Sailor, 7 and Scout, 3, he was able to go home in April for a short time to host<span> </span><em>DWTS</em><span> </span>alongside Amanda Keller.</p> <p>Grant will return to our screens next week to host a new show on Channel 10 called <em>Celebrity Name Game</em>.</p>

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How our sense of taste changes as we age

<p>Taste is a complex phenomenon. We do not experience the sensation through a single sense (as we would when we see something using our sense of sight, for example) but rather it is made up of the five senses working together to allow us to appreciate and enjoy food and drink. Initial visual inspection of food indicates if we would consider consuming it. Then, when eating, smell and flavour combine to allow us to perceive a taste. Meanwhile, the mix of ingredients, texture and temperature can further impact how we experience it.</p> <p>Unfortunately, this means that losing any of our senses, particularly smell or taste, can reduce our enjoyment of food. Think of the last time you had a cold or a blocked nose. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2579627/">It’s likely that</a> the temporary loss of smell changed the way you tasted food, lowered your appetite, or might even have caused you to overconsume as a means of seeking satisfaction and satiation.</p> <p>A similar phenomenon <a href="https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/130/4/927S/4686631">happens when we get older</a>. The way we perceive taste starts to change by the age of 60 – when the sensitivity of our sense of smell <a href="https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181219115505.htm">also starts to diminish</a> – becoming severe from the age of 70.</p> <p><strong>Contributing senses</strong></p> <p>As set out above, when our sense of smell functions less and is not able to detect and discriminate between different smells, it <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2579627/">affects our taste perception</a>. The decline in sensitivity of sense of smell with age is due to several factors, including a reduction in the number of olfactory receptors – which recognise different odour molecules – in the back of the nasal cavity, as well as a declining rate of regeneration of the receptor cells.</p> <p>Another reason for impairment of the sense of taste with ageing is due to structural changes in the taste papillae. These bumpy structures host taste buds in the mouth, on the tongue and palate. One type of these papillae, fungiform, which contain high levels of taste buds, decreases in number as we age and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23013608">also changes in shape</a>, becoming more closed. The more open the papillae, the easier it is for chemicals in food to come into contact with the receptors to create taste. Closed papillae <a href="https://academic.oup.com/chemse/article/43/2/117/4718453">reduce the contact surface</a> between food compounds and receptors resulting in less perception of food tastes.</p> <p><strong>Changing tastes</strong></p> <p>Poor chewing is another factor that contributes to low detection of tastes. Due to ageing or poor oral health, some people lose their teeth, with many resorting to dentures. But dentures, particularly if ill-fitting, can affect the quality of chewing and breaking down of food compounds. This can then reduce the dissolution of the food compounds in saliva and reduces the contact levels with the sensory receptors in the taste buds. In addition, saliva secretion <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2579627/">can also decline</a> as a result of ageing. This means that there is less fluid to carry food compounds to the taste receptors, and less liquid available to help food compounds to dissolve, so taste is more poorly received.</p> <p>General health also plays an important role in our sense of taste at any age. Head injuries, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2980431/pdf/0561142.pdf">medicinal drugs</a>, respiratory infections, <a href="https://www.macmillan.org.uk/information-and-support/coping/side-effects-and-symptoms/eating-problems/changes-in-taste.html">cancer</a>, radiation, and environmental exposure such as <a href="https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140325094810.htm">smoke</a> and particulates can all contribute to an impaired sense of taste and exposure to many of these factors increase as we get older.</p> <p>Not everyone’s sense of taste declines in the same way, however. Changes are known to be diverse among different people and genders, and not everyone shows the same level of impairment as they age. Though some things are inevitable, there are things that we can all do to at least reduce loss of taste. Our preliminary research, for example, has indicated that keeping a healthy diet, an active lifestyle, and ensuring a low to moderate consumption of the five tastes – sweet, sour, salt, umami and bitter – could help to slow down the changes in papillae.</p> <p><em>Written by Anita Setarehnejad and Ruth Fairchild. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/how-our-sense-of-taste-changes-as-we-age-112569"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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