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15 vertigo treatments to finally cure your dizziness

<p>What is vertigo?<br />It’s the feeling of false movement – as if the world is spinning like a carnival ride and you can’t get off.</p> <p>It is a symptom of many conditions and diseases that target the inner ear, according to the National Organisation for Rare Disorders (NORD). They include:</p> <ul> <li>benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)</li> <li>Ménière’s disease</li> <li>ear infections</li> </ul> <p>Other conditions that can cause vertigo involve the central nervous system. These include:</p> <ul> <li>concussion</li> <li>multiple sclerosis</li> <li>alcohol or medication toxicity</li> <li>stroke</li> <li>viral meningitis</li> </ul> <p>The vertigo treatment that’s right for you will likely depend on the root cause of your condition.” An accurate diagnosis is essential, especially to rule out central nervous system causes. Diagnosis most commonly includes an MRI of the brain. Audiology tests of the workings of the ear can also be helpful,” says neurologist, Arif Dalvi.</p> <p>Consider vestibular rehabilitation<br />Many of the conditions which cause vertigo affect the vestibular system, a pathway located within the inner ear which regulates balance, equilibrium and spatial orientation. According to VeDA – a group focused on inner ear disorders – vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can be effective at reducing vertigo and dizziness. VRT is an exercise-based program customised for each patient. The exercises focus on improving balance, reducing dizziness and dealing with other symptoms of vertigo. Your doctor will refer you to a physical therapist for this program.</p> <p>Try the Epley manoeuvre<br />“For benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a vestibular exercise called the Epley manoeuvre can be helpful,” says Dr Dalvi. BPPV is the most common cause of vertigo, and it’s the result of calcium crystals (otoconia) coming loose in the inner ear. According to the Mayo Clinic, the manoeuvre (also called “canalith repositioning“) is best performed by a medical professional because of the risk of neck or back injury. By laying back and then shifting the head, the process moves the crystals to a less sensitive area where they can be reabsorbed by the body. Your doctor will prescribe the Epley manoeuvre for right or left side BPPV.</p> <p>Change your diet<br />When migraines include vestibular symptoms such as dizziness, loss of balance and vertigo, they are called vestibular migraines. Alterations in your diet may be a good initial vertigo treatment. Changes in diet that help prevent migraines can reduce or even eliminate vertigo and other vestibular symptoms associated with this type of headache, according to VeDA. “From a dietary standpoint, it is important to avoid alcohol, foods high in salt, and excessive caffeine, as any of these can make symptoms worse,” says Dr Derek Bennetsen, emergency physician.</p> <p>Gently ride out the storm<br />Your vertigo may clear up on its own. Sometimes, says Dr Bennetsen, all you need is to lie down and remain calm and quiet. “Vertigo may be alleviated by remaining still, and limiting changes in position as much as possible,” says Dr Bennetsen. In a dark, quiet room, lie still taking care not to move your head or even your eyes, he says. Even if your symptoms resolve on their own, you’ll still want to get checked out, he advises.</p> <p>Take an antihistamine<br />As the name suggests, antihistamines block the effects of histamine, which can cause allergic reactions, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and vertigo. Internal medicine specialist, Lisa Ashe, recommends trying over-the-counter Benadryl or the prescription meclizine.</p> <p>Migraine medicines may help<br />A study published in Otology &amp; Neurotology in 2018 suggests that preventative medications for migraine, including tricyclic antidepressants, were effective in decreasing dizziness and vertigo in patients.</p> <p>Try sedatives<br />According to The American College of Cardiology (ACC), sedatives may reduce the spinning associated with vertigo by calming down brain activity and reducing anxiety. Dr Ashe recommends benzodiazepines, such as Valium, Ativan and Xanax. These medications may be a particularly effective vertigo treatment for reducing vertigo caused by inner ear problems, the ACC notes.</p> <p>Diuretics for Ménière’s disease<br />Ménière’s disease is an inner ear disorder that can trigger vertigo. Doctors often prescribe so-called water pills – diuretic medication – and a low-salt diet, says Dr Bennetsen: “This is because the condition is thought to be the result of an excessive build-up of endolymph fluid, in the inner ear.”</p> <p>Antiviral medications may help<br />Do you get earaches? Inner ear infections can lead to dizziness and – unlike middle-ear infections – a virus may be responsible. Occasionally, a systemic viral infection like mononucleosis, herpes or the flu can lead to vertigo, according to Cleveland Clinic. “Viral infections may respond to antiviral medications, alleviating symptoms,” says Dr Dalvi. Examples of anti-viral drugs include Tamiflu and Acyclovir.</p> <p>Drink more water<br />You need water – and so do your ears. Dehydration is a cause of dizziness, says the Mayo Clinic. Dr Bennetsen also recommends avoiding substances that can deplete fluids such as alcoholic beverages, salty foods and caffeine.</p> <p>Surgical solutions<br />In some rare instances, surgery may be the only treatment that can ease your symptoms of your vertigo. Dr Dalvi says an acoustic neuroma – a benign tumour – can grow on the vestibular nerve between the inner ear and brain, disrupting balance and hearing. According to the Mayo Clinic, your doctor may monitor this slow-growing neuroma, choose to treat it with radiation or advise surgical removal. Another rare source of vertigo is a malignant brain tumour.</p> <p>Check your medications<br />Many popular prescribed medications can trigger side effects like dizziness and vertigo. Or drugs can interact to disturb your balance. Let your doctor know about over-the-counter meds you take and don’t forget to include supplements and herbs. According to the experts at the Mayo Clinic, prescriptions and over-the-counter drugs that may cause dizziness include:</p> <ul> <li>antidepressants</li> <li>anti-seizure drugs</li> <li>blood pressure-lowering drugs</li> <li>sedatives</li> <li>tranquilisers</li> </ul> <p>Healthy habits may help<br />A healthy lifestyle is another vertigo prevention strategy that you need to do no matter what the cause. Try reducing stress and making sure to get enough sleep. Eat a diet full of produce and lean proteins, and stay active (given your condition).</p> <p>Bone up on vitamin D<br />Falling short of this vital nutrient can harm your bones – your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Patients with the most common type of vertigo (BPPV) who were deficient in vitamin D may have benefitted from supplementing with D, per 2016 research in Auris Nasus Larynx. Patients were less likely to suffer a relapse of symptoms. (One limitation, however, was the lack of control group in the study.)</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Corey Whelan. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/15-vertigo-treatments-to-finally-cure-your-dizziness"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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12 reasons you might have a migraine (besides hormones)

<p>You consume “trigger” foods<br />According to Headache Australia, foods such as cheese, chocolate and processed meats may trigger migraine headaches. However, the foods that cause migraines often differ depending on the individual; surprising foods such as snow peas, olives, and soy sauce have reportedly triggered migraines in some people. Be your own expert by keeping a log of the foods you have eaten before a migraine attack. Doing so can help you determine which foods to avoid in the future.</p> <p>You drink sugary or caffeinated drinks<br />Sugary, caffeinated and alcoholic drinks are also on the ‘Migraine triggers’ list. These drinks can result in dehydration and also contain preservatives that increase blood flow to the brain, both common causes of migraines.</p> <p>Your sleeping patterns have changed<br />Many migraine sufferers find that missing sleep or getting too much sleep can trigger a migraine attack. If the migraines are temporary, there’s probably no need to make a change, but if they persist it might be time to regulate your sleeping pattern.</p> <p>You’re at risk of a stroke<br />If migraines are unusual for you, they could be a sign that you are having a stroke. “Migraine headaches can masquerade as a stroke because they have the same neurological symptoms,” Ralph Sacco, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Miami, told Reader’s Digest. “I tell people to treat it like a stroke and call for help; let us figure it out.” Vision problems and numbness in your arms and legs are also migraine symptoms that could signal a stroke.</p> <p>You’re stressed out<br />Yes, it’s true – stress at home or work could be causing that intense, throbbing migraine pain in your skull. But here’s the good news: research has shown that meditation could be a solution to chronic migraines. One study at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Centre found that adults with migraines who participated in a meditation and yoga program for eight weeks had shorter and less debilitating migraine headaches than those who received standard medical care. The members of the first group also tended to have less frequent and less severe migraine attacks, and reported having a greater sense of self-control over their migraines.</p> <p>You’re sensitive to sensory stimulation<br />Flickering lights and strong-smelling perfumes could be triggering your migraine. A study published in Nature Neuroscience found that when the membranes around the central and nervous system get irritated, pain receptors are stimulated in the brain. For sensitivity to light, wearing sunglasses – even at night – can limit this irritation.<br />You have hidden heart problems<br />Studies have found that those who suffer from frequent migraines could be more prone to vascular problems like heart attacks and heart disease. Researchers stress the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle that lowers high blood pressure and cholesterol, as well as quitting smoking.</p> <p>You’re dehydrated<br />Migraines can strike when your body loses too much water. Make sure you are drinking the recommended 2.5 to 3.5 litres of water per day to decrease your risk of a migraine attack.</p> <p>You have a brain tumour<br />If nausea, vomiting, motor weakness or changes in memory, personality or thinking accompany your migraine, you could be at risk for a brain tumour or brain cancer. Talk to your doctor right away if your migraine worsens.</p> <p>You’re near bad weather<br />Certain weather patterns are associated with the onset of migraines, according to researchers at the University of Cincinnati. Their study found that migraines were 28 percent more likely to occur when lightning struck, perhaps due to electromagnetic changes.</p> <p>You have caffeine withdrawal<br />Although caffeine withdrawal is commonly known as a migraine trigger, researchers aren’t quite sure what causes the headache. Some believe it may be due to a signalling chemical, called adenosine, whose receptors are typically blocked by caffeine intake. But caffeine headaches don’t normally occur unless the individual has been used to drinking many cups of coffee a day, according to everydayhealth.com. Thankfully, caffeine withdrawal only lasts for a few days, and cutting back on caffeine gradually instead of quitting cold turkey can limit the painful side effects of withdrawal.</p> <p>You’re genetically inclined to have migraines<br />Sometimes, all you can do is chalk up your migraines to your genes. A 2013 study at the University of California linked migraines with a certain genetic mutation in humans. It found that a significant proportion of migraine sufferers in the families they studied either had the mutation or were the offspring of a mutation carrier.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Brooke Nelson. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/12-reasons-you-might-have-a-migraine-besides-hormones"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em>​</p>

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"I hope I make it": 7-year-old works to pay for her own brain surgery

<div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Liza Scott, 7, has set up a lemonade stand inside her mother's bakery to raise money for her much-needed brain surgeries.</p> <p>“She has three cerebral malformations,” her mother Elizabeth said. “One is what they call a schizencephaly. So it’s a cleft in the frontal lobe in the right side of her brain, and we think that’s what causing the seizures.”</p> <p>Liza started having Grand Mal seizures and weeks later, doctors discovered that she had an "extra special brain".</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840067/liza-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/947a013cda2d4bf88832369e30bd05eb" /></p> <p>“In most every instance of these rare malformations doctors only see one malformation — in Liza’s case she has 3,” Elizabeth wrote on<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mightycause.com/story/Lemonadeforliza" target="_blank">Liza’s Mightycause page</a>.</p> <p>Liza is getting her first round of surgeries next week, which she is scared about, but her mother is trying to calm her down.</p> <p>“I can’t handle it. So, I hope I make it,” Liza said. “My mom keeps saying I’m going to, but I feel like I’m not.”</p> <p>Her mother, Elizabeth Scott, set up the Mightycause page as she is a single mother and needs financial help to pay for the surgeries.</p> <p>“As a single mom and the financial supporter of both of my children, this is not something you can budget for,” Scott said to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://whnt.com/news/i-hope-i-make-it-7-year-old-alabama-girl-selling-lemonade-to-fund-her-own-brain-surgeries/" target="_blank"><em>WHNT</em></a>.</p> <p>The page has gone viral and at the time of writing, $230,844 has been raised for Liza and her much-needed surgeries.</p> </div> </div>

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Backlash over suggested new term for "pregnant woman"

<p><span>Melbourne radio host Tom Elliott critiqued "politically correct idiocy" that he believes is filtering into Australia from the UK.</span><br /><br /><span>Elliot accused the UK of trying to "de-genderise the English language", and labelled it "very strange stuff".</span><br /><br /><span>His anger stems from the call to change the term “breastfeeding” to “chest feeding” as a way to be inclusive.</span><br /><br /><span>The move was followed by a similar decision made by the Australian National University.</span><br /><br /><span>"ANU is committed to equity and diversity and ensuring we reflect the broad nature, background and experiences of Australians and our society, as well as a being a safe and welcoming campus for all people," a university spokesperson informed Yahoo News Australia last week.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.2817904374364px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836441/senior-pregnant.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fdfd6af96ded4acab24b490117e52059" /></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><span>Harriet Shing, Victoria's first openly gay female MP, called for inclusive language to start being used in Australia.</span><br /><br /><span>This includes the removal of gender when referring to someone who is pregnant.</span><br /><br /><span>The Australian National University’s Gender Institute guide also has similar advice and suggests using the terms “gestational” or “birthing parent” rather than “mother”, and the terms “non-gestational” or “non-birthing parent” rather than “father”.</span><br /><br /><span>“This is madness in the UK and they’re pursuing this politically correct idiocy with great fervour over there [and] it is spreading here," Elliott said on 3AW.</span><br /><br /><span>On Thursday, the use of the term “person” over “mother” in legislation allowing cabinet ministers maternity leave was rejected.</span><br /><br /><span>"This amendment means the law will no longer protect trans and non-binary individuals as it should," transgender charity Mermaid said in response.</span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840054/4pm-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5bb9f4f3ce684068bfb0eb13adc4a691" /></span></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5bb9f4f3ce684068bfb0eb13adc4a691" /></p> <p><span>"This is yet another example of an insidious campaign that follows a pattern of taking a minority group and portraying them as a threat to women, but providing no evidence."</span><br /><br /><span>Elliott's angry words follow behind toy giant Hasbro who announced it would be dropping the honourifics from Mr and Mrs Potato Head.</span></p>

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"Not good enough": QLD Premier furious after COVID-19 vaccine "overdose"

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Two elderly Australians received four times the recommended dosage of the COVID-19 vaccine, but are showing "no signs of an adverse reaction".</p> <p>The two patients are an 88-year-old man and a 94-year-old woman from the Holy Spirit Nursing Home in Brisbane.</p> <p>Both residents were given four times the recommended dosage by a doctor working at the facility, who has temporarily been stood down from giving any more vaccines.</p> <p>Lincoln Hopper, CEO of the nursing home's operator St Vincent's Care Services said that the incident was "extremely concerning" and was reporting the GP to the Australian Health Practioner Regulation Agency.</p> <p>Hopper also blamed Healthcare Australia, which is contracted by the Australian government to administer the vaccines.</p> <p>"Yesterday was very distressing to us, to our residents and to their families," Mr Hopper said in a statement.</p> <p>"This incident is extremely concerning. It's caused us to question whether some of the clinicians given the job of administering the vaccine have received the appropriate training."</p> <p>"Before vaccinations are allowed to continue at any of our sites, Healthcare Australia – or any other provider – will need to confirm the training and expertise of the clinicians they've engaged so an incident like this doesn't happen again."</p> <p>Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk was furious as she told parliament she'd only found out about the overdoses yesterday evening despite the incident occurring in the morning.</p> <p>"Discovering these details now is simply not good enough. None of this is good enough and the Federal Government must explain itself," she said.</p> <p>"I want to know what training is being provided to the people the Federal Government is employing to administer the vaccines in our aged care facilities to give additional confidence," she said to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/coronavirus-queensland-elderly-patients-given-four-time-recommended-dose-of-covid19-vaccine/3737b34e-10e3-4d58-afbc-ba49a6caf95c" target="_blank"><em>7News</em></a>.</p> <p>"People need and must have full confidence in this vaccine."</p> <p>Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said that so far, the elderly patients had not had an adverse reaction to the overdose.</p> <p>"The Chief Medical Officer, who has been involved in that, is in the fortunate position of being able to indicate that all are well and there have been no adverse outcomes," he said.</p> <p>Hunt also said there were a number of safeguards that were immediately put into place to deal with the incident.</p> <p>"I think it's very important that we're up front," Mr Hunt said.</p> <p>"The safeguards that were put in place immediately kicked into action and a nurse on the scene identified the fact that a higher than prescribed amount of the dose was given to two patients.</p> <p>"I want to thank her for her strength of character and her professionalism."</p> <p>Queensland began rolling out the vaccine on Monday, with 1,000 people expected to receive the dose by the end of the week.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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15 body signs no one tells you will come before menopause

<p>Unexpected symptoms<br />Changes like bruises and extra hair are just a few of the unexpected symptoms of premenopause and perimenopause, the latter being the last four or so years before a woman enters menopause.</p> <p>Breast pain<br />Pesky menopause changes and hormonal fluctuations can cause cyclical breast tenderness (ranging from bothersome to unbearable) even when Aunt Flo isn’t due for a visit. What’s more, since perimenopause causes irregular cycles, it’s nearly impossible to know when your breasts are going to begin throbbing, according to the National Cancer Institute. Your breasts may also feel “more lumpy” than they did before, notes Ellen Dolgen, Menopause Mondays blogger and author of the free eBook, The Girlfriend’s Guide to Surviving and Thriving During Perimenopause and Menopause.</p> <p>Unexpected bruises<br />Perimenopause causes some women to become a bit clumsy – and those minor bumps can quickly turn into big bruises. This is because fluctuating hormones can make skin thinner, making you bruise easier.</p> <p>Dry eyes<br />Strangely, excessive tearing is a sign that your eyes are desperately trying to make up for a lack of moisture. And you can thank menopause changes and plummeting hormones for those “Cheech and Chong”-style eyes, Dolgen says. Hormones affect the ocular tissues and the composition of tears your eyes produce, resulting in excessively dry eyes and changes in vision (going from near-sighted to far-sighted, for example).</p> <p>Chin hair<br />Don’t be surprised if your tweezers become your new best friend, Dolgen says. For a lucky 15 percent of women, “super human” hair on your chin, upper lip, or cheeks is an all-too-common symptom of perimenopause. And, perhaps what’s worse, the hair on your head may become thin, dry, or brittle.</p> <p>Heart palpitations<br />The sudden speeding-up or irregularity of your heart rate is a common yet not often talked about symptom of perimenopause. Studies show that epinephrine and norepinephrine, the neurotransmitters that regulate heart rate and blood pressure, tend to fluctuate in menopausal women, David Portman, MD, a gynaecologist and Women’s Health expert told everydayhealth.com.</p> <p>Urinary urgency or leakage<br />Pee a little when you do jumping jacks or leak when you cough or sneeze? Gotta hurry up and go right now? It’s likely due to stress urinary incontinence (SUI) or urge urinary incontinence (UUI) – both common menopause changes. Lower oestrogen levels cause the lining of the urethra to thin, says JoAnn V. Pinkerton, MD, executive director of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS). And weakened pelvic floor muscles, often a result of a vaginal childbirth, are also to blame.</p> <p>Dry skin<br />Less oestrogen equals acne and dry and thinning skin for many women in entering menopause, which Dr Pinkerton likens to “reverse puberty.” It’s also common to experience flare-ups or new cases of allergies and eczema during this time, adds Dolgen, whose swears by coconut oil for softer skin and smaller pores.</p> <p>Body odour<br />Of course, the excessive sweating that accompanies night sweats and hot flashes can create an unpleasant odour. But there’s another explanation, too: A drop in oestrogen levels tricks your hypothalamus gland into thinking you’re overheated, signalling your body to sweat more.</p> <p>Migraines<br />Migraines may start for the first time, or worsen, when you start going through menopause because of new hormonal fluctuations, says Dr Pinkerton. The good news, however, is that hormonal migraines usually stop or vastly improve after menopause, when levels are consistently low. In fact, only 5 percent of women suffer migraines after age 60, according to the Migraine Research Foundation.</p> <p>Vaginal dryness<br />Sex-stifling vaginal dryness was one of the most difficult symptoms for Dolgen. “Your vagina takes a trip to the desert and takes your eyes and skin along with it,” she says. Menopause changes, such as lower oestrogen levels, cause thinner, drier and less-elastic vaginal tissue and decrease blood flow to the area. The result: vaginal dryness, itching and painful sex.</p> <p>Hot flashes<br />Sure you’ve heard about hot flashes, but you may not know that they can be different for every woman. Some even experience them for decades, starting in perimenopause. Caused by a drop in oestrogen levels, which affects the gland that regulates body temperature, hot flashes can happen during the day or at night – or both. They can be mild, lasting seconds, or severe and stick around for a half hour or longer.</p> <p>Weight shifts<br />Whether you call it meno-pot, meno-pudge, or middle-age spread, extra fat in the abdominal region is a reality for many women in perimenopause. “A woman’s weight throughout her menopausal journey is impacted by five factors: hormones, diet, exercise, stress and genetics,” Dolgen explains. And you can also lose muscle mass – 0.6 percent per year or more if you’re not physically active and don’t get enough protein, Dr Pinkerton adds.</p> <p>Irregular periods<br />Is your period shorter and lighter one month and heavy with cramping the next? This is part of perimenopause, explains Pinkerton. In addition to being a nuisance, irregular periods also up your pregnancy risk. “The second highest unintended pregnancy time for women is during your 40s,” Dr Pinkerton says. “And pregnancy remains a risk until you haven’t had a period for a year.”</p> <p>Bone loss<br />The less oestrogen your ovaries produce, the more bone loss may accelerate. This can put you at a greater risk for osteoporosis, or bone thinning, which increases your risk of fracture. “You can lose up to 20 percent of your bones during the first five years of menopause,” Dr Pinkerton says.</p> <p>Fuzzy thinking<br />Hormonal changes – along with premenopausal symptoms like mood swings and sleep problems – may make you more forgetful and less focused. Stress also plays a role. “It’s hard to relax, especially when you’re going through the trials of perimenopause,” Dolgen says, “but it’s important for your mind and body to decompress.”</p> <p><em>Written by Susan Jara. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/15-body-signs-no-one-tells-you-will-come-before-menopause?pages=1">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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“Never talk like that about a man”: Jelena Dokic hits back at cruel comments

<p>Jelena Dokic has opened up about receiving cruel criticism about her weight while working at the Australian Open.</p> <p>The former world No. 4 has been interviewing tennis players competing in this year’s tournament and took to Instagram she put on some weight during Melbourne’s lockdown.</p> <p>However the 37-year-old told people to “get over it” on Tuesday night.</p> <p>“I am sharing this with you all because even though I have the best supporters in the world that send me thousands of messages of support, I have also received a few comments body shaming me and seen an article in the media about my weight and physical appearance,” Dokic wrote with two images of her before and after COVID-19 side by side.</p> <p>“I have always been honest with you all about my struggles and my weight battles. I have talked about my weight and not a lot of people have done that publicly.</p> <p>“Now I am also going to be honest but I also feel like I need to address the negative attention around what people think I should look like.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CLWSPSqhO0r/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CLWSPSqhO0r/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by JELENA DOKIC 🇦🇺🇦🇺🇦🇺 (@dokic_jelena)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“And here is my message to you, GET OVER IT.”</p> <p>Dokic retired in 2014 lost 53kg after reaching 120kg between 2018-2019.</p> <p>She revealed in a social media post her battle with depression over her weight.</p> <p>“Leave me and my physical appearance alone. I really don’t know why people and the media have the need to comment on someone’s physical appearance, especially when it comes to women,” she said.</p> <p>“You would never talk like that about a man, it’s always about women and their appearance.</p> <p>“While I am nowhere near my heaviest, I am also completely honest about the fact that I have put some weight back on in the Melbourne lockdown.</p> <p>“It was very hard mentally for me in the world’s toughest lockdown for six months and not being able to see my loved ones for 15 months.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7ev0YaBvyv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7ev0YaBvyv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by JELENA DOKIC 🇦🇺🇦🇺🇦🇺 (@dokic_jelena)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I have even had some depression and anxiety creep back up and it’s been a battle.</p> <p>“To all the body-shamers, online trolls and the media that have body shamed me, you should be ashamed of yourselves. If you have nothing nice to say, don’t say anything at all.</p> <p>“How about a bit of kindness? How about a message asking me how I am doing? Instead of talking about my weight, why don’t you talk about all my accomplishments? Does my weight determine my worth?</p> <p>“It’s so easy to judge others but why can’t people just be kind? We should be talking about inner beauty and not the shallow outside looks.”</p>

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"You've just made this even harder": Chris Hemsworth's body double reveals struggle

<p>Chris Hemsworth's body double has revealed he's eating seven meals a day to try and keep up with the Hollywood heart throb's size.</p> <p>Bobbly Holland Hanton has revealed the Thor actor is making his life harder as his size keeps growing by the day.</p> <p>“Everyone is like ‘Wow look at the size and him’ and I’m like yeah that’s brilliant, I’m that guy’s double’, so I text him, I’m like, ‘Thanks very much dude, you've just made this even harder’,” he told Nova’s Fitzy and Wippa.</p> <p>“I train with him a lot, we train all the time, we’re on the same diet regime and training.</p> <p>“He’s the biggest though he’s ever been so I have to be the biggest I’ve ever been which is a challenge but I’m up for it.”</p> <p>Hemsworth eats seven meals a day and they need to be the right meals at the right time, which means his stunt double has to do the same.</p> <p>“Every two hours we are eating, it’s become a chore, I don’t enjoy eating at all, every two hours it’s like get calories in, training twice a day, it’s full on,” he told the show.</p> <p>“We’re training so much, we are packing on so much size, it’s difficult on the body.</p> <p>“I find carrying around the extra weight is difficult and hard to maintain on the ligaments.”</p> <p>The pair first worked together on<span> </span><em>Thor: The Dark World</em><span> </span>in 2013 and have gone on to feature in several movies together.</p> <p>Becoming close friends, Holland Hanton has previously said Hemsworth is like family.</p>

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"Proof of vaccination" certificates part of AUS vaccine plan

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>The Australian Federal Government has announced that Australians, once vaccinated, will get a record that will be stored and displayed on the Express Plus Medicare and MyGov mobile phone applications, which could help Aussies travel overseas again.</p> <p>Anyone who requires a hard copy after getting the COVID-19 vaccine can access a printout from vaccine providers and Services Australia offices.</p> <p>Some government leaders have their doubts about the Federal Government's ability to follow through with this plan, with Anthony Albanese voicing his opinion to the<span> </span><em>ABC</em>.</p> <p>“We know that they didn’t get the [COVIDSafe] tracing app right,” he told the ABC.</p> <p>“So they need to, as the rollout of the vaccine occurs, make sure that they absolutely get it right because our economy, as well as our health, depends on it.”</p> <p>Government Services Minister Stuart Robert has said that Australians should have "enormous confidence" in the system.</p> <p>“Any requirement for borders to open up will require vaccination and it will require the widespread use of assured certificates, and that is what we are talking about today – the Australian assured certificate that Australians can have enormous confidence in,” Mr Robert told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/federal-government-reveals-plans-for-proof-of-vaccination-certificates-to-be-stored-and-displayed-on-phone-apps/news-story/5eec12b6058215777ed43d5221160df7" target="_blank">reporters</a> on the Gold Coast.</p> <p>“Importantly for Australians, they can have assurance the certificate they will have will be robust, it will be anchored to them, so they will know it’s their certificate, and it will be widely accepted.”</p> <p>It is expected that these certificates will simplify visits to hospitals and nursing homes and could be required for interstate travel if further lockdowns are in place.</p> <p>Mr Robert said that it would be a state-by-state basis as to whether proof of vaccination would be necessary to visit workplaces, restaurants or supermarkets.</p> <p>“We would be expecting them to issue public health orders if they see fit so I will leave that to the states and territories,” Mr Robert said.</p> <p>“What the federal government does is provide a record of vaccination to Australians should the need be there for Australians to use it. And Australians need to have that record, especially, depending on state public health orders but also when travelling and borders open up again.”</p> <p>The Pfizer vaccine is due to be rolled out nationally from the end of this month and the AstraZeneca vaccine is due in March.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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“Slept through the whole pandemic”: Teen wakes from year-long coma

<p>Jokes were thrown around last year about "skipping 2020", but for one family it was an unfortunate reality.</p> <p>UK teen Joe Flavill was just 18 when he was hit by a car in Burton on March 1 last year, causing a traumatic brain injury.</p> <p>Until only a few weeks ago, he was in a coma - just a few short weeks before the UK entered its first COVID-19 lockdown.</p> <p>But even though he was completely unaware of the pandemic wreaking havoc around the world, Mr Flavill ended up contracting the virus while in hospital.</p> <p>Although he regained consciousness a few weeks ago and is gradually becoming more responsive, his aunt Sally Flavill-Smith said they weren't sure how much he understood of what had been happening in the world while he had been "away".</p> <p>"We also don't know how much he understands as his accident was before the first lockdown and it's almost like he has slept through the whole pandemic," she told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.staffordshire-live.co.uk/news/burton-news/teenager-coma-before-covid-pandemic-4915032" target="_blank">Staffordshire Live</a>.</p> <p>"It's hard as we know he is more alert, but how do you explain the pandemic to someone who has been in a coma?</p> <p>"A brain injury is very much the unknown, so we haven't been given an idea of what to expect really."</p> <p>Ms Flavill-Smith is helping raise money for Mr Flavill's recovery and to support his mother, Sharon.</p> <p>"He has been following commands, for example, touching his left and his right ear when asked to do so, he is able to move both of his legs, he is answering yes and no through blinking and the most amazing step is that he has shown us his incredible sense of humour," she wrote online last week.</p> <p>The family hopes that soon Mr Flavill will be able to undertake physiotherapy, which has been delayed due to the ongoing pandemic.</p> <p>He had been studying for his A-Levels (roughly equivalent to an ATAR) and was a passionate sportsman.</p> <p>He had been achieved a Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award, which he would have been due to receive at Buckingham Palace in May last year.</p>

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One time you're more likely to feel COVID-19 vaccine side effects

<p>As Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison urges people to get the coronavirus vaccine, many Australians are curious about the potential side effects of the Pfizer COVID-19 jab.</p> <p>“We want to encourage Australians right around the country to roll up their sleeves and get a COVID-19 vaccine,’’ the Prime Minister told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/scott-morrisons-message-so-life-can-return-to-normal/news-story/7f1bfdfe13d680db1d6836f7f612ea93" target="_blank">news.com.au.</a></p> <p>“For 12 months we have fought COVID-19, prioritising saving lives and livelihoods, but to win the battle we need Australians to get vaccinated.</p> <p>“The vaccine will be voluntary and Australians should have confidence that it is both safe and effective.</p> <p>“Getting the jab will be a critical step in returning to a more normal life, however it won’t be an instant silver bullet.”</p> <p>Side effects are to be expected after getting a vaccine and side effects are also a sign that the vaccine is working and triggering the immune response to protect you against infections.</p> <p>The most commonly reported side effects of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination are pain at the injection site, tiredness, headache, muscle pain, chills, joint pain and fever, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/when-youre-most-likely-to-have-side-effects-from-covid19-vaccine/news-story/e3cc740ef7e1360c8c9385b3a3270aa3" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em>.</a></p> <p>An interesting fact to note is that people experienced more side effects after the second dose instead of the first dose. This has been backed up by Frank McGeorge of Local 4 News, who logged a video dairy of his experiences with the second dose.</p> <p>“My experience with the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine was pretty much in line with what I had expected,’’ Dr McGeorge said.</p> <p>“Mainly just soreness in my arm where I received the injection although it was more severe than I had ever experienced from any other shot.</p> <p>“My second shot was a different story.</p> <p>“I want to be clear. I’m talking about this so you have an idea of what could happen after the second shot and are prepared,’’ he said.</p> <p>“Make sure you have a light day planned. I’ve talked to a lot of my co-workers who also had their second dose and a least a third of them did have significant side effects.”</p> <p>The COVID-19 vaccine is administered in a two-dose series, ideally three weeks apart into the muscle.</p> <p>For many, it is uneventful. For others with a history of allergic reactions to the vaccine, caution is urged.</p> <p>Experts have said that in rare cases, there is a remote chance that the vaccine could cause a severe allergic reaction, which would usually occur within a few minutes to one hour after getting the vaccination. Signs of a severe allergic reaction can include:</p> <ul> <li>Difficulty breathing</li> <li>Swelling of your face and throat</li> <li>A fast heartbeat</li> <li>A bad rash all over your body</li> <li>Dizziness and weakness</li> </ul>

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Rebel Wilson reveals the sad reality of losing weight

<p><span>Rebel Wilson has revealed the sad truth about losing weight.</span><br /><br /><span>While chatting to 2Day FM’s new breakfast radio show <em>Hughesy, Ed and Erin,</em> Rebel explained how differently she has been treated since losing weight.</span><br /><br /><span>Erin Molan asked the actress: “Hey I’d love to know … we have all seen you physically change from the outside, how has it changed you on the inside? How has it changed you as a person?”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839693/rebel-wilson-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3723f7bd84f14e8da056736eeb43c747" /><br /><br /><span>Rebel explained “It’s interesting Erin, I like to think I looked good at all sizes and I’ve always been confident.</span><br /><br /><span>“It’s not like I wasn’t confident and now I’m confident.</span><br /><br /><span>“What’s been really interesting to me is how other people treat you.</span><br /><br /><span>“Sometimes being bigger, people didn’t look twice at you and now that I’m in good shape people offer to carry my groceries to the car and open doors for you. Is this what other people have experienced all the time? That to me has been really interesting.”</span><br /><br /><span>She went on to say: “I also find it interesting that people pay so much attention to a weight loss transformation when there is so much going on in the world.”</span><br /><br /><span>Rebel Wilson revealed she got stuck into a gruelling working routine and underwent a strict diet in 2020 to get in shape.</span><br /><br /><span>She stunned fans with her health, but admitted not everyone was supportive during an Instagram Live.</span><br /><br /><span>“Industry-wise, there were a lot of people who wanted me to stay as Fat Amy,” Wilson explained, in reference to her character in the movie franchise Pitch Perfect.</span><br /><br /><span>“And at the end of the day, it is my life and my body and Hollywood had in a way typecast me but I didn’t want to stay like that.</span><br /><br /><span>“It makes me sad sometimes that I didn’t value myself enough before all of this to get healthy.”</span></p>

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More unforeseen long-term effects of COVID-19 revealed

<p>Almost a year into the global pandemic, doctors and scientists are still coming to terms with a concerning phenomenon.</p> <p>It's not a mutant strain or a side effect of the vaccine, but the aftermath of the disease that is crippling those diagnosed.</p> <p>Weeks after they were expected to recover from the virus, many are suffering from complications caused by COVID-19, which is affecting their entire body, from severe fatigue to memory lapses to digestive problems, erratic heart rates, fluctuating blood pressure and hair loss.</p> <p>Many of those who are suffering from the after-effects had minimal symptoms when originally diagnosed and doctors assumed recovery would take about two weeks.</p> <p>And then there are the “long haulers”, suffering a condition experts have deemed “post-acute COVID” or “chronic COVID”.</p> <p>“Usually, the patients with bad disease are most likely to have persistent symptoms, but COVID doesn’t work like that,” Oxford University professor of primary care, Trisha Greenhalgh, told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/doctors-begin-to-crack-covids-mysterious-long-term-effects-11604252961" target="_blank"><em>The Wall Street Journal</em></a>.</p> <p>The lead author of an August BMJ study, Professor Greenhalgh was one of the first to define chronic COVID-19 patients as those whose symptoms span multiple organ systems and last over 12 weeks.</p> <p>“The disease itself is not that bad” for them, she explained, yet cognitive issues and heart problems sometimes persist for months.</p> <p>While other outbreaks such as the Spanish flu and ebola have had long-term symptoms, what makes COVID-19 different is that it doesn't just impact the lungs, but the heart, kidneys, nervous and digestive systems.</p> <p>“I haven’t really seen any other illness that affects so many different organ systems in as many different ways as COVID does,” medical director for Mount Sinai Health System’s Centre for Post-COVID Care in New York, Zijian Chen, told the<span> </span><em>WSJ</em>.</p> <p>“We thought it was a virus that, once it does what it does, you recover and you go back to normal.”</p> <p>Turns out, that isn't the case, he added it "is really scary".</p> <p>One explanation for what’s causing the virus’ second act is that inflammation continues to affect organs or the nervous system even after it’s gone, researchers said.</p> <p>“Even those who had no symptoms and were young and fit … even in those patients we saw abnormalities,” director of the University Hospital Frankfurt’s Institute for Experimental and Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, Eike Nagel, said.</p> <p>“You don’t realise how lucky you are with your health until you don’t have it,” 43-year-old lawyer, Elizabeth Moore, told the publication. Since contracting COVID-19 last March, she has struggled with memory problems and gastrointestinal issues, losing almost 14kg.</p> <p>At the end of April, “I thought I beat this thing. I was ecstatic,” she said. But after testing positive for coronavirus antibodies in May, Ms Moore said her health took a sharp turn for the worse, leading to tachycardia (racing heartbeat) and fluctuations in her blood pressure.</p> <p>While those symptoms have improved, the mother-of-three is still dealing with the gastrointestinal problems and a recent test found her stomach lining is inflamed.</p> <p>“I feel like there has to be some sort of next step,” she told the<span> </span><em>WSJ</em>. “Because I’m not ready to accept this as my new reality.”</p>

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16 things to never do at the gym

<p>Don’t be that person<br />It makes sense that you get ‘in the zone’ at the gym, enjoying your ‘me time’ and doing your utmost to make the most of your fitness time. But gyms are still public places! You still need to be respectful of others, and that means avoiding these behaviours that’ll make your fellow exercisers give you the stink eye (perhaps literally). Of course, now with the rampant spread of COVID-19 leading to some gyms being closed and others enacting strict rules to reduce the spread, there is a whole new set of gym faux pas.</p> <p>Don’t leave a mess behind<br />So, you need a mat, Bosu ball, an assortment of free weights, a foam roller, an incline bench, and a few kettlebells to complete your workout? Great – but when you’re done, remember the cardinal rule of any gym. “At the end of your workout, or as you’re done with each piece of equipment, put everything back,” says Dawn Bartolini, a lifestyle and weight-loss coach (who happens to have lost more than 45 kilos). “Your mama doesn’t work here!” On that note, put everything back where it belongs, not where it’s convenient.</p> <p>Don’t grunt the entire time<br />Look, we get it: you’re lifting sooo much weight. But no one is impressed: “Lifting heavy weights is hard, but if you’re grunting on every single set – you’re a tool,” says trainer, James Shapiro. “No one is impressed, you’re awarded no points, and no one will talk to you. Please relearn how to breathe properly, which will also help you make greater increases in strength and lean muscle.”</p> <p>Don’t make the locker room public<br />There’s really no need to catch up with your boyfriend on video chat while you’re touching up your makeup in the locker room. Please move this to the top of your list of things to never do at the gym, says Eve Dawes, trainer and yoga, spin, and Zumba instructor. “Do not FaceTime in the locker room. We are trying to shower and get changed, not be part of a peep show.”</p> <p>Don’t set up camp by the weight rack<br />There’s an unspoken ‘no-lift zone’ in every gym, and it’s called the weight rack. In fact, consider one and a half metres all around the weight rack off limits for your workout. “If you start a set of bicep curls while standing right in front of the rack, you block the entire gym from accessing the weights,” says certified personal trainer, Dani Singer. “Grab the weights you need, and find an open spot on the weight floor to perform your workout. Stay out of the weight rack area, unless you’re grabbing or returning your weights.”</p> <p>Don’t praise a stranger’s progress<br />Just as you would never assume a woman is pregnant, you should never offer unsolicited praise to fellow gymgoers –­ even if you think you are being kind by giving them a compliment. “I am not a skinny woman,” says Jeanette DePatie, a plus-sized, certified fitness instructor. “I have had several people come up to me over the years and say things to me that they believe are encouraging – like, ‘good for you!’, ‘Stick with it, and you’ll lose the weight in no time,’ or ‘It’s so great that you’ve started on your fitness journey.’ Obviously, they are completely unaware that I’m a 20-year licensed fitness teacher who is not exercising to lose weight. Don’t assume you know where somebody is in their exercise journey or that you know why they are exercising.”</p> <p>Don’t be a machine hog<br />There are only so many machines and pieces of equipment to go around at a gym – and during peak times that may mean you have to remember the lessons you learned in the sandbox during preschool. “Be courteous of others when you’re using the equipment,” says certified personal trainer, Michael Kuang. “If you see someone waiting to use the same thing, tell them how much longer you will be. Or better yet, offer to let them work in between your sets.”</p> <p>Don’t throw your weights<br />Unless you’ve joined a power-lifting or CrossFit gym, there’s no reason to bang your weights down on the ground in between sets. “Besides giving people a heart attack when a 100-kilo bar slams to the floor, you are seriously putting people at risk for a broken foot,” warns personal trainer, James Cappola. “If you are in a regular gym with a general population, you have to act accordingly. Don’t be the guy who comes in, attempts to lift a 100-kilo barbell, and then throws them to the floor because the last few reps are too much.” Either use a spotter or use less weight, bro.</p> <p>Don’t crowd the squat racks<br />If you aren’t doing a compound exercise – like a squat, deadlift, or shoulder press – then stay out of the squat racks. “This isn’t the place to do your bicep curls, because you can use dumbbells or other bars specifically for that,” explains Nick Rizzo, who has spent six years as a competitive powerlifter and four years training others. “This applies to all other types of random exercises you see people doing in squat racks.”</p> <p>Don’t belt out a tune<br />You’re in the zone and your playlist dishes up your favourite tune. What do you do? Start singing? No, thank you. You’re not at home in your shower and everyone outside your headphones can hear your hums, whistles, not to mention profanities as you try to rap alongside Cardi B. “Please, no singing at the top of your lungs,” says Bartolini. “Nobody needs to hear your ‘na-na-nas!’” Yes, you can have fun during your workout, but not to the point of distracting others.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Jill Schildhouse. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/fitness/16-things-to-never-do-at-the-gym?pages=1"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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Australia seeking urgent advice after 29 elderly deaths from Pfizer vaccine

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt is seeking more information on the highly-touted Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine after Norway reported 29 deaths to the vaccine.</p> <p>Hunt asked the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to seek out more information about the vaccine, with the TGA confirming it's working closely with the European Medicines Agency to investigate risks flagged by Norway.</p> <p>“The TGA is evaluating all of the scientific and clinical information provided by the vaccine’s sponsor, Pfizer, as well as other available evidence … prior to making a regulatory decision,” the TGA said in a statement.</p> <p>Media reports in Norway have flagged that six more elderly patients have died after being given the vaccine.</p> <p>All patients who have passed are 75 and over, with 13 deaths fulled assessed and another 16 under review.</p> <p>“Most people have experienced the expected side effects of the vaccine, such as nausea and vomiting, fever, local reactions at the injection site, and worsening of their underlying condition,” a statement from the Norwegian Medicines Agency said.</p> <p>The TGA has confirmed that the deaths were recorded among very frail patients, with some anticipated to have months to live before taking the vaccine.</p> <p>“We will continue to work with European regulators over the coming days to investigate this report and determine whether specific warnings about risks of vaccination in the very elderly or terminally ill should be potentially included in the product information for the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine.</p> <p>“We have been in contact with the Foreign Minister, and Marise Payne will task DFAT to seek advice directly from the Norwegian government,” Mr Hunt told reporters on Sunday.</p> <p>“In addition, I‘ve briefed both the Acting Prime Minister and the Prime Minister’s Office today. So as further information is available, we’ll share that with the Australian public.”</p> <p>Hunt has also confirmed that the Federal government has removed all hotspots in Australia.</p> <p>“There are no remaining hotspot definitions,” Mr Hunt said.</p> <p>“Of course, inevitably, there will be days of new cases. There will be days where there may be a requirement for Commonwealth hotspot definition to be reintroduced. But they‘ll be done on the basis of that, and cases.”</p> <p>“We‘re not out of the woods because the world isn’t out of the woods,” he said. “And our challenges remain always, while there is a disease that is abroad in the rest of the world, but Australians are doing incredibly well.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Billionaire launches scathing attack at Serena Williams over her weight

<p>Serena Williams' husband Alexis Ohanian has accused Madrid Open owner Ian Tiriac of being racist and sexist after he told the American athlete to retire.</p> <p>The former Olympic tennis star turned billionaire Tiriac urged the 39-year-old to retire due to her age and weight.</p> <p>“At this age and the weight she is now, she does not move as easily as she did 15 years ago,” Tiriac said on Romanian TV. “Serena was a sensational player. If she had a little decency, she would retire.”</p> <p>This isn't the first time Tiriac has taken aim at Serena's weight.</p> <p>In 2018, when asked about the state of women's tennis, he took aim at the champion by saying: “With all due respect, 36 years old and 90kg …”</p> <p>Serena then responded: “It’s an ignorant comment and it’s a sexist comment. Maybe he’s an ignorant man.”</p> <p>And now, after Tiriac's most recent comments, William's husband and father to their three-year-old daughter Alexis Olympia, has hit back on Twitter.</p> <p>Co-founder of Reddit Ohanian mocked 81-year-old Tiriac.</p> <p>After a quick Google search, Ohanian discovered Tiriac had not won a single Grand Slam single, tweeting: “Safe to say no one gives a damn what Ion Tiriac thinks.”</p> <p>Ohanian added: “Had to Google it … turns out my 3 year old has more Grand Slam victories than this.”</p> <p>He then responded to a fellow Twitter user, who tried to defend Tiriac.</p> <p>Ohanian wrote: “Keep defending your racist, sexist clown.”</p> <p>He later added: “2021 and no holding back when a racist/sexist clown with a platform comes for my family.”</p> <p>Williams needs just one more Grand Slam title to equal Margaret Court’s incredible record.</p> <p>She also boasts 16 Grand Slam doubles titles and four Olympic gold medals.</p> <p>Tiriac, meanwhile, never made it past the fourth-round at a Grand Slam in singles.</p> <p>He did win the 1970 French Open doubles title, however.</p>

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Sister dumped from bridal party after lockdown weight gain

<p>A bride-to-be has caused controversy after admitting that she dumped her sister from her bridal party after she gained weight.</p> <p>The bridezilla revealed she asked her sister to step away from her bridesmaid duties after she put on 10kg during lockdown.</p> <p>She further went on to explain that her older sister struggled with eating disorders her whole life, but still tried to defend her actions.</p> <p>But after she was slammed over her decision, she eventually confessed to wanting to "protect her wedding day".</p> <p>Sharing on Reddit, the bride-to-be admitted the move had divided her family.</p> <p>“My sister Julia was overweight growing up while the rest of us (five girls, no brothers) were always petite,” she said.</p> <p>“No one in our family ever treated her badly for her weight, though my mum did try to help her diet several times throughout our childhood for purely health reasons.</p> <p>“She was hospitalised for her eating disorder for the first time when she was 18, and she’s been in and out of treatment facilities since then.</p> <p>“Pre-pandemic, Julia seemed to be on a recovery kick again. She looked healthy, seemed to be eating normally. I was hopeful she could keep it together and felt okay about asking her to be a bridesmaid at that point.</p> <p>“That was the last time I saw her though (Feb 2020), until I saw her Friday for Christmas Day.</p> <p>“Julia has gained a LOT of weight in that time, probably 10kg, which is a lot because she’s short. This is a huge red flag to me because prior relapses have been preceded by weight gain, which seems to trigger another relapse.”</p> <p>The bride-to-be said it was then she made the decision to dump her from her wedding.</p> <p>“I [decided] it makes more sense for her to not be a bridesmaid. That way she can wear whatever she wants, be skinny or fat, show up or not, and it won’t affect the day as a whole,” said said.</p> <p>“So I texted her after Christmas to ask if she was doing okay. Sure enough, she admitted she’d been having body image issues since gaining weight during lockdown.</p> <p>“I kindly asked her to step down from being a bridesmaid, explaining that it was for her own good and I was only doing this because I cared about her. She seemed upset but agreed to step down.”</p> <p>The decision ended up causing a heated debate amongst family members, with even the bride's fiancé joining in, saying she was harsh to dump her sister over her weight.</p> <p>“Now our dad is furious with me, saying Julia is heartbroken,” she said.</p> <p>“My mom and sisters are all on my side here and agree Julia not being a bridesmaid is what’s best for everyone.</p> <p>“So I wasn’t that worried about being in the wrong here—until my FIANCÉ said I was wrong and basically called me out for even bringing up her weight with her.”</p> <p>She added that while she was worried for her sister’s mental health, she was also concerned about her wedding day.</p> <p>“Yes, of course protecting my wedding day is part of my consideration here,” she said.</p> <p>“God forbid one single day doesn’t revolve around her I guess.”</p> <p>Some Reddit users slammed the bride.</p> <p>“The obsession over the wedding pictures is disgusting. Why does a wedding have to be an Instagram event?” said one.</p> <p>Added another: “Bride sounds so self-centered. Thank god the fiancé talked some sense into her.”</p> <p>Said a third: “With family like this, it’s no wonder she has an eating disorder.”</p> <p>But others disagreed, with one saying: “Maybe she went about it the wrong way, but her feelings are valid. Also what girl doesn’t dream a perfect wedding day, it’s natural to overthink all the variables that play into it.”</p>

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