Cruising

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Luxury cruising on a budget: How you can get the perks without the price tag

<p>Most travellers know that cruising is an experience of a lifetime. You’re able to reach places that are usually exclusive to those who travel by sea and each morning you’re greeted with spectacular views. While there are plenty of cruise ships you can hop aboard on, nothing is quite like cruising in a luxurious suite aboard a boutique vessel.</p> <p>Boutique cruises are becoming extremely popular with more discerning travellers. They have a much more intimate feel to them compared to a mega-ship as they are usually smaller in size than their mainstream counterparts. But size does not compromise on experience, and if you’re someone who likes to build relationships and meet new people, a boutique cruise is the perfect option for you.</p> <p>Those who oversee boutique cruises are known to take great pride in providing the best services, such as staff knowing each traveller’s name and providing a much more personal experience.</p> <p>But if you need a bit more of a nudge, here are the reasons you should look to upgrade to a luxurious suite on your next cruise:</p> <p><strong>1. Boutique cruises can reach places big vessels can’t</strong></p> <p>It may seem obvious but it’s something to consider. Because of the convenient size of a boutique cruise, it’s able to sail to places their larger counterparts cannot. Meaning you’re able to truly immerse yourself in the location you’re visiting and see scenic views like no other. So, whether it’s the Northern Lights you’re gearing up to see or the Scottish Isles, it’s guaranteed that smaller ships will get you places that you can’t reach any other way.</p> <p>Cruise lines such as <span><a href="https://cmvaustralia.com/">Cruise &amp; Maritime Voyages</a></span> have ships with a comfortable, country-club ambiance that are able to make their way into harbours that many larger ships cannot, which gives you the perfect opportunity to explore the city in ways you never have before. Another perk is that many boutique cruise lines tend to stay in popular ports overnight, so those aboard can truly have a day to night experience in the city they’re staying at.</p> <p><strong>2. It’s more intimate</strong></p> <p>Whether you choose to travel with a crowd or fly solo, <a href="https://cmvaustralia.com/cruises/special-offers?utm_source=Over60&amp;utm_medium=Web&amp;utm_campaign=SuiteSale">boutique cruises</a> are a great way to get out there and meet new people. Because many vessels only carry 500-600 guests at a time, there is more of a chance to strike up a conversation with like-minded individuals who are currently on the same journey as you.</p> <p>With boutique cruise lines, it’s more about you than it is about the ship. It may not feature a great big water slide, but the cabins are spacious, there is more space for passengers and the staff are very attentive. It’s not about the grandeur but about the experience.</p> <p>Activities such as trivia nights or small group tours can really help bring people closer together, and not to mention the moments where you’re able to gather around a bar or café for drinks.</p> <p><strong>3. It’s convenient</strong></p> <p>A cruise always sounds like a great idea until you realise you have to travel long distances just to reach the departure dock. Luckily, a boutique cruise with <span><a href="https://cmvaustralia.com/cruises/special-offers?utm_source=Over60&amp;utm_medium=Web&amp;utm_campaign=SuiteSale">Cruise &amp; Maritime Voyages</a></span> depart from all around Australia, so it’s practically on your doorstep.</p> <p>With the voyages departing from places such as Sydney, Adelaide and Fremantle just to name a few, there is a way for everyone to get the full cruise experience without the inconvenience of long distances. Whether you choose to explore the great locations of Australia or take a trip to Europe, ships departing from every city is another detail that boutique cruise lines add to help make the customer experience that much better.</p> <p><strong>4. Better value for money</strong></p> <p>While it may seem like you’re paying quite a bit of money when choosing to go on a cruise in a luxurious suite, the truth is, it’s a much better deal than going with a standard run-of-the-mill voyage.</p> <p>And right now, you can save up to 60% off suites for a limited time with <span><a href="https://cmvaustralia.com/cruises/special-offers?utm_source=Over60&amp;utm_medium=Web&amp;utm_campaign=SuiteSale">Cruise &amp; Maritime Voyages</a></span>. Whether you’re looking into a quick getaway or a grand voyage, you’re bound to find something that suits you and your budget with the many packages available.</p> <p>With expansive living areas and plenty of on-board amenities, this is your chance to experience the life of luxury at an affordable cost. But run don’t walk, as the offer ends on October 22.</p> <p>THIS IS SPONSORED CONTENT BROUGHT TO YOU IN CONJUNCTION WITH <span><a href="https://cmvaustralia.com/cruises/special-offers?utm_source=Over60&amp;utm_medium=Web&amp;utm_campaign=SuiteSale">CRUISE &amp; MARITIME VOYAGES.</a></span></p>

Cruising

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Why this is the best way to see Europe

<p>With over one billion tourists visiting the continent each year, Europe is known to be the perfect holiday destination for people all around the world. While there are countless ways to experience Europe in all its glory, there is one option that should be considered above all. Immersive, relaxing and convenient, river cruising is not only a luxurious travel option, but also enables you to see Europe from a totally new perspective. Read on for more reasons why a river cruise is the best way to experience Europe.</p> <p><strong>1. Travel in style and comfort </strong></p> <p>As Europe once relied on their waterways for trade and industry, most of the historical and cultural centres are located near the riversides. Some river cruise tour companies, such as <a href="https://goo.gl/NkhoQ1">Avalon Waterways</a>, provide experienced local guides to greet you at every port and share first-hand knowledge on the surrounding areas.</p> <p>Enjoy some of the world’s most spectacular views from the comfort of your own bed. Some of the latest fleets feature state of the art design and innovation, including floor-to-ceiling panoramic windows in the cabins, allowing you to witness the spectacular different parts of Europe in a comfortable environment.</p> <p class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/292263518" width="640" height="360" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><strong>2. You only have to unpack once</strong></p> <p>Whether you packed your luggage weeks in advance or the night before, there is no doubt that it can be a chore. And what’s even more difficult is unpacking everything only to pack it up again. Repeat this process over and over again and the task can start to become a little tedious. The great thing about river cruises is that you only need to unpack once. So, no need to rummage around your suitcases to find a certain pair of shoes. Instead, just hang up your items in the closet space provided and forget about it until the end of your trip.</p> <p><strong>3. Maximise your limited holiday time</strong></p> <p>The great thing about a <span><a href="https://www.avalonwaterways.com.au/?utm_medium=native&amp;utm_source=over60&amp;utm_campaign=avalon19-europe-sep18&amp;utm_content=website-link&amp;utm_term=paid-sep">river cruise</a></span> is that you’ll arrive in your new port of call early in the morning – imagine waking up every day in a new location – and have the chance to explore the city until the late afternoon or evening. This way you’re able to properly immerse yourself in the city you’re visiting, as you have enough time to take in the details, the culture and the history. With a week-long cruise generally stopping at 5-6 port cities, you will be covering a lot of different locations without going through the hassle of intensive airport checks and long queues just to exit the premises. You can rest assured that the minute you wake up and step foot outside the ship, you’re ready to start exploring whether it’s with a group of your closest friends or as a solo traveller.</p> <p><strong>4. You get the most out of your money</strong></p> <p>When you start to add up the cost of flights, train tickets and airport shuttles – alongside hotel, food and entertainment expenses – the budget you were planning to stick to suddenly starts flying through the roof. With a river cruise, your transportation, accommodation and dining options, as well as general entertainment, are all included in the cost. This way you won’t be hit with any surprise charges at the end of a blissful holiday away.</p> <p><strong>5. Different cruises for different budgets</strong></p> <p>The great thing about river cruises is that there’s an option for everyone. Whether you want to splurge or save, you’re bound to find a package that suits your budget and needs. With multiple locations and time frames to choose from, you have control over where you go and what you want to see. While some may prefer to go on a romantic seven-night cruise from Amsterdam to Basel, others may want to go on a 20-night cruise from Amsterdam to Oltenita.</p> <p><a href="https://goo.gl/UQ6FaK">Avalon Waterways</a> understands that everyone is different, and people have different needs, so every package is designed to suit you. With countless options to choose from, you’re bound to walk away with an itinerary that features all the hotspots on your bucket list. Holidays should be fun, not stressful; you’ve earned your time to breathe. So, why not book a river cruise and give yourself the time and space to step out and see the world your way. Delight in the difference and comfort. Leaving the rules behind, but not the luxury.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7821066/avalon-q.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/204b1aa462324d51a122b3255fd0cb7e" /></p> <p>Even better news, you can currently save up to <a rel="noopener" href="https://goo.gl/NkhoQ1" target="_blank">$4,600 per couple </a>with <a href="https://goo.gl/UQ6FaK">Avalon Waterways</a> – a huge saving, which includes free Wi-Fi, three course meals prepared by some of the best chefs and a number of on-board amenities, including a self-serve beverage station, fitness centre, library and many other inclusions that will make sure every dollar is spent wisely.</p> <p>THIS IS SPONSORED CONTENT BROUGHT TO YOU IN CONJUNCTION WITH <span><a href="https://goo.gl/UQ6FaK">AVALON WATERWAYS</a></span>.</p>

Cruising

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A day in the life of a luxury cruise ship passenger

<p><strong>1. Rise and shine</strong></p> <p>Everyone wakes up on a cruise to find themselves floating blissfully somewhere between vast seas and even vaster skies.</p> <p>While you slumbered, your floating hotel travelled through the night. Come morning, just outside your window is a completely new world and destination waiting for you to discover. What a way to start your day!</p> <p><strong>2. Breakfast club</strong></p> <p>Early risers can catch sunrise from the deck with a steaming cup of coffee and warm French pastries before heading to breakfast, while later risers can take in the views and the fresh sea air before heading downstairs to breakfast. Cruise restaurants offer banquets fit for a king. Choose from fresh fruit, omelettes, pancakes and, of course, ­a traditional full English breakfast.</p> <p><strong>3. Ease into your day</strong></p> <p>Energise your morning with a gentle yoga class, stretching your body and relaxing your mind on the top deck, or doing a few laps of the pool. For something a little more invigorating, hit the gym. If that sounds like too much action, simply spend your morning lounging by the pool or getting lost in a book, perhaps engrossing yourself in the history, culture and legends of your next port of call.</p> <p><strong>4. Port action</strong></p> <p>If it’s a port day, you might want to head out straight after breakfast to fit in all the sights. Maybe you have a tour lined up to see the local attractions; a boat trip to view a coral reef; or a sightseeing tour from high up above a rainforest canopy.</p> <p>From tropical island paradises of the South Pacific to the majestic ice-scapes of Scandinavia and Alaska and the bustling Mediterranean, where you can take a nostalgic trip back in history and visit ancient monuments and ruins, the world is your oyster as far as cruise travel is concerned.</p> <p>You can also choose to whittle the afternoon away in a quaint restaurant and watch the world go by.</p> <p><strong>5. Me time</strong></p> <p>If you spent the previous day exploring on land, a day on board allows you to unwind and soak in the delights of ship life, such as a day of spa treatments and pampering, sunbathing by the pool, or simply afternoon tea on deck.</p> <p>For a bit more excitement, try the surfing and skydiving simulators.</p> <p>Or if you want to learn something, take a cookery class, or learn to dance the tango. Whatever your poison, what is not to be missed is watching the sun going down from the deck with a glass of Happy Hour bubbles in hand.</p> <p><strong>6. Make a night of it</strong></p> <p>An array of Broadway shows, cabaret spectaculars and concerts are on offer after dark. And if you want to party like it’s 1999, head to the nightclubs and chic lounges where everyone’s party can carry on late into the night.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/cruising/day-life-luxury-cruise-ship-passenger?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Cruising

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$4.6 million payout over cruise nightmare

<p>A man has been awarded a $4.6 million compensation from Norwegian Cruise Lines after a simple trip to the cruise doctor turned into hell.</p> <p>Ilija Loncar, 30, who was formerly employed as a waiter on the cruise ship the Norwegian Breakaway, made a trip to the ship’s doctor after he developed flu-like symptoms, including nausea.</p> <p>The doctor onboard, Sebastian Campuzano, had been hired by the cruise line a few months prior and was described as a “young, inexperienced, Columbia-trained physician”.</p> <p>To treat the mild symptoms, Dr Campuzano prescribed the antihistamine promethazine, which was injected by nurse Marco Oracion in a “huge” dose over a short period of time.</p> <p>This error led to an “intense” reaction that plunged Mr Loncar into a detrimental situation that resulted in his arm being amputated.</p> <p>Loncar’s lawyer, Thomas Scolaro, alleged in a Florida court that the medication wasn’t suitable for the worker’s illness and that the anti-nausea drug Zofran would’ve been a better treatment.</p> <p>The drug was also injected intravenously into Mr Loncar’s arm, instead of intramuscularly in his buttocks, which is the recommended technique.</p> <p>“(Dr Campuzano) gave the wrong medication, the wrong dosage by the wrong route through the wrong injection site, and it was administered over the wrong time and by the wrong method,” Mr Scolaro said.</p> <p>“They gave (Mr Loncar) the most dangerous type of medication they could give to treat this very simple, common problem that can be treated with a very light and easy medication — Zofran. It’s all they needed to do."</p> <p><span style="font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit !important;">It was also claimed that the 25-milligram dose that was administered was well above the usual amount prescribed.</span></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.law.com/dailybusinessreview/2018/09/10/miami-attorney-helps-secure-3-3m-for-man-whose-arm-was-amputated-after-seeking-care-for-flu-like-symptoms/?slreturn=20180818215235"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Miami Daily Business Review</u></em></strong></a> reports: “All the medical data out there strongly suggests six and a quarter milligrams is a perfectly therapeutic dose. Campuzano orders it by intravenous injection when there is a pill, there’s a suppository, there’s a syrup.</p> <p>“ … He orders it by IV injection into the vein when — if you are going to order this medication through the injectable method — there’s a FDA black box warning on IV promethazine, which says the preferred route is deep intramuscular, which is a shot in the tush.”</p> <p>Even when Mr Loncar reported a reaction to the medication, the medical staff did not respond.</p> <p>“As soon as the medication went in he immediately reported burning,” Mr Scolaro said. </p> <p>“All the warnings out there say when there is a reported burning, you stop.”</p> <p>A few hours later, Mr Loncar’s right forearm turned black and blue.</p> <p>Instead of immediately evacuating the employee to a hospital, the medical staff massaged the area for 24 hours until the ship reached the next dock.</p> <p>Due to the extreme negligence and human error, Mr Loncar developed Compartment Syndrome, where pressure builds up due to internal bleeding and swelling.</p> <p>Once he arrived at a hospital, it was too late to save his gangrene-infected arm.</p> <p>After emergency operations, Mr Loncar’s arm was amputated at the elbow.</p> <p>The former employee suffered mental anguish, loss of capacity for the enjoyment of life, loss of future earning capacity, aggravation of pre-existing conditions, inconvenience, humiliation, scarring and disfigurement.</p> <p>Mr Scolora alleges that this is all because of “wilful, wanton, and outrageous violations” in the form of medical errors and the failure to evacuate Mr Loncar.</p> <p>Mr Loncar was awarded AU$4.6 million for past and present pain, medical expenses and loss of earning capacity.</p>

Cruising

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How to pack for your first cruise

<p><strong>Hand luggage</strong><br />Most cruise lines will take your suitcases at check-in, but it can take a while for these to be delivered to your room. So, it makes sense to pack a small carry bag to take on with you containing your passport, tickets, swimsuit, change of clothes and any other essentials including medication and valuables.</p> <p><strong>Cruise style</strong><br />Do some research into what you’ll be doing. If it’s mostly on-board entertainment, you’ll need lots of swimwear and casuals, whereas shore trips to galleries and cultural venues will require smarter wear.</p> <p><strong>Dinner style </strong><br />Most cruise ships have a selection of restaurants, and you’ll probably get a set number of dinners in a formal restaurant, with other meals served in casual or buffet style eateries. Each cruise line has their own dress codes and rules, which should be provided on their website. As a general rule they are:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Casual:</strong>If you’re having lunch or dinner at a buffet-style restaurant, then the dress code is laidback, although swimwear and bare feet are usually not allowed.</li> <li><strong>Semi-formal:</strong>Polo shirts and chinos or smart jeans for men, with women wearing dresses or smart separates.</li> <li><strong>Formal:</strong>Men will be required to wear a dark suit and tie or dinner jacket, with ladies dressing up in cocktail or floor-length dresses. Your tickets should say how many formal nights there are.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Gala nights</strong> <br />If you are on an upmarket cruise, a gala night or two is usually part of the itinerary. Some men enjoy wearing a tuxedo for these special events, although a lounge suit is usually acceptable, and for women, it’s an excuse to go all out, with evening gowns or glittery cocktail dresses.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/cruising/how-to-pack-for-your-first-cruise">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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This cruise company just banned children

<p>Vikings River Cruises has just announced it will no longer permit people under the age of 18 on board their cruises.</p> <p>The cruise company, based in Basel, Switzerland, has changed its river cruise policy to be the same as its Viking Ocean Cruises line, which has had an adults-only policy since 2015.</p> <p>The cruise line’s age policy is now “one of the strictest in the industry”, according to <em><a href="https://www.orlandoweekly.com/Blogs/archives/2018/08/27/viking-cruise-lines-bans-children-says-their-clients-want-kid-free-vacations">Orlando Weekly</a></em>.</p> <p>Viking’s new terms and conditions page stipulates that for all new trips booked on both lines after August 1, 2018, passengers must be 18 or over.</p> <p>This does not apply to cruises booked on behalf of people under the age of 18 through to 2019.</p> <p>The rule change does not come as a huge surprise considering Viking River Cruises’ minimum passenger age was 12 years old.</p> <p>Viking senior vice president of marketing Richard Marnell said the new rule makes sense as the cruise line’s travel experience is for the over-50s market.</p> <p>“Viking has always offered experiences that are designed for travellers who are 50 and older, with interests in history, art, culture and exploration. It’s what we’re known for,” Mr Marnell said.</p> <p>“Previously, we had allowed a degree of flexibility in the minimum age for travel, but increasingly our guests have told us how much they appreciate an environment where they can travel without children.</p> <p>“In addition to marketing what Viking is, we believe our guests also appreciate knowing what Viking is not,” he said.</p>

Cruising

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Aussies’ biggest fear on cruise ships revealed

<p>Although cruising can be an idyllic travel option, it is no secret that there are some unique mishaps that can be encountered as you sail the high seas. </p> <p>Now, a new study by <a href="https://www.finder.com.au"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>finder.com.au</strong></span></a> has revealed the number one fear Australians have about cruising is getting gastro.</p> <p>The research found that Aussie travellers were more concerned about the possibility of getting a stomach bug on a cruise than the ship sinking, losing luggage, violent storms, falling overboard or the ship leaving them behind.</p> <p>The study found that 37 per cent of Australians were most afraid of gastro, which was an even bigger concern than regular seasickness.</p> <p>The fear of getting gastro was so strong that two in five Aussies admitted they would never go on a cruise because they were afraid of getting sick.</p> <p>Norovirus is a highly contagious virus with symptoms including nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach cramping as well as fever, headache, muscle aches and fatigue.</p> <p>Gastro outbreaks have been associated with cruise ships because of the enclosed environment onboard, which allows the virus to rapidly spread through food, surfaces and person-to-person contact. </p> <p>In this year alone, 443 people have been impacted in seven major outbreaks so far.</p> <p>An outbreak is considered “major” if it affects more than 2 per cent of all passengers.</p> <p>“A massive two in five Australians wouldn’t go on a cruise solely due to concerns about getting sick,” finder.com.au’s travel insurance expert Bessie Hassan said.</p> <p>“Unfortunately it’s a reality that gastro outbreaks on cruise ships can be common, but worrying about getting sick doesn’t need to ruin your holiday.”</p> <p>Between December 2016 and February 2017, there were consecutive outbreaks of norovirus on eight Sun Princess voyages.</p> <p>Sydney-based law firm Shine Lawyers has been preparing a large-scale action against Carnival Australia, the owner and operator of Princess Cruises.</p> <p><strong>Tips for avoiding norovirus on a cruise</strong></p> <p>Finder.com.au recommended passengers wash or sanitise hands regularly on a cruise, especially before eating and after using the bathroom. It is also important to clean your hands after taking part in an onboard activity or using public armchairs.</p> <p>When turning the bathroom tap off, use a paper towel to avoid possible recontamination.</p> <p>It is also important to keep a close eye on the buffet food as bacteria can thrive in foods kept at room temperature. It is also helpful to limit person-to-person contact – choose to wave instead of shaking hands.</p> <p>What is your biggest fear about cruising? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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World’s longest cruise set to visit 59 countries in 245 days

<p>Fancy a world cruise that calls at 113 ports in 59 countries across six continents in 245 days?</p> <p>That'll be $117,995 thanks. For the most basic room. Prefer to travel in the top-of-the-range owner's suite? If you had a spare $342,895 you would have been in with a chance but it's already taken.</p> <p>Billing itself as the longest ever continuous world cruise, the Norwegian-owned Viking Sun embarks on the eight-month journey on August 31, 2019. </p> <p>Departing from London's Greenwich, the 930-passenger vessel stops in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Faroe Islands and Norway before crossing the Atlantic to Iceland and Greenland. </p> <p>From there, it makes its way around America to Los Angeles where it skips through the South Pacific to New Zealand, calling at several ports on both islands before heading to Australia. </p> <p>Then it's up through Southeast Asia, India, the Middle East, Africa and southern Europe, eventually arriving back in London. </p> <p>The price includes business class airfares, private car transfers to the ship, "virtually all drinks on board" and one excursion in each port. </p> <p>The cheapest fare of $117,995 per person means a couple travelling together will pay $235,990, or $963 a day between them. </p> <p>The cruise appears to be filling up fast, with only wait list spaces for the cheapest fares. There are spaces available in mid-range cabins. </p> <p>Luxury touches aboard the 465-stateroom ship include a glass-backed infinity pool cantilevered off the stern, a Nordic spa with a "snow grotto" where snowflakes descend from the ceiling through chilled air, a winter garden and eight restaurants. </p> <p>Viking chairman Torstein Hagen said the lines world cruises "offer guests the rare opportunity to unpack once and explore dozens of the best destinations on earth - at a value that is unprecedented in the travel industry". </p> <p>If nearly A$117,995 is your idea of a value holiday that is. </p> <p><em>Written by Lorna Thornber. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><u>Stuff.co.nz.</u></strong> </a></em></p>

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Richard Branson is building a luxury cruise ship for adults only

<p>Virgin Voyages, the cruise line launched by Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson, has released renderings of its new adult-only cruise ship.</p> <p>The <em>Scarlet Lady</em> will have an 18-year-old age requirement and will feature a nightclub, a thermal spa, two restaurants, athletic clubs and a barbershop.</p> <p>The interior and exterior have been conceptualised by some of the world’s most successful design firms, including Tom Dixon Design Studio of London, Roman and Williams of New York and Concrete Amsterdam.</p> <p>“Our design partners together with our internal design team have dreamed up eye-catching, intimate and alluring spaces that we can’t wait to see come to life,” said Tom McAlpin, President and Chief Executive Officer for Virgin Voyages, in a statement to <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au"><strong><em><u>Business Insider</u></em></strong></a>.</p> <p>There will also be an exclusive outdoor lounge called Richard’s Roof-deck for suite guests.</p> <p>Inside the ship, guests can choose between two restaurants, Pink Agave and Test Kitchen.</p> <p>The ship will have an outdoor athletic club for guests who are interested in joining a boxing class or running track. The indoor gym will offer group fitness classes, yoga and stationary bicycles.</p> <p>There will also be a thermal spa called Redemption that will have a hydrotherapy pool, mud room, salt room, cold plunge rooms, quartz beds and other spa treatments.</p> <p>For those looking for furthering pampering, there will also be a nail salon, a barbershop and a hair salon.</p> <p>The ship is expected to arrive in Port Miami in 2020 for its maiden journey.</p> <p>It will hold 2,700 passengers and 1,150 crew members.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see inside the luxury cruise line.</p> <p><em>Photo: Virgin Voyages</em></p>

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Cruise ship worker rescued 22 hours after falling overboard

<p>A cruise ship worked who fell overboard has been miraculously rescued by another passing cruise ship.</p> <p>The 33-year-old man, who was working for Norwegian Cruise Line, is in a stable condition after reportedly treading water for 22 hours to stay alive.</p> <p>According to the US Coast Guard, the worker went overboard at around 3.20 pm local time on Saturday, 45 kilometres north west of Pinar del Rio, Cuba.</p> <p>The man fell off the <em>Norwegian Getaway</em> and was rescued by Carnival Cruise Line’s <em>Carnival Glory</em>.</p> <p>“It was nothing short of miraculous,” president of Carnival Cruise Line, Christine Duffy, said in a statement.</p> <p>The search for the man was suspended on Saturday evening, but a cabin steward from the <em>Carnival Glory</em> spotted him in the water at around 1.20 pm on Sunday.</p> <p>Carnival spokeswoman AnnMarie Matthews said the man did not have any safety device on when he was rescued and they “can only surmise that he was likely treading water the entire time”.</p> <p>“Kudos to the <em>Carnival Glory</em> team for this amazing effort to rescue a fellow seafarer,” Ms Duffy said.</p> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://miami.cbslocal.com/2018/07/01/missing-cruise-employee-found/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>CBS Miami</em></strong></span></a>, US Coast Guard spokesman Jonathan Lally said: "The <em>Carnival Glory</em> had found someone in the water waving their arms and they rescued him and he was the missing <em>Norwegian Getaway</em> crew member and that was roughly about 21 miles north of Cuba.”</p> <p>Norwegian said in a statement that the line is “extremely thankful” to Carnival Cruise line.</p> <p>“We are so happy to know that the individual is safe and will soon be reunited with friends and family,” the Norwegian statement said.</p>

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Rare Titanic letter offers insight into life on doomed ship

<p>A rare letter written on-board the Titanic recently went up for auction, giving a glimpse of what life was like on the historic ship.</p> <p>According to auction house Henry Aldridge &amp; Son, the letter was written by Second Class passenger and survivor Kate Buss.</p> <p>The letter, written on April 10, 1912, is addressed to her brother Percy James and was in response to a letter she had received from him while on the historic ship.</p> <p>“I’ve been quite alright — but now feel dead tired and more fit for bed than anything,” Ms Buss wrote.</p> <p>“Have to go to dinner-tea in half an hour.”</p> <p>The letter reveals more about everyday life on the Titanic, which sank on April 15, killing 1503 passengers.</p> <p>“Mr Peters spent about an hour on the vessel and they might easily have spent another without waste of time,” Ms Buss wrote.</p> <p>“The first class apartments are really magnificent and unless you had first seen them you would think the second class were the same.”</p> <p>Ms Buss said the ship had not yet reached Cherbourg, France, but the mail had cleared.</p> <p>“I think I’d best try and get some postcards of the vessel,” she wrote.</p> <p>She also said that the passenger she was sharing her stateroom with had not yet turned up. She was also told by two clergymen sitting opposite her at the table to eat a good lunch.</p> <p>Ms Buss finished her letter by informing her brother that she was putting her letter in the post.</p> <p>“Must clear and have a wash now,” she wrote. “Will pop this in the [mail] in case I’m sea sick tomorrow. PW brought a box of chocolates — shouldn’t wonder if I’m like Jim Buss and get it the other way. Give my love to all enquirers — must go. Much love, Kate.”</p> <p>Ms Buss was travelling to America to marry her fiancé Samuel Willis.</p> <p>She survived the Titanic sinking when the <a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/travel-trouble/2018/04/the-call-that-sealed-the-fate-of-titanic-victims/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Carpathia</span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"> picked her up</span></strong></a> along with 705 other passengers.</p> <p>Kate Buss and Samuel Willis married on May 11 as planned.</p> <p>She passed away on July 12, 1972 at the age of 96.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Henry Aldridge &amp; Son</em></p>

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What it’s like to cruise around NZ solo

<p>The last time I sailed on Azamara Journey was in 2014, on an unforgettable cruise from Athens to Rome.</p> <p>A general strike in Athens meant Syntagma Square was packed with  protesters and tours to the Acropolis were out of the question. No matter; my cruise companion and I boarded the Journey at Piraeus to find we'd been magically upgraded to the Club World Owner's Suite. Any sense of sightseeing disappointment evaporated in a trice.</p> <p>Four years on, I'm on a mission to check out what's changed since the ship had a multimillion-dollar refurb in 2016 – and to experience sailing solo for a change. Azamara Journey's cruise starts in Auckland, recently rated the world's third-most liveable city (after Vienna and Zurich). I'm not surprised by this news – Auckland is easy to get around on public transport, scores highly on the shopping, dining and natural-attractions scene and its cruise port is right there in the middle of the city.</p> <p align="center"><img src="https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/p/j/0/b/p/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1pj0lo.png/1524519902434.jpg" alt="The ship had a multimillion-dollar refurb in 2016." class="photoborder"/></p> <p align="center"><em>The ship had a multimillion-dollar refurb in 2016.</em></p> <p>Before we sail out of Auckland, we are treated to an impressive onboard performance of the haka and other tribal dances by a local band of musicians. They manage to entice a surprising number of passengers to join them on the deck and it's a fun start to the cruise.</p> <p>After the excitement of sailaway – and a vaguely worrying thought about dining alone – dinner on the aft deck of Windows Cafe proves to be a breeze. A seafood buffet is in full swing – you pick your own ingredients and the chefs cook it all in front of you – and my table for one (OK four, with three empty places) overlooking the Hauraki Gulf is the best place to be for amazing sunset views and casual conversations.</p> <p align="center"><img src="https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/p/j/0/b/o/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1pj0lo.png/1524519902434.jpg" alt="The pool deck on Azamara Journey." class="photoborder"/></p> <p align="center"><em>The pool deck on Azamara Journey.</em></p> <p>Has the ship changed much over four years? Yes and no. The decor is brighter and lighter, a selection of house drinks is now included in the fare, dining is better than ever and the service even more attentive than I recall. The former Looking Glass Lounge is now the more attractive Living Room, where wine and tapas are served in the evening and coffee and snacks during the day, while favourite features such as the painted tromp de l'oeil ceiling in the library (Drawing Room) remain.</p> <p>On the way to the Bay of Islands I join a table of single travellers for dinner, hosted by cruise director Tony Markey. You have to book a spot in advance and there are so many of us we spill onto a neighbouring table. It's a lively evening. On one side of me sits a former US senator, on the other a retired teacher, also from the US. An English woman gets straight to the point – "What are you going to do about your gun laws?" Then we talk Trump, Brexit, travel, sex and everything else under the sun.</p> <p>Over the next few days, friendships develop; Azamara Journey's size and spaces are very conducive to sociability, whether you're travelling with a group, couple or on your own. And if you're not the most confident single traveller, organised cruise excursions are a boon. Whether you take a ship's tour or a cheaper option offered by a local operator, it takes the hassle out of making the arrangements yourself and, particularly if you choose a small-group tour, you get to know fellow passengers along the way.</p> <p align="center"><img src="https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/p/j/0/b/q/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1pj0lo.png/1524519902434.jpg" alt="The Aqualina restaurant." class="photoborder"/></p> <p align="center"><em>The Aqualina restaurant.</em></p> <p>I join a Waitangi walking tour at the Bay of Islands. Guide Morrie is a straight-talking Māori who shares his extensive knowledge of his ancestors' culture as we wander along the glittering rocky coastline. He explains the significance of the massive ceremonial canoe, which is launched every February for Waitangi Day celebrations, and inside the surprisingly homely Treaty House we inspect a replica of the historic Waitangi Treaty.</p> <p>At the ornately carved Meeting House, which symbolically faces the Treaty House, we see a dazzling display of Māori weaponry, stick games and the haka; later we split up to try our hands at wood-carving or flax-weaving. Not something I'll be doing again, by the way, crafts are not my forte. Azamara Journey's visiting magician Paul Draper accompanies the tour – his show in the new 54 Below venue that evening is mind-boggling.</p> <p>My next outing is with eight other passengers from Tauranga to Rotorua, the birthplace of Maori culture. Minibus driver John keeps up a running commentary during the 45-minute drive, on everything from soaring real-estate prices in seafront Mount Maunganui to how the freshwater lakes surrounding Rotorua are full of trout. You can catch the fish but selling them is illegal.</p> <p align="center"><img src="https://resources.stuff.co.nz/content/dam/images/1/p/j/0/b/s/image.related.StuffLandscapeSixteenByNine.620x349.1pj0lo.png/1524519902434.jpg" alt="Kayaking the Queen Charlotte Sound." class="photoborder"/></p> <p style="text-align: center;" align="center"><em>Kayaking the Queen Charlotte Sound.</em></p> <p>The gushing geysers and bubbling mud pools at Te Puia are as dramatic as I'd imagined and the sulphur smell much fainter. It's a key tourist attraction and very managed – however, our onsite guide talks geology with authority and takes us through a nocturnal sanctuary to observe a pair of young kiwi birds. You can only see the native "slow breeders" in the wild if you're accompanied by a ranger.</p> <p>After a look through the inspirational new NZ Arts &amp; Crafts Institute in Te Puia we spend an hour or so at the Polynesian Spa, languishing in geothermal pools that overlook steaming, multicoloured Lake Rotorua and far distant mountains. We agree on the drive back to the ship that another hour there would have been preferable to the educational pit stop we make at a kiwifruit farm – but it's a first-world problem.</p> <p>By the time we reach Picton the weather is considerably cooler and the prospect of kayaking on Queen Charlotte Sound is suddenly not so enticing. Nobody else is piking out, though, and it turns out to be a wonderful, energising experience. Ten of us paddle about 14 kilometres in and out of bays and coves in a mountainous landscape that's so vast and silent it's quite mystical; our entertaining guide's dry comments bring us back to earth (or sea).</p> <p>Another highlight is the AzAmazing Evening in Wellington. These special events are held once on every cruise and almost everyone on the ship attends the superb Symphony by the Sea in Wellington Cathedral. Even if you don't know much about classical music you recognise these pieces; two are traditional songs made famous by Dame Kiri Te Kanawa.</p> <p>I jump ship in Dunedin and catch a glimpse of Azamara Journey a few days later in Sydney, where it's setting off on its 102-night Bridge to Bridge voyage to London. Fifty-two passengers are on board for the full cruise; as Captain Johannes Tysse says, "I hope they won't be climbing the walls by the end of it, but we have plenty of things to keep them entertained."</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><strong>Cruise</strong></p> <p><em>Azamara Quest will sail four voyages between Australia and New Zealand in 2019; 16-night Melbourne to Auckland, departing January 6; 16-night Auckland to Sydney, departing January 22; 14-night Sydney to Auckland, departing February 7; and 15-night Auckland to Cairns, departing February 21. <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__azamaraclubcruises.com&amp;d=DwMGaQ&amp;c=N9aEhCy8U0rJkO1xCZf7rgM9fohfR5qe_N93viZd7O8&amp;r=kNONHh_9qghstnaZzt5LFySipmRKjcpxz7waAfXLdzs&amp;m=jqIGzfOoUiMQ3dWC9TedpQQtBI1lo6umx6SU66fU_60&amp;s=KMSZ5_2TXwEZLDFa5Q4vaRWekJRzkbWSDWBwQ9_fc_Y&amp;e=" target="_blank">azamaraclubcruises.com</a></strong></span></em></p> <p><em>Sally Macmillan travelled as a guest of Azamara Club Cruises and Emirates.</em></p> <p><em>Sally Macmillan. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz.</span></strong></a></em></p>

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3 very good reasons to try a senior singles cruise

<p>Sometimes the most rewarding things we do in life are those that force us to get out of our comfort zone. Whilst the thought of going on a cruise by yourself might be terrifying, all the other passengers onboard will be in the same boat. Here are some of the great benefits of embarking on a senior singles cruise.</p> <p><strong>1.  Meet new people</strong></p> <p>Whether you end up finding love on the cruise or not, you will have the opportunity to meet plenty of people who are in the same season as life as you. If you don’t meet a partner, you could still end up finding terrific friends. Singles cruises are very social, so expect to meet new people on a day-to-day basis. Singles cruises will strategically help you form friendships with fun classes, social mixers and seating at mealtime.</p> <p><strong>2. Same motives</strong></p> <p>Singles cruises are exclusive to singles so all passengers can have an opportunity to find love. While enjoying the ocean views and blue skies, whoever you come across you will know they are on the cruise as the same reason as you – to meet someone new in an exciting way!  Knowing that everyone on board is single, will help you know that whoever catches your eye is open to starting a relationship.</p> <p><strong>3.  Fun environment</strong></p> <p>Whatever way you like to have fun, whether that be pottery or dance classes or playing golf, senior singles cruises have it all. If you find someone on board, you have a list of great date activities that you can do together as you get to know them. If you are finding it hard to strike up a conversation with someone or feel like you are getting lost in the crowd, you can do a social activity to get out of your cabin.</p> <p>Have you ever been on a singles cruise? If so, tell us about your experience in the comments below.</p>

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Should you take your own pillow on a cruise?

<p>Going on a cruise, no matter how long your journey may be, requires you to pack some essential items to make it through the trip.</p> <p>One cruiser has asked other travellers on <a href="https://boards.cruisecritic.com.au/showthread.php?t=833016" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Cruise Critic</strong></em></span></a> if it is necessary to pack his pillow for his sea adventure.</p> <p>“I was wondering if anybody every brings their own pillows. If the pillows are good, I won't worry about it. I just don't want to have neck cramps all week,” he asked.</p> <p>Here are the responses he received from a community of avid cruisers.</p> <p>CruiseDude_83 said: “Yes every cruise. It is not because I feel that the ones on the cruise are dirty i just sleep on my own better…”</p> <p>ChristieNJ wrote” “Never! It's sad that the cruise pillows are WAYYY more comfortable than my own!”</p> <p>CL-JW agreed: “We’ve found the pillows to be good on board.”</p> <p>Tika shared: “I always take my little travel pillow with me when I travel. It is about half the size of a standard pillow and scrunches real small so easy to pack. I know some folks have asked their cabin stewards for different pillows and they always accommodate their requests. One line we cruised on actually asked us in a pre-cruise questionnaire what type of pillows we wanted and bed duvet or standard spread.”</p> <p>Retiredawacs said: “I’ve travelled all over the world and I don't leave home without my pillow. I always find a way to make room for it. I've been told though that on our cruise in three weeks that there is a pillow menu to select from. We are staying in a GS. I still think I will take my own.”</p> <p>Cruiser starlake shared his tricks to travelling with his pillow.</p> <p>“I always take my own pillow. I don't have any problem with the ship's pillows, I just like my own,” he wrote. <br /> “I have a standard size pillow and either make room for it in my checked luggage, or if there is no room there I have simply tied it to my carry-on and go through airport security. I have never been asked to find room inside the carry-on and have never had anyone even say anything about it. It is amazing if you look around airports and see how many people carry their own pillow.”</p> <p>Do you pack your pillow when you go on a cruise? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Aboard Australia’s only country music cruise

<p>The Australian country music cruise, <em>Cruisin’ Country</em>, is back for its eighth consecutive year.</p> <p>Departing from Sydney in October 2018, the seven-night cruise has an impressive line-up of the best Aussie country musicians.</p> <p>The cruise will be on luxury liner <em>Radiance of The Seas</em> and will travel to Noumea and the Isle of Pines in New Caledonia.</p> <p>Artists who will perform on the cruise include John Williamson, Troy Cassar-Daley, Graeme Connors, Gina Jeffreys, Sara Storer, Tania Kernaghan, Anne Kirkpatrick, James Blundell and Amber Lawrence.</p> <p>But the country music isn’t the only treat lined up for guests. The cruise will also have activities such as dancing lessons, workshops, bush poetry and open mic sessions.</p> <p>This cruise, which is part of the Choose Your Cruise brand, has seen more than 38,000 passengers embark on this Aussie country escape since 2009.</p> <p>Choose Your Cruise’s Caitlin Manov said: “The minute you get onboard – even if you are travelling alone – you are part of 2000-plus country fans who are onboard for the very same reason as you, a shared passion for music.”</p> <p>“In many cases, if you were to go to a concert or music festival at home, it isn’t that often that you would strike up a conversation with the person next to you, as you are usually there to see the artists and then move on to your next destination. The great thing about <em>Cruisin’ Country </em>is that everyone feels so relaxed being on holiday, it creates an atmosphere that you want to be part of every year,” she said.</p> <p>“There is something very special about the country music industry in Australia,” she added.</p> <p>“It comes down to the fact that artists and punters alike are genuine, good people. There are no egos or rock stars in country music, there are just people with a story to tell and new friends you are yet to meet that are there to listen.</p> <p>“This welcoming attitude is what made <em>Cruisin’ Country </em>a possibility for us. We dreamed of creating an inclusive atmosphere where artists and guests could be entertained and enjoy some time away from the real world.</p> <p>“Luckily, this dream was able to become a reality by the incredible artists we have onboard, who are more than happy to stop for a chat after a show, or stop for a photo by the pool. The intimacy that comes with being on a ship with your favourite artist is something you will not find at any concert or music festival elsewhere and we are very proud of that. We love our <em>Cruisin’ Country </em>family.”</p> <p>The family cruise takes place from the 9-16 October and <a href="https://chooseyourcruise.com.au/cruises/cruisin-country-8/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">tickets are now on sale.</span></strong></a></p>

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The extraordinary story of the British sailor who could have saved the Titanic

<p>In 1912, sailor David Blair avoided death when he was taken off the crew for Titanic’s maiden voyage.</p> <p>It turns out, the sailor could’ve played an unknowing role in the historic tragedy by walking away with the key to a locker containing the vessels crow’s nest binoculars.</p> <p>Historians believe if the binoculars had been accessible on the journey, the iceberg which caused the fatal sinking, may have been spotted earlier.</p> <p>According to the Britain’s Burton Mail, Titanic survivor Fred Fleet told an official inquiry that if they had access to binoculars, they would’ve spotted the iceberg earlier.</p> <p>“David Blair was standing by for three months in Belfast when the Titanic was being built and was signed on for the whole of the New York voyage,” retired Derby headteacher Murray Shaw told the Burton Mail.</p> <p>"He would have been responsible for all the navigation equipment but was taken off the ship in Southampton, surplus to requirements. As a former Navy man myself, I can understand why he would have been upset."</p> <p>Mr Blair was involved in sea trials to assess the Titanic prior to its maiden voyage to New York.</p> <p>He was supposed to be the second officer on the trip when the ship’s owner drafted in senior officer Henry Wilde from sister ship the Olympic.</p> <p>In a postcard to his sister, Mr Blair his expressed his disappointment that he was replaced.</p> <p>"Am afraid I shall have to step out to make room for chief officer of the Olympic. This is a magnificent ship, I feel very disappointed I am not to make her first voyage,” he wrote.</p> <p>On April 14, 1912, the Titanic hit an iceberg at 11:45 and by 2:20am the next morning, it had sunk.</p> <p>More than 1,500 passengers and crew, including Mr Blair’s replacement died.</p>

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The bizarre way to make a cruise ship bigger

<p>In a world first for a luxury cruise ship, Silversea's Silver Spirit has been sliced in half during an ambitious lengthening project.</p> <p>A prebuilt 15-metre segment will be inserted inside in order to create more space on board the ship for public areas.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="497" height="280" src="/media/7818109/in-text_497x280.jpg" alt="In Text (3)"/></p> <p>The dissection of the 32,600 tonne ship occurred in front of an audience of international press and VIP guests, who were able to watch the manoeuvring of the vast new midsection into place.</p> <p>The operation will not be completed until May 5 and is expected to take 450,000 hours to complete with more than 500 skilled workers.</p> <p>The Silver Spirit's new length of 210.7 metres is expected to increase the capacity of the ship by around 12 per cent.</p> <p>Four new restaurants will be found on board the ship's new midsection, bringing the total number of dining rooms to eight, capable of seating 15 per cent more diners.</p> <p>On top of the extension is an additional 15 metres of sky deck alongside the pool area, with 20 per cent more outdoor seating and a new aerobics area.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Inside, there will be a new spa, expanded gym and two cafes.</p> <p>All suites will also undergo a refurbishment before the ship sets sail again on May 6.</p> <p>Silversea donated all the ships' old furniture to charity, filling 11 containers with 4652 items of furniture, computers and other articles, to be used for social welfare purposes in institutions across the island of Chania, Crete, identified as an island in need.</p> <p>The ship's first service will be a seven-day cruise between Rome and Barcelona.</p> <p><em>Written by Kylie Mclaughlin. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz.</span></strong></a></em></p>

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