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The healthiest supermarket foods in Australia revealed

<p>Many products on supermarket shelves claim to be “nutritional”, which can make it difficult to discern which items are worth the buy.</p> <p>But now, the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Healthy Food Guide </em>has revealed the winners of their annual top health food picks.</p> <p>“Our team of dietitians have closely analysed hundreds of brands across 10 major food categories to discover the most nutritious and best value for money,” the experts wrote.</p> <p>Here are the winners of each category.</p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">1. Bread</strong></p> <p>The winner of the bread category was Burgen Wholemeal &amp; Seeds as it is packed with a high level of fibre and has a low number of carbohydrates.</p> <p>Other standout entrants included Helga’s Square Loaf and Mission Foods’ low-carb wraps which can be used as a bread substitute.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:500px;" src="/media/7821427/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2153280cc3b24bd085efdd34f4c30e79" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">2. Lunch box snacks</strong></p> <p>Parents looking to reduce lunch box prep time without compromising nutrition should consider Woolworths’ Perfection Fresh Qukes Baby Cucumbers.</p> <p>The snack, which comes in packets of five, was named the winner for the category.</p> <p>All of the lunch box finalists were low in sugar and contained less than 144 calories.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:500px;" src="/media/7821428/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/66935432c9814bbd81520810acc59243" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">3. Pantry staples</strong></p> <p>The winner of the pantry staple category was Cobram Estate Extra Virgin Olive Oil. This product made the top spot for its ability to make “healthy cooking a breeze” as well as its nutritional benefits.</p> <p>Coming in behind the popular olive oil was San Remo’s CousCous and microwaveable Quick Cups by SunRice.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 306px; height:306px;" src="/media/7821429/3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3993e33b7e374d37878b89cc6fc6152f" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">4. Best cereal</strong></p> <p>Shoppers are flooded with a choice of breakfast cereals in the supermarket, with many having labels that are hard to decipher.</p> <p>The cereal which came in first was a porridge by Freedom Foods which comes in sachets and contains more wholegrains than many of its competitors.</p> <p>Other contenders for the spot were Woolworth’s home brand muesli, as well as other porridge and granola-based breakfasts.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:500px;" src="/media/7821430/4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3423c10c783d44bb9bb0879a6432a45d" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">5. Vegetarian food</strong></p> <p>In recent years, supermarkets have expanded their selection of vegetarian options. Impressively, a burger took the title for this category as it contains six grams of both protein and fibre, in addition to being gluten-free. Coles’ homebrand Southern Smoked Sweet Potato and Black Bean Burgers were named the winners.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 305px; height:305px;" src="/media/7821431/5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ce3e33bf25694cc4be87e4f1ffaa5690" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">6. Yoghurts</strong></p> <p>According to the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Healthy Food Guide</em>, nine out of ten Australian’s aren’t consuming enough dairy.</p> <p>The magazine recommends shoppers look to increase their intake by purchasing Rokeby Farms’ Whole Protein Style Quark, which was named the best yoghurt for its high level of protein.</p> <p>However, if the strong flavour is too much, shoppers can also choose Danone’s YoPro, which packs 15g of protein compared to Rokeby’s 17g.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:489.74763406940065px;" src="/media/7821432/6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aeb860f77893451db6966d6d5c043604" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">7. Ready meals</strong></p> <p>While some ready meals lack in taste and nutritional value, the magazine highlighted their top pick. Michelle Bridges and Woolwoths’ Beef and Tomato Casserole contains three servings of vegetables per meal. Super Nature bowls was also a top contender for the category.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:500px;" src="/media/7821433/7.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/344fc376213b40af9f9cbdeca8d31c87" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">8. Best allergy-friendly snack</strong></p> <p>The winner for the best allergy-friendly snack was Carman’s Super Seed &amp; Grain Crackers in the Ancient Grain and Cracked Pepper flavour.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 450px; height:323px;" src="/media/7821434/0.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9c93aa0512034e2b9158b05ecd95cd20" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">9. Best packaged savoury snack</strong></p> <p>The experts at the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Healthy Food Guide</em> magazine voted The Happy Snack Company Roasted Chic Peas (Lightly Salted) as the winner in this category.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 450px; height:323px;" src="/media/7821435/00.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7704f4b66a7347ce9daa25cba080f0d1" /></p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">10. Best packaged sweet snack</strong></p> <p>The brand which took home the title as the best packaged sweet snack was Emma &amp; Tom’s Milk No Added Sugar in Espresso. The brand's products are free from preservatives, concentrates and artificial flavours.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 450px; height:323px;" src="/media/7821436/000.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1819b2ecc6a0429aadd0d7da4c1e2e6f" /></p> <p>Do you buy any of these products? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Body language experts analyse Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank’s royal wedding

<div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Boy, were we in for a treat this year, as not only was there one royal wedding to celebrate, but two. While everyone made sure to tune in to watch Prince Harry marry the now Duchess of Sussex in May, it was a pleasant surprise when the Queen’s granddaughter Princess Eugenie announced her wedding for the month of October.</p> <p>Marrying Jack Brooksbank in the iconic St. George’s chapel, Princess Eugenie looked radiant and positively glowing as she stood in front of family and friends, ready to say her vows while the world watched on.  </p> <p>She stunned in a beautiful Peter Pilotto gown and accessorised it in true royal fashion, with a tiara. But while these were all obvious to the eye, what you may not have noticed is the loved-up couple’s body language.</p> <p>“This couple is completely enveloped in one another,” said human behavioural expert and author Susan Constantine to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/entertainment/a23739200/princess-eugenie-jack-brooksbanks-royal-wedding-body-language/" target="_blank"><em>Goodhousekeeping.com</em>.</a> “From start to finish, you can tell this is a solid couple who actively listens – and respects – one another.”</p> <p>Throughout the ceremony, Jack seemed visibly nervous, as he prepared himself to wed the Princess in front of millions.</p> <p>“He’s sporting a sombre look,” body language expert Patti Wood told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/entertainment/a23739200/princess-eugenie-jack-brooksbanks-royal-wedding-body-language/" target="_blank">GoodHousekeeping.com</a></em>.</p> <p>“He’s holding all of his tension in his mouth without letting it get the best of him.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821407/gettyimages-1051952738.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2629d10370e44d6bad62e36b93474200" /></p> <p>But despite her fiancé’s anxiousness, Eugenie is completely enthralled with her husband-to-be. “Although her mouth is also tightly closed, she’s looking at him like he’s delicious,” says Wood. “It’s a look you’ll typically see when someone spots someone new and attractive, which makes it rare – and extra-special – on their big day.”</p> <p>During the vow and ring exchange, which is the most important part of the entire ceremony, the couple is seen rubbing each other’s fingers. “This is their way of playing and comforting one another,” Wood explains.</p> <p>While the ring exchange didn’t go smoothly for Jack, Constantine points out Eugenie’s reaction to the moment. “When he’s having a hard time with the ring, Eugenie maintains her stance and is very patient with him. She doesn’t try to step in or adjust the ring herself but lets him take charge.”</p> <p>Once the formalities were done and dusted, the newlyweds made their way outside where they shared a kiss in front of a doting crowd.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821408/gettyimages-1051954184.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1225d00a12df4dfb9aca3ca60e066017" /></p> <p>“There’s a special tenderness and sweetness in this highly publicised moment,” Wood explains. “Her light handhold, his check in before the kiss, and the mutual gaze are all good signs, especially on a couple’s wedding day.”</p> <p>As Jack holds on to Eugenie during the kiss, his hand is placed firmly on her lower back, while the Princess has a much gentler touch, and according to Wood, this shows his deep level of respect for his new wife.</p> <p>“This couple has a strong, unbreakable love for one another, which you can see through their mutual gaze and full smiles,” Wood says.</p> <p>Did you watch Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank’s wedding? Let us know in the comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Why you should think twice before eating tomato sauce

<p>It’s a favourite staple for so many us, but it may be doing you significant harm. We’re so used to going to the pantry and grabbing some tomato sauce as a tasty addition to our food, that instinct belies what we’re actually consuming.</p> <p>For some, it may not be surprising to know that tomato sauce is high in sugar and salt, but just how high might shock you. And it may make you think twice about eating it.</p> <p>According to nutritionist Kristen Beck, the condiment has “next to no nutritional value,” with a squirt of the sauce (a tablespoon) having more sugar in it than chocolate or a biscuit, reports <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/you-may-want-to-consider-cutting-out-tomato-sauce-after-reading-this/news-story/a01b992bb8462e7b0b011ccb672c8ba7" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>. </p> <p>“A single serve of tomato sauce is around 15ml (roughly three teaspoons of tomato sauce) and generally equates to 1 teaspoon of sugar (glucose and fructose),” Beck tells the website.</p> <p>Perhaps unknown to many is that several manufacturers of tomato sauce use high-fructose corn syrup, which adds a subtle sweetness, and is an attractive option for these brands because it’s cheaper than using sugar. Fructose corn syrup can cause weight gain and increase insulin in the body.</p> <p>In more bad news, Beck says that the exact amount of cane sugar added to tomato sauce is hard to decipher.</p> <p>“In addition to the natural sugars coming from tomatoes, manufacturers also add around 20% cane sugar to tomato sauce, but the exact amount added is impossible to decipher because Australian labelling laws don’t require the exact amount of sugar added to be listed on the label.”</p> <p>The nutritionist advises consumers to not be fooled by the ingredients listed on tomato sauce labels, despite it having a low calorie count per serving.</p> <p>“When you look at the ingredients list for tomato sauce, on first glance it looks pretty good,” she said.</p> <p>“The first ingredient is tomatoes or tomato puree (approximately 75%) which may sound healthy, but you need to remember that fresh tomatoes are almost 95% water weight. When pureed, the natural sugar content in tomatoes becomes much more concentrated.”</p> <p>There’s a common perception that natural sugars in fruit and vegetables are somehow better for us, but Beck says that’s not the case.</p> <p>“Even if sugars contained naturally in tomatoes may sound healthier than sugar, the World Health Organisation classifies sugars from fruit and vegetable concentrates as the same as all other added sugars.</p> <p>“Concentrated fructose, such as that contained in tomato sauce and fruit juice extracts, has been shown to be associated with the body’s inflammatory response and fat accumulation around your midsection (but fructose in whole fresh fruit is still very healthy for you).”</p> <p>The amount of salt in tomato sauce is also concerning, with one serving having 160mg of sodium, which takes a big bite out of the recommended daily sodium intake of 920mg.</p> <p>But there is some good news for sauce lovers – the tomato puree contained in tomato sauce is rich in the antioxidant lycopene, about 10 times greater than in fresh tomatoes, according to Beck.</p> <p>“Lycopene is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease and prostate cancer risk,” she says.</p> <p>Will you be thinking twice about your tomato sauce intake? Let us know in the comments section below.</p>

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Body language expert's verdict: Did Harry and Meghan have a spat at Eugenie's wedding?

<p>On Friday, Prince Harry and Meghan joined together with the royal family to watch on as Princess Eugenie married Jack Brooksbank.</p> <p>And while the Duke and Duchess of Sussex are known for not shying away from public displays of affection, a body language expert has revealed the reason why the couple showed a “less than tactile display”.</p> <p>Speaking to <u><em><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/"><strong>The Sun's Fabulous Online</strong></a></em>,</u> body language expert Judi James revealed that Harry and Meghan looked tense as they sat inside St George’s chapel, waiting for the ceremony to begin.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 332.28643216080405px;" src="/media/7821335/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/05b190cbf22d4eea87537eafc78a3c0c" /></p> <p>“For some reason Harry looks distracted and fidgety as they wait in the pews, while Meghan sits facing front and looking demure and impervious, with a polite social smile on her face,” Judi said<em>.</em></p> <p>“Harry mutters something to Meghan and her eyebrows raise before she turns her head towards him, using what looks like an emphatic gesture with each word of her reply.”</p> <p>She added: “Meghan looks a little bit like a mother with a naughty kid and she even raises both of her hands in a gesture that could mean slight exasperation.</p> <p>“Whatever she says she then leans forward to resume her conversation with the guest in the row in front.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 333.9793281653747px;" src="/media/7821336/2.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ff7d6e72077540a4a11afc06555ff9e5" /></p> <p>“Harry's response is to rub his face, sniff and lick his lips impatiently as he sinks against the side of the chair, looking away.”</p> <p>Although the cause of the tension between the two is unknown, the couple quickly bounced back and became their normal outgoing selves again.</p> <p>Judi James explained: “If the pair did have a small disagreement it was soon over because they were back to their normal loving, hand-holding and hugging behaviours once the ceremony was over.”</p> <p>Harry and Meghan said their vows in the same church earlier this year on May 19.</p> <p>The Duchess of Sussex wore an elegant navy Givenchy dress to Eugenie’s nuptials, accessorising with a hat by Noel Stewart and Manolo Blahnik heels.</p> <p>For her big day, Eugenie wore a low-back wedding gown by Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vo, proudly showing her scoliosis scar following surgery when she was 12 years old. </p>

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Why wet weather makes us fat

<p>It’s no secret that Aussies can encounter all seasons of weather in just one day.</p> <p>It is very common for a sunny day to quickly develop into stormy weathers within hours.</p> <p>But besides from keeping us locked indoors or drenching our clothes, it turns out there is another consequence of rainy weather – making us overeat.</p> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/diet/why-wet-weather-makes-us-fat/news-story/46b5864bb9e68efbfcf7ea2a3593013b"><strong style="font-style: inherit;"><u>news.com.au</u></strong></a>, nutritionist Susie Burrell explains how rain is adding to our waistlines.</p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">1. We link the rain to feeling cold</strong></p> <p>“Human beings like to eat when it is cold — physiologically eating helps to warm us up via the slight increase in metabolic rate that occurs when we eat and we have been programmed to seek out warming, hearty meals when the temperature drops,” Susie explains.</p> <p>However, when summer showers hit, our brains continue to connect the wetness with cold temperatures, even if it is still hot.</p> <p>“While temperatures are not that low, our brains are still telling us that rain means cold and discomfort, acting as a trigger to seek out something warm and comforting to eat,” she said.</p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">2. We are inside more</strong></p> <p>Because wet weather traps us indoors, it significantly increases our accessibility to sugary snacks hiding in the kitchen. Susie explains that the most significant predictor of discretionary or junk food intake is accessibility.</p> <p>In order to avoid the sugar cravings, it is important to keep busy and stick to your normal meal times. Many people also tend to watch more TV when there is bad weather, making it more inviting to consume tempting snacks.</p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">3. We are bored</strong></p> <p>When people are bored, food becomes an easy way to occupy us. Susie explains: “When we are staying indoors more, over a number of days, especially during school holidays, cooking, baking and eating are among the easiest, most satisfying ways to occupy us, multiple times each day.” </p> <p>To overcome this urge, Susie recommends using rainy days to catch up on all the jobs that are sitting on your to-do list to keep your mind occupied.</p> <p><strong style="font-style: inherit;">4. We use the rain as an excuse</strong></p> <p>Because rainy weather has the tendency to make days a lot more gloomier, it can also be easy to reach for something unhealthy to perk yourself up.  </p> <p>“One of the easiest ways we can feel better instantly is to eat something yummy — a slice of cake with a coffee; a yummy dessert or chocolate bar with our afternoon snack just to pep us up a little. If this kind of eating is just occasional, it is not an issue, but when you have weeks of rain it can become a problem,” says Susie. </p> <p>To avoid snacking on something you will regret, opt for a herbal tea or low-calorie hot chocolate to give you an energy boost.</p> <p>Are you guilty of any of these habits when it’s raining? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Mum stirs heated debate online after asking if she should shave her 6-year-old’s legs

<p>A mum has sparked an intense debate online after asking a controversial question on a parenting forum.</p> <p>The mum, who goes by the username TellerTuesday4Eva, posted on <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mumsnet.com/" target="_blank">Mumsnet</a></em> about whether she should shave her six-year-old daughter’s body hair.</p> <p>“A big part of me knows this is ridiculous, but there’s another part that wants [my daughter] to make her own choices,” she wrote.</p> <p>“She has and always has had very hairy legs and a hairy lower back. I presumed it was baby down, and would go away in time, but it hasn’t, and it’s gone darker as she’s gotten older.”</p> <p>The concerned mother mentioned that the body hair is affecting her daughter’s self-esteem as she notices other young girls her age are not dealing with the same issue.</p> <p>The poster did say that she has had conversations with her child about how all bodies are made differently but worries that the message isn’t coming across to her daughter.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821164/31852e62531f306b94ac7aa155411bd0.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/975885d1d61349faa309137c6bab5d38" /></p> <p>“In the summer she became aware of it,” she wrote.</p> <p>“She asked me if there was a way to get rid of the hair, we talked about it and everyone’s bodies being different.</p> <p>“Since she’s gone back to school she’s mentioned it again quite a few times. I have to point out here that nobody else has mentioned it, classmates etc. It’s [my daughter] herself that has the issue … she’s now getting upset about swimming and not wanting to go because she says when her legs get wet it looks worse. The hair’s quite long so when it gets wet and lays flat she is right in what she’s saying.”</p> <p>She asked for users on the site to offer their advice if they were in her situation.</p> <p>Surprisingly, she received an overwhelming amount of support, with many parents reacting positively to her daughter’s concern.</p> <p>“I was a very hairy child (well still am quite) and I desperately wanted to shave but my mum wouldn’t let me. I did it myself when I was 13 without my parents – with a cheap Bic razor! I think helping her is better than refusing and then her doing it herself,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“I would help her remove the hair. It’s really embarrassing being the first hairy girl and just because her peers haven’t noticed yet, doesn’t mean they won’t. She’s not comfortable with the hair on her legs, and given most women choose to remove theirs, she’s not expressing a controversial opinion that is likely to change when she gets older,” added another. “If when she’s a teen she decides to hell with it, she’d rather be hairy all over, the hair will grow back. It’s not an irreversible decision or something she’ll grow out of.”</p> <p>After sifting through all the advice that was given, the mum took to the forum to update everyone on how she spoke to her daughter and they both decided that removing the hair was the best way to go.</p> <p>“Thank you all so much for your replies. I was well prepared to get flamed, but overwhelmed with how supportive you’ve all been,” she wrote. “We’ve talked about it at length tonight and decided that we’ll try a mitt first to see what the outcome is.”</p> <p>Do you think the mum is making the right decision? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Why you're tripling the risk of developing a deadly disease if you take these heartburn tablets

<p>A new study has found that popular heartburn pills can triple the risk of potentially deadly infections.</p> <p>The research found that patients on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were more likely to fall ill with deadly bugs, including E. coli.</p> <p>Researchers believe the drugs could be allowing harmful organisms to spread by reducing levels of the stomach acid that normally kills them.</p> <p>The drugs, including brands like Zanprol, Prevacid and Prilosec, are prescribed to an estimated 55 million patients in England alone.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 305.993690851735px;" src="/media/7821146/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/11eb887af851492099913bbf604cd8e1" /></p> <p>The tablets work by reducing the production of acid by blocking the enzyme in the wall of the stomach that produces acid.</p> <p>Microbiologists at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust studied 126 hospital patients sick with drug resistant bugs called ESBL-enterobacteriae.</p> <p>These bugs, such as E.coli, occur naturally in the bowel where they do no harm. However, if they escape to other parts of the body they can become life-threatening.</p> <p>The reports of ESBL-bugs are increasing and don’t respond to commonly-used antibiotics like penicillin.</p> <p>Patients in the study were asked if they had taken heartburn medicines in the past six months.</p> <p>The study, published in the Journal of Hospital Infection, found infected patients were three times more like to have taken PPIs than a group of healthy volunteers.</p> <p>In a report the scientists explained: “PPIs are widely overprescribed and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry.”</p> <p>“This is the first time this risk factor has been identified in a UK hospital population, and the magnitude is greater than in previous community-based studies.</p> <p>“Reducing inappropriate use of PPIs may reduce transmission.”</p> <p>Several studies in recent years have linked over-use of PPIs with stomach cancer, stroke and even reduced sperm count in men.</p> <p>Despite PPIs only being prescribed for normally four weeks, it’s feared that millions stay on the tablets for years.</p> <p>Research shows 25 per cent of patients are still on them after a year and four per cent continue on the pills after five years.</p> <p>Less than half of those who remain on the tablets long-term are advised by doctors to try to come off them.</p> <p>Do you take heartburn tablets on a regular basis? Tell us in the comments below. </p> <p> </p>

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Jools Oliver praised for sharing candid photo from son’s birth

<p>Jools Oliver, the wife of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, has been praised for sharing a very intimate photo that was taken just seconds after the birth of her youngest son.</p> <p>The photo, which was taken in 2016, shows the mother of five reaching out to hold newborn River Rocket Blue Dallas in their first moments together.</p> <p>The 43-year-old gave UK baby goods retailer Mothercare permission to share the image on Instagram as part of its “First Steps” campaign, which is aimed at celebrating the joy of becoming a parent.</p> <p>"The sheer emotion on Jools’ face says it all, pure LOVE LOVE and more LOVE," the company wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoRxTsyArJ1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoRxTsyArJ1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Mothercare UK (@mothercareuk)</a> on Sep 28, 2018 at 10:09am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The raw image is starkly different to most post-birth photos shared by most celebrity mothers, which are often taken hours or days after labour.</p> <p>Fans were quick to encourage Jools for sharing an unfiltered photo of such a special moment in her life.</p> <p>"What an impactful moment in a mother's life caught on camera," one person wrote.</p> <p>Another added: "Wonderful photo @joolsoliver ... I’m about to have my fifth baby and I’m so anxious this time around!!"</p> <p>This photo is not the first time Jools has shared a vulnerable snap of motherhood.</p> <p>When son River was born in August 2016, she shared the news on Instagram alongside a photo of her breastfeeding the newest addition to her family.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BI08AT6g8kk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BI08AT6g8kk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jools Oliver (@joolsoliver)</a> on Aug 7, 2016 at 5:12pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Little baby boy Oliver has arrived we are so very happy, blessed, grateful and totally in love all over again and so very proud of our two eldest daughters who cut the cord," she wrote.</p> <p>Earlier this year, she also bravely shared another photo from her first moments with River, revealing that she and Jamie had lost two children.</p> <p>In honour of International Day of the Midwife, Jools wrote: "We have been so lucky to have been blessed with the most wonderful midwives for each of our 5 children and the 2 little angels we lost.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BiaKPIBAbz5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BiaKPIBAbz5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jools Oliver (@joolsoliver)</a> on May 5, 2018 at 1:13pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Kind, calm, warm and gentle. When you are scared and at your most vulnerable the squeeze of a hand and a stroke of your head means more than they will ever know."</p> <p>Jamie and Jools regularly share sweet photos with fans of their beautiful children, Poppy, 16, Daisy, 15, Petal, 9, Buddy, 8, and River, 2. </p>

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The revolutionary poo pills that could be a weight-loss boon

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">The secret to getting skinny may finally be revealed, but it's a bit hard to swallow.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A New Zealand research facility has undertaken a revolutionary study on four overweight teenage girls and developed a "magic pill" that could be a diet and exercise alternative to losing weight – a capsule filled with human faeces.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The aim of the study, which finishes at the end of 2019, was to trial these "poo pills" on obese adolescents. They wanted to see if the faeces of a fit, healthy person could alter the gut microbiome of an overweight person, which would in turn help them lose weight and maintain a healthy weight. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">If their theory is right, this groundbreaking treatment could change the lives of millions.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Most of what we know about the gut microbiome we learnt from studying mice," says Wayne Cutfield, Professor of Paediatric Endocrinology at the Liggins Institute.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"If you take the gut microbiome from a thin mouse and put it in a fat mouse, the fat mouse gets a lot thinner."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Cutfield says the basic science behind this is that the bacteria from a healthy person or "superdonor's" gut is able to "scavenge calories from waste", meaning the recipient will lose weight.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">So what does it take to be a superdonor? </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Superdonors needed to be completely healthy and not be on any medication, slim based on their BMI, have a healthy diet and exercise regularly," says Cutfield.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Only about 10 per cent of the uber-healthy people who volunteered to be donors for this study made the cut.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In a three-episode series airing in New Zealand, <em>The Good Sh*t </em>follows four overweight teenage girls to see if this revolutionary treatment actually works.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The Liggins Institute chose obese adolescents for their study due to the limited treatment options that overweight teenagers have to manage their weight.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Bariatric surgery is only available in limited amounts for adults and the drugs used to treat adult obesity aren't licensed in children, and they aren't very effective anyway," says Cutfield.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We chose to focus on this because teenage obesity is probably the biggest health problem New Zealand faces."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Alofa, one of the participants, joined the study when she realised she wanted to make a lifestyle change.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I was probably the heaviest that I've ever been," she said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"One of my family members had a wedding coming up and I was like, 'Jeez, what are the photos going to look like?' That, and it was getting really expensive plus-size shopping."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Alofa said a turning point for her was a frightening moment on a school trip.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We had gone camping in the caves, and I got stuck in one of the caves. I was like, 'I actually don't know how I'm going to get out of here'. That was a real eye-opener for me."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Alofa says a challenge of the study was that it's a double blind trial. This means neither the scientists or the participants will know who has been given the real drug until the end of the experiment in 2019.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I needed to have the mindset that if this didn't work or if I didn't even get the real pill, that there was still hope I would be able to lose the weight myself."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">So, could anyone benefit from poo pills? If they actually work, yes.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"If this treatment is shown to be effective, it could benefit millions of people, says Cutfield.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We know that dieting and rigorous exercise can work, but humans are hedonistic creatures. These pills are a once-only treatment, that you only take over two days, and our results show that they effects last at least six months."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">What you're really wondering though, is how anyone can stomach swallowing someone else's faeces?</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"What we do is strain and sieve out the bacteria and get rid of all the waste, which is the smelly bit," says Cutfield.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We clean the bacteria up and put them in capsules, so they're completely odourless. That's the key thing because if you could smell it, like ripe French cheese three feet away, you'd go, 'I'm not sure I can do this.'"</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">What do you think of this revolutionary treatment to tackle obesity – would you take poo pills? Tell us in the comments below. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Sinead Corcoran. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/107401769/revolutionary-poo-pills-developed-in-nz-could-be-a-weightloss-boon">Stuff.co.nz</a>. </em></p>

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The final days of Weight Watchers as we know it

<p>Although Weight Watchers has been a weight loss leader since 1963, the company is undergoing a dramatic transformation as it rebrands its core values and diet methods.</p> <p>Rather than simply losing weight, the company will now focus on “overall health and wellness”.</p> <p>To affirm the transformation, Weight Watchers will now be known as “WW”, alongside the tagline: “wellness that works”.</p> <p>While speaking to <a href="https://www.news.com.au"><strong style="font-style: inherit;"><u>news.com.au</u></strong></a>, President and chief executive officer Mindy Grossman said the name change reflects the brand’s new focus on helping clients look at health holistically – whether they need help losing weight, eating healthier, getting active or improving their mental health.</p> <p>“We are the biggest believers in body positivity… the first thing we ask people is not, ‘Do you want to lose weight?’, but ‘What does healthy mean to you? What are your health goals?’ Mine might be different to yours, and once we ask that we also ask what things we need to do to get there,” she said.</p> <p>“If one thing is to lose weight, we are going to help them do that, but we don’t dictate a weight and we don’t tell you what you have to do.”</p> <p>She said that the company would no longer just look at a “number on a scale”, but support the overall needs and goals of members.</p> <p>“No body is created equal — that’s really important to us,” she said.</p> <p>The WW app will be updated on October 4 to reflect the name change, while other big changes will be rolled out at a later date.</p> <p>These changes will include a partnership with mindfulness organisation Headspace, the introduction of the WellnessWins program to reward members for positive everyday habits and improvements to the current FitPoints system.</p> <p>WW will also help clients find other members with similar interests or those at similar life stages and from January 2019, every product sold by the company will be free from artificial sweeteners, flavours, colours and preservatives.</p> <p>Ms Grossman said the company’s transformation was here to stay and not just a trend they were following.</p> <p>“We don’t see it as a trend... 'wellness’ is in the Zeitgeist everywhere… and it’s as simple as it sounds — we inspire healthy habits for life, and provide tools that people need," she said.</p> <p>In February, Weight Watchers made the shock announcement that they would be removing the iconic “before and after” weight loss photos.</p> <p>Oprah Winfrey, Weight Watchers ambassador and major shareholder, shared her support for the company to ditch its name.</p> <p>“As Weight Watchers becomes WW, I believe we will continue to inspire people not only to eat well, but to move more, connect with others and continue to experience the joys of a healthy life,” she said.</p>

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Body language expert shares verdict on Prince Harry and his mother-in-law

<p>A body language expert has weighed in on Prince Harry’s relationship with his mother-in-law, Doria Ragland, after the duo spent the day together to support Meghan at her charity cookbook launch.</p> <p>While Prince Harry has been known to have a shy demeanour in the past, Meghan appears to take after her mum’s ability to appear natural in the spotlight.</p> <p>Speaking to The Sun, body language expert Judi James said the 34-year-old appeared “shy and a little bit intimidated” by the company of his mother-in-law.</p> <p>Judi said: “Doria and Meghan seem to form a really tight double act, with both women displaying signals of elegant confidence.”</p> <p>She added, “Meghan’s attention is clearly primarily on her mother here which might be a huge shift for Harry who has so far been bathing in her flattering eye contact and touch rituals.”</p> <p>When the trio arrived at the event, Harry was seen walking a few steps behind Doria and Meghan.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7820937/image_.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/043fb367b4354591bfb5860c5f81ca6b" /></p> <p>“Harry’s body language suggests he’s stepping back slightly to allow the real power double act to shine,” she explained.</p> <p>“He walks behind Doria and Meghan, using a small self-comfort barrier ritual with one hand touching his belt, and when he stands with Doria he keeps a space between them rather than being more tactile or engaging with her.</p> <p>“Harry's dad Prince Charles used far more reassurance and touch rituals with Doria on Harry and Meghan's wedding day but Harry seems more compliant and just a tiny bit intimidated like most new husbands are by their mothers-in-law.</p> <p>"He looks happy to allow his very confident-looking wife and mother-in-law do their own thing while he watches in admiration.”</p> <p>Despite his reportedly “shy” demeanour, Harry didn’t mind showing off his cheeky nature when he was caught stealing extra samosas from the marquee.</p> <p>When he noticed he had been caught out, he flashed a wide grin at the camera.</p>

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Here’s what happens to your body after you have a soft drink

<p>Half an hour after finishing a can of soft drink, your blood sugar has spiked.</p> <p>So you're probably feeling pretty good. Your cells have plenty of energy, more than they need.</p> <p>Maybe that soft drink had some caffeine as well, giving your central nervous system a kick, making you feel excitable, suppressing any tiredness you might have.</p> <p>But a<span> </span><a href="https://baker.edu.au/news/media-releases/soft-drink-metabolic">clever new study</a>, published on Monday, nicely illustrates that while you're feeling good, strange things are going on inside your blood vessels – and in the long run they are not good for you.</p> <p>For this study, 28 obese or overweight young adults agreed to sit in a lab for a whole day while having their blood continuously sampled.</p> <p>The volunteers ate a normal breakfast, lunch and dinner. At morning tea and afternoon tea, researchers from Melbourne's Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute gave them a can of soft drink.</p> <p>Their blood samples revealed exactly what happened next.</p> <p>Sugar from, say, a chocolate bar is released slowly, as your digestive system breaks it down.</p> <p>With a can of soft drink, almost no break-down time is needed. The drink's sugar starts to hit your bloodstream within about 30 minutes. That's why you get such a big spike.</p> <p>Your body responds to high levels of blood sugar by producing a hormone called insulin.</p> <p>Insulin pumps through the bloodstream and tells your cells to suck in as much sugar as they can. The cells then start burning it, and storing what they can't burn.</p> <p>That quickly reduces the amount of sugar in the blood, and gives you a burst of energy. So far, so good.</p> <p>But the sugar keeps coming. High levels of blood sugar will quickly damage your blood vessels, so the body keeps making insulin.</p> <p>In fact, just having two cans of soft drink meant the volunteers' insulin stayed significantly higher than usual - all day.</p> <p>After lunch, and another soft drink for afternoon tea, their sugar and insulin levels spiked again.</p> <p>And, once again, over the next few hours blood sugar dropped but insulin levels stayed stubbornly high – right through to late afternoon, when the study finished.</p> <p>The study demonstrates that two cans of soft drink is all it takes to give your pancreas – the crucial organ that produces insulin – a serious workout, says Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, the study's senior author.</p> <p>"If you did this day in, day out, your pancreas would be under considerable stress – and this is how diabetes can develop," says Kingwell. "Having a little can of soft drink in the morning is going to have lasting effects throughout the day."</p> <p>If your diet has too much sugar in it, forcing your body to keep your insulin high all the time, eventually your cells will grow insulin-resistant. That forces the pancreas to make even more insulin, adding to its workload. Eventually, it will burn out.</p> <p>But something else interesting is happening inside your body as well. Insulin tells your body to burn sugar, but it also tells it to stop burning fat.</p> <p>Normally, the body burns a little bit of both at once. But after a soft drink, your insulin stays high all day – so you won't burn much fat, whether you're on a diet or not.</p> <p>One of the study's participants, Michelle Kneipp, is now trying as hard as she can to kick her soft-drink habit.</p> <p>She's switched soft drinks for flavoured sparkling water. "It still tastes like soft drink, and it's still got the fizz," she says.</p> <p>"But it's hard, because sugar's a very addictive substance."</p> <p><em>Written by Liam Mannix. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Stuff.co.nz.</strong></span></a>  </em></p>

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Why I'm done dyeing my grey hair

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>OPINION:<span> </span></strong>Something weird is happening at the shops, at church and on the train. Women I don't know are telling me I'm brave.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"You look beautiful, but I don't have the courage," a lady said in the parking lot. "My hairdresser is my sister and she won't let me."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I love your style, but I can't risk it," whispered a woman at a business conference.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">My act of courage isn't much. It's not like I went under enemy fire to rescue a fellow soldier, or saved a baby from drowning. I just stopped colouring my hair.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">I had dark-brown hair that started getting noticeably grey by the time I was 30. So like a lot of women, I started dyeing it, first on my own in the bathtub until I got sick of the stains on the porcelain. Then I switched to getting it done at the salon.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It was expensive, messy and time-consuming. My interest in gossip magazines isn't enough to fill two hours sitting in a chair under a dryer, smelling chemicals. And my hair grows fast, so I needed to go back every five weeks to keep from getting a "skunk streak" of white at my centre part.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">When I didn't have time to make an appointment, which was often, I would colour in the roots with a special "touch-up" crayon and feel like an idiot.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">What really got me was seeing pictures of stars like George Clooney and knowing that it is considered fine and sexy for a mature man to have grey hair. Men with obvious dyed hair can look a little silly – think about certain ageing rock stars and politicians.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><img style="width: 500px; height: 284.091px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7820818/1-george-clooney.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c4307328937f491a97bad6532e163551" /></p> <div class="sics-component__caption__caption" style="text-align: center;"><em>Why is it considered fine and sexy for men like George Clooney to have grey hair but not women?</em></div> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">But many women seem to think they have to keep up the illusion forever that they are still 35 (at most) and fertile, unencumbered by too much wisdom and too many accomplishments.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Grey hair is one of the last feminist fashion frontiers. We no longer have to cinch ourselves into corsets. Many of us have given up crippling high heels and tossed the pantyhose. We're asserting ourselves at work, "leaning in", as the saying goes, asking for raises, demanding respect and a harassment-free environment.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">But our hair starts to silver and suddenly we're slaves to spending $500 or more a year to pretend something our male colleagues don't need to pretend. It's quite a racket.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Don't get me wrong – men and women all want to look good as long as they can. And people should do what they want with their own bodies – my mother is 91 and still blonde and why not? Only her hairdresser knows for sure.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">I just wish more women would feel that it was OK to let it go, because going grey has done something for me besides saving time and money.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">I like my natural hair. I like how varied it is – silver along the sides and still dark in the back. I like how it has gotten curly and full again, in a way it wasn't after years of chemical damage. It's a lovely colour, which is why some young people are dyeing their hair grey on purpose.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">I also like that it has given me some needed perspective in a society that makes a cult of youth, disdains maturity and ignores the reality of passing time. It reminds me that I'm not a kid anymore. And this isn't a bad thing.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Not being a kid anymore means I read the books I want, and not the books I feel I should read. It means that I'm still going to be polite, but not so polite that I lose myself and don't get what I'm after.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It means not wasting my time at events I don't need to attend when I'd rather be with family and friends.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">When I see my hair in the mirror, it's a memento mori, a reminder that my time is not infinite, and I should spend it doing what matters.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Anti-ageism activist Ashton Applewhite wrote that one problem with trying to pass for younger is that it's like a gay person trying to pass for straight – it's based in shame over something that is not shameful. I wouldn't take the comparison that far, but I agree there's nothing shameful about growing older. It's what happens if we're lucky. And pretending it's not happening is a way of surrendering power.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">I don't think I'm brave. I'm just frugal, and contrary. If the crowd goes one way, I want to go the other. I see my grey hair as a little act of rebellion against the toxic idea that people lose value as they age, instead of gaining it. To quote David Crosby, I see grey hair as my "freak flag".</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">And I'm letting it fly.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Mary Wisniewski. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/beauty/107009322/why-im-done-dyeing-my-grey-hair">Stuff.co.nz</a>. </em></p>

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People are still dying from the 9/11 attacks 17 years later

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">The flood of people coming down with illnesses stemming from the toxic dust kicked up by the 9/11 terror attacks in New York City in 2001 has been so great that the US$7.3 billion (AUD$10.4 billion) dedicated to sufferers could run out before everyone has been helped, the<span> </span><em>Daily News<span> </span></em>has learned.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund (VCF), which is responsible for providing financial assistance to those suffering from illnesses caused by Ground Zero contaminants, is already showing signs of strain.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We do periodic assessments of our data," VCF Special Master Rupa Bhattacharyya told the<em><span> </span>Daily News</em>. The assessments, she said, create projections that will determine if the fund will be able to help everyone before it expires on December 18, 2020.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Looking at the data more recently, I'm starting to get a little concerned," she said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Bhattacharyya wouldn't say if the fund is running out of money. She said the VCF plans to publish its updated projections in the next few weeks "and maybe seek some public comment on changes that will have to be made regarding our policies and procedures."</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Survivor advocates are concerned that, as the money peters out, those who file for compensation from now until the end will get less money than those who filed earlier with the same problems.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I'm pretty confident that they will run out of money," said 9/11 advocate John Feal. "But I don't think people should be concerned right now. I bet my one kidney that we will get the VCF extended."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Sources with knowledge of the VCF's money woes said that a bill to extend the fund could be brought to Congress as early as next month.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Through August 31, the VCF has reviewed 38,502 compensation claims from 9/11 illness sufferers this year – a nearly 28 per cent jump over the 30,081 claims it took in last year over the same period. Of the 38,502, about 20,000 claims already have been approved with payouts that can range up to US$200,000 AUD$280,660), depending on the illness.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The VCF has also seen a 94 per cent jump in "deceased claims" – requests for compensation by estates or family members of a 9/11 survivor who has already succumbed to illness. As of the end of August, 720 families have sought some form of financial compensation this year. In 2017, about 371 families did so in the same timeframe.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">And these numbers could continue to rise in the next few years, Bhattacharyya said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"There are diseases with long latency periods," she said. "Mesothelioma is one that is talked about often, and you won't even see it for 15 or 20 years. We won't see those claims for a while."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">According to the website Asbestos.com, an estimated 400 tonnes of asbestos – the microscopic fibres that cause mesothelioma – was used in the construction of the World Trade Center. All of it was released into the air when the buildings were pulverised into dust.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A source with knowledge of the assessment procedure said the VCF still has more than US$3b (AUD$4.2b) in funding left to distribute, so any concerns Bhattacharyya might have are not imminent.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We're required by statute to periodically reassess our policies and procedures to make sure we are prioritising the claimants with the most debilitating conditions," the source said. "Her concerns are part of the periodic reassessment process that was built into the statute. It's part of what the statute requires VCF to do."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Scores of the people inhaled the dust as they sifted through the powder-caked debris looking for survivors and remains, in what is considered one of the worst environmental disasters in the United States.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It was unprecedented in the US," said Dr John Howard, administrator for the World Trade Center Health. "The acute number of fatalities on that day has not been surpassed, and the chronic health effects have people succumb to illnesses ... it seems incomparable that any other disaster is close.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We don't want to see another one like this," he said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><img style="width: 500px; height: 284.091px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7820766/1-twin-towers.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a38b355628894a28a3898a2870e444d6" /></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">As of June, 88,484 first responders and survivors have registered with the World Trade Center Health Program.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Of that number, roughly 10,000 have some form of cancer that has been certified by the program.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"[That's] 10,000 people that were either first responders or were in the trade union, or victims, survivors or volunteers," former<span> </span><em>Daily Show</em><span> </span>host and 9/11-survivor advocate John Stewart told the<em><span> </span>Daily News</em>. "I mean, this is an outrageous number."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Howard said the health program has seen a "growth spurt" within the last year – including a 260 per cent increase in those who either worked or lived at or around the site, which the program categorises as "survivors".</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">So many survivors have been coming through the door that the program has opened a new clinic on Franklin St in Lower Manhattan that will see an estimated 750 patients a month.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">According to the best estimates, 90,000 first responders showed up at the World Trade Center in the aftermath of the attack. An additional 400,000 survivors lived and worked in the area at the time.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Of that number, about 55,000 first responders and fewer than 20,000 survivors have registered with the World Trade Center Health Program – meaning thousands more could be signing up in the next few years.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"The numbers are real," said Feal. "This is not getting better. It's getting worse."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Feal estimates that someone dies of a 9/11-related illness an average of every 2.7 days. Neither the VCF nor the World Trade Center Health Program keeps records on how many people have died of a 9/11-related illness, but Feal says the number is close to 2100. By the 20th anniversary of 9/11, more people will have died of an illness stemming from Ground Zero than the 2700 who died at the Twin Towers that day.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"More people will have cancer," he said. "More people will have died, and that pains me."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">On the weekend, the FealGood Foundation will add 163 new names to its wall of 9/11 heroes in Nesconsent in the US state of New York. They're people who died of 9/11 illnesses – both survivors and first responders – since last September, when 141 names were added to the wall.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It's the most we've ever put on our wall," said Feal, who in just the last two weeks has collected three more names for next year's ceremony. "The 9/11 fraternity is shrinking."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Feal showed up at Ground Zero a day after the terror attacks. He, too, inhaled the smoke and dust swirling around, but hasn't gotten sick yet.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">But tomorrow is another day.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We're all looking over our shoulder, asking ourselves, 'When am I next?' That's the most prevalent conversation between survivors."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">And it didn't have to be that way. Advocates say the federal government could have demanded first responders and volunteers wear masks so they didn't have to breathe the toxic stew of death in – but they didn't.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Instead, Christie Todd Whitman – administrator for the federal Environmental Protection Agency at the time – announced a few days after the attacks that the air was safe to breathe.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Her moral compass was pointed in the wrong direction," Feal said. "Ten thousand people are sick because of her words. If she didn't say it, people wouldn't have gotten sick. We weren't given the respiratory and hazmat gear. Human life took a backseat to the almighty dollar."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A call to Whitman for comment was not returned.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Stewart, who fought to get the Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act passed – giving coverage to those afflicted with Ground Zero-related health woes for the next 75 years – tends to get indignant when someone mentions how the government said the air was safe to breathe.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"No scientist in their right mind, no environmental-protection person in their right mind [would have thought that]," Stewart said. "I'm not a professional, I just live near there – I knew how dangerous the air was.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"You couldn't not know," he said about the white dust that seemed to be everywhere in the weeks after the attack. "We had it all on our windows and cars. You could smell it for weeks and months. Every material that was at that site was pulverised and then burned, and anybody that was near there was inhaling it as fine atmospheric molecules."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Noah Goldberg and Thomas Tracy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/106981880/people-are-still-dying-from-the-911-attacks-17-years-later">Stuff.co.nz</a>. </em></p> </div>

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Needless medical procedures: When is a colonoscopy necessary?

<p>A<span> </span><a href="https://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/early/2018/08/06/bmjqs-2018-008338">recent study</a><span> </span>found up to 20 per cent of all procedures performed in a New South Wales hospital were either unhelpful or harmful. Some of these, which included performing a colonoscopy for constipation, were becoming more prevalent.</p> <p>A colonoscopy is a test where a small, flexible tube is inserted into the bowel to check for abnormalities such as growths on the bowel, which can lead to bowel cancer.</p> <p>Around 600,000 colonoscopies were<span> </span><a href="http://acsqhc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=4192ad4f3a394c9ca5f7dfed5923698a">performed in Australia</a><span> </span>in 2013-2014. This figure is expected to rise to more than a million a year by 2020, equivalent to one in every 25 Australians.</p> <p>A colonoscopy is an invasive procedure and comes with risks, including bowel perforation. So, it’s important to have the test only if you’re likely to benefit from it.</p> <p><strong>Why are colonoscopies performed? </strong></p> <p>Bowel cancer is the<span> </span><a href="https://bowel-cancer.canceraustralia.gov.au/statistics">second-most-common</a><span> </span>cause of cancer-related death in Australia. Current<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22356322">evidence suggests</a><span> </span>colonoscopy significantly reduces the risk of bowel cancers. This is where colonoscopy’s greatest benefit lies. Colonoscopy can also be used to diagnose inflammatory bowel diseases.</p> <p>Bowel cancers start out as small growths in the bowel called polyps. These can be seen with a colonoscopy and cut out by doctors during the test.</p> <p>So, colonoscopy is more worthwhile when done in people at an increased risk of bowel cancer. The most important risk factor is age, as cancer rates increase in people older than 50.</p> <p>But some younger people can be at risk due to family history. And<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/25251195/?i=5&amp;from=/23011536/related">recent data suggest</a>s<span> </span>bowel cancer in young people is rising here and internationally, though we’re not sure why.</p> <p><strong>Who should have a colonoscopy? </strong></p> <p>A doctor will usually recommend a colonoscopy if patients are at increased risk of bowel cancer due to family history (particularly first-degree relatives who develop bowel cancer before the age of 55), if their “poo test” is positive for blood, or if they have concerning symptoms such as bleeding.</p> <p>An<span> </span><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2010.04344">Australian study</a><span> </span>tried to determine which symptoms could best predict bowel cancer. The authors collected data on around 8,000 patients with a range of symptoms – including rectal bleeding and constipation – undergoing colonoscopy. They followed them to see who was diagnosed with a cancer (or a large polyp) during the colonoscopy.</p> <p>They found that, apart from age, rectal bleeding was the strongest predictor of bowel cancer. Other common symptoms such as abdominal pain or constipation alone were not associated with bowel cancer, suggesting colonoscopy in these cases was unnecessary. These<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18676420">findings</a><span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19935790">have been</a><span> </span><a href="https://gut.bmj.com/content/65/Suppl_1/A225.2">replicated</a><span> </span>in<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21689337">other studies</a>.</p> <p><strong>When not to have a colonoscopy</strong></p> <p>Small polyps grow slowly and may take 10 years or longer (if at all) to develop into bowel cancer. This is why it is considered inappropriate to<span> </span><a href="http://www.choosingwisely.org/clinician-lists/american-college-surgeons-colorectal-cancer-screening-tests/">continue screening</a><span> </span>in people aged over 75.</p> <p>International speciality groups<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18938166">don’t recommend</a><span> </span>ongoing screening when life expectancy is less than 10 years, because many people will not benefit. And they will be exposed to the risks of colonoscopy, including bowel perforation and major bleeding.<span> </span><a href="https://wiki.cancer.org.au/australia/Guidelines:Colorectal_cancer">Australian guidelines </a>also recommend stopping colonoscopy in people aged around 75.</p> <p>In young people, colonoscopy is often performed to look for inflammatory bowel disease, but new non-invasive stool tests can select out people at higher risk. Young people with irritable bowel syndrome may also undergo repeated colonoscopies to try to find an alternative reason for their symptoms, but this strategy is usually unhelpful.</p> <p><strong>Why are colonoscopies on the rise? </strong></p> <div class="grid-ten large-grid-nine grid-last content-body content entry-content instapaper_body"> <p>Australia’s population is ageing and the number of people older than 55 is increasing.</p> <p>Consumer demand can also drive unnecessary testing. Evidence shows that<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25531451">people frequently overestimate</a><span> </span>the benefits and underestimate the harms of tests such as colonoscopy. Often there’s a misconception that more tests and more health care leads to better health, when data suggests the opposite is true.</p> <p>The global<span> </span><a href="http://www.choosingwisely.org.au/home">Choosing Wisely</a><span> </span>campaign aims to educate consumers about risks of over-testing. In the future,<span> </span><a href="http://www.nature.com/articles/nrgastro.2018.1">symptoms-based algorithms</a><span> </span>and new diagnostic tests might improve a doctor’s ability to identify those at increased risk of bowel cancer for colonoscopy.</p> <p>In the meantime, prioritising colonoscopy for patients who are at higher risk should be the goal.</p> <p><em>Written by Suzanne Mahady<span class="fn author-name">. </span>Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/needless-medical-procedures-when-is-a-colonoscopy-necessary-102576">The Conversation</a>. </em></p> <p> </p> </div> <div class="grid-ten grid-prepend-two large-grid-nine grid-last content-topics topic-list"></div>

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Huge egg recall in Australia

<p>After 23 cases of salmonella poisoning caused by eggs have been reported so far, the farmer who is responsible claims that it’s not his fault.</p> <p>The Glendenning Farms worker, who chose not to provide his name, has said that he has never experienced something like this in his 20 years of being in the business.</p> <p>“Even the Food Authority said it wasn’t my fault,” he told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/egg-farmer-says-salmonella-contamination-not-my-fault/news-story/24edd0227f0abd0feec49c2f159d633e?utm_source=Daily%20Telegraph&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=editorial" target="_blank">The Sunday Telegraph</a></em> from his farm in Cobbitty, in south-west Sydney.</p> <p>“It is something to do with the birds. Some birds have been flying in from overseas, landed on the shed and chucked a sh*t.”</p> <p>The farm is run by the Osman family and the company Eggz on the Run.</p> <p>Their lawyer, Raed Rahal, said they are “shell-shocked by the news as it is their livelihood.”</p> <p>“They would certainly not do anything to risk anyone’s safety,” said Mr Rahal.</p> <p>“We are not even certain that the outbreaks are in the eggs.</p> <p>“The strain is from overseas. There was only a certain batch that was supposed to be removed but the company has voluntarily decided to remove all batches of eggs.”</p> <p>According to Mr Rahal, the outbreak led back to a bakery in Sydney, though he is unsure of its location.</p> <p>Sydney consumers are being told to avoid the eggs after those affected were shown to have symptoms of Salmonella enteritidis.</p> <p>The staggering amount of cases are now being investigated by the NSW Food Authority and NSW Health, and the company, Eggz on the Run, is undertaking a voluntary recall of the eggs.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:300px;" src="/media/7820718/7e049a8c97b855261d9da514d47cbfb5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d49e3a4d8ecb494baea535dba12e87b1" /></p> <p>The recall is for Glendenning Farms whole shell eggs with best before dates: 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24 and 29 September 2018 and 1 October 2018.</p> <p>The recall is only for eggs sold in cartons and bulk trays throughout NSW.</p> <p>“The NSW Department of Primary Industries has issued a biosecurity direction of the farm to restrict movement of livestock, eggs, manure and disposables and order the disinfection and decontamination of equipment,” an NSW Health statement said.</p> <p>“This direction will be in place while further investigations are underway.”</p> <p>Symptoms of Salmonella enteritidis include fever, headache, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, usually around six to 72 hours after the contaminated food is eaten.</p> <p>Consumers have been advised to either return the eggs back to the place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them.</p> <p>Proof of purchase for a recalled item is not required.</p>

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