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Why panic attacks aren’t a reason to panic

<p>Panic attacks typically occur when a person is under stress. The stress can be physical, like being run down, or emotional, like a significant life change.</p> <p>Panic attacks are a relatively common experience with as many as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5143159/">one in seven</a> people experiencing them at least once. A little more than half of those people will have repeated panic attacks.</p> <p>Our understanding of panic attacks has changed over time, but we’ve now come to a good understanding of what panic attacks are and how we can help those who experience them.</p> <p>It’s important to understand that panic attacks are a physiological expression of anxiety, and not intrinsically dangerous. The symptoms are the body’s natural way of coping with perceived threats.</p> <p><strong>A build-up of stress</strong></p> <p>Panic attacks are typically experienced as time-limited episodes of intense anxiety.</p> <p>The effects of stress can accumulate slowly, and a person is unlikely to be aware of the extent of their stress until a panic attack occurs.</p> <p>Panic attacks often appear to arise for no apparent reason. They can occur anywhere and at any time, including at night, when the person has been asleep.</p> <p>Panic attacks often have a very abrupt onset and usually resolve over the course of minutes rather than hours.</p> <p>They are often, but not always, experienced as physical symptoms, such as rapid or skipped heartbeat, difficulty breathing and tightness in the chest, dizziness, muscular tension and sweating.</p> <p>When someone experiences a panic attack there is also an emotional response which is driven by perceptions of threat or danger. If the person doesn’t know why a panic attack is happening, or perceives it as something more sinister, they are likely to feel more anxious.</p> <p><strong>Are panic attacks dangerous?</strong></p> <p>Panic attacks are not dangerous in and of themselves. They are simply intense anxiety, and the symptoms are real expressions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activating and regulating.</p> <p>An increase in heart rate occurs to improve the delivery of oxygen to our muscles to prepare for action like fight or flight. More oxygen is therefore needed, and so breathing rate is increased, resulting in a sense of breathlessness and tightness in the chest.</p> <p>As oxygen is directed to the core and muscles, supply can proportionately decrease to the head, leading to symptoms of dizziness.</p> <p>The expression of these symptoms will self-regulate, so all panic attacks will cease. However, the residual effects of the body’s chemical messengers, adrenaline and noradrenaline, take some time to “wash out”. So it’s likely that after a panic attack the person will still feel some anxiety.</p> <p>Again, this serves the function of having the body be prepared to reactivate for any other perceived or real threat. It’s also understandable that after this experience the person will feel tired and drained.</p> <p>So if you have a panic attack, while unpleasant, it isn’t necessarily a sign that you need to seek help. It may be that through reflection you can use the panic attack as a signal to examine what is happening to lead to the physical or emotional stress in your life, and perhaps make some changes.</p> <p><strong>When should you seek help?</strong></p> <p>A small portion of people (1.7%) who experience panic attacks <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5143159/">may go on to develop a panic disorder</a>.</p> <p>Panic attacks may become frequent and lead a person to avoid situations they perceive as high risk.</p> <p>In this case the panic attacks become a panic disorder, and it would be useful to seek expert help from a registered mental health professional, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist.</p> <p>The <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0004867418799453">most effective treatment</a> for panic disorder is psychological therapy (cognitive behaviour therapy) with or without antidepressants.</p> <p><strong>What can I do to help a friend?</strong></p> <p>If you see someone having a panic attack, try not to “feed the fear” by responding with anxiety or fear. Remember and calmly remind the person that while the experience is unpleasant, it is not dangerous and will pass.</p> <p>Perhaps the most useful thing to do for someone having a panic attack will be to help to re-focus their mind, away from the thoughts that are causing stress.</p> <p>But you can also give them a sense of control over the physical effects of the attack. This can be done by helping to slow and pace the person’s breathing. There are many variations of this process, but one example is to calmly ask the person to breathe in for four seconds, hold their breath for two seconds, and then breathe out slowly over six seconds.</p> <p>You can quietly count the seconds with the person and repeat the procedure for a minute or so, or as needed.</p> <p><em>Written by Justin Kenardy. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/panic-attacks-arent-necessarily-a-reason-to-panic-they-are-your-bodys-way-of-responding-to-stress-111174"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Not everyone is beautiful – but that’s okay

<p>You probably aren’t beautiful. It’s statistical, not personal.</p> <p>Most of us are average, a few of us are ugly, and a tiny number of us are beautiful or handsome.</p> <p>Many of us struggle with our own attractiveness, and in particular, the idea that we don’t have enough of it. <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13284200601178532#preview">Research suggests</a> that <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S147101531400052X">body dissatisfaction</a>, or not liking one’s body, is a major concern for both men and women. And the pursuit of a more attractive body, if manifested as a <a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/14/943">drive for thinness</a> or a drive for muscularity, is a big risk factor for the <a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0001541">development of eating disorders</a> and <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/eat.20828/abstract">muscle dysmorphia</a>, both which are on the rise in Australia.</p> <p>Who do we blame? <a href="http://public.gettysburg.edu/~cbarlett/index/08BVS.pdf">The media</a>, unsurprisingly, among a host of <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/bul/134/3/460/">potential culprits</a>.</p> <p>In the absence of population-level interventions to improve our body image, social media and corporations have filled the void.</p> <p>Tumblr and Instagram are replete with images and words that “everyone is beautiful”, that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”, that “beauty is only skin-deep”.</p> <p>Dove, in marketing their beauty products predominantly to women, state their mission to create “a new definition of beauty [which] will free women from self-doubt and encourage them to embrace their real beauty”.</p> <p>These messages are comforting and appealing, but are they backed up by evidence?</p> <p><strong>Myths and maxims of beauty</strong></p> <p>Consider the sentiment, “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”, which suggests beauty is subjective.</p> <p>Data suggests that people are remarkably consistent in their <a href="http://jonathanstray.com/papers/Langlois.pdf">determination of who is attractive</a> and who isn’t, both within and across cultures. That’s not to say that subjectivity plays no role at all – as we’re all guided by our individually formed preferences – but that the scope for subjectivity exists within the narrow confines of the objective traits of physical beauty.</p> <p>What about “beauty is only skin-deep”, or in other words, that a person’s appearance has no bearing on their personality or behaviour?</p> <p>It does. <a href="http://www4.uwsp.edu/psych/s/389/dion72.pdf">“What is beautiful is good”</a>, according to a group of oft-cited psychologists in their seminal 1972 paper that explored this very idea. Decades later, we know beautiful people are not only just thought of as “good”. Attractive people are also <a href="http://jonathanstray.com/papers/Langlois.pdf">considered more intelligent</a>, sociable, trustworthy, honest, capable, competent, likable, and friendly.</p> <p><strong>So, what should we do?</strong></p> <p>We could attempt to convince people that they are beautiful. We could attempt to redefine beauty standards to be broader and encompassing of more people, thus allowing more people to belong to the beautiful club. But these strategies won’t work because they don’t reduce the importance ascribed to beauty in the first place.</p> <p>We could preach the platitude that beauty is simply unimportant, but this is wholly inconsistent with the data.</p> <p>We ought to be balanced in our approach to beauty – that it is important, but not as important as the media makes it out to be.</p> <p>The media will encourage you to base a disproportionate amount of your self-esteem on your and others’ positive evaluations of your external appearance. For some, this harmful tendency stems from family, friends, and partners.</p> <p>Understand that you are complex and multifaceted. The sources from which you derive your self-esteem and self-worth must be similarly diverse. What can you do with your body? What can your brain do? Are you intelligent, creative, funny, athletic, caring, a hard worker, a great cook, a great mother or father?</p> <p>Consciously placing less importance on physical attractiveness and diversifying sources of self-esteem won’t be easy. For some, the process will be extremely difficult, and it may be wise to seek the advice of a psychologist.</p> <p>A generous dose of scepticism is also needed, particularly toward campaigns spearheaded by the beauty industry – especially when these advertisements mask their commercial intentions under the guise of “feel-good” benevolence.</p> <p>Don’t be too disheartened that you’re not beautiful; not many people are. Cultivate your self-esteem elsewhere. You’ll feel better for it.</p> <p>This article was co-authored by Sangwon Lee, undergraduate LLB/BA candidate at the University of Queensland.</p> <p><em>Written by Scott Griffiths. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/not-everyone-is-beautiful-35915"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Woman slams Kmart for “disgusting” customer service email

<p>23-year-old Sydney woman Georgia Rochelle was simply looking to give feedback on Kmart’s apparel offerings, but the department store’s response has left her reeling.</p> <p>Rochelle told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/fashion/woman-outraged-by-kmarts-disgusting-customer-service-response/news-story/cf703198cc8dc8b2df3b184df3627645" target="_blank">news.com.au</a> </em>that she had been searching for plus size clothes in her local branch only to find “half a rack of ugly clothes” hidden behind rows of smaller-sized clothing. She also found that the activewear section had nothing that would fit her size 24 body, even though the store is supposed to stock up to size 26 for its women’s plus size range.</p> <p>She went on to message Kmart’s Facebook page to share her experience. While the initial response was friendly, the follow-up email she received on Monday horrified her.</p> <p>“While we try to cater for as many people as possible please understand people come in all shapes and sizes and we can’t cater for absolutely everyone,” the customer service representative wrote.</p> <p>“It is not entirely our job to make you feel good about yourself.”</p> <p>Rochelle said the email “shocked” her and “made me feel like I was in high school again.”</p> <p>However, Rochelle said she was more angered than embarrassed by the shaming response. “It’s so insulting I can say something about there being a limited range for plus-sized people, and they equate that with feeling bad about my body, which isn’t the case at all,” she said.</p> <p>“I don’t think your size is something to be embarrassed about. All it shows is that prejudice (against fat people) doesn’t go away – even when you’re supposed to be professional.”</p> <p>Other customers have joined Rochelle in lambasting the retailer for their “appalling” message. “Do you train your staff to be unprofessional and disrespectful to relevant and honestly needed feedback?” a shopper wrote on Kmart’s Facebook page.</p> <p>“Let's face it, your plus size section is completely awful,” said another.</p> <p>“Why are you not listening to your customers who are obviously willing to spend the money if only there was decents clothing to select from … There is a massive market for our size range and big shop names are not taking advantage of this.”</p> <p>Kmart has apologised for the mishap in a statement issued to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/fashion/woman-outraged-by-kmarts-disgusting-customer-service-response/news-story/cf703198cc8dc8b2df3b184df3627645?fbclid=IwAR1otS70gurauXYU7Ui1i_4QDIA3nGKyru1KxK2WEGgsDZtD_71IN-SIQrM" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>. “We are truly sorry for these comments and have spoken directly to this customer to apologise,” the statement said.</p> <p>“This does not reflect Kmart’s views at all. We want every customer that interacts with Kmart to have a pleasurable shopping experience, and on this occasion, we have not lived up to this commitment.”</p> <p>Rochelle said she has been invited by the retail giant to join a special focus group to improve the brand’s plus-size range, which she intends to accept.</p> <p>However, Janine Mison, director of plus size fashion agency United Curves is sceptical about the initiative.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FJanineMison%2Fposts%2F2392333120786109&amp;width=500" width="500" height="644" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“I've tried for years to work with Kmart Australia on this issue and spent quite some time and effort, attended meetings with their team, their CEO and provided feedback and suggestions from my extensive customer base,” Mison shared on her social media page.</p> <p>“They listen, they say all the right things, yet actions speak louder than words. ZERO change, ZERO improvement and if anything, a backwards slide.”</p> <p>Have you had any difficulties finding plus sized clothing at Kmart? Share with us in the comments.</p>

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What injuries can you face while gardening and what can you do?

<p><span>Most of us consider gardening to be a pleasurable diversion on a sunny afternoon, and it is, but the other reality is that gardening can result in many different injuries. The desire to get outdoors and into gardening action is healthy and fun, although without adequate stretching and warming up beforehand, you are asking for trouble. It’s normal to feel occasional niggles and soreness after time spent performing gardening chores, but must it always be this way? There’s no denying that injuries are more likely as we get older, so what injuries can you face while gardening and what can you do?</span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 333.125px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7825008/image.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6fa9ec2ba90e480f9a1d6af629239f80" /></span></p> <p><span>Repetitive tasks and constant repositioning when kneeling, sitting and stretching are natural gardening functions. Unfortunately, these same activities are a major cause of gardening injuries. Fatigue is also a factor, resulting in tripping, slipping and falling accidents that happen more than they should. With tiredness comes inattention to detail, and the sometimes comical and often painful occurrence of stepping on a mislaid rake or fork that springs up and strikes a person is not just something we see on TV. Common gardening injuries include:</span></p> <ul> <li><span>Sprains and strains</span></li> <li><span>Sharp muscle and joint pain</span></li> <li><span>Stiff aching muscles</span></li> <li><span>Neck and shoulder pain</span></li> <li><span>Lower and upper back pain</span></li> <li><span>Carpal tunnel syndrome</span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>Exercise for mobility and strength</span></strong></p> <p><span>Living with back pain is an unfortunate situation that can be eased with a little pre-planning. Back pain is caused by factors that can include wear and tear, strains, muscular issues, bad posture, poor sleep, incorrect lifting, stress and over-tiring muscle groups. Fortunately, the majority of potential back pain causes can be counteracted with simple exercises and a little common sense.</span></p> <p><strong><u><span>Stretching:</span></u></strong><span> Stretching that strengthens the back and core muscles helps reduce back pain and prevents repeat episodes. You can gradually introduce stretching exercises with a customised approach that suits your fitness level and requirements. Peak fitness isn’t the goal, so remember to stop immediately if exercise or stretching becomes painful.</span></p> <p><strong><u><span>Exercise:</span></u></strong><span> Once you have completed your stretching routine it’s time to perform some strengthening exercises. Take it slowly and focus on technique – it’s not a race. Here are some great <a href="https://www.deepheat.com.au/back-pain-relief/">stretching and exercise tips</a> that will have you feeling limber and ready for action.</span></p> <p><strong><u><span>Hot and Cold:</span></u></strong><span> Warm-ups and cool-downs are an integral feature of muscle management and pain relief. Don’t fret, you aren’t required to immerse yourself in an ice-cold bath or sweat it out in a summertime sauna. Progressive heating and cooling pain relief products are convenient and effective, such as <a href="https://www.deepheat.com.au/">Deep Heat</a> Regular Relief, Night Relief and Odourless Back Patches. </span></p> <p><strong>Addressing pain caused by gardening</strong></p> <p><span>Your stretching and exercise routine will go a long way toward avoiding debilitating pain, while Deep Heat products contain ingredients for fast acting, targeted pain relief, even while you sleep. <a href="https://www.deepheat.com.au/product-category/pain-relief/heating/">Heating</a> and <a href="https://www.deepheat.com.au/product-category/pain-relief/cooling/">cooling</a> products ease muscle pain caused by physical labour, lifting and bending, and can be used every day for pain relief as required. Here are a few suggestions.</span></p> <p><span>Sports Spray pain relief delivers heat conveniently for temporary pain relief.</span></p> <p><span>Deep Heat regular relief is a tried and favourite for targeted temporary pain relief.</span></p> <p><span>Use ICE Gel to relieve muscle pain caused by gardening with a soothing cooling feeling.</span></p> <p><span>Try Deep Heat back patches for odourless sustained, soothing relief.</span></p> <p><span>Always read the label and follow the directions for use. If symptoms worsen or change unexpectedly, talk to your healthcare professional. </span></p> <p><span>Everyone is different, but painful, tight and sore muscles are frustrating for anyone to experience. So, take a deep breath, limber up, relax and enjoy your time outdoors with reduced pain. </span></p> <p><em><span>This is sponsored content brought to you in conjunction with <a href="https://www.deepheat.com.au/">Deep Heat</a>.</span></em></p>

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Man develops deadly brain infection after cleaning ear with cotton buds

<p>It’s hard to resist the temptation to clean the insides of our ears with cotton buds, despite warnings on the label and health experts telling us otherwise. However, this near-fatal case may change your mind.</p> <p>An English man has sworn off cleaning his ears with cotton swabs after developing an infection that spread from his hearing to the lining of his brain.</p> <p>The 31-year-old man began developing the infection after the tip of a cotton bud he used got stuck in his ear canal, according to a case published in <a rel="noopener" href="https://casereports.bmj.com/content/12/3/e227971" target="_blank">BMJ Case Reports</a> earlier this month.</p> <p>He was experiencing seizures, headaches, ear pain and discharge before being rushed to hospital, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.livescience.com/64958-cotton-swab-ear-infection.html" target="_blank"><em>Live Science</em></a> reported.</p> <p>The small amount of cotton left turned out to trap debris and induce a severe bacterial infection that progressed to the base of his skull and moved into the lining of his brain, said lead author Dr. Alexander Charlton, a member of the team of ear, nose and throat specialists involved in the man's treatment at University Hospital Coventry in England.</p> <p>Fortunately, Charlton and other doctors were able to remove the debris through a minor surgery. The patient was found to have necrotizing otitis externa, an infection in the soft tissue of the area from the outside of the ear to the eardrum. After almost a week in hospital, the man is expected to be free from long-term hearing issues.</p> <p>However, he was ordered by Charlton not to use cotton buds in his ears anymore, as the doctor said they have been linked to infections and punctured ear drums. "They can only cause problems," Charlton said.</p> <p>Health practitioners acknowledge that cotton buds are a popular ear-cleaning tool among the laymen. "I think that most people will have used them at some stage," Dr Joe Kosterich told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.myvmc.com/videos/ear-health/" target="_blank">Virtual Medical Centre</a>.</p> <p>"In fact, they are something that shouldn’t be used. We think of them as being soft, but when you press on a cotton wool bud, they’re not actually all that soft. It is possible to perforate the eardrum with them."</p> <p>Ana Kim, MD, the director of Otologic Research at Columbia University Medical Centre also said removing ear wax might make ears more prone to infection. "It keeps the outer ear canal skin moist, allowing for the skin cells to be healthy and enabling the cells to continue shedding skin debris," she told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.businessinsider.sg/seizure-brain-infection-after-using-a-cotton-swab-2019-3/" target="_blank">INSIDER</a>.</em></p> <p>Do you use cotton buds regularly? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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“I see it and I feel it”: Lisa Curry’s surprising confession

<p>Former Olympian Lisa Curry has revealed that she took a year off exercise.</p> <p>The former swimmer, who has competed in three Olympic Games and won a slew of gold medals at international competitions, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://coach.nine.com.au/2019/03/14/12/05/lisa-curry-fitness-diet" target="_blank"><em>Nine Coach</em></a> that she took a break from active lifestyle after meeting her now-husband Mark Tabone.</p> <p>Curry announced her engagement to the entertainer in 2016, and the couple <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/lisa-curry-is-getting-married-today" target="_blank">tied the knot</a> in May 2018.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BskTbFYgGbz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BskTbFYgGbz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Lisa Curry AO (@lisacurry)</a> on Jan 12, 2019 at 11:59pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"In the last three years, I've met my now husband-to-be – we've been travelling a lot, sleeping in, and going out for dinner," the 56-year-old said. "It's got to the point where in the last year I've done pretty much no exercise."</p> <p>Curry said while she felt happy and is at a "really good" point in her life, she <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/lisa-curry-opens-up-about-her-secret-struggle" target="_blank">gained weight</a> and started feeling less fit. "I've got about six to eight kilos to lose, and for me that's a lot. Most people probably wouldn't see it – but I see it, and I feel it."</p> <p>The mother-of-three recently embarked on a new regimen to get her health back on track and to "find Lisa Curry again".</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtiNy-3A_S5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtiNy-3A_S5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Workouts are always fun when I have a crowd watching me😂😂💪🏻 @morgangruell My PT @mark66andrew #grannieandflynn @3hotgrannies</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lisacurry/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Lisa Curry AO</a> (@lisacurry) on Feb 6, 2019 at 1:05am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>She enlisted the help of four personal trainers to guide her on a strength-building program with high-intensity interval training. "I'm sore and I'm a bit tired and I have jelly legs when I walk down the stairs," she said.</p> <p>"But you know what? I feel good, and exercise gives you more energy, and when you feel good you make better eating choices."</p> <p>Curry admitted that she struggles with menopause and hormonal changes, which come with negative effects on her body and mood. However, she believes women can still take control over these conditions.</p> <p>"Hormonally speaking, even more of a concern to women than their hormones being out of whack and being moody and tired, is their weight gain that comes with it," she said.</p> <p>"I completely get it, but I want to prove that my weight gain is not just menopausal – it's because I've been lazy, and having a good time, and eating too much of the wrong things, and sleeping in."</p>

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Dementia early warning signs: Changes to look out for

<p>You swear you left your keys on the table, but they don’t seem to be there.</p> <p>You walked into a room and can’t remember what you needed.</p> <p>You became increasingly frustrated because you couldn’t find the exit in the shopping centre.</p> <p>Do these situations seem familiar?</p> <p>Ageing is a beautiful process. It’s proof of a life well-lived, with many stories and experiences to share. But growing older can also have adverse effects on your health, with one being dementia.</p> <p>Dementia isn’t just one size fits all, as the disease comes in many forms – the most common being Alzheimer’s. But despite the complicated nature of the neurological illness, the symptoms generally overlap with one another, which is why it’s important to understand the early warning signs.</p> <p>We sat down with Tamar Krebs, a leading expert in aged and dementia care, to provide us an insight into the common disease. While symptoms can be similar from patient to patient, they can also vastly vary depending on the type of dementia the person is dealing with.</p> <p>And when it comes to the most common symptoms, the complicated disorder has uncomplicated warning signals.</p> <p>“Depending on the type of dementia, for some it may be becoming more withdrawn from day to day life, for others it maybe confusion and making a mess of paying bills and simple mathematics,” Ms Krebs explained.</p> <p>“If someone was a great cook, you may notice a change in their cooking ability or taste of the food.”</p> <p>But while these are easy to keep track of, dementia isn’t completely black and white, with many important signs going by unnoticed.</p> <p>“Subtle signs of being disengaged, we find that families first make excuses for the person – they are getting older or maybe a bit depressed,” says Ms Krebs.</p> <p>“When someone displays forgetfulness, people that are around pretend to brush it off, saying ‘we all forget sometimes’, instead of looking for an increased pattern of memory loss.”</p> <p>And the statistics are alarming, with 1 in 10 people over 65 dealing with dementia. Meaning by the year 2028, over 589,000 people will be diagnosed with the disease – 55 per cent of those being women.</p> <p>According to <span><a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/dementia-statistics">Health Direct</a></span>, dementia isn’t purely associated with memory loss, as the illness is the leading cause of death amongst Australian females and the second leading cause of death overall.</p> <p>These numbers are only growing, with many coming to terms with their loved ones being consumed by the disability.</p> <p>Ms Krebs says that when taking care of someone with dementia, there is one thing to keep in mind.</p> <p>“They aren’t always suffering, rather it is important to learn to live with dementia,” she says.</p> <p>“The approach of living with dementia is a solution-based approach focusing on the things the person enjoys and CAN do, rather than focusing on their diminishing memory and cognition.”</p> <p>Unfortunately, there is no proven deterrent when it comes to dementia, but there has been plenty of noise around maintaining a good lifestyle.</p> <p>“Keeping social, keeping fit, eating well and staying relevant, but nothing is proven,” says Ms Krebs.</p> <p>If you find yourself relating to this story, and recognise one or more of these symptoms, then be sure to visit your GP for a check-up.</p>

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“I can’t breathe”: Serena Williams forced to retire after terrifying health scare

<p>Serena Williams has been forced to retire from her third-round match at Indian Wells Masters after a frightening health scare that left her with “extreme dizziness".</p> <p>The 23-time Grand Slam Champion won the first three games of her highly anticipated clash with Garbine Muguruza in the California desert.</p> <p>She took the court for the second set, but soon complained of feeling ill as the match continued.</p> <p>She lost the next six games and decided to call it a day when she was trailing 3-6 0-1.</p> <p>Tournament organisers took to Twitter to explain the 37-year-old was suffering from a “viral illness".</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Feel better soon! <br /><br />Serena Williams' third round retirement was due to viral illness.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BNPPO19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BNPPO19</a> <a href="https://t.co/mpBNT0snHu">pic.twitter.com/mpBNT0snHu</a></p> — BNP Paribas Open (@BNPPARIBASOPEN) <a href="https://twitter.com/BNPPARIBASOPEN/status/1104886929403785216?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“I’ve never seen her like that,” one commentator said.</p> <p>“It’s so, so rare that she ever retires from a tennis match.”</p> <p>The tournament was the sixth time Williams and Muguruza came face-to-face on court.</p> <p>The last two clashes were grand slam finals which saw Williams winning at Wimbledon in 2015 and Muguruza taking home the 2016 French Open crown.</p> <p>"We've played many times and it's always super-tough, super-exciting," said Muguruza, who is a former world number one like Williams. "I wish I'm going to see her soon and [she's] feeling better."</p> <p>Williams explained in a statement, “Before the match, I did not feel great, and then it just got worse with every second; extreme dizziness and extreme fatigue.</p> <p>“By the score, it might have looked like I started well, but I was not feeling at all well physically.</p> <p>“I will focus on getting better and start preparing for Miami.”</p>

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Guinness World Records: Meet the world’s oldest living person aged 116

<p>A 116-year-old Japanese woman has been given the title of the world’s oldest living person by Guinness World Records on Saturday.</p> <p>Residing in a nursing home in Japan’s southwest, Kane Tanaka enjoys playing the board game Othello and studying mathematics.</p> <p>In a ceremony, which took place at the nursing home, Ms Tanaka was officially bestowed the title in front of her family and the mayor.</p> <p>Ms Tanaka was born on January 2, 1903 and was the seventh of eight children.</p> <p>In 1922 she married Hideo Tanaka, with the pair having four children together and adopting another.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">WORLD’S OLDEST PERSON: 116-year-old Kane Tanaka was honored Saturday as the world's oldest living person by Guinness World Records. She says it's been a dream of hers since she was 100 ❤️ <a href="https://t.co/NOo501hdHz">https://t.co/NOo501hdHz</a> <a href="https://t.co/BVfxXfxhX0">pic.twitter.com/BVfxXfxhX0</a></p> — CBS News (@CBSNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/CBSNews/status/1104456895174270976?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Holding the title previously was Chiyo Miyako, also from Japan. She passed away in July at the age of 117. The oldest person to break the record before Miyako was also Japanese, with the region’s healthy lifestyle contributing to their long life.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Our new oldest person living record holder Kane Tanaka (116) was given a box of chocolates as a gift today at the certificate presentation - she immediately ate them!<br />Later when she was asked how many chocolates she wants to eat today, she said "100" 😄🍫 <a href="https://t.co/rgrgP0JcRp">https://t.co/rgrgP0JcRp</a> <a href="https://t.co/T48UWK562k">pic.twitter.com/T48UWK562k</a></p> — GuinnessWorldRecords (@GWR) <a href="https://twitter.com/GWR/status/1104295628459462659?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The nation is known to consume plenty of fish, rice, vegetables and other low-fat foods, with many of the elderly remaining active into their 80s and beyond.</p> <p>But despite the impressive milestone, Ms Tanaka still has a long way to go if she hopes to beat the oldest person to ever exist – French woman, Jeanne Louise Calment who was 122 years when she died.</p> <p>Guinness said the world’s oldest man is currently being investigated, as the man who was previously going to be given the title passed away in January at 113.</p> <p>Masazo Nonaka, also Japanese, enjoyed devouring sweets and was never seen without his trademark knit beanie.</p> <p>His retirement was spent watching sumo wrestling on TV, reading the daily news and eating plenty of desserts.</p> <p>According to his family, Mr Nonaka’s long life was credited to his stress-free lifestyle.</p> <p>He managed to outlive all of his siblings, his wife and also three of their five children.</p> <p>Would you want to live past 100? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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10 nutrition myths you need to stop believing

<p>Your nutrition needs change with age, as it becomes critical to incorporate healthy habits to better support your physical and cognitive health.</p> <p>Dietitian Ngaire Hobbins debunks the top myths when it comes to your diet.</p> <p><strong>1. Your stomach shrinks as you get older</strong><br />Although your appetite and your capacity to eat may change, your stomach doesn’t shrink as you get older. In fact, not eating well enough only accelerates the ageing process.</p> <p><strong>2. Weight loss is healthy</strong><br />Unfortunately, this is not always the case when we are older. Instead, dieting or unintentional weight loss should be avoided in our later years, with any weight loss a natural result of combining good exercise with an eating plan rich in protein.</p> <p>In fact, a bit of extra padding is beneficial to support your body and brain in the years ahead.</p> <p><strong>3. You need to eat less as you get older</strong><br />Whilst your metabolism slows and your energy output decreases, food and eating is what protects and fuels you — it is your key to ageing well.</p> <p>As you age, you may need to eat less of some things, and your body will need more of others, particularly foods rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals.</p> <p><strong>4. Only eat what you feel like</strong><br />The ageing process can play tricks on our appetite and the triggers that tell us if we are hungry or full. As a result, you might eat less than what your bodies really need. It’s important to realise the vital importance of continuing to eat despite the tricks, so your body gets the energy and nutrients it needs to function.</p> <p>An outright loss of appetite is not normal and could be symptomatic of an underlying health problem. If you are having trouble eating enough, try to eat small meals regularly throughout the day, even if you don’t always feel like it.</p> <p><strong>5. You need a low-fat diet</strong><br />Contrary to deeply entrenched popular opinion, a low-fat diet is not always the best, especially as you get older. Fat is an important source of calories and some people might need to eat a bit extra to maintain weight.</p> <p>For most, however, eating foods that contain mostly unsaturated fats is best for heart, body, and brain health. Fats found in foods such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado, and oily fish are ideal.</p> <p><strong>6. Eat more vegetables</strong><br />Whilst nutrient-rich vegetables continue to be essential in your diet, protein needs to be at the centre of your plate, with the vegetables surrounding it from now on. That’s because you need more — not less — protein as you get older.</p> <p>Protein keeps our muscles, immune system, organs, and brains — all our systems — working and renewing minute by minute. Vegetables are always important, but if your appetite is small, ensure you get the protein in first, then enjoy the vegetables.</p> <p><strong>7. You only need to drink water when you’re thirsty<br /></strong>If you feel thirsty, you are already a bit dehydrated. That’s a problem because neither your body nor your brain can function at peak capacity if you are dehydrated. Dehydration can cause confusion and delirium, hampers kidney function, and worsens a multitude of other conditions. As you get older, you may not sense thirst as efficiently, putting them at greater risk of dehydration and making fluid intake an essential element of overall nutrition.</p> <p><strong>8. Supplements are sufficient</strong><br />Of course, we can’t live off vitamins and supplement tablets alone. Your body works best when it is working — that means eating and digesting food. What’s more, most supplements promoted to help you live longer, boost memory, fight off dementia and more, fail to live up to their claims.</p> <p>And there’s another problem — many interact with common medications or just don’t work the way they would if you ate them in the foods, they are naturally found in.</p> <p>You could spend a lot of money for no gain when you could do better by simply eating. Not only that, but you would miss out on one of life’s greatest pleasures — cooking and eating with family and friends.</p> <p><strong>9. You must always eat a "proper meal"</strong><br />Making sure you eat regularly is essential to help you live well and remain independent. However, eating three full meals a day can be a struggle if you have a loss of appetite, or find cooking too difficult or time-consuming.</p> <p>You can opt for pre-packaged meals, frozen dinners, or takeaway foods, but some of these don’t contain the protein and other nutrients necessary to support ageing bodies and brains; others are high in sodium or saturated fats. If three good meals are too much of a challenge, five to six small meals or well-chosen snacks can be just as beneficial.</p> <p><strong>10. Malnutrition is part of getting older</strong></p> <p>Malnutrition can affect anyone — at any age — and is not a normal part of the ageing process. However, with age comes a greater risk of malnutrition and it’s important that you don’t dismiss the warning signs as being a part of "old age".</p> <p>For more information on healthy habits for eating well, read the <a href="https://homeinstead.com.au/resources/nutrition-seniors">full nutrition guide</a>.</p> <p>What healthy habits have you tried to incorporate into your life?</p> <p><em>Written by Ngaire Hobbins. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/10-nutrition-myths-to-ignore.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

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4 steps to dealing with criticism

<p>No one enjoys receiving criticism, but it’s a crucial process in growing as a person and improving on your faults. And being open to receiving constructive advice is a trait that many people respect. While human nature is wired to be defensive, follow these steps to help you understand and receive criticism better.</p> <p><strong>1. Recognise when you’re being defensive</strong></p> <p>The minute you hear something that goes against what you think of yourself, you start to feel a sense of rage building up inside. But as soon as you notice yourself getting heated up, take a deep breath and try to relax. It’s only natural to tense up when you’re emotional but practicing breathing exercises will help you counteract your emotions.</p> <p><strong>2. Listen<em> only</em> to understand</strong></p> <p>When the person standing in front of you is telling you what you can improve on, then listen to them. Don’t interrupt with a counter-argument, and don’t tell them they’re wrong. You may have valid points, but bring them up at another time, not when you’re on the receiving end of constructive advice.</p> <p><strong>3. Let them know you will continue to think about the conversation</strong></p> <p>Maybe you might not have come to a resolution but telling the other person that you’ll ponder on their words after the conversation has ended will show them that you care. Saying something like: “It’s not easy to hear what you’re telling me, but I want you to know that I’m going to give it a lot of thought.”</p> <p><strong>4. Draw the line at insults</strong></p> <p>Criticism should always help improve you as a person, so when someone starts delivering personal insults, that’s when you need to walk away. Everyone deserves respect, and if the person sitting in front of you cannot give you that, then you have the right to exit the situation.</p> <p>Are you someone who handles criticism well? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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4 tips for sleeping peacefully every night

<p>As we age, it is common for us to experience <span><a href="https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/aging-and-sleep">changes in sleeping patterns</a></span>. Some of us experience a greater fragmentation in sleep characterised by frequent episodes of wakefulness throughout the night. Some of us have a harder time falling asleep than we used to. These situations can result in us feeling tired during the daytime.</p> <p>Our need for <span><a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinseatonjefferson/2017/10/23/how-older-adults-can-improve-sleep-without-drugs/#4604b49a1c54">sufficient high-quality sleep</a></span> does not lessen as we age; we still need plenty of sleep in order for our wounds to heal, for our bodies to repair themselves, for our hormones to be properly regulated and for successful completion of countless other bodily functions that sleep facilitates.</p> <p>If you notice that you're not sleeping as peacefully as you used to, we offer the following 4 helpful tips for your consideration.</p> <p><strong>1. Avoid consuming caffeine after 4pm</strong></p> <p>You're no doubt aware caffeine can give you an energy boost that is counterproductive to sleep. <span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3805807/">Scientific research demonstrates</a></span> that the effects of caffeine linger in the body longer than you might think. Caffeine will disrupt your sleep even if you consume it up to 6 full hours before bedtime. So, if you drink a cup of caffeinated coffee with your evening meal, you can count on it leading to sleep disruptions later that night. If you go to bed at 10pm, it's wise to make 4pm your cut-off point for consuming caffeine in any form.</p> <p><strong>2. Choose a healthy mattress, pillow and bedding</strong></p> <p>Your mattress and pillow can either support you in peaceful sleep, or they can interfere with it. If you aren't sleeping well, it's worth investigating how your bedding could be improved.</p> <p>If you frequently wake with neck pain, the physiotherapists at Physioworks suggest that it is likely due to an <span><a href="https://physioworks.com.au/FAQRetrieve.aspx?ID=31087">unsupportive pillow</a></span>. They point out that most people need to replace their pillows at least every 3 or 4 years. This is because a pillow's supportive capabilities deteriorate with use and time.</p> <p>If you often find yourself waking with a headache or a case of dizziness, a <span><a href="http://livingsafe.com.au/toxic-chemicals-fire-retardants-in-mattresses-making-us-sick-organic-mattresses-a-safer-healthier-option/">toxic mattress</a></span> could be to blame. If you purchased your mattress prior to 2005, it would be wise to replace it. This is because older mattresses are likely to contain <span><a href="https://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/8e81d7e1-a379-4590-b296-19e14a72d909/files/factsheet.pdf">toxic flame retardant chemicals</a></span>. These toxic chemicals are not manufactured in Australia, and Australians stopped importing them in 2005. They are still ubiquitous in some other countries, notably the United States.</p> <p>Your mattress and pillow aren't the only factors to consider. Your sheets can also influence the quality of your sleep. On hot nights in Australia, experts at the <span><a href="https://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/files/pdfs/SleepingOnHotNights-1216.pdf">Sleep Health Foundation</a></span> recommend avoiding synthetic sheets and synthetic blends in favour of natural fibres, particularly cotton. This is because varying thermal properties of some fibres can cause you to become sweaty and agitated on hot nights – and this can especially be an issue when you sleep on synthetic sheets.</p> <p>Bamboo sheets are another excellent option to consider if night sweats often cause you discomfort while sleeping. Bamboo's unique fibre structure wicks away moisture and keeps you both drier and cooler than you'd be if sleeping on synthetic sheets.</p> <p>If you're trying to decide between <span><a href="https://www.ecosa.com.au/blog/post/bamboo-sheets-vs-egyptian-cotton.html">bamboo sheets vs Egyptian cotton</a></span>, experts say bamboo is more hygienic, affordable and durable in addition to being as comfortable as Egyptian cotton.</p> <p><strong>3. Understand and respect your own unique circadian rhythms</strong></p> <p>Maximising your own unique <span><a href="https://www.sleep.org/articles/4-tips-maximize-circadian-rhythm/">circadian rhythms</a></span> could help you to improve your sleep quality, energy levels and all around productivity. Think of it as helping to give your own internal body clock a positive boost.</p> <p>You can help your body by forming a daily, habitual routine that involves waking and sleeping in a predictable pattern. Schedule your daily exercise routine in the early morning or afternoon hours. Avoid exercising late in the day, because exercise shortly before bedtime can disrupt your circadian rhythms and interfere with your ability to easily fall asleep.</p> <p><strong>4. Get treated for any sleep disorders that ail you</strong></p> <p>If you try all of the above suggestions without seeing any improvement in your sleep, it would be beneficial to speak with your GP about it. It is possible that you might have a <span><a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/sleep-disorders">sleep disorder</a></span> that will require professional treatment. Your GP can most likely help you diagnose and treat common issues such as snoring, sleep apnoea and restless legs syndrome. In cases where your issues may be beyond your GP's areas of medical expertise, she/he may refer you to one of Australia's qualified sleep specialists or sleep clinics.</p> <p>Following these suggestions is likely to help put you back on track for sleeping peacefully every night.</p> <p>Do you have any tips on how to get a better night’s sleep? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The "devastating" decision that Luke Perry’s family made

<p>Luke Perry’s family made a tough call on the day of the actor’s death, an insider has revealed.</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>Riverdale</em><span> </span>and <em>Beverly Hills, 90210</em> star was rushed into a Californian hospital after suffering a massive <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/detecting-strokes-here-s-what-you-need-to-know/" target="_blank">stroke</a> on Wednesday, February 27.</p> <p>He was then put under heavy sedation to allow his brain and body to recover after the attack – however, his condition did not improve even after several days, the insider told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/luke-perrys-family-made-decision-to-take-him-off-life-support/" target="_blank"><em>Us Weekly</em></a>.</p> <p>“Luke’s loved ones were hoping they’d pull him out of it after 48 hours or so,” they said. “But he never recovered. It was devastating.”</p> <p>On Monday, five days after Perry’s admission to hospital, his family – including fiancée Wendy Madison Bauer, ex-wife Rachel “Minnie” Sharp and children Sophie and Jack – made the difficult decision to take him off life support.</p> <p>The actor tragically died at the age of 52.</p> <p>Jack, the 21-year-old son of Perry and Sharp, has shared a tribute to his late father on Instagram.</p> <p>“I’ll miss you every day that I walk this earth,” he wrote. “I’ll do whatever I can to carry on your legacy and make you proud. I love you Dad.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BurfjpaHkDt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BurfjpaHkDt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">He was a lot of things to a lot of people. To me, he was always Dad. He loved and supported me in everything, and inspired me to be the best that I could possibly be. I’ve learned so much from you, and my heart is broken thinking about everything you won’t be here for. I’ll miss you every day that I walk this earth. I’ll do whatever I can to carry on your legacy and make you proud. I love you Dad.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/boy_myth_legend/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Jungle Boy • Jack Perry</a> (@boy_myth_legend) on Mar 6, 2019 at 12:03pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Jack, a pro wrestler known as ‘Jungle Boy’, also cancelled his appearance at an upcoming wrestling show in Los Angeles.</p> <p>His younger sister Sophie also shared a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/caring/luke-perry-s-daughter-breaks-her-silence-on-actor-s-shock-death/" target="_blank">statement</a> on her Instagram account.</p> <p>“I cannot individually respond to the hundreds of beautiful and heartfelt messages, but I see them, and appreciate you all for sending positivity to my family and I,” the 18-year-old wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Buo6FIuAhfB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Buo6FIuAhfB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A lot has happened in this past week for me. Everything is happening so fast. I made it back from Malawi just in time to be here with my family, And in the past 24 hours I have received an overwhelming amount of love and support. I cannot individually respond to the hundreds of beautiful and heartfelt messages, but I see them, and appreciate you all for sending positivity to my family and I. I’m not really sure what to say or do in this situation, it’s something you aren’t ever given a lesson on how to handle, especially when it’s all happening in the public eye. So bear with me and know that I am grateful for all the love. Just, being grateful quietly.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lemonperry/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Sophie Perry</a> (@lemonperry) on Mar 5, 2019 at 11:57am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I’m not really sure what to say or do in this situation, it’s something you aren’t ever given a lesson on how to handle, especially when it's all happening in the public eye. So bear with me and know that I am grateful for all the love.”</p>

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7 signs you have low-grade inflammation – and what you need to do about it

<p><span>Inflammation is usually picked up on after serious forms of infection or injury. Although low-grade inflammation can be just as dangerous. </span></p> <p><span>Identifying small signs of inflammation can help prevent long-term serious effects of this health issue.</span></p> <p><span>Author of <em>The Inflammation Solution</em>, Dr William Sears explains the body’s use of inflammation: </span></p> <p><span>“The term inflammation comes from the root words meaning ‘on fire’ […] the root cause of inflammation is that your immune system is out of balance and confused.”</span></p> <p><span>Inflammation can be a good thing when your body fights infection, injury or disease, although if the signals get crossed you could experience chronic, low-grade inflammation.</span></p> <p><span>Health and Wellness expert for Maple Holistics, Caleb Backe, stated, “</span><span>While you may not have severe inflammation, living in a state where your body is always a little bit inflamed can still have adverse consequences on your long-term health." </span></p> <p><span>This highlights that even the small signs of inflammation such as fatigue and vague pain are important to note. </span><span>According to experts, these are the seven things you should keep an eye out for and pay attention to.</span></p> <p><strong><span>1. Swelling</span></strong></p> <p><span>Dr Allen Conrad, doctor of chiropractic and certified strength and conditioning specialist, said,</span><span>"Low levels of inflammation are dangerous because they are easy to miss. When something is extremely sore or swollen, people are more aware of the symptoms and usually go to the doctor to get it evaluated." Dr Conrad advises to mention even subtle swelling to your doctor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>2. Fatigue</span></strong></p> <p><span>Inflammation can be apparent through feeling unnecessary fatigue. If you have no reason to feel tired then something might be wrong.</span></p> <p><span>"The effects of low-grade inflammation can mean that you have reduced cellular-energy availability," Backe says. "If you find that you’re constantly fatigued and you’ve ruled out an iron deficiency, then you might be suffering from mild inflammation."</span></p> <p><span>If you experience chronic fatigue it’s really important to bring this up with your doctor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>3. Aches and pains</span></strong></p> <p><span>An often-overlooked sign of low-grade inflammation includes general aches and pains. </span></p> <p><span>"If you feel like you have more than your fair share of aches, then you might be suffering from mild inflammation," Backe says. "When you haven’t put your body under stress and it still hurts, then it’s a sign that there’s something more going on."</span></p> <p><span>If you are experiencing intense pain that isn’t related to physical strain, then visit your doctor.</span></p> <p><strong><span>4. Low mood</span></strong></p> <p><span>A low mood and depression can be symptoms of many health concerns and inflammation should also be considered. Depression symptoms should be discussed with a doctor or other medical professional as it is serious.</span></p> <p><span>"Another symptom of low-grade inflammation could be depression," registered dietician Jeanette Kimszal. "Inflammation can affect the way the brain functions and has been thought to be a reason for someone to experience depressive episodes.”</span></p> <p><strong><span>5. Feeling “foggy”</span></strong></p> <p><span>Brain fog is a genuine medical condition that occurs in people with chronic health conditions. Brain fog can be caused by inflammation as well.</span></p> <p><span>"Low-grade inflammation can also induce neuroinflammation," pharmacist Lindsey Elmore tells <a href="https://www.bustle.com/p/7-signs-you-have-low-grade-inflammation-why-you-should-pay-attention-to-it-16102033">Bustle</a>. "This can lead to fever, fatigue, anhedonia (loss of interest in activities and inability to feel pleasure), depression and cognitive impairment. These are collectively known as the 'sickness behavior’."</span></p> <p><span>Cognitive issues can be a reason to visit the doctor as inflammation can be to blame.</span></p> <p><strong><span>6. Tender joints</span></strong></p> <p><span>Inflammation, even low-grade, can cause damage to the tissues of the body, which has long-term effects. So, feelings or raw or tender joints are a sign to look out for and report to your doctor.</span></p> <p><span>"[Low-grade inflammation is] dangerous because the tissues wear and tear," Dr Sears says. "For instance, the joints … will get tender."</span></p> <p><strong><span>7. Stomach problems</span></strong></p> <p><span>Inflammation can impact your digestive system as much as your brain, mood and joints, so it’s an important thing to look out for.</span></p> <p><span>"Emerging evidence suggests that low-grade inflammation alters gut microbiota, and this can lead to full-blown inflammatory conditions such as Celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis," Dr Elmore says. "You may experience constipation, diarrhea, stomach upset, bloat or foul-smelling stool. This is because abnormal gut microbiota has been shown to induce human antigens and trigger aberrant immune responses."</span></p> <p><span>If you’re experiencing any or all of these symptoms, see your doctor to help manage your symptoms and provide relief.</span></p>

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“I survived my own funeral”: Woman shares miracle story

<p>A woman has shared her story of surviving cancer after being told she only had “months, not years” to live.</p> <p>Advertising professional and English woman Amanda McDonald was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer in 2013. Eighteen months into the treatment, when McDonald thought she was heading for recovery, the doctors revealed the terrible news that the cancer had spread to her brain.</p> <p>She underwent surgeries and radiotherapy to remove the tumour, but they could not stave off the return of the cancer.</p> <p>“In October 2015, I was told I was dying,” McDonald told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/feb/15/experience-i-survived-my-own-funeral-amanda-mcdonald" target="_blank"><em>Guardian</em></a>. “I was 42. The doctors said there was no more they could do for me.”</p> <p>With mortality looming close, McDonald decided to organise her own funeral to spend time with her friends and family for one last time.</p> <p>A party was held in an upscale restaurant for 250 guests, including friends, colleagues, clients and family. Her mother “couldn’t bear the thought of coming”, but her father and husband were present.</p> <p>“I wanted to celebrate my life with the people I Ioved the most,” McDonald told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/survived-funeral-woman-shares-amazing-recovery-story-045646843.html" target="_blank">Yahoo7 News</a></em>.</p> <p>“I knew I was going to die soon and wanted to say goodbye properly. At your actual funeral you don’t get the chance to do that.”</p> <p>The funeral was a success, with the guests writing down their favourite memories and giving eulogies about what McDonald meant to them.</p> <p>“The day after ‘the funeral’ I woke up and thought: ‘That was the high and now I’ll fade away’,” she said.</p> <p>She proceeded to cease her treatment and continue living normal, everyday life with her husband Dean, trying to stay on as long as possible.</p> <p>Miraculously, the tumour did not grow back as expected.</p> <p>“Day by day, I began to start living a normal life again, although I was plagued by fears that I was going to die,” she said.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpageforamanda%2Fposts%2F2245468699113035&amp;width=500" width="500" height="493" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>About five years after her original diagnosis, McDonald is now cancer-free. Her oncologist said her survival was a rare case that happened only to one other patient in his 28-year career, while her palliative care nurse simply called her the “miracle lady”.</p> <p>McDonald has changed her life since she was cured. “I treasure the people I love more,” she said. “I don’t work long hours and travel all the time. I still work for them in a support role part time and work from home. </p> <p>“When you’ve looked death in the face and you are somehow allowed to step back, you are just overwhelmed with gratitude.”</p>

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Chezzi Denyer opens up about near-death experience: “Tell Sailor I love her”

<p>Chezzi Denyer has opened up about her near-death experience, which came back to mind after witnessing her daughter Sailor’s <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/chezzi-denyers-warning-to-parents-i-fully-encourage-people-to-get-their-children-tested/" target="_blank">severe allergic reaction</a>.</p> <p>In an interview with <em><a href="https://www.mamamia.com.au/grant-denyer-wife/">Mamamia</a> </em>published on Friday, the mother-of-two said she nearly lost her life to anaphylaxis shock when she was 32.</p> <p>Chezzi said she was vomiting and struggling to breathe so severely that she mouthed to husband and broadcaster Grant Denyer, “Tell Sailor I love her.”</p> <p>In an Instagram post, Chezzi explained, “I arrive at hospital close to death, unable to breathe with swollen lips, eyes closed over and swollen tongue.”</p> <p>She revealed that if she had arrived at the hospital five minutes later, she “wouldn’t have survived”.</p> <p>“It caused me a lot of grief,” she said. “I received counselling for post-traumatic stress disorder. I thought I was gone.”</p> <p>After extensive testing, it was revealed that Chezzi was reacting to cat hair from the carpet of her home from previous owners, which was exacerbated by the wattle tree outside her window and a glass of wine she had for dinner that night.</p> <p>Sailor, who was 18 months old at the time of the incident, showed signs of allergies later on.</p> <p>Last week, Chezzi shared on Instagram a picture of Sailor’s arms after she was tested for allergies.</p> <p>“Unfortunately her reactions are worse than 3 years ago,” Chezzi wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuXODH6F-nl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuXODH6F-nl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Any parent with a child with allergies knows what this photo is about. Allergy testing. It hurts. It’s scary. It’s hard to watch for a Mum. It’s itchy, irritating. It’s frustrating. But, it can be life saving. Yes, allergies can be fatal. And the number of people developing serious allergies in Australia is skyrocketing.. And really, we have no idea why. It’s petrifying for parents. Living on edge that one small cross contamination with a nut, a grain, a fruit, a chemical could kill your child in an instant. Part of my Post Traumatic Stress Disorder was related to me myself having an anaphylactic reaction when Sailor was 18months old. And they still haven’t been able to tell me exactly what caused it. Only that my histamines were through the roof because the previous owners of the house we bought had cats. I had eaten and drunk things that day that pushed my immune system over the threshold, and boom I arrive at hospital close to death, unable to breathe with swollen lips, eyes closed over and swollen tongue. They cut my clothes off me and put the paddles on my chest and at the same time gave me a large shot of Adrenalin. And in 6 hours I was released home under the guidance of an Allergist who tried to work out how all of a sudden at the age of 32 I had such a severe reaction. It was terrifying. As my Husband drove me to hospital, I was throwing up and struggling to breathe. And it happened so quick. It was so unexpected. Thankfully, my Husband was able to be calmed by my Sister Linda who knows firsthand about allergies due to serious allergies with her eldest daughter. Her advice to Grant at that time, and Grant’s quick thinking and driving skills saved my life that day. I remember it well.. But this post isn’t about me, it’s about my little Sailor and every other child and parent dealing with allergies.. These are Sailor’s little arms pricked with different drops of various things we suspect she could be allergic to. And unfortunately her reactions are worse than 3 years ago. She’s very allergic to grass we have around our house. She’s also now developed a reaction to peanuts for the first time. Also Oranges and Avocados. So we’ll carry an Epi-pen...</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/chezzidenyer/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> chezzidenyer</a> (@chezzidenyer) on Feb 26, 2019 at 3:05pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Previously, Sailor had been found to get reactions to other food items. </p> <p>"She wanted some of Grant's paleo cereal and she had a moderate reaction to cashew,” Chezzi told <em>Mamamia</em>. “Her face swelled up, she had puffy eyes and hives on her lips.”</p> <p>Chezzi returned to the allergy specialists after Sailor reacted to watermelon when eating at a hotel buffet recently.</p> <p>“Her histamine levels were out of control,” Chezzi said. “They were all elevated, which I guess partly we now know, is because she is allergic to two particular grasses around our house. So that made the perfect storm for her. She's now also allergic to peanuts, avocado and oranges, which she wasn't before.”</p> <p>Other parents have praised Chezzi for her Instagram post, which put the spotlight on the seriousness of having allergies.</p> <p>“A lot of parents go through it and I take my hat off to them,” she told <a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/2019/02/27/13/13/chezzi-denyer-grant-denyer-allergy-daughter-test" target="_blank"><em>9Honey</em></a>.</p> <p>“It’s warmed me to see all the beautiful comments from people telling me about their own experiences … It seems to be getting a lot worse.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bt4CwhjF_x7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bt4CwhjF_x7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by chezzidenyer (@chezzidenyer)</a> on Feb 14, 2019 at 12:30pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Paediatric allergist Dr Preeti Joshi told <em>Mamamia </em>that allergies can develop in some people over time. She recommended checking for allergies with regular testing.</p> <p>“It depends on the age, the allergy they have and any other problems present,” Dr Joshi said.</p> <p>“If you have a teenager who has an established peanut allergy you might only need to go back every one to two years. If you have a little baby or a child and things are changing quite rapidly, we know the majority of younger kids can grow out of allergies – so that might be more of a six months to one year kind of check in.”</p> <p>According to the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, keeping a record of symptoms could help in identifying the allergens that cause a reaction. People looking for information and advice on their allergies can contact Allergy &amp; Anaphylaxis Australia on 1300 728 000.</p>

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This is how your looks affect your personality – according to science

<p>Ever since the dawn of time, looks have always played a huge part in the lives of humans. Our physical appearance has a lot to do with how people treat us, and how we come across.</p> <p>While we’re constantly told that it’s “what’s on the inside that counts”, a new study published in the journal <em>Evolution and Human Behaviour</em> investigated just how much our outwards appearance affects what we carry inside.</p> <p>The results of the study revealed that our personality is not entirely based on what we look like, but instead, it comes down to gender and behaviour.</p> <p>Scientists from the University of Gottingen gathered two groups from Germany and the UK and analysed them. Each participant was imaged using a 3D body scanner and had their grip and upper body strength measured to reveal their strength and physique.</p> <p>This resulted in examiners not being able to confirm if extraversion in women and their physical beauty went hand in hand.</p> <p>“Although women who consider themselves attractive are actually more likely to be sociable and less shy, it could be their positive self-image that is the reason for this,” said Christoph von Borell, the lead author.</p> <p>To find out if their outward appearance had any effect on their behaviour, researchers brought in other people to assess the participants.</p> <p>“When we did this, the connection can no longer be observed,” explained von Borell.</p> <p>The results for men showed that those who were more muscular were far more extraverted than those who weren’t.</p>

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Health check: Will eating nuts make you gain weight?

<p>The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend we eat <a href="http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/frequently-asked-questions/general-nutrition/nuts-and-health">30g of nuts</a> – a small handful – each day. But many of us know nuts are high in calories and fat.</p> <p>So, should we be eating nuts, or will they make us gain weight?</p> <p>In short, the answer is yes, we should eat them, and no, they won’t make us gain weight if eaten in moderate amounts. The fats in nuts are mostly the “good” fats. And aside from that, our bodies don’t actually absorb all the fat found in nuts. But we do absorb the nutrients they provide.</p> <p><strong>Dietary fat: friend or foe?</strong></p> <p>Nuts do contain fat, and the amount of fat varies between nut types. For example, a 30g serving of raw cashews or pistachios contains around <a href="http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/afcd/Pages/foodsbyfoodgroupsearch.aspx?foodGroupID=19&amp;subFoodGroupID=80">15g of fat</a>, whereas the same amount of raw macadamias contains around <a href="http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/afcd/Pages/foodsbyfoodgroupsearch.aspx?foodGroupID=19&amp;subFoodGroupID=80">22g of fat</a>.</p> <p>There are different kinds of fats in our diet and some are better for us than others. Nuts contain mainly <a href="http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/afcd/Pages/foodsbyfoodgroupsearch.aspx?foodGroupID=19&amp;subFoodGroupID=80">monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats</a>. These types of fats are known as “good fats”. They can help lower cholesterol when we eat them <a href="https://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/nutrientrequirements/sfa_systematic_review/en/">in place of saturated fats</a>.</p> <p>The type of fats present <a href="http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/afcd/Pages/foodsbyfoodgroupsearch.aspx?foodGroupID=19&amp;subFoodGroupID=80">varies between nuts</a>. For example, walnuts are rich in polyunsaturated fats, whereas other types of nuts such as hazelnuts and macadamias have more monounsaturated fat.</p> <p><strong>What the evidence says</strong></p> <p>Even if the type of fat in nuts is good for us, they are still high in fat and calories. But this doesn’t mean we should be avoiding them to manage our weight.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24898229">Studies</a> that looked at people’s eating habits and body weight over a long period have found people who regularly eat nuts tend to gain less weight over time than people who don’t.</p> <p>We see a similar pattern in clinical studies that asked people to include nuts in their diets and then looked at the effects on body weight.</p> <p>A review of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23595878">more than 30 studies</a> examined the effects of eating nuts on body weight. It did not find people who ate nuts had increased their body weight, body mass index (BMI), or waist circumference, compared to a control group of people who did not eat nuts.</p> <p>In fact, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27807041">one study</a> found that when people ate a pattern of food aimed at weight loss, the group of people who ate nuts lost more body fat than those who didn’t eat nuts.</p> <p><strong>Let’s nut this out</strong></p> <p>There are several possible explanations for why eating nuts doesn’t seem to lead to weight gain.</p> <p><strong>1. We don’t absorb all of the fat in nuts:</strong> The fat in nuts is stored in the nut’s cell walls, which <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25351860">don’t easily break down</a> during digestion. As a result, when we eat nuts, we don’t absorb all of the fat. Some of the fat instead is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15321799">passed out in our faeces</a>. The amount of calories we absorb from eating nuts might be between <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21733319">5%</a> and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26581681">30%</a> less that what we had previously thought.</p> <p><strong>2. Nuts increase the amount of calories we burn:</strong> Not only do we not absorb all the calories in nuts, but eating nuts may also <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19010571">increase the amount</a> of energy and fat we burn. It’s thought this may partially be explained by the protein and unsaturated fats in nuts, although we don’t yet know exactly how this occurs. Increases in the number of calories burnt can help us maintain or lose weight.</p> <p><strong>3. Nuts help us feel full for longer:</strong> As well as fat, nuts are rich in protein and fibre. So, nuts help to keep us <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25182142">feeling full</a> after we eat them, meaning we’re likely to eat less at later meals. Recent studies have also suggested providing people with nuts helps <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26688734">improve the overall quality</a> of the types of foods they eat. This may be because nuts replace “junk foods” as snacks.</p> <p><strong>4. People who eat nuts have healthier lifestyles in general:</strong> We can’t rule out the idea that eating nuts is just a sign of a healthier lifestyle. However, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25182142">randomised controlled trials</a>, which can control for lifestyle factors like eating habits, still find no negative effect on body weight when people eat nuts. This means the favourable effects of nuts are not just the result of nut eaters having healthier lifestyles – the nuts themselves play a role.</p> <p>Overall, the evidence suggests nuts are a healthy snack that can provide us with many of the nutrients our bodies need. We can confidently include the recommended 30g of nuts a day in a healthy diet, without worrying about the effect they will have on our waistlines.</p> <p><em>Written by Elizabeth Neale, Sze-Yen Tan and Yasmine Probst. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-will-eating-nuts-make-you-gain-weight-108491">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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