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Gold-digger grandma steals $300,000 from Centrelink

<p style="text-align: left;">A grandmother from Geelong in Victoria has admitted to the crime of stealing close to $300,000 in taxpayers' money in the hopes to secure her dead partner's multi-million-dollar assets.</p> <p>76-year-old Noel Newling was proven guilty after discovering she had been giving false information to Centrelink regarding her relationship status.</p> <p>Since 1997, Newling had accumulated up to $287,000 from taxpayers while she was in a relationship with a wealthy man.</p> <p>Newling had no intention to admit to the crime, but after her deceased partner's will stated to give the majority of his $4 million assets to charity, Newling had no other choice as she hoped to overturn the legal document, reports <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9now.com.au/a-current-affair/2018/extras/latest/181017/great-granny-gold-digger?ocid=social-9ACA" target="_blank"><em>A Current Affair</em></a>.</p> <p>The government was under the impression that Newling had been single for the past decade, but the truth was far from it.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" width="698" height="573" scrolling="no" id="molvideoplayer" title="MailOnline Embed Player" src="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/embed/video/1784460.html"></iframe></p> <p>The 76-year-old had been in a relationship with a man named Michael Stansfield, who happened to have accumulated quite a bit of money throughout his years.</p> <p>Mr Stansfield was a share trader and passed away in 2016. Newling’s late partner left her with $50,000, a $185,000 property and a $34,000 car.</p> <p>He then proceeded to distribute the rest of his wealth to different charities.</p> <p>Newling claims she was unaware of Mr Stansfield wealth, but once his earnings came to light, she attempted to challenge the will to obtain the money for herself.</p> <p>In order to do that, Newling had to admit to fraudulent behaviour in the Geelong County Court, otherwise her chance of acquiring the money was close to zero.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.geelongadvertiser.com.au/news/crime-court/geelong-court-leopold-greatgrandmother-noel-jennifer-newling-jailed-for-centrelink-rort/news-story/2874acc65c3489c39c5e2b11fe84604a" target="_blank"><em>The Geelong Advertiser</em></a> reported that, Judge Susan Cohen issued a sentence for Newling, and gave her two years and 10 months in prison but would be released in four months with a two-and-a-half-year good behaviour bond.</p> <p>Newling was faced with an influx of reporters outside court, where she said that she knew that her behaviour was wrong but gave the excuse that she “had to live".</p> <p>She has now been asked to repay the government for all the money she has taken over the years, something that Newling says can only be paid back once she has her late partner's estate.</p>

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The $1.99 IKEA hack that solves household clutter

<p>Savvy shoppers have discovered a clever way to organise their homes without breaking the bank.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bhg.com.au/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">Better Homes and Gardens</em></strong></span></a><strong> </strong>have revealed the six ways shoppers are repurposing a $1.99 product from IKEA.</p> <p>The Variera plastic bag dispenser is designed to fit inside drawers and cabinets to keep things organised, but customers have shared the creative ways they use it around their homes.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7820792/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9e169be8cc78465d89db4d344719dd02" /></p> <p>One popular way to use the budget-friendly product is to attach it inside a wardrobe door and then use it to store underwear and socks once they’ve been folded.</p> <p>For those who struggle to locate wrapping paper around the house, they also recommend storing the roles inside the dispenser.</p> <p>“You can also hang it inside the closet door for easy storage and access. Use another dispenser to store ribbons. You can poke the ends out of the holes,” they said.</p> <p>The affordable organiser can also be used to store winter accessories such as gloves, scarves and hats, together.</p> <p>A clever way to tidy your cleaning products is to hang the dispenser sideways and then hang spray bottles, sponges, brushes and gloves from the holes.</p> <p>The IKEA product can also fit a rolled yoga mat and kit for someone who wants to organise their exercise gear.</p> <p>“[You can also] grow a vertical wall of succulents or strawberries with the Variera. Fill it with compost and use it as a planter. Arrange the plants inside the holes,” they said.</p> <p>What is your best organisation tip? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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From $2.50 to 10 cents: The major supermarket selling avocados for dirt cheap

<p>Avocado lovers rejoice! The popular fruit was available for a small price of 10 cents at a Coles supermarket, shocking customers as they made the discovery.</p> <p>Posting a photo of the rare finding to her Twitter page, Maddie Burke captioned it: “At a Coles in Perth.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">At a Coles in Perth. 😮🥑 <a href="https://t.co/AifePeYxnw">pic.twitter.com/AifePeYxnw</a></p> — Maddie Burke (@Maddie_Burke) <a href="https://twitter.com/Maddie_Burke/status/1039510339224649728?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">11 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The photo shows multiple boxes of Hass avocados slashed to ten cents on “special.”</p> <p>They were marked down at Wanneroo Coles, Perth after the store ordered too many avocados.</p> <p>As expected, the post soon gained traction and social media users were all rushing to catch the bargain.</p> <p>“Omg someone go get me a tray or two. I’ll even buy two for the delivery guy hahaha,” one person commented on Facebook.</p> <p>“Avo toast FOR DAYS!!!! No more paying for “lemons”, NO MORE SMASHED FETA AND LEMON TOAST!!” said another enthusiastic user.</p> <p>One was in disbelief, as they said “it’s not April … If this is real ….”</p> <p>Others chose to compare the average market price to the price being advertised at the Perth supermarket.</p> <p>“I paid $10 for four avocados yesterday,” commented one person.</p> <p>“Still can’t get a house though,” said another.</p> <p>On a regular day, Hass avocados are sold for $2.50 each at Coles supermarkets.</p> <p>Unfortunately, those living outside the region will still have to fork out money to purchase the superfood, but for those living in Perth, you should run not walk.</p> <p>The trendy superfood is predicted to have a major price drop as avocado growers are planting more trees in order to double production by 2025.</p> <p>Chief executive officer of Avocados Australia, John Tyas, said that there are lots of new plantings around the country, and he believes it will boost production in the coming years.</p> <p>“We expect production to be over 110,000 tonnes by 2025,” he said.</p>

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The brilliant $6 Kmart hack for storing your Coles Little Shop collectables

<p>As the dust settles on the Coles Little Shop phenomenon, people are coming up with clever hacks on how to re-use and store their tiny collectables.</p> <p>Little Shop – a promotion run by Coles of mini plastic goods that took the nation by storm – will be ending soon, and naturally, people’s interest is starting to wither. But one thrifty mum has an ultimate hack for that.</p> <p>Melbourne mum, Alannah Koch has used $6 magnetic tape from Kmart to turn her items into magnets.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.mamamia.com.au/coles-little-shop-and-kmart-hack/">Mamamia</a></em>, Alannah said that she’s only been collecting the items for the past seven weeks, and she didn’t realise the hype around them.</p> <p>“At first, we had no idea what they were but found one in our shopping bag when we got home, opened it up and it was a mini Nutella and it was so cute. So, over the following days and weeks we really got to know what it was all about and we’re hooked!”</p> <p>Taking her three weeks to obtain the full collection, Alannah found that her sixteen-month-old son Oakland loved to play with them.</p> <p>“I’ve just got to watch him as he’s only sixteen-months-old so to him everything is edible,” she said.</p> <p>A few weeks into collecting, Alannah found that she owned several spares.</p> <p>“I wanted to do something creative with them as they are so cute I didn’t want to throw them away or waste them,” she said. Her creative juices started flowing and that was when Alannah thought of a brilliant way to repurpose the little items.</p> <p>“I was browsing the Kmart website one day and saw they sold magnetic tape, which works exactly like normal tape except it’s a magnet.</p> <p>“I started sticking it on the backs [of the minis] to make them into magnets, so when Oakland is older he can have them as magnets for his drawings on his part of the fridge.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnIsbt7hyke/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnIsbt7hyke/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" target="_blank">Creative Fridays✌🏻 So we’ve been getting our creative hats on around the house and turning our left over @coleslittleshop collectables into Magnets for the fridge! With this super easy $6 magnet tape from @kmartaus it’s Sooo easy! The tape is adhesive like normal tape and you just use the cutter on the end to the length you want, then stick it on.. it’s that simple! They look super cute, it’s a fun little activity to do at home and you don’t have to feel bad thinking you’d have to throw them out. _____________________________________________________________ What’s everyone else doing with theirs? #kmart #coleslittleshop #creative #creativefriday #creativedaily #repurpose #reuse #recycle #activities #activitiesforkids #activity #mumlife #motherhoodthroughinstagram #friday #fridaymood #sahmlife #sahm #raisingkids #kidscrafts #mummy #secondhand #magnet #creativity #parenthood #parentlife #parenting #getcreative #motherhoodunplugged #reality #instamum</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/new.mummy.life/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" target="_blank"> Alannah🔅</a> (@new.mummy.life) on Aug 31, 2018 at 1:02am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Alannah then went on to say, “They will not just be stuck in a collector’s case and eventually put in the cupboard, but they’ll be on our fridge for a very long time!”</p> <p>Oakland is also happy with the new setup.</p> <p>“He loves them on the fridge, pulling them off and throwing them on the floor mostly at this age!”</p>

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Could you be owed $3000? Five million Aussies set to sue big banks

<p>Set to be the largest class action in the nation’s history, up to five million Australians could end up receiving over a thousand dollars from the country’s biggest banks.</p> <p>Expected to launch today, law firm Slater and Gordon will be responsible for a legal action on behalf of around one in three Australian workers who have invested their super with the banks involved.</p> <p>It is estimated the landmark lawsuits could compensate account holders as much as $3000 back and could cost the banks over $1 billion.</p> <p>The reason for the lawsuit is that bank-owned super funds have been caught putting members' money into the parent bank instead of the bank that offers the best interest rate – which means many workers are often paid between 0.5 and 1 per cent less interest than they should be.</p> <p>According to the firm, if someone has $100,000 in cash, a 0.5 per cent difference could make them $3000 out of pocket in six years.</p> <p>Another study shows that someone with $25,000 in cash in an AMP retail fund would be at a loss of $1600 after five years in comparison to someone in an industry fund, getting just 1.41 per cent interest and higher fees, compared to 2.59 per cent and lower fees.</p> <p>It is believed that around one in three working-age Australians – which is around five million in total – will be affected in some way as they have super in cash with retail funds, which most of the time are owned by big banks.</p> <p>Favoured by older Australians, cash is considered to be the safest form of super investment.</p> <p>The firm has launched a website called <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.slatergordon.com.au/getyoursuperback/" target="_blank">getyoursuperback.com</a></em> where any Australians who fit the criteria by having their super in cash can register as part of an initiative to get as many people as possible.</p> <p>Ben Hardwick, head of Slater and Gordon’s class actions spoke to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/banking/record-class-action-launched-against-australias-banks/news-story/e2fa23644d189b742e24cee49b40a84c" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em> and said that low-interest rates combined with fee gouging by cash funds would have a negative impact on Australians in retirement.</p> <p>“This means that millions of Australians are out of pocket and a handful of banks have lined their pockets,” he said.</p> <p>“Slater and Gordon doesn’t think that’s fair and we are saying, enough is enough.”</p> <p>The first lawsuit announced today will be against Colonial First State, who are under Commonwealth Bank and AMP. From there, another 18 class actions are expected to follow.</p> <p>“What funds like Colonial First State have been doing is dumping super with a parent bank such as CBA. The interest from the parent bank is so low that investors in the cash option are receiving rates as low as 1.25 per cent a year. This is even below the RBA cash rate,” Mr Hardwick told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/banking/record-class-action-launched-against-australias-banks/news-story/e2fa23644d189b742e24cee49b40a84c" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p>“This rate of return is ludicrously low. Standard bank interest should be around 2.0 to 2.5 per cent. That’s what most banks offer to ordinary customers with their normal term-deposits. And that’s what industry super fund members and some retail fund members have been getting.”</p> <p>While it’s hard to say how far the class action could go, official data shows that there are 28.6 million superannuation policies held by 14.8 million Australians.</p> <p>Around 55 per cent of those – or 8.2 million – have at least one retail account and it’s been said that majority of these consist of some form of cash component.</p> <p>These numbers show that this would be the biggest class action in Australian history.</p>

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How much should I have in my emergency fund?

<p>An emergency fund is exactly that - it’s the money that will tide you over when an emergency happens.</p> <p>This includes losing your job, having to pay for urgent home or car repairs, and to pay for medical and dental emergencies.</p> <p>Because it’s meant to be accessed quickly, you should keep your emergency funds in a liquid bank account.</p> <p><strong>How much do I need?</strong></p> <p>First you should know how much you spend in a month.</p> <p>Keep track of your expenses for three to four months.</p> <p>You should already start saving some money while you do this exercise.<br /> <br />An emergency fund should only be used to cover the necessities and not the luxuries, which means bills such as transportation, utilities, groceries and your rent or mortgage.</p> <p>You should not be using this money for holidays or shopping.</p> <p><strong>How much should I save?</strong></p> <p>Once you know your monthly expenses, start working towards saving three months’ worth.</p> <p>For example, if you need $3000 a month to cover all your bills, you should have $9000 squared away for emergencies.</p> <p>Having that amount will give you peace of mind that you can weather the storm until you get back on your feet.<br /> <br />While it’s a good start, three months’ worth of savings is not nearly enough to cover larger costs.</p> <p>For example, if you lose your job, it may take you several months to find a suitable replacement.</p> <p>Which is why you should keep going and work towards having six months’ worth of expenses set aside.<br /> <br />One financial expert, former TV host Suze Orman, even advocates setting aside eight to 12 months’ worth of expenses to feel truly secure.</p> <p><strong>How can I start saving money?</strong></p> <p>No matter how much you earn, try sticking to the 50-20-30 rule.</p> <p>This means not more than 50 percent of your income should go towards living expenses and essentials, while 20 percent should go towards savings, investments and reducing your debt.</p> <p>The final 30 percent should be used for discretionary spending, such as travel, gifts and entertainment.</p> <p>Adjust your spending accordingly using the guide.</p> <p>For example, if you’re consistently exceeding 30 percent of your pay on discretionary spending, you might need to find cheaper entertainment alternatives or cut down on nights out.</p> <p>And if you’re just starting out, you might want to save a little more aggressively in order to squirrel away that emergency cash.</p> <p><strong>Do I keep going once I complete my emergency fund?</strong></p> <p>After you’re satisfied that the amount in your fund will keep you secure for a good amount of time, you should look into saving money for other purposes, such as buying a home of your own, or your retirement.</p> <p>You may even want to explore investing for potentially higher returns.</p> <p>Be aware though that investments come with risks, so you should speak with a qualified financial consultant whom you trust before committing to any investments.</p> <p>And, of course, if you ever need to withdraw from your emergency fund, you should start building it back up again as soon as you’re able.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/how-much-should-i-have-my-emergency-fund?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="https://www.isubscribe.com.au/Readers-Digest-Magazine-Subscription.cfm">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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The incredible wage to work at a supermarket: Ten $155k-a-year Aldi jobs on offer

<p>Aldi has announced the German supermarket is now hiring 10 Area Managers, with the salaries for the roles starting at $101,800 - $155,000 including a company car and iPhone.</p> <p>The supermarket has continued to grow in its success in Australia in recent years and is hiring the 10 managers as they open new stores in Victoria.</p> <p>The successful applicants will be responsible for overseeing three to five Aldi stores, which includes managing all aspects of their operation such as recruitment, training, profit and loss management.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 294.33611884865365px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7820645/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cfb6a0cabd724a6da9f7bfa929a34d4f" /></p> <p>Aldi’s Victorian Store Operations Director, Hariet Honore, told the <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Herald Sun</u></em></strong></a> that applicants will be taught everything they need to know for the role in the “comprehensive” 12-month training program.</p> <p>“We believe what you don't know, you will learn. We teach about Aldi's unique business model and all the things that make it successful,” she said.</p> <p>“We are more focused on finding the right people with the 'Aldi Attitude'.”</p> <p>The minimum requirements for the role include having a completed Bachelor’s Degree or a Master’s Degree in any discipline, a strong academic record, three years business experience and proven success in leadership roles.</p> <p>Ms Honore said Aldi is looking for hardworking applicants who want to make a difference.</p> <p>“We are looking for determined, hardworking, motivated, positive and resilient Area Managers.”</p> <p>Once the year of training is complete, Area Managers will be assigned an area and will then manage up to 80 staff members.</p> <p>Do you shop at Aldi? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Leigh Sales slams Westpac CEO: “Your latest profit was $4.2 billion, can’t you use that?”

<p>Yesterday, Westpac announced that they will be the first of the Big Four banks to increase its variable home loan rates, a move that is expected to be copied by the other financial institutions.</p> <p>In a statement, the bank said its rates would be raised by 0.14 per cent from September 19, saying that the price hike is due to an increase in its wholesale funding costs.</p> <p>However, Westpac made a profit of $4.2 billion, so <em style="font-weight: inherit;">7:30</em> host Leigh Sales questioned why the bank couldn’t put that money towards the increasing costs.</p> <p>Westpac CEO Brian Hartzer attempted to defend his decision, explaining why the cost had to be passed on to customers rather than decreasing the bank's profit.</p> <p>“This is a difficult decision. Any time we are affecting people’s cost of living, it is something that we take very seriously but we borrow the money to fund people’s home loans and the cost has gone up,” Mr Hartzer said.</p> <p>A family with a $300,000 home loan will soon be paying an extra $35 in interest per month, while Aussies with a $500,000 home loan will be forking out an extra $516 a year on interest.</p> <p>Sales put the figures to Mr Hartzer and asked: “An ordinary household has to work within their budget to pay the extra money on their mortgage yet one of the wealthiest institutions can’t do the same?”</p> <p>Mr Hartzer said Westpac had worn the cost for the past six months, hoping it would go down but “we sadly had to conclude this is a more permanent change or certainly it is going to persist for a little while”.</p> <p>Despite the bank’s last profit being up six per cent, Mr Hartzer said the margin has been “significantly impacted” since costs started to rise in February.</p> <p>“Part of my job sometimes is to make difficult decisions that are about the long-term sustainability of our business and that involves addressing increases in funding costs,” Mr Hartzer said.</p> <p>While the CEO said he understood customers “frustration” with the interest rate hike, he said: “At the same time, Leigh, we have to run our business and part of that is to acknowledge the realities of higher funding costs.”</p> <p>The higher interest rates will come into effect on September 9 for all new and existing customers for Westpac and Westpac-owned St George.</p> <p>Westpac said it variable mortgage rate for owner-occupier properties will increase to 5.38 per cent per annum for customers with principal and interest repayments, while residential investment properties will be hit with an interest rate of 5.93 per cent.</p> <p>“Customers wanting to switch from a variable interest only loan to the lower rate principal and interest loan can do so without any penalty or fee,” the bank said.</p> <p>RateCity research director Sally Tindall said Westpac had prolonged their rate hike for longer than the market expected.</p> <p> “Westpac has today asked their variable rate home loan customers to help ease their cost of funding pressures,” Ms Tindall said.</p> <p>“While banks are entitled to make a profit, some Westpac home loan customers will be disappointed with the bank’s decision to increase their interest rate.</p> <p>“Most households will be able to absorb the rate hike, however, anyone who overstretched to get in the market will feel burdened by this extra cost.</p> <p>“Now that Westpac has hiked, taking the brunt of the bad PR, we expect the other three banks to follow suit.</p> <p>“If your lender hikes your interest rate, it’s the perfect time to start considering your options.</p> <p>“Ironically the banks are desperately seeking out customers to boost their lagging profit margins. They’re doing this by offering rock-bottom rates, but only to new customers so if you’ve got a bit of equity in your home, now is a great time to consider refinancing,” she said.</p> <p><span>What do you think of Westpac boss Brian Hartzer's explanation? Let us know in the comments below. </span></p>

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Phone scammers steal $100,000 from widow two days after husband’s death

<p>An 81-year-old widow has been swindled of $100,000 by scammers just two days after her husband passed away. </p> <p>The scam first started in June, when Christine “Kitty” Hansen received a call saying that she won a competition. </p> <p>The widow from North Dakota in the US told WDAY that she feels foolish, saying that they “caught her at a bad time”<span style="font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit !important;">. </span></p> <p>“I got a phone call and the guy said he was from Publisher’s Clearing House, and that I’ve won $2.6 million and I’ve been entering their contests for years, so I didn’t think anything about it,” Mrs Hansen told the news outlet.</p> <p>However, Ms Hansen was told that she could not receive her prize money until she paid taxes on it. </p> <p>Over the following weeks, she was instructed to send seven boxes of cash to various addresses. </p> <p>Ms Hansen’s family believes the thieves targeted her after seeing her husband’s obituary shared online. </p> <p>They believe the 81-year-old didn’t tell them about the calls because she was being intimidated by the thieves, with the crooks claiming the Internal Revenue Service would take away her home if she didn’t make the tax payments. </p> <p>“She would never have spent money like that, they’re preying on her when she’s not even thinking straight,” the widow’s daughter Renee Anderson said.</p> <p>“They also coached her on what to say, because the bank tried several times to help her.”</p> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/kitty-hansen"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong style="font-style: inherit;">GoFundMe</strong></span></a> page set up by Ms Hansen’s family, the widow did not only lose her life savings, but she was also convinced to take cash advances on credit cards, leaving her in debt. </p> <p>Although there is not much hope in recovering the entire amount that was stolen, the family started the fundraiser to help Ms Hansen pay off her debt. </p> <p>Renee said the scam taught them to make sure children of elderly parents are listed on their bank accounts. </p> <p>If Renee’s name was on her bank account, the bank would’ve been allowed to call her when they suspected fraudulent activity. </p> <p>Renee also highlighted the painful lesson the family have learnt from the experience: “Do not send cash, ever, to anyone.” </p>

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Reserve Bank of Australia issues stern warning to homeowners

<p>The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) has issued a stern warning to homeowners and mortgage holders that rising interest rates may hurt their hip pockets.</p> <p>RBA’s governor Philip Lowe issued the warning on Tuesday, saying that it's been eight years since the last interest rate hike and that “borrowers have never experienced a rise in official interest rates”.</p> <p>“Over recent times the Australian economy has been improving,’’ he said.</p> <p>“This is good news.</p> <p>“If we continue on this current improving track as we expect we will it is likely that the next move in official interest will be up, not down.”</p> <p>The RBA has kept the interest rate on hold at 1.5 per cent since August 2016.</p> <p>Mr Lowe said his advice to borrowers was to “make sure” they are in a good financial position for interest rates hike.</p> <p>The RBA is expected to increase interest rates in the second half of 2019, depending on inflation rates and the job market, the <a href="https://www.afr.com/markets/rba-governor-philip-lowe-tells-borrowers-to-prepare-for-rate-hikes-20180820-h148m3"><strong>Financial Review</strong></a> reported.</p> <p>Mr Lowe also said homeowners should not assume the value of their homes will continue to rise.</p> <p>“Most of our cities have seen falls in housing prices at some point over the past decade,” he said.</p> <p>“While I would expect housing prices to trend higher over time as our incomes increase, there is no guarantee that your home will be worth more tomorrow than it is today.</p> <p>“So plan accordingly.”</p>

Retirement Income

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Family's despair after power bills increase by 400% due to law change

<p>When Lee and Warren Mullaly purchased their new home in Forster, NSW they were thrilled. Having pre-installed solar panelling would ensure that their electricity bill would remain low, and while that was the case for a period of time, this year, the semi-retired couple are paying over $400 each quarter.</p> <p>“The government incentive finished and even though we were aware this was going to happen, we still thought our bills were going to be significantly lower,” Lee Mullaly told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/changes-to-solar-feedin-tariffs-have-caused-huge-increases-to-power-bills/news-story/a5bafadf063bcb2f99b0d739feac0296" target="_blank">News.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p>Without a battery, the Mullaly's only find their solar panels beneficial during the day as the power produced must be used immediately.</p> <p>And in the evenings when the panels are not generating electricity, any power they use during that period comes from the grid. With their bill previously coming in at $95 a quarter, they are now facing an increase of $1400 more than what they paid the year before.</p> <p>This is the consequence of the Solar Bonus Scheme that was initiated by the NSW Government, ending on 31 December 2016. With the scheme paying households 60c or 20c per kilowatt an hour for the electricity they provided to the grid, many families benefited greatly.</p> <p>Now, as the scheme has shut down, households have taken a hit, and with a battery costing $15,000 to install for the semi-retired couple, the Mullaly's believe that the outlay wouldn’t be worth it.</p> <p>“We’ve got to watch what we spend, we haven’t got a lot of money coming in and we’ve got to weigh up the benefits,” said Lee Mullally.</p> <p>The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) sets a recommended price for retailers, but it is not mandatory for retailers to follow. This year, the suggested benchmark dropped by 44 per cent due to below average wholesale electricity prices.</p> <p>Solar expert and ShineHub co-founder Alex Georgiou said this year’s changes to feed-in tariff rates could see families losing around $300 a year on a 5-kilowatt system.</p> <p>“If a person is not home to use solar power during the day, around 75 per cent of this is sent back to the grid,” he said.</p> <p>While an average household could have earned $657 a year selling power to the grid at a price of 12 cents, this year, that price would drop to $355 if they get 6.5 cents.</p> <p>When asked if she would consider a solar panelling system now, Mrs Mullaly said she would never do it without installing a battery first.</p> <p>“If you are thinking about getting panels you need to get a battery because ultimately it will be a huge saving and will take the worry away.”</p> <p>Do you have solar panelling on your home? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Retirement Income

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$28 for instant coffee: The supermarkets ripping off Aussies

<p><span>The thought of paying $28 for a jar of coffee can be hard to imagine for many, but for those consumers living in remote areas of Australia, this inflated cost is a reality.</span></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-13/supermarkets-charging-remote-shoppers-nearly-double-city-prices/10107060" target="_blank">ABC News</a></em> launched an investigation on government-controlled supermarkets after it was said that people were paying up to $18 more for household items than those living in metro areas. The investigation compares the prices of products in Lockhart River in comparison to the same products in Brisbane.</p> <p>Products such as washing liquid had a difference of $10.80 compared to the price in Brisbane, and baby formula cost $9 more than the standard price.</p> <p>And it’s not just grocery prices that are inflated. Unleaded petrol in the region was priced at $1.93 per litre and $1.89 for diesel – also at a store run by the government.</p> <p>Lockhart River Mayor Wayne Butcher believes shoppers in remote indigenous regions are being ripped off.</p> <p>“I’m angry because it’s very expensive and it just makes life so much harder,” he said.</p> <p>“It’s not like you have choices either; you can’t just go to Coles or Woolworths. It’s an extra burden on each household and it’s not something we need.”</p> <p>Community Enterprise Queensland (CEQ) is in charge of more than 20 of the remote stores across the state and is a statutory body of the Queensland Government.</p> <p>A spokesperson from the government said they subsidise “fresh fruit, milk, eggs, some baby products and core basket essentials to ensure prices are kept low".</p> <p>“It also assists communities to have access to ‘best buys’ and ‘specials’ and price matches with Coles, Cairns, on online products,” the spokesperson said.</p> <p>“However, it must also be noted that there are still significant freight costs that have to be borne due to CEQ operating in very remote areas of the state.”</p> <p>A recent productivity commission review recommended the government to step away from assets such as retail stores, as they can ‘crowd out’ locals from business opportunities.</p> <p>In 2016, the government took over most of the remote supermarkets in Queensland.</p> <p>Mr Butcher has said they were promised a decrease in prices but instead, had to deal with prices increasing even further.</p> <p>“They said things would get better, but that’s a broken promise,” he said.</p> <p>“Because of the remoteness and lack of employment opportunities, they should consider more subsidies to make things affordable.”</p>

Retirement Income

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Family's outrage after dementia-stricken grandmother hit with $4000 energy bills

<p>A family has expressed their outrage after their grandmother was unwillingly signed up to an energy company and then hit with a $4000 bill.</p> <p>Joan Ford, 86, lives at the View Hills Manor nursing home in Melbourne, where her residency fee covers all utilities.</p> <p>Despite this, Joan received an electricity bill in June from 1st Energy that totalled $1,384, reported the <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">ABC</em></strong></a>.</p> <p>Joan’s daughter and son-in-law, Patricia and Mark Matthys, were outraged by the letter, which claimed the energy was supplied in May to the unit at her nursing home.</p> <p>Mark said his mother-in-law was unable to recall what the bill was for.</p> <p>Speaking to ABC Radio Melbourne, Mark said: “How on earth would it even be possible to make up an account for a person who doesn't actually have anything to pay for?”</p> <p>The family contacted the energy provider and were told the error had been fixed.</p> <p>However, Joan then received a second bill for more than $2584, with the provider claiming the energy had been supplied between June and the beginning of July.</p> <p>The second bill was followed by two reminder notices and a phone call from a collection agency.</p> <p>Mark revealed that his mother-in-law had been targeted through a phone call, and that the incident had caused her a lot of stress.</p> <p>Victoria’s energy and water ombudsman, Cynthia Gebert, said she didn’t understand how the bill was calculated as nursing homes are generally not individually metered.</p> <p>She recommended that vulnerable people join the do-not-call register to avoid sales calls.</p> <p>The energy provider resolved the error and Joan was not required to pay the hefty amount.</p> <p>A spokeswoman from 1st Energy said the company had apologised for the incident, which was caused by an administration error.</p> <p>“Due to human error the matter was unfortunately not fully remedied when initially picked up. It has now been fully resolved,” she said.</p>

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Why grocery prices are set to soar

<p>As Australia faces a horror drought, farmers across the country have been forced to slaughter their animals or watch them die as they struggle to feed and water livestock.</p> <p>Currently, 98 per cent of NSW and almost two-thirds of Queensland is either in drought or drought affected, while parts of Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia have also been hit.</p> <p>Some farmers have labelled this drought as the worst they’ve ever seen, and experts are warning the rest of the country to brace for the impact of the drought on supermarket prices.</p> <p>Executive director of agriculture research firm Australian Farm Institute, Richard Heath, said while “every drought was different”, they drive up grocery bills at double the rate of inflation.</p> <p>“Every drought is different depending on what time of the year it starts and where it’s more severe, and that flows on to what food types might be affected,” he told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/"><strong><u>news.com.au</u></strong></a>.</p> <p>“Drought is not a new feature of Australian agriculture and generally what’s happened in the past is there has been in increase in grocery prices overall … generally the price has increased at about twice the rate of the consumer price inflation during equivalent periods of drought in the past.</p> <p>“But exactly what foods will be affected and the timing of that is really quite hard to determine until after the fact when we can go back and see how it’s translated into different foods.”</p> <p>Mr Heath predicted the availability of meat will increase before the shortage kicks in and pushes up prices.</p> <p>“In the early stages of drought the availability of meat products quite often increase with farmers offloading stock because they can’t feed them. So there might be a lot more on the market as the drought takes hold, but when the season recovers, farmers try to build up numbers again and potentially there could be less stock available for sale,” he explained.</p> <p>“Grocery prices are obviously the way that the community overall feels the impact of drought when it gets severe enough to impact the availability of food, but before that farmers are obviously the first and most severely affected.</p> <p>“The rural communities the farmers live in can also be severely affected because the income that farmers usually spend in the community just isn’t there. Retail and service industries in rural towns really suffer dramatically and they take a long time to recover, because the drought may break but it might be another six to 12 months before farmers start having decent incomes again.”</p> <p>National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) CEO, Tony Mahar, revealed that essential crops such as wheat, barley, oats and canola have also been impacted by the drought, along with livestock.</p> <p>“It’s pretty serious — some parts of Australia have been in drought for five, six, seven years so it has been really challenging for parts of the industry,” Mr Mahar told news.com.au.</p> <p>“Animals are stressed, farmers are stressed and families are stressed so it does have a large impact.</p> <p>“There has been a very reduced grain harvest this year. Australian farmers export around two-thirds of what they produce because it’s such a small market, so food security is not an issue.”</p> <p>Mr Mahar explained that if the grain shortage drives up the price of livestock feed, the price of meat will also increase.</p> <p>“Going forward next year, chances are feed prices are going to be more expensive for chicken, pork and beef producers who will have to pay more for their feed including barley, oats and wheat. Their input into their beef, pork and chicken products are going to get more expensive and ultimately, it could have a flow on to consumer prices,” he said.</p> <p>Mr Mahar said that any government and community support during this drought would be welcomed, as Australian farmers only receive a fraction of government subsidies compared to farmers in Europe, Asia and the US.</p> <p>“Farmers are a tough, resilient group and we’ll push through this … but at the end of the day, our farmers produce such amazing quality food and we need to support them through this time,” he said.</p>

Retirement Income

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Take a first look: The new Special Buys range coming to Aldi stores this Saturday

<p>Aldi customers are generating buzz online after the German retailer announced the latest Special Buys range that will be appearing in stores this Saturday.</p> <p>The discount supermarket chain will be selling a budget laundry range, which will include a washing machine base unit for $59.99, a storage base unit for $79.99 and a $19 iron.</p> <p>One discount that is catching the eye of many Aldi fans is the 7.5kg front loader washing machine for $379.</p> <p>There will also be a discount 7kg dryer on sale for $399.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7819954/1.jpg?width=0&amp;height=0" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b7b97e35839a4f8292161f823b4b2046" /><img style="width: 500px; height:298.10725552050474px;" src="/media/7819954/1.jpg?width=500&amp;height=298.10725552050474" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b7b97e35839a4f8292161f823b4b2046" /></p> <p>Aldi’s laundry range has been praised not only for its affordability, but also the trendy and modern look of the products.</p> <p>Shoppers can also purchase a $16.99 laundry trolley, a $19.99 drying rack and a retractable clothes line for $49.99 – to make household chores just a little bit easier.</p> <p>For those who are in need of an ironing board there will be one on sale for $39.99.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7819955/2.jpg?width=0&amp;height=0" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fec695fc1a4745a88c53d549c6ed8777" /><img style="width: 500px; height:249.74146845915203px;" src="/media/7819955/2.jpg?width=500&amp;height=249.74146845915203" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fec695fc1a4745a88c53d549c6ed8777" /></p> <p>And for other customers who are looking to splurge, there will also be a steam station iron for $129, which takes just two minutes to heat up.</p> <p>This week, Aldi has come under fire from Aussie entrepreneur Dick Smith, who claimed the supermarket was sucking wealth from Australia.</p> <p>“When will enough be enough?” he wrote in a passionate <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/dick-smith-lashes-out-at-aldi-when-will-enough-be-enough"><strong><u>open letter.</u></strong></a></p> <p>“Will these goods, just like your peanut butter, come from countries like Argentina where wages are extremely low?</p> <p>“Won’t this mean our Australian farmers and food processors will never be able to compete with such low prices?</p> <p>“You are privately owned, so it is not possible for Australians to share in the wealth creation of your company, and you also don’t have the costs of publicly listing on the stock exchange which would result in the employment of many additional Australians.”</p> <p>Aldi Australia chief executive Tom Daunt responded to the letter, saying that the company employs more than 11,500 Australians and partners with more than 1000 Aussie suppliers.</p> <p>Are you excited about Aldi's new laundry range? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Retirement Income

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"A huge wake-up call": Big banks' $24,000 rip-off on credit card rewards

<p>If you have a credit card with any of the Big Four banks, you will get just $12 of value out of your rewards program if you spend $24,000 in a year. <br /><br />New analysis by financial comparison website Mozo shows the average net value of rewards credit cards offered by the major banks has fallen 96 per cent in the past two years, following the Reserve Bank’s interchange fee regulation. <br /><br />In 2016, a customer spending $24,000 a year received an average of $284 in rewards. But today, you would need to spend $60,000 to receive the same value. <br /><br />“If you spend less than that the figure’s going to be worse, if you spend more it’s not going to be so bad, so it really depends,” Mozo product data manager Peter Marshall said. <br /><br />“The main point is it’s more important than ever for people to know what value they’re getting out of their rewards versus how much they’re paying to keep that card, and reassess whether they’re getting the benefits that justify it.”</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/0e4cd915d0eb5d7b8e4afaadbe2f8317" alt="CommBank customers are now in the red. Picture: Mozo" width="650" height="488" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/99d8d6283559f46bf7f2de344b55d9fb" alt="Points earning has dramatically fallen. Picture: Mozo" width="650" height="488" /><br /><br />Mozo’s calculations were based on typical credit card spend of $2000 a month, per RBA data, with introductory bonus points and annual fee waiver offers excluded. The net value was derived from the rewards value minus the annual fee. <br /><br />Last year, the RBA introduced changes that reduced the fees banks could charge each other to process credit card transactions. As those fees were used to fund credit card rewards programs, the rewards program has suffered. <br /><br />“It was basically a nice profit margin that was built into the system for them,” Mr Marshall said. “That’s been capped so it’s reduced the income stream. We’ve seen a range of responses to that — there’s reduced points earning, lower caps on how much you can earn, but also higher annual fees on some cards.” <br /><br />Out of the Big Four banks, Commonwealth Bank cardholders were the worst off, with a customer on the typical spend now $58 in the red under the changes. Westpac customers were the winners with a net value of $48. <br /><br />“Our results are a huge wake-up call for cardholders to start questioning whether their rewards card is worth it after all,” Mozo director Kirsty Lamont said in a statement. <br /><br />“They are now having to spend two-and-a-half times more to earn the same amount of net rewards value they would have received two years ago on the typical annual spend. No longer a card exclusively for big spenders, [American Express] cards generally offer better value for the typical spender.”</p>

Retirement Income

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Why the cost of bread is set to rise

<p>The cost of the humble loaf of bread is set to surge as the price of Australian wheat spikes.</p> <p>And whether you like white, multigrain, wholemeal or the fancier loaf varieties, it doesn’t matter as all bread prices are set to soar.</p> <p><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/business/bread-prices-set-to-surge-as-cost-of-australian-wheat-spikes/news-story/a8bacca23839f766d39a00b465a75597">The Daily Telegraph</a></span></strong></em><span> </span>report the prices of futures contracts for wheat on the east coast have increased 24 per cent over the past six months.</p> <p>A futures contract is a deal to buy or sell something at an agreed price at a future date, thereby serving as an indicator of where prices are going.</p> <p>Farmers are blaming a long spell of dry weather in wheat-growing land for the rise in prices.</p> <p>The winter season is also off to a poor start with analysts at National Australia Bank this week forecasting Australia’s wheat output from the winter crop to be “a shade under” 20 million tonnes.</p> <p>A month earlier, the bank was forecasting 21.3 million tonnes and the federal government last month predicated Aussie farmers would deliver a 21.9 million tonne haul.</p> <p>The difference between the forecasts might sound small but in a nation that eats a lot of bread, and exports a lot of wheat, even a small fall in output can make a big difference to the price.</p> <p>According to Roy Morgan research, 11 million Australians buy bread every week and Aussies spend more than $2 billion a year at chains such as Brumby’s and Bakers Delight, along with independent bakeries.</p>

Retirement Income

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ACCC report reveals shocking tactics used by energy companies

<p>The government has been urged to stop a sneaky tactic used by energy providers that costs Australian households hundreds of dollars each year.</p> <p>The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has taken aim at electricity retailers who are disguising late payment fees as “discounts” to trick people into they’re getting a better deal.</p> <p>A report released today by the consumer watchdog slams the tactic whereby energy providers charge exorbitant late fees on bills under the guide of providing a discount for paying on time.</p> <p>As <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://campaigns.choice.com.au/late-fees/">Choice</a></span> </strong>reports, “these ‘discounts’ are actually sneaky late payment fees designed to punish people so they end up paying more than they should.”</p> <p><img width="374" height="575" src="https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/21a2249204af3a4a31011fa924a090e5" alt="It sounds like a good deal, until you get stung." style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p> </p> <p><img width="374" height="210" src="https://campaigns.choice.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/energy-bill-late-fees.jpg" alt="Graphic illustration based on figures from an actual electricity bill." class="aligncenter wp-image-2029" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>The ACCC argues that power prices had reached “unacceptable” level and outlined measures that would save an average household $409 a year.</p> <p>The damning review into the national energy market recommends a “reset” of the market and accuses energy companies of gouging customers with unnecessary and unfair costs.</p> <p>Through market manipulation and misleading practices by energy providers, the ACCC said Australians were losing “hundreds of dollars a year”.</p> <p>The report, commissioned by Treasurer Scott Morrison in March last year, outlines 56 recommendations that are needed to bring down prices and restore consumer confidence.</p> <p> Some of the recommendations of the report include:</p> <p>• The Australian Energy Regulator should be given more powers to target market manipulation</p> <p>• Discounts can often be misleading and need to be made fairer</p> <p>• Customers should be able to compare discounts from a default or benchmark rate set by the regulator</p> <p>• Special conditions like pay on time discounts should not operate like harsh late penalties</p> <p>• Customer transfer process should be sped up so customers can move to new offers quickly</p> <p>• Third-party comparator sites should declare commissions they receive</p> <p>• The introduction of default offers consistent across all retailers, set at a price determined by the Australian Energy Regulator</p> <p>Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg labelled the report as “an extremely comprehensive and important piece of work”.</p> <p>“There is good news for consumers out of these recommendations, which the ACCC has said will reset the market and drive power prices lower,” Mr Frydenberg told Sky News this morning.</p> <p>“There are 56 recommendations and the Turnbull Government will carefully consider them and we will consult with the states because a number of the recommendations have an impact on state responsibilities,” he said.</p>

Retirement Income

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The $600,000 government incentive for seniors to downsize

<p>From July 1, a new incentive for older Australians selling a family home has kicked in.</p> <p>The Federal Government is encouraging people aged 65 and over, who have lived in their home for at least 10 years, to downsize and put extra money into their superannuation funds.</p> <p>Older homeowners will be able to make a post-tax contribution to their superannuation fund of up to $300,000 for one person and $600,000 for a couple.</p> <p>These new contributions will be in addition to any other voluntary contributions people are able to make under the existing rules and concessional and non-concessional caps.</p> <p>The downsizer superannuation contributions scheme, announced in last year’s Federal Budget, wants to encourage older homeowners to downsize, which will free up homes for younger families.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">What you need to know</span></p> <ul> <li>Coming into effect July 1, 2018, the downsizer superannuation contributions scheme is available to homeowners aged 65 and over</li> <li>The property must have been held for at least 10 years and been the owner’s principal place of residence. However, the homeowner does not have to have lived in the home for all of those 10 years.</li> <li>Both the owner and their spouse can contribute, even if the spouse is not on the title of the property.</li> <li>Homeowners can only make one downsizer contribution per person</li> <li>A homeowner can contribute up to $300,000 – and a couple can contribute $600,000 – from the sale of their home into a superannuation fund.</li> <li>Downsizers have 90 days after their property settles to make the contribution.</li> <li>The contribution is not exempt from the Age Pension means test and may affect a government pension.</li> </ul> <p> </p>

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Sneaky tax grab threatens to destroy retirement dream of thousands of Australian seniors

<p>A new “greedy” tax on luxury vehicles, including motorhomes, is threatening to destroy the retirement dream of many Aussie grey nomads.</p> <p>In Queensland, the government’s two-per-cent levy could bump up the price of campervans by nearly $10,000.</p> <p>The Queensland government's tax will apply to vehicles that are worth more than $100,000 and weigh less than 4.5 tonnes – a category that most campervans fit into.</p> <p>Companies have spoken out against the tax as they believe it will deter many potential customers and force many retirees to walk away from their dream of affording a holiday vehicle.</p> <p>Pensioner Alan Dawes purchased his motorhome five years ago but said he wouldn’t have been able to make the same purchase in the 2018 market.</p> <p>“If I was buying this vehicle now, it would affect me by about $9,000. Which makes it out of reach for a lot of people,” Mr Dawes told <em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/2018/06/25/18/47/two-percent-tax-on-luxury-cars-being-extended-to-motorhomes?ocid=Social-9NewsB" target="_blank">Nine News</a></span></strong></em>.</p> <p>Opposition Leader Deb Frecklington accused the government of a greedy tax grab on grey nomads.</p> <p>"They've paid their taxes and now, when they're in the prime of their life when they want to get out and enjoy this beautiful state, they're going to be slugged even more," she said.</p> <p>Some retailers are concerned they could lose out if they are forced to cover the tax on campervans they have already sold.</p> <p>"If I don't pass it on, which I can't ... it will cost myself and my partner $96,000," John Burke from Explorer Motorhomes explained.</p> <p>Caravanning groups are worried the tax could have a greater impact on tourism in country Queensland.</p> <p>"80% of tourism out there at this time of year is in caravans and motorhomes," the CEO of Caravanning Queensland, Ron Chapman, said.</p> <p>“If people can't buy them and keep going around Queensland, then we're in strife."</p> <p>The government said caravans and trailers will be exempt from the tax.</p> <p>"But if it is one of those luxurious vehicles then it might attract some duties," said Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk.</p> <p>What are your thoughts on this luxury vehicle tax? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Retirement Income