Placeholder Content Image

Today show star and veteran doctor dies at age 69

<p>A veteran doctor and regular guest on the <em>Today</em> show Dr Ric Gordon has passed away at the age of 69 from pancreatic cancer. </p> <p>Known for sharing his expertise as an obstetrician and fertility specialist, Dr Gordon became a household name after he delivered the first baby on Australian television. </p> <p>Upon hearing of his death, veteran radio host and beloved Australian author Wendy Harmer revealed Dr Gordon delivered both her babies even after she and her partner dropped out of IVF.</p> <p>In a post on X, she wrote, “He was a pioneer in IVF in Australia and gave hope to so many... and was kind and caring professional. Vale.”</p> <p>Nine News confirmed the “sad news” of Dr Gordon’s passing from pancreatic cancer on Saturday, as presenter Georgie Gardner said “he will be deeply missed”.</p> <p>Professionally known as Dr Ric Porter, he had previously hosted Nine’s long-running lifestyle hit <em>Good Medicine</em>, which ran for nine years in the 1990s. </p> <p>Dr Gordon was a part of the team of doctors who delivered the first IVF birth in NSW in 1983, and during his career, he delivered more than 5000 babies, including in 2003 when he safely delivered a baby live on the <em>Today</em> show.</p> <p>Reflecting on the moment in 2022, Dr Gordon told <em>Today</em> viewers it was an extraordinary moment in television.</p> <p>“It went so well, it was a great morning and a good outcome,” he said. “The baby cried when it was meant to cry, mum and dad were happy."</p> <p>The well-known doctor also drew some controversy over his career, including an offensive analogy where he used the Holocaust to explain weight loss on the same breakfast TV program in 2015. </p> <p>Despite apologising for saying “there were no overweight people in the concentration camps”, his apology was dismissed by many for being “insufficient” and “unsatisfactory”.</p> <p>Dr Gordon said at the time, “I’m very sorry it upset those people. It was never my intention.”</p> <p>He added that he had “done a lot of study” on the Holocaust and his comments were merely “used as a medical example”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Today </em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Legendary Today show reporter dies unexpectedly

<p>Legendary entertainment reporter Sam Rubin has died unexpectedly after reportedly suffering a heart attack at the age of 64. </p> <p>According to TMZ, the incident occurred at his Los Angeles home, shortly after Rubin presented his regular segment on US TV network KTLA’s <em>7-9 a.m. Morning News</em> program. </p> <p>The reporter worked for LA TV station KTLA as their entertainment reporter, and also regularly worked with Aussie programs <em>Today</em> and <em>Today Extra</em>.</p> <p>KTLA confirmed Rubin's death in a statement, saying, “KTLA 5 is profoundly saddened to report the death of Sam Rubin."</p> <p>"Sam was a giant in the local news industry and the entertainment world, and a fixture of Los Angeles morning television for decades,” the statement read. </p> <p>“His laugh, charm and caring personality touched all who knew him. Sam was a loving husband and father: the roles he cherished the most."</p> <p>"Our thoughts are with Sam’s family during this difficult time.”</p> <p>Karl Stefanovic paid tribute to his colleague on Instagram, saying he "adored every second with Sam on air and off over the past two decades".</p> <p>"His spirit. His laugh. His warm caring nature. He was a beautiful man. What a loss. All love to his family, and to his TV family at KTLA5 News."</p> <p><em>Today Extra</em> host David Campbell also paid tribute to Rubin, calling him a "Hollywood great".</p> <p>"He had an encyclopaedic knowledge of the industry," Campbell posted on social media.</p> <p>"For years we would cross to him and gossip and laugh," he said.</p> <p>"He would visit us Down Under, and whenever you were in LA you had to catch up. His loss is profound. My love and condolences to his family whom he adored."</p> <p>"Also his KTLA team who have lost a brother. We will cross back to you some other time Sam."</p> <p>On <em>Weekend Today</em>, Richard Wilkins expressed his sadness at Rubin's passing, while also remembering fond memories of working together. </p> <p>“The entertainment world has really lost one of its greatest colleagues and dear friends today,” Wilkins said.</p> <p>“For the last 20-odd years he’s been a member of our family, mainly through the Today show and Today Extra … but whenever the big stories broke, Sam was our go-to guy."</p> <p>“And those beautiful people that he works with, they will be absolutely gutted today, obviously he brought this immense knowledge of the entertainment industry, but he brought this immense warmth as well.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

"I have some very big news": Today host announces shock resignation

<p>In a shock announcement on Friday morning, beloved <em>Today </em>show presenter Brooke Boney revealed that she will be bidding farewell to the morning program.</p> <p>Boney, known for her vibrant presence and insightful reporting, has been an integral part of the show since 2019, captivating audiences with her charisma and professionalism. However, her journey is about to take a new turn as she embarks on a remarkable academic pursuit at Oxford University.</p> <p>“Guys, I have some very big news for you this morning," Boney said to her co-hosts on the panel. "I’ve been offered a place at Oxford University later this year, which means I’ll be leaving the show after the Olympics</p> <p>“I don’t want to go into too much right now, because there’ll be plenty of time for goodbyes and thank yous, but I just wanted to share that good-slash-bad news with you all this morning.</p> <p>“It’s been a dream of mine to be able to study at an overseas university, and it just felt like the right time to take that step.</p> <p>“I’m so grateful to come in here every day and I love you all so much. So it’s made the decision really difficult. But it just means that you’ll all have to plan trips to the UK to come and visit."</p> <p>The news of Boney's departure stirred a wave of emotions among fans and colleagues alike. With tears and heartfelt messages, the tight-knit morning show panel expressed their pride and support for her next endeavour. Co-hosts Karl Stefanovic and Sarah Abo showered Boney with words of encouragement, acknowledging her longstanding dream of studying at an overseas university.</p> <p>“We are very, very proud of you,” Stefanovic said. “So proud of you,” Abo added.</p> <p>Boney's journey to this pivotal moment has been marked by dedication and perseverance. Hailing from the Hunter Region of NSW, she discovered her passion for media at a young age, volunteering at a local community radio station. Her path led her to Sydney, where she pursued an advertising cadetship before delving into university education as a mature-age student. Graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism in 2013, Boney's career trajectory took her to various roles, from political correspondent to newsreader on Triple J's breakfast show.</p> <p>Now, as she prepares to embark on a Masters in Public Policy at Oxford University, Boney reflected on the significance of this opportunity. "I thought if I don't do this now, then I'm probably never going to," she shared.</p> <p>While bidding farewell to the <em>Today</em> show, Boney reassured viewers that her departure is not the end of her journey with Nine. Expressing her desire to explore future collaborations with the network, she remains optimistic about the possibilities that lie ahead.</p> <p>As Brooke Boney prepares to embark on her next chapter, her legacy as a trailblazing journalist and cherished presenter continues to inspire. As she bids adieu to the morning show, audiences eagerly await the next chapter in her remarkable journey.</p> <p><em>Images: Nine</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Love-struck elephant goes wild on safari

<p>In the annals of adventure, there are tales of bravery and resilience – and then there are tales of two guys just trying to find a quiet spot for a bathroom break in South Africa.</p> <p>Meet Henry Blom and Taylor Fulmer, the unlikely protagonists of a safari gone haywire. Innocently disembarking from their tour truck for a brief moment of relief in the bush, the pair suddenly found themselves smack dab in the middle of a romantic rampage by none other than a love-stricken bull elephant.</p> <p>As screams echoed through the savannah, Henry and Taylor found themselves in a bizarre game of hide and seek with a pachyderm-sized opponent. "We got off the truck with a bunch of other people to use the bathrooms and then we started hearing screaming," Henry <a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/today/elephant-safari-attack-witnesses-describe-terrifying-moment-wild-animal-charged/451c9dd1-3d90-4112-868c-99e3a8f17019" target="_blank" rel="noopener">recounted on the <em>Today </em>show</a>, probably wishing they had all decided to hold it in a little longer.</p> <p>But it wasn't just any elephant causing the ruckus. No, this was one amorous elephant on a mission – sweating, urinating and emitting more bodily fluids than a broken faucet.</p> <p>As the wild beast charged, Henry and Taylor feared for their lives, imagining scenarios straight out of an action movie where they'd be the unlucky extras squashed beneath a mammoth-sized villain.</p> <p>Yet, amid the chaos, there emerged a hero: the tour guide. While the elephant treated the truck like a chew toy, the guide maintained a Zen-like calm, steering the vehicle with the finesse of a seasoned race car driver dodging obstacles. "We saw the elephant charge and my fear was that it was going to go through the window," Taylor recounted, possibly wondering if he should've packed a spare pair of pants for the trip.</p> <p>As the dust settled and the elephant's romantic pursuit waned, Henry and Taylor breathed a sigh of relief. But their ordeal wasn't over just yet. The guide's sage advice? "Stay quiet and get ready to run."</p> <p>Words of wisdom to live by, especially when you're in the crosshairs of a loved-up elephant.</p> <p>Reflecting on their brush with danger, Henry and Taylor couldn't help but marvel at the surreal experience. "He was so close we could smell him, it was crazy," Henry mused, perhaps understating the olfactory assault they endured.</p> <p>So, the next time you're contemplating a safari adventure, remember Henry and Taylor's tale of bathroom breaks gone wild. Because when nature calls in the wild, you might just find yourself in the midst of an elephant love story – and trust us, it's not as romantic as it sounds.</p> <p>Images: The <em>Today </em>Show</p>

Travel Trouble

Placeholder Content Image

Yes, Kate Middleton’s photo was doctored. But so are a lot of images we see today

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/t-j-thomson-503845">T.J. Thomson</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p>Rumours and conspiracies have been <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/28/style/princess-kate-middleton-health.html">swirling</a> following the abdominal surgery and long recovery period of Catherine, Princess of Wales, earlier this year. They intensified on Monday when Kensington Palace released a photo of the princess with her three children.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C4U_IqTNaqU/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C4U_IqTNaqU/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by The Prince and Princess of Wales (@princeandprincessofwales)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The photo had clear signs of tampering, and international wire services <a href="https://apnews.com/article/kate-princess-photo-surgery-ca91acf667c87c6c70a7838347d6d4fb">withdrew the image</a> amid concerns around manipulation. The princess later <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1767135566645092616">apologised for any confusion</a> and said she had “experimented with editing” as many amateur photographers do.</p> <p>Image editing is extremely common these days, and not all of it is for nefarious purposes. However, in an age of rampant misinformation, how can we stay vigilant around suspicious images?</p> <h2>What happened with the royal photo?</h2> <p>A close look reveals at least eight inconsistencies with the image.</p> <p>Two of these relate to unnatural blur. Catherine’s right hand is unnaturally blurred, even though her left hand is sharp and at the same distance from the camera. The left side of Catherine’s hair is also unnaturally blurred, while the right side of her hair is sharp.</p> <p>These types of edits are usually made with a blur tool that softens pixels. It is often used to make the background of an image less distracting or to smooth rough patches of texture.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=1000&fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=600&h=358&fit=crop&dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=600&h=358&fit=crop&dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=600&h=358&fit=crop&dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&h=450&fit=crop&dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=754&h=450&fit=crop&dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/581145/original/file-20240312-26-rhmkk1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=754&h=450&fit=crop&dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><span class="caption">At least eight logical inconsistencies exist in the doctored image the Prince and Princess of Wales posted on social media.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C4U_IqTNaqU/">Photo by the Prince of Wales/Chart by T.J. Thomson</a></span></figcaption></figure> <p>Five of the edits appear to use the “clone stamp” tool. This is a Photoshop tool that takes part of the same or a different image and “stamps” it onto another part.</p> <p>You can see this with the repeated pattern on Louis’s (on the left) sweater and the tile on the ground. You can also see it with the step behind Louis’s legs and on Charlotte’s hair and sleeve. The zipper on Catherine’s jacket also doesn’t line up.</p> <p>The most charitable interpretation is that the princess was trying to remove distracting or unflattering elements. But the artefacts could also point to multiple images being blended together. This could either be to try to show the best version of each person (for example, with a smiling face and open eyes), or for another purpose.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Like many amateur photographers, I do occasionally experiment with editing. I wanted to express my apologies for any confusion the family photograph we shared yesterday caused. I hope everyone celebrating had a very happy Mother’s Day. C</p> <p>— The Prince and Princess of Wales (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1767135566645092616?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 11, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <h2>How common are image edits?</h2> <p>Image editing is increasingly common as both photography and editing are increasingly becoming more automated.</p> <p>This sometimes happens without you even knowing.</p> <p>Take HDR (high dynamic range) images, for example. Point your iPhone or equivalent at a beautiful sunset and watch it capture the scene from the brightest highlights to the darkest shadows. What happens here is your camera makes multiple images and automatically stitches them together to make an image <a href="https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/photography/hub/guides/what-is-hdr-photography.html">with a wider range of contrast</a>.</p> <p>While face-smoothing or teeth-whitening filters are nothing new, some smartphone camera apps apply them without being prompted. Newer technology like Google’s “Best Take” <a href="https://blog.google/products/photos/how-google-photos-best-take-works/">feature</a> can even combine the best attributes of multiple images to ensure everyone’s eyes are open and faces are smiling in group shots.</p> <p>On social media, it seems everyone tries to show themselves in their best light, which is partially why so few of the photos on our <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15551393.2020.1862663">camera rolls</a> make it onto our social media feeds. It is also why we often edit our photos to show our best sides.</p> <p>But in other contexts, such as press photography, the <a href="https://www.ap.org/about/news-values-and-principles/telling-the-story/visuals">rules are much stricter</a>. The Associated Press, for example, bans all edits beyond simple crops, colour adjustments, and “minor adjustments” that “restore the authentic nature of the photograph”.</p> <p>Professional photojournalists haven’t always gotten it right, though. While the majority of lens-based news workers adhere to ethical guidelines like those published by the <a href="https://nppa.org/resources/code-ethics">National Press Photographers Association</a>, others have let deadline pressures, competition and the desire for exceptional imagery cloud their judgement.</p> <p>One such example was in 2017, when British photojournalist Souvid Datta admitted to <a href="https://time.com/4766312/souvid-datta/">visually plagiarising</a> another photographer’s work within his own composition.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Photographer Souvid Datta appears to have plagiarized Mary Ellen Mark: <a href="https://t.co/iO1Lm8CowU">https://t.co/iO1Lm8CowU</a> <a href="https://t.co/jswHyApGNj">pic.twitter.com/jswHyApGNj</a></p> <p>— PetaPixel (@petapixel) <a href="https://twitter.com/petapixel/status/859824132258537472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 3, 2017</a></p></blockquote> <p>Concerns around false or misleading visual information are at an all-time high, given advances in <a href="https://theconversation.com/nine-was-slammed-for-ai-editing-a-victorian-mps-dress-how-can-news-media-use-ai-responsibly-222382">generative artificial intelligence (AI)</a>. In fact, this year the World Economic Forum named the risk of misinformation and disinformation as the world’s greatest <a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2024/01/ai-disinformation-global-risks/">short-term threat</a>. It placed this above armed conflict and natural disasters.</p> <h2>What to do if you’re unsure about an image you’ve found online</h2> <p>It can be hard to keep up with the more than <a href="https://theconversation.com/3-2-billion-images-and-720-000-hours-of-video-are-shared-online-daily-can-you-sort-real-from-fake-148630">3 billion photos</a> that are shared each day.</p> <p>But, for the ones that matter, we owe it to ourselves to slow down, zoom in and ask ourselves a few simple <a href="https://www.aap.com.au/factcheck-resources/how-we-check-the-facts/">questions</a>:</p> <p>1. Who made or shared the image? This can give clues about reliability and the purpose of making or sharing the image.</p> <p>2. What’s the evidence? Can you find another version of the image, for example, using a <a href="https://tineye.com/">reverse-image search engine</a>?</p> <p>3. What do trusted sources say? Consult resources like <a href="https://www.aap.com.au/factcheck/">AAP FactCheck</a> or <a href="https://factcheck.afp.com/">AFP Fact Check</a> to see if authoritative sources have already weighed in.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/225553/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/t-j-thomson-503845">T.J. Thomson</a>, Senior Lecturer in Visual Communication & Digital Media, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/yes-kate-middletons-photo-was-doctored-but-so-are-a-lot-of-images-we-see-today-225553">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Hero image: The Conversation / X / Instagram</em></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Channel 9 host goes public with new romance

<p>Channel 9 personality Sophie Walsh has gone public with her relationship with Sydney Sixers cricketer Moises Henriques. </p> <p>The Today host confirmed their relationship with an adorable photo of the couple from inside Taylor Swift’s Saturday night blockbuster at Accor Stadium in Sydney.</p> <p>The pair were pictured cuddling up to each other as they posed with Taylor Swift playing in the background. </p> <p><em>News Corp</em> first revealed the pair have quietly been seeing each other recently, with the first signs of their relationship shared on Walsh's Instagram page in January.</p> <p>The couple posed in one of the stadiums with their arms around each other and Walsh captioned it with a simple black heart emoji. </p> <p>Radio and TV presenter Dan Anstey, who was one of the first to comment on the picture at the time, playfully said: "He's a keeper."</p> <p><em>Today Show </em>colleague Jayne Azzopardi wrote: "This makes me happy ❤️ 🏏"</p> <p>"Love this," added Tracy Vo. </p> <p>"Winners are grinners. ❤️" wrote<em> Nine News</em> weather presenter, Belinda Russell.  </p> <p>Henriques, 37, is a popular figure in Australian cricket, having represented Australia in all three formats of the game.</p> <p>He has a a four-year-old son from his former marriage with ex-partner Krista Thomas, who he got married to in 2018. </p> <p>Henriques has not yet shared any photos with Walsh on his own Instagram page.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

Alzheimer’s may have once spread from person to person, but the risk of that happening today is incredibly low

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/steve-macfarlane-4722">Steve Macfarlane</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p>An article published this week in the prestigious journal <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-023-02729-2">Nature Medicine</a> documents what is believed to be the first evidence that Alzheimer’s disease can be transmitted from person to person.</p> <p>The finding arose from long-term follow up of patients who received human growth hormone (hGH) that was taken from brain tissue of deceased donors.</p> <p>Preparations of donated hGH were used in medicine to treat a variety of conditions from 1959 onwards – including in Australia from the mid 60s.</p> <p>The practice stopped in 1985 when it was discovered around 200 patients worldwide who had received these donations went on to develop <a href="https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/creutzfeldt-jakob-disease-cjd/">Creuztfeldt-Jakob disease</a> (CJD), which causes a rapidly progressive dementia. This is an otherwise extremely rare condition, affecting roughly one person in a million.</p> <h2>What’s CJD got to do with Alzehimer’s?</h2> <p>CJD is caused by prions: infective particles that are neither bacterial or viral, but consist of abnormally folded proteins that can be transmitted from cell to cell.</p> <p>Other prion diseases include kuru, a dementia seen in New Guinea tribespeople caused by eating human tissue, scrapie (a disease of sheep) and variant CJD or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, otherwise known as mad cow disease. This raised <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_BSE_outbreak">public health concerns</a> over the eating of beef products in the United Kingdom in the 1980s.</p> <h2>Human growth hormone used to come from donated organs</h2> <p>Human growth hormone (hGH) is produced in the brain by the pituitary gland. Treatments were originally prepared from purified human pituitary tissue.</p> <p>But because the amount of hGH contained in a single gland is extremely small, any single dose given to any one patient could contain material from around <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000563.htm">16,000 donated glands</a>.</p> <p>An average course of hGH treatment lasts around four years, so the chances of receiving contaminated material – even for a very rare condition such as CJD – became quite high for such people.</p> <p>hGH is now manufactured synthetically in a laboratory, rather than from human tissue. So this particular mode of CJD transmission is no longer a risk.</p> <h2>What are the latest findings about Alzheimer’s disease?</h2> <p>The Nature Medicine paper provides the first evidence that transmission of Alzheimer’s disease can occur via human-to-human transmission.</p> <p>The authors examined the outcomes of people who received donated hGH until 1985. They found five such recipients had developed early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>They considered other explanations for the findings but concluded donated hGH was the likely cause.</p> <p>Given Alzheimer’s disease is a much more common illness than CJD, the authors presume those who received donated hGH before 1985 may be at higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>Alzheimer’s disease is caused by presence of two abnormally folded proteins: amyloid and tau. There is <a href="https://actaneurocomms.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40478-017-0488-7">increasing evidence</a> these proteins spread in the brain in a <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8086126/">similar way to prion diseases</a>. So the mode of transmission the authors propose is certainly plausible.</p> <p>However, given the amyloid protein deposits in the brain <a href="https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/estimates-amyloid-onset-may-predict-alzheimers-progression">at least 20 years</a> before clinical Alzheimer’s disease develops, there is likely to be a considerable time lag before cases that might arise from the receipt of donated hGH become evident.</p> <h2>When was this process used in Australia?</h2> <p>In Australia, donated pituitary material <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2022/07/the-cjd-review-final-report.pdf">was used</a> from 1967 to 1985 to treat people with short stature and infertility.</p> <p><a href="https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2022/07/the-cjd-review-final-report.pdf">More than 2,000 people</a> received such treatment. Four developed CJD, the last case identified in 1991. All four cases were likely linked to a single contaminated batch.</p> <p>The risks of any other cases of CJD developing now in pituitary material recipients, so long after the occurrence of the last identified case in Australia, are <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2010/193/6/iatrogenic-creutzfeldt-jakob-disease-australia-time-amend-infection-control">considered to be</a> incredibly small.</p> <p>Early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (defined as occurring before the age of 65) is uncommon, accounting for <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356853/">around 5%</a> of all cases. Below the age of 50 it’s rare and likely to have a genetic contribution.</p> <h2>The risk is very low – and you can’t ‘catch’ it like a virus</h2> <p>The Nature Medicine paper identified five cases which were diagnosed in people aged 38 to 55. This is more than could be expected by chance, but still very low in comparison to the total number of patients treated worldwide.</p> <p>Although the long “incubation period” of Alzheimer’s disease may mean more similar cases may be identified in the future, the absolute risk remains very low. The main scientific interest of the article lies in the fact it’s first to demonstrate that Alzheimer’s disease can be transmitted from person to person in a similar way to prion diseases, rather than in any public health risk.</p> <p>The authors were keen to emphasise, as I will, that Alzheimer’s cannot be contracted via contact with or providing care to people with Alzheimer’s disease.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/222374/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/steve-macfarlane-4722"><em>Steve Macfarlane</em></a><em>, Head of Clinical Services, Dementia Support Australia, &amp; Associate Professor of Psychiatry, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/alzheimers-may-have-once-spread-from-person-to-person-but-the-risk-of-that-happening-today-is-incredibly-low-222374">original article</a>.</em></p>

Mind

Placeholder Content Image

Woolies boss grilled for scrapping Aus Day merch

<p>Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci has shared the reason why the retailer chose to drop Australia Day merchandise. </p> <p>The supermarket giant copped some <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/woolworths-under-fire-for-dropping-australia-day-merch" target="_blank" rel="noopener">backlash </a>after they announced that they would stop selling the merch, with even opposition leader Peter Dutton calling for a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/peter-dutton-calls-for-woolworths-boycott" target="_blank" rel="noopener">boycott</a> for their decision. </p> <p>They have since issued a full-page advertisement insisting the supermarket giant is not anti-Australia Day, which Banducci was grilled for in his latest appearance on the <em>Today</em> show. </p> <p>“We aren’t trying to ‘cancel’ Australia Day, rather Woolworths is deeply proud of our place in providing the fresh food that brings Australians together every day,” Banducci wrote in the letter. </p> <p>“So you’re not anti Australia today as a company?”<em> </em><em>Today</em> show host Karl Stefanovic asked in reference to the letter. </p> <p>“Karl, we are a very proud Australian company. We’ve been around for 100 years.</p> <p>"We have 178,000 hard working team members who are going to be in store doing the right thing for our customers on Australia Day, and we’re passionate about this country,” the Woolworths chief executive replied. </p> <p>“But you’re not anti Australia Day?” Stefanovic asked again.</p> <p>Banducci replied saying that the day “means different things to everyone” and that he supports Aussies to commemorate the day in whatever way they wish. </p> <p>He added that while customers won't be able to buy Australia Day merch at their stores, they will decorate their stores across the country in “green and gold” to commemorate the day. </p> <p>“You must have serious regrets about this?” Stefanovic grilled. </p> <p>“I think we could clearly have done a better job of explaining our decision, that’s why I’m here,” Banducci replied.</p> <p>“I do feel anxious about the impact that this is having on our team. They are proud, hard working Australians, and for them to be seen as anti-Australian or woke is fundamentally unfair.”</p> <p>He added that this decision was made 12 months ago when they found that there was “gradual decline” in demand for the merchandise. </p> <p><em>Images: Today</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

The path to better hearing, today

<p>In 1902, Princess Alexandra of Denmark, who would very soon become Queen Consort of the United Kingdom alongside King Edward VII, found herself enraptured by a fascinating new device that was fast becoming the talk of Europe.</p> <p>The young princess had been fitted with one of the world’s first portable electric hearing aids, and it proved to be a life-changing success.</p> <p>Back in Denmark, the impact of this event became a clarion call to one Hans Demant, a bicycle manufacturer and purveyor of sewing machines. His wife, Camilla, also suffered from severe hearing loss and so, after a determined journey to London, Hans returned with a precious electric “Acousticon”.</p> <p>Witnessing Camilla’s progress served as a source of inspiration for Hans to extend his assistance to a broader community of individuals suffering with hearing loss, and so he initiated the import of hearing devices from America. In 1904, Hans Demant founded the company that would later become known as <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/">Oticon</a>, a name now synonymous with cutting-edge hearing solutions, paving the way for the modern hearing aids we know today and bringing new-found joy to millions worldwide.</p> <h3>Hearing health</h3> <p>Hearing health is a such critical aspect of our overall well-being, yet it often goes overlooked until problems arise. In New Zealand, hearing issues affect a surprisingly large portion of the population, with a 2022 EHIMA report estimating as many as one in ten New Zealanders are living with hearing loss. Sadly, a lack of awareness can lead to irregular hear- ing check-ups, which in turn leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment.</p> <h3><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50616" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/miniRITE_R_H1-2023_RightLeft_C090ChromaBeige_LEDgreen_Speaker60_OpenBassDome_500pctSize_w_shadow_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="642" /></h3> <h3>A new world of sounds</h3> <p>A far cry from the bulky hearing aids of over a century ago that were hailed as a miracle in the press and transformed Queen Alexandra’s life, the pinnacle of today’s devices – such as <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/hearing-aid-users/hearing-aids/products/real" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Oticon Real™ hearing aids</a> – continue to change the way we experience the world of sound.</p> <p>With their advanced processing capabilities and state-of-the-art technology, Oticon Real can help get back the real sounds of life, precise and optimally balanced, whether it’s the laughter of grandchildren, musical notes or simply the rustling of leaves in the wind.</p> <p>One of the standout features of Oticon Real hearing aids is a unique technology called Deep Neural Network (DNN). This built-in intelligence has learned to recognise all types of sounds, their details, and how they should ideally sound. This means they can instantly adapt to changes, keeping you at your best wherever life takes you.</p> <p>By analysing and adjusting to your environment, Oticon Real hearing aids ensure that they provide what you need to hear. They do this by reducing background noise, which can help enhance speech comprehension and allow you to engage effortlessly in conversations, even in noisy settings.</p> <h3>Connection is key</h3> <p>In today’s digital age, connectivity is paramount, and Oticon Real hearing aids certainly rise to the challenge, offering seamless connectivity to compatible* smartphones and other Bluetooth-enabled devices. You can effortlessly stream phone calls, music and other audio directly to your hearing aids, vastly enhancing your listening experience.</p> <h3><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50617" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/Oticon_Real_Still_Life_miniRITE_R_Wallet_JBS_24873_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="863" /></h3> <h3>Improved quality of life</h3> <p>Perhaps the most significant benefit of Oticon Real hearing aids is their positive impact on your quality of life. Improved hearing can lead to increased social engagement, better relationships and enhanced overall well-being. With the help of Oticon Real, you can participate more actively in social gatherings, make the most of your favourite activities and feel more connected to the world around you.</p> <p>Oticon Real hearing aids aren’t just devices; they are a life-changing gift that allow you to reconnect with the sounds and people you love. No longer are they fit just for a queen; they are readily available to anyone with the need and the longing to be truly present for life’s most cherished moments.</p> <p><em>For more information and to find your nearest hearing clinic, visit <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">oticon.co.nz</a></em></p> <p><em>*For information on hearing aid and device compatibility, visit <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/compatibility" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.oticon.co.nz/compatibility</a></em></p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50618" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/Oticon_Real_miniRITE_R_9_colors_lineup_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="125" /></p> <p><em>All images: Supplied.</em></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with Oticon.</em></p>

Hearing

Placeholder Content Image

Today Show reporter welcomes her first baby

<p><em>Today</em> show star Gabrielle Boyle has shared the exciting news of the birth of her first child. </p> <p>The Channel Nine reporter announced the arrival of her son, who she welcomed with her husband Ian Hardy, to her Instagram followers on Tuesday, </p> <p>Boyle shared an adorable snap of her cuddling with her son, as she announced his very traditional name: William Theodore Hardy. </p> <p>In the happy snaps, Gabby and Ian looked every inch the proud new parents as they showed off their bundle of joy.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CyvNySkPj-1/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CyvNySkPj-1/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Gabrielle Boyle (@gabrielleboyle)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"William Theodore Hardy. Our Billy boy. 20-10-23. 3.1kg," the new mum captioned her first post of the smiling bub.</p> <p>She then shared several more photos just moments later, which showed her cuddling up with William in the hospital bed before Ian gave him his first bottle feed. </p> <p>On Tuesday morning, just hours after Gabby and Ian's happy announcement, the <em>Today</em> show shared its own post to Instagram congratulating the pair. </p> <p>"Congratulations to our reporter Gabby Boyle and her husband Ian who have welcomed to the world a beautiful baby boy," the caption read. </p> <p>Gabby's famous friends and colleagues flocked to the comments to share their congratulations for the new parents. </p> <p><em>A Current Affair</em> host Allison Langdon wrote, "He is perfection, babe. Well done guys. Hope you're feeling ok. That smile xx."</p> <p><em>Studio 10</em> host Angela Bishop said, "Congratulations and welcome Billy! What a smile!", while Nine News Perth reporter Tracy Vo added, "Beautiful! Hello, Billy. Congratulations, gorgeous."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

Today hosts left shocked by cheeky schoolboy’s outrageous joke

<p dir="ltr">Hosts of the <em>Today</em> show have been left stunned after a schoolboy shared a controversial yet hilarious joke. </p> <p dir="ltr">Karl Stefanovic and Sarah Abo were joined by a young schoolboy via video link, who began sharing the joke with the hosts. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to the <em>Daily Mail</em>, producers said the hilarious moment was unplanned, and said they had no idea what the boy was going to say ahead of time. </p> <p dir="ltr">The boy began asking, “A vegan and a vegetarian are jumping off a cliff to see who will hit the bottom first. Who wins?”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I don't know,” Stefanovic said. “Who wins?” asked Abo.</p> <p dir="ltr">The boy didn't miss a beat as he replied, “Society!”</p> <div class="embed" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; width: 600px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7267995120258141441&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40theaussieadventurer%2Fvideo%2F7267995120258141441%3Fq%3Dtoday%2520show%2520vegan%2520joke%26t%3D1695171318241&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2FoUAkOjqzRACIARpSgEe33GQnZbfo0xRDBEBXdI%3Fx-expires%3D1695344400%26x-signature%3DY%252BsEt%252Fz731TG0f%252FPGvqYG%252F7TqN0%253D&amp;key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p dir="ltr">The hosts doubled over in laughter as they couldn’t hide their shock at the grim punchline, while Karl was so tickled by the joke that he fell off the couch. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We weren't expecting that!” Abo said, laughing nervously.</p> <p dir="ltr">The candid moment has since gone viral on TikTok, racking up tens of thousands of views from both around Australia and around the world. </p> <p dir="ltr">The clip made waves in the US, as TikTok users remarked that such a moment could never happen on strait-laced American TV.</p> <p dir="ltr">Introducing the video in a viral TikTok, American commentator Benny Johnson called it 'the single greatest moment in television history'.</p> <p dir="ltr">One US viewer commented, “That kid's got more wit and humour than a lot of comedians today.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another added, “I'm not even this kid's dad, and he still made me proud!”, while a third person remarked, “That kid just won the internet.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Many vegans and vegetarians were even forced to admit that, despite being the butt of the joke, the young man's comic timing was exemplary.</p> <p dir="ltr">“As a vegetarian, I laughed my arse off,” one wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: TikTok</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

It was written for nuclear disarmament – but today You’re The Voice is the perfect song for the ‘yes’ campaign

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-tregear-825">Peter Tregear</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p>The serendipity of the pairing between John Farnham’s 1986 hit single You’re the Voice and the Voice to Parliament referendum is obvious, but it goes well beyond the fact the two share the key word “voice”.</p> <p>The original was composed by a team of British songwriters in response to an anti-nuclear demonstration in London’s Hyde Park in 1985. Chris Thompson, Andy Qunta and Maggie Ryder had planned a song-writing session on the day an <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1985/10/27/world/100000-in-london-protest-arms-race.html">estimated 100,000 marched through central London</a> in support the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.</p> <p>Thompson, however, overslept. As an act of self-admonishment he decided to express his remorse by conceiving a song that emphasised the importance of personal agency in achieving political change.</p> <p>This is the kernel of meaning in You’re the Voice. It is also what makes it so especially well suited to support a campaign about a referendum to give Indigenous Australians a constitutionally recognised Voice to Parliament nearly 40 years later.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">OUR NEW AD IS LIVE!</p> <p>You’re the Voice that will make history.</p> <p>On 14 October, we know we all can stand together with the power to be powerful.<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HistoryIsCalling?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HistoryIsCalling</a>, so <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/VoteYes?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#VoteYes</a>. Are you in? John Farnham is.<br /><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/UluruStatement?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#UluruStatement</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/StayTrue2Uluru?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#StayTrue2Uluru</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YoureTheVoice?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#YoureTheVoice</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/VoteYes?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#VoteYes</a> <a href="https://t.co/4ujYd9gk0M">pic.twitter.com/4ujYd9gk0M</a></p> <p>— ulurustatement (@ulurustatement) <a href="https://twitter.com/ulurustatement/status/1698260272165875951?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 3, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <h2>The grain of Farnham’s voice</h2> <p>Thompson was not at all convinced at the time Farnham <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/music/why-john-farnham-was-nearly-rockblocked-from-youre-the-voice/news-story/9e048f2d4550a8b4c1a28e2eba4909f6">could do the song justice</a> when he requested it for inclusion in his album Whispering Jack.</p> <p>And yet the particular qualities of Farnham’s singing is also arguably crucial to the song’s success, then and now.</p> <p>The music’s combination of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sentimental_ballad#Power_ballads">power ballad</a> tempo with <a href="https://music.amazon.com.au/playlists/B078H6J6BF">pub anthem</a> singability calls for a kind of full-throated vocal performance that takes more than a little inspiration from African American gospel traditions.</p> <p>Singers drawn from these traditions include giants of popular musical culture like James Brown, Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin. It is not exaggerated praise to suggest Farnham here delivers a performance that stands with their best.</p> <p>And it was career changing for him, helping Farnham to put to rest his earlier image as a clean-cut purveyor of sentimental pop songs like <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0c55lXRAeg">Sadie the Cleaning Lady</a> and relaunch his career.</p> <p>Farnham’s singing here exemplifies what Roland Barthes famously described in <a href="https://courses.lsa.umich.edu/jptw/wp-content/uploads/sites/23/2017/08/Barthes-ImageMusicText.pdf">an essay from 1972</a> as the “grain of the voice”: the element of a singer’s individuality which helps convey the sincerity and authenticity of what is being sung.</p> <p>You’re the Voice further highlights the grain of Farnham’s singing via the exclamation “oh, whoa!” regularly punctuating the song’s chorus. In a powerful moment of sonic symbolism, the exclamation is eventually taken up in the advertisement (like the sentiment of the song itself, it is no doubt hoped) by a chorus of supporters.</p> <h2><em>You</em> are the voice</h2> <p>Indeed, if it is to succeed, the referendum will need to convince an especially broad coalition of Australians to vote for “yes”.</p> <p>The song supports this goal from its very title: <em>you</em> are the voice. It asks each of us, individually, to consider how we can act for the common good.</p> <blockquote> <p>We have the chance to turn the pages over <br />We can write what we want to write <br />We gotta make ends meet, before we get much older.</p> </blockquote> <p>The song’s explicit call to action has now been connected to the forthcoming referendum: now is the moment to use your voice at the ballot box to give, in turn, a constitutionally enshrined voice to indigenous Australians.</p> <p>The “yes” campaign’s appeal to collective responsibility is one aspect of the referendum process that <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/aug/16/lidia-thorpe-calls-for-referendum-called-off-indigenous-voice-to-parliament-no-campaign">concerns some Indigenous critics</a>. The very enterprise of constitutional reform, after all, presumes the legitimacy of the Australian constitution which in turn presumes the legitimacy of the original act of colonial dispossession.</p> <p>But the bigger threat to the “yes” campaign arguably comes from those who see the idea of an <a href="https://ipa.org.au/ipa-today/the-indigenous-voice-to-parliament-has-the-potential-to-be-divisive">Indigenous voice to parliament itself as divisive</a>.</p> <p>Yet, as the song goes:</p> <blockquote> <p>This time, we know we all can stand together <br />With the power to be powerful <br />Believing we can make it better.</p> </blockquote> <p>The use of You’re the Voice here reinforces the view that supporting the Voice to Parliament is a positive act of national reconciliation that we, as a nation, can take together.</p> <p>It is an injunction to take personal and collective responsibility for the history and character of the country we all share.</p> <h2>Politically inclusive</h2> <p>The advertisement is the work of Mark Green of <a href="https://themonkeys.com.au/">The Monkeys advertising agency</a> and historian <a href="https://www.clarewright.com.au/">Clare Wright</a>.</p> <p>It focuses on a family as they watch key moments which shaped Australia’s collective identity. It looks at key moments of reconciliation, Indigenous achievement and Indigenous protest; but also broader moments in collective action.</p> <p>In a particularly astute move, the advertisement overlays images of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jan/01/john-howard-port-arthur-gun-control-1996-cabinet-papers">John Howard’s 1996 gun reforms</a> in the wake of the Port Arthur massacre as Farnham delivers the lines:</p> <blockquote> <p>We’re all someone’s daughter<br />We’re all someone’s son<br />How long can we look at each other<br />Down the barrel of a gun?</p> </blockquote> <p>Implicit in this conjunction is a reminder to us that support for the “yes” vote, like any nation-changing political act, can come from any side of politics.</p> <h2>Democratising the message</h2> <p>There are many more layers we could tease apart in You’re The Voice. Its extended bagpipes solo originated as an homage to AC/DC singer Bon Scott, connecting it to the egalitarian, <a href="https://www.popmatters.com/141796-let-there-be-rock-2496022409.html">working class culture</a> Scott’s music addresses.</p> <p>Then there is the way the bagpipes, combined with the song’s use of side-drum rhythmic patterns, evoke the sound world of a military tattoo or march. This simultaneously elevates the register of its message. The song – and now the ad – is an implicit call to arms.</p> <p>The inclusion of You’re the Voice in the “yes” campaign thus provides powerful support for its central message.</p> <p>Farnham himself recognises this. Upon release of the advertisement, Farnham <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/john-farnham-backs-voice-permits-his-anthem-to-front-yes-campaign-ad-20230901-p5e18t.html">spoke about</a> how, when it was first released in 1986, the song “changed his life”.</p> <p>Generously, he concluded: "I can only hope that now it might help in some small way, to change the lives of our First Nations Peoples for the better."</p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-tregear-825">Peter Tregear</a>, Principal Fellow and Professor of Music, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/it-was-written-for-nuclear-disarmament-but-today-youre-the-voice-is-the-perfect-song-for-the-yes-campaign-212769">original article</a>.</em></p>

Music

Placeholder Content Image

"I can't answer that!": Karl's cheeky question stumps JFK's daughter

<p><em>Today</em> show host Karl Stefanovic left the US ambassador to Australia Caroline Kennedy - John F Kennedy's daughter - in fits of laughter after he posed a cheeky personal question on Wednesday morning. </p> <p>Stefanovic didn't miss the opportunity to play cupid for his daughter by asking the US Ambassador about the relationship status of her youngest son, Jack Schlossberg. </p> <p>“I hope that you don’t take any offence (to) what I am going to ask. My daughter wanted to know if your son is single?” he said. </p> <p>This elicited a laugh from the ambassador, who smoothly deflected the question by saying: “You would have to ask him. I can’t answer that.” </p> <p>Stefanovic laughed and said:  “Good deflection.” </p> <p>The ambassador played along and said: “Your daughter must be so mad at you right now. I would be so mad if I was your daughter.”</p> <p>The<em> Today </em>show host has two daughters, Ava, 18 and Harper, 3, and continued the joke by saying he was asking on behalf of Harper. </p> <p>“Then there is something really wrong with you,” the ambassador quipped. </p> <p>Stefanovic's co-host Sarah Abo joined in on the teasing and said: “Welcome to what the rest of the nation already knows.”</p> <p>Schlossberg, 30, is the only grandson of former US president John F. Kennedy, and has a considerable social media following with over 100,000 followers on Instagram. </p> <p>Besides his dashing looks, the 30-year-old also graduated with a law degree from the prestigious Harvard Law School. </p> <p><em>Images: Today Show/ News.com.au/ Getty/ Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

Karl's mum steals the show on Today

<p>Karl Stefanovic's mum has stolen the show on <em>Today</em> after she called in to offer some health advice. </p> <p>The <em>Today</em> panel were discussing tick bites on Friday morning, consulting Dr Nick Coatsworth earlier in the show about how to remove them, with the doctor saying you must remove the tick around the head, as well as any pincers to reduce the risk of reactions and inflammation.</p> <p>After consulting Dr Coatsworth, Karl's mum Jenny joined the conversation via video link to ask some advice from a parents point of view. </p> <p>"So, let's go to Dr J now, AKA my mum, Jenny from the block," Karl joked before introducing his mum on the show.</p> <p>"I had a big argument with you at the start of the year about all this, when I pulled a tick out of a cousin and you got very cranky at me, so what is your solution?"</p> <p>"I got cranky, because you didn't know if it was a tick and I saw it and said it was a tick and my suggestion is, if you can't get it out right from the head, like Nick the doctor [said], you need to go to the doctor and get it all out," she said.</p> <p>"I said if you leave the head in it can cause infections and you can get all those sort of weird tick diseases these days."</p> <p>"Jenny knows what she's talking about," Today co-host Sarah Abo said.</p> <p>"Before we go Dr J, where do you think you went wrong with me as a parent?" Karl questioned his mum as his co-hosts giggled.</p> <p>"Did you leave a tick inside your own son, Jenny?" Sarah joked.</p> <p>"We got them," Karl quipped as his mum added that he didn't get too many.</p> <p>Jenny added that you need to put some alcohol on the area where the tick was after pulling it out at the head, with Karl joking, "And that's where my love of alcohol came from!"</p> <p>"It all makes sense now," Sarah added.</p> <p>Karl's sister-in-law and co-host of <em>Today Extra</em> Sylvia Jeffreys said with a laugh, "The best part of that was the way she very carefully dodged that question about where it all went wrong, Karl!"</p> <p>"And thanks for revisiting that one, Sylvie," he responded.</p> <p>"Couldn't help it!" she quipped.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Today</em></p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

Sarah Abo reveals what it’s actually like to work with Karl Stefanovic

<p>Sarah Abo has opened up on what it's really like to work alongside Karl Stefanovic. </p> <p>The veteran breakfast show presenter has a personality and voice that's larger than life, so being able to match his energy has become one of Abo's talents after six months of being a co-host for the <em>Today Show. </em></p> <p>The 37-year-old presenter only had good things to say about Stefanovic. </p> <p>"One thing I will tell you is Karl is an incredible person, an incredible broadcaster," she said.</p> <p>"That mind of his, it does not stop - I don't know when he finds time to sleep, he's always thinking about the next thing," she added. </p> <p>She praised her co-hosts ability to understand the core of a story, no matter how complex it is, share it with the viewers in a way that is easy to digest. </p> <p>"That's something that comes through in all the stories we cover," she said.  </p> <p>"It is incredible to sit alongside somebody who is so experienced and so supportive of me as well, as I'm learning and finding my feet and work my way through this crazy world that is breakfast television.</p> <p>"I couldn't ask for a better partner working alongside me," she praised her senior. </p> <p>Her one minor complaint is that Stefanovic's quirky sense of humour can be hard to understand</p> <p>Although she remains a good sport and pretends to laugh at them. </p> <p>"I mean sometimes I've gotta pretend to like his jokes which can be a bit awkward, but hey - I know how to laugh," she chuckled.</p> <p><em>Image: Today Show </em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

“Done with the vaccine”: Karl Stefanovic blasts fifth booster

<p>Karl Stefanovic has once again sparked controversy after declaring he is “done with the vaccine.”</p> <p>Karl shocked viewers after expressing concerns that the jab could cause “heart issues” as the Australian Technical Advisory Group (ATAGI) updated its vaccine recommendations. </p> <p>According to the ATAGI, as of February 20, anyone aged 18 and over who has not had the COVID vaccine or has not contracted the virus in the past six months will be eligible to get another shot - opening up a fourth dose for Aussies aged 19-29 and a fifth dose for those 65 and over. </p> <p>“As you know, I am not a glowing ambassador for more than two shots,” Stefanovic said.</p> <p>The Today show host then questioned whether another dose would be able to fight new strains of the virus, stating he is aware of people “over the age of 60 who are still incredibly nervous about getting it."</p> <p>“The other thing that I am concerned about, if I have another dose, is that I may get complications,” he said. </p> <p>The host’s guest, medical expert Dr Nick Coatsway insisted Australians aged 60 and over “needn’t be” scared of the jab but added that the conceded boosters are only a temporary solution.</p> <p>“Let’s understand the science, if you get a fifth dose your protection is enhanced for around about 8-12 weeks and then it returns after the fourth dose or the third dose,” Dr Coatsworth said.</p> <p>The ATAGI has again emphasised the importance of Aussies who are already eligible, including people over 65, to get their booster in 2023 as they remain at high risk of severe disease and death from COVID. </p> <p>Currently, there is no additional booster available to those 18 and below, with the exception of children aged 5-17 who are at high risk of developing a severe illness.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

“Enough is enough”: Karl's crime wave plea after family targeted

<p>A number of Aussies are resorting to hiring their own private security to watch over their properties while they sleep as the country faces a major crime wave.</p> <p>Within 24 hours, a teenager was stabbed to death in Melbourne’s northwest and three young offenders have been charged over Facebook Marketplace robberies in Queensland.</p> <p>As the crime problem continues to worsen, <em>Today</em> co-host Karl Stefanovic revealed his own family have been targeted.</p> <p>“Enough is enough,” he demanded.</p> <p>"This has happened to me, it's happened to my family, I've had kids come to my house, doing things and I've got them on tape," a disgruntled Stefanovic continued.</p> <p>"It is only relatively minor offences, but if it is getting to that level for me, it is getting to that level across the country - we keep having to talk about it, keeping saying we've got to do something about it and nothing happens.”</p> <p>Stefanovic also emphasised the colossal impact these targeted attacks have on families, regardless of whether it’s a home invasion, car theft or robbery on the street.</p> <p>“Whenever the crime comes to their doorstep, whenever someone breaks into their car, whenever something happens that's close to home, it has a tremendous psychological impact,” he said.</p> <p>He agreed with authorities discouraging vigilante activities as a solution, however, noted that the problem is only getting worse.</p> <p>"That's my big concern, that's the big concern for a lot of authorities in various states," he said.</p> <p>"I don't understand how authorities can't see how significant an impact this is having on the day-to-day life of people, law-abiding citizens at home.</p> <p>"It's not stopping and that's the problem."</p> <p><em>Image credit: 9News / Today</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

4 things you can do today to improve bone strength

<p><em><strong>Dr Vincent is a world-renowned clinical nutritionist, food scientist and expert on antioxidants.</strong></em></p> <p>Bone health is an extremely important issue. While bones make up on average only 15 per cent of human body weight, they are the frame that supports our body. For people 60 and over, this is especially important because age-related bone loss is progressive and can lead to osteoporosis.</p> <p>As we get older, our bones tend to lose their strength, structure and density. The good news is there are lots of things we can do to slow this process and avoid osteoporosis.</p> <p>The issue of bone health has gained a lot of interest in recent years because we are all living longer but moving around less. The key to staying healthy is to keep moving. </p> <p>There are several causes and conditions that can result in bone density loss and/or osteoporosis.  This is why it is so important to discuss these issues with your health practitioners.</p> <p>The main causes include:</p> <ul> <li>Inactivity</li> <li>Aging</li> <li>Hormonal imbalances</li> <li>Certain use medications or chemicals such as steroids</li> <li>Emotional stress</li> <li>Nutritional deficiencies including bone building compounds such as vitamin D and calcium.</li> </ul> <p>It is never too late to give the much-needed attention to our bones, regardless of what age we are.</p> <p>Here are four things you can do to support your bone health.</p> <p><strong>1. Reduce your risk of falling</strong></p> <p>This may sound simple, but it is a crucial thing. One out of five falls causes a serious injury and more than 95 per cent of hip fractures are caused by falling.</p> <p>In older people, reducing risks of falling can be as easy as having your eyes checked. Having an annual eye check ensures that your eyeglasses are in line with your eye conditions.</p> <p>Older people tend to spend more time at home enjoying their familiar surrounds.  Making sure your home is a safe environment is critical.</p> <p>Getting rid of things you could trip over, adding grab bars inside and outside your tub or shower and next to the toilet, putting stable railings on both sides of stairs and making sure your home has lots of light are among the things you can do to increase the safety of your home.</p> <p><strong>2. Staying active and exercise</strong></p> <p>Exercise is vital at every age for healthy bones. It is so beneficial that it helps to prevent and treat osteoporosis. Being living tissues, bones respond to exercise by becoming stronger and more diverse exercise allows us to maintain muscle strength, coordination and balance which in turn helps to reduce the risk of falling.</p> <p>The best bone exercise is weight bearing or resistance training, basically exercises that force you to work against gravity. Examples include weight training, walking, hiking, tennis and even dancing!</p> <p>Simple activities such as gardening, walking the dog and cleaning are also great ways to remain active and exercise our bones.</p> <p>Remember it is important to always consult health or fitness professionals before starting a new exercise routine.</p> <p><strong>3. Healthy diet</strong></p> <p>Fresh food is the best source of our nutritional needs.</p> <p>Dairy, raw cultured dairy (kefir and yogurt), green leafy vegetables, wild caught fish are rich in calcium, magnesium, vitamin K, phosphorus, omega 3 essential fatty acid – all of which are vital for bone health.</p> <p>Having a healthy dose of sunshine also helps to boost the synthesis of vitamin D in our body, but always be cautious with excessive UV exposure.</p> <p>Some of us may need or prefer to take supplements to fulfil these nutritional needs. As the scientist who discovered the world's first breakthrough to extract activated phenolics from produce using only water, I do recommend taking activated phenolics on a daily basis to help to support our general health and wellbeing.</p> <p>On the contrary, excessive intake alcohol, sugar, caffeine and processed meat could be detrimental for our bone health.</p> <p><strong>4. Healthy mind</strong></p> <p>It goes without saying that a healthy mind helps to build a healthy body. We know that stress is one of the causes of bone density loss. Stress can cause hormonal imbalance, poor nutrients absorption and lack of physical activity. Stop worrying about the little things and focus on the important things.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Channel Nine addresses rumours of "tension" on Today set

<p>Channel Nine has addressed rumours of tension and anxiety on the set of <em>Today</em>, with the relationship between hosts Karl Stefanovic and Sarah Abo reportedly being strained. </p> <p>According to reports to <a href="https://www.newidea.com.au" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>New Idea</em></a>, Stefanovic and Abo have been at odds over a reported $700,000 pay gap, with Karl reportedly earning $1.5million a year for his hosting duties while Abo brings home $800,000 a year.</p> <p>Despite the rumours of "tension" over the six-figure pay gap, Nine's director of morning television Steven Burling told <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/morning-shows/channel-9-denies-salary-leak-is-causing-tension-on-today-show/news-story/ecb1489015c2b038fd968652e9e0a6b8" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer noopener">news.com.au</a></em> that the rumours are "not even remotely correct".</p> <p>"The salary figures for our network talent published last week in various outlets were not even remotely correct. Anyone who watches <em>Today</em> can confirm there's absolutely no tension on set," Mr Burling said.</p> <p>"We couldn't be happier with our talented line-up of Karl, Sarah, Brooke, Alex and Tim who are working well and having a great time - end of story."</p> <p>The statement comes after <em>New Idea</em> spoke to a source allegedly close to the show, who said the news of the pay gap was "anxiety inducing" for new host Sarah, who took over from Ally Langdon in January. </p> <p>"The news of Karl's big pay cheque is anxiety inducing to say the least... Some are wondering why she isn't being more equally matched with Karl," a source allegedly said.</p> <p>"If you were Sarah would you stay and put on a smile every day knowing full well you're being paid so much less than your male counterpart for doing the same job? I can imagine she's likely disappointed."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Today</em></p>

TV

Our Partners