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Better Homes and Gardens star's dream rural property up for grabs

<p><em>Better Homes and Gardens </em>star Charlie Albone and his wife interior designer Juliet Love, have listed their dream Ourimbah home. </p> <p>The 2.07ha property located on the Central Coast has been listed by McGrath Gosford agents Peter Morris and Nate Waters with a $3m to $3.2m price guidance.</p> <p>The four-bedroom, three-bathroom home sits deep behind a gated entry, which ensures privacy and is surrounded by plenty of greenery with its garden alcoves, a stunning wisteria-covered arbour, fruit trees, and a few garden beds for vegetables. </p> <p>There is also a feature dry-stone wall fire pit built by Scottish stonemason Callum Grey, that's perfect for winter and colder nights.</p> <p>The English cottage-style home  comes with a separate self-contained unit that includes a bedroom and kitchenette. </p> <p>The home is every animal lovers' dream with five paddocks that come with animal shelters, plumbed water troughs and a three-stall stable. </p> <p>For those hot summer days, whoever the new owners are can dip into the saltwater pool located on the property. </p> <p>The property is equipped with 100,000-litre tanks and has town water. </p> <p>Albone and his family bought the property in 2012 for $840,000 which means that if it was sold at the price guide then it's almost four times the original price they bought it at. </p> <p>The top acreage sale at Ourimbah currently sits at $3,725,000 for a 13.93ha Dog Trap Rd six-bedroom house, which sold in 2021.</p> <p><em>Images: news.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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Former home of Kylie Minogue and Michael Hutchence for sale

<p>The stunning Sydney apartment that Michael Hutchence and Kylie Minogue shared for two years has hit the market. </p> <p>The late INXS frontman and the Aussie pop princess lived in the Liverpool Street apartment from 1989 to 1991, with the building boasting a colourful history. </p> <p>The current owner and director of AusMed Innovations Gavin Holland, who owns the Longevity Lounge in Double Bay, believes the picturesque apartment overlooking Hyde Park and the harbour was the scene of some wild parties.</p> <p>“I know that back in those days there was a lot of socialising that went on, for want of a better word,” says Holland.</p> <p>“In this building, there’ve been suicides, murders, famous and infamous people — all sorts of stuff."</p> <p>Despite the past history of the building, the two-bedroom two-bathroom apartment boasts new finishings and stunning views of the city. </p> <p>“But what we’ve done recently is spend two-and-a-half million dollars on refurbishing the rooftop pool and jacuzzi, so that’s obviously an expense the new owners won’t need to fork out.”</p> <p>Hutchence is known to have lived in the apartment with Minogue on level 27, just two floors below the communal rooftop pool, for two years during their whirlwind romance.</p> <p>The apartment at <a href="https://www.realestate.com.au/property-apartment-nsw-sydney-144104704">2704/187 Liverpool Street, Sydney </a>has a $3.3 million guide, and will be auctioned at the end of February. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / realestate.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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Tenants forced to pay landlord after fleeing their “uninhabitable” rental

<p dir="ltr">A family has been ordered to pay their former landlords $3,000 after they “abandoned” they “uninhabitable” rental property. </p> <p dir="ltr">Bechara Rizk and Ariye Atayi Juma claimed that the Sydney home was unlivable, given the unrelenting infestation of cockroaches and other bugs. </p> <p dir="ltr">When the couple moved into the home with their young daughter on April 29th 2023, they immediately noticed “tiny insects and small cockroaches” in the linen cupboard, living area, master bedroom, second bedroom and main bathroom.</p> <p dir="ltr">They said the house was completely inundated with insects, as they found them on the walls, doors, skirting boards, carpets and in the toilets.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rizk emailed the real estate agency saying he did not consider the property habitable — especially for his young daughter.</p> <p dir="ltr">“(We) went to the property an hour ago for the first time since we received the keys yesterday and there were tiny insects and cockroaches alive and dead in every room,” the email said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have taken some videos if you need to see evidence but, most importantly, we are not comfortable bringing a small baby who is crawling to live in this apartment.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I am writing to formally pull out of the lease and wanting to understand what the repercussions are for us.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The real estate offered to arrange a pest control service, to which the couple turned down as they believed the problem was too far gone to be fixed easily. </p> <p dir="ltr">After returning the keys on May 1st, Rizk sent an email the next day requesting their bond and deposit be returned.</p> <p dir="ltr">A pest controller treated the home on May 3rd, recording that a “small amount of (insect) activity” had been located and treated.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a letter to Rizk and Juma the next day, the real estate agency said the pest controller had found “no evidence of a pest infestation in the property” and the couple’s claim the property was uninhabitable was without merit.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rizk replied, “We have pulled out of our lease not due to a change of mind, it is uninhabitable and simply not what we signed up for.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We cannot live in an insect-infested apartment with a young baby.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“As any parent should understand, our child is our first priority and at the very least it would be irresponsible and the most could potentially put her in harm.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The matter between the family and the landlord ended up in the NSW Civil and Administrative Tribunal, with the couple seeking repayment of their bond while the landlords asked for compensation for the couple’s “abandonment” of the lease.</p> <p dir="ltr">Tribunal member Ross Glover found that the couple did in fact abandon the property, and were ordered to pay their former landlord $3,000 in compensation. </p> <p dir="ltr">The amount was deducted from the couple's bond which left no remaining balance to be refunded to them. </p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 14pt;"><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ce22768c-7fff-0303-0182-7d6aa3cd857a"></span></p>

Money & Banking

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Real estate agency slammed for "greedy" rental increase

<p>Real estate agency Nelson Alexander has come under fire after increasing the weekly rent to one of their vacant properties on the day of the viewing. </p> <p>The property, located in the inner suburbs of Melbourne, had a scheduled viewing on Thursday and many hopeful tenants were keen to check it out. </p> <p>Unfortunately, their interest came at a cost, as the agency sent out a text just hours beforehand saying that they were increasing  the weekly rent from $600 to $650 due to "overwhelming" demand.</p> <p>Journalist Jacqueline Felgate shared the text on social media, and many branded the agency's move as  "greedy" and "disgraceful" and even accused them of perpetuating the rental crisis. </p> <p>The exact location of the property and the number of bedrooms it has <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">is unknown, and after receiving all the backlash, the ad has since been pulled. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">The real estate agency also apologised and said that </span>they "do not solicit or encourage any form of rental bidding".</p> <p>"Whilst the current issue at hand is not a breach of legislation, it fell short of our commitment to fair and transparent practices," the statement read.</p> <p>"We are deeply aware of the moral and social responsibility we have to our community during these challenging times."</p> <p>They also added that they are currently reviewing their processes to "ensure this doesn't ever happen again". </p> <p>It is unclear whether the property has been put back on the market and for what price. </p> <p><em style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #323338; font-family: Figtree, Roboto, 'Noto Sans Hebrew', 'Noto Kufi Arabic', 'Noto Sans JP', sans-serif; background-color: #ffffff; outline: none !important;">Images: Instagram</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Women forced to do shocking act for $100 rent reduction

<p>Two women in Queensland have claimed that they were forced to use a makeshift  "temporary shower" outdoors, while renovations are being carried out in the property's only bathroom. </p> <p>The pair, who were expecting a porta-loo style shower to use during the four-to-six weeks renovation, were horrified when they found out the makeshift shower was just a blue tarpaulin attached to the side of the house.</p> <p>Electrical cords and plumbing pipes can be spotted hanging down in front of the open cubicle, and has no curtain for privacy or a lock, raising questions for their privacy and safety. </p> <p>To make matters worse, the women revealed on Facebook that they initially tried negotiating for a rental discount of $200 per week during the renovations, but their landlord said "no way" offering only a $50 discount, "then $100 as final offer".</p> <p>Dr Chris Martin, Senior Research Fellow in the University of NSW's City Futures Research Centre, slammed the landlord for "a bunch of possible breaches". </p> <p>"There is a big question about whether the temporary arrangement meets the minimum standards that apply to rented premises in Queensland under the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act," he told <em>Yahoo News</em>. </p> <p>"Those minimum standards include that the bathroom and toilet facilities must provide privacy and that a premise must be weatherproof and structurally sound, and there's a standard about security," he added. </p> <p>He also claimed that "there's a bunch of possible breaches of the minimum standards of this temporary arrangement," as intruders could also potentially get in. </p> <p>The Senior Research Fellow also slammed the $100-a-week reduction in rent, calling it "grossly insufficient".</p> <p>"What a professional landlord who takes a bit of pride in themselves as a reputable housing provider would have done, is hire one of those portable bathrooms that come on a little trailer with a little heater and hook it up, and also do a rent reduction for the hassle of having to trot out to the trailer to shower," he said.</p> <p>"That would be the appropriate response."</p> <p>He encouraged the tenants to speak to Tenants Queensland or a local tenants advice service about what to do, adding that they could say that the current temporary arrangements could be deemed "unlivable or uninhabitable". </p> <p>"I suggest they should also be telling the landlord that this arrangement may place the landlord in a further breach of the agreement and for the liability for an even bigger rent reduction and the prospect of compensation if they don't do this better,"  Dr Martin told the publication. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"Eviction season": Real estate slammed for callous Christmas email

<p>A real estate agency has been forced to apologise after tenants were sent a callous email about paying their rent on time over the Christmas period. </p> <p>The email, which is believed to be sent by Professionals Taylor Lakes in Melbourne, referred to the festive period as "eviction season", and encouraged renters to make timely payments to ensure "your living arrangements are not jeopardised over this festive period".</p> <p>"Christmas is a fantastic time of year and also a very busy time," the email begins.</p> <p>"Christmas time is also known in property circles as 'eviction season' as so many people choose to use their rental payments for Christmas spending instead of ensuring that their family accommodation remains top priority over this period.</p> <p>"We see so many tenants fall behind in their rent and then get into the position where they are not able to catch up, as this is their biggest financial obligation."</p> <p>The agency said it didn't want to be tasked with the "unfortunate job" of having to remove and evict them from their homes over Christmas. </p> <p>"We find this action very unpleasant for everyone concerned and we all enjoy our Christmas much less because of it," it said.</p> <p>"We urge you to pay careful attention and ensure that throughout December and January, you pay your rent on time, every time!"</p> <p>The email was met with a wave of backlash online, with many calling the message "thoughtless" and "not professional". </p> <p>"This is just appalling," Anti-Poverty Network SA wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>Professionals chief executive Katherine Gonzalez-Cork said the email was brought to her attention on Wednesday morning, and offered an apology to the recipients.</p> <p>"The email was distributed to tenants directly from the Taylors Lakes office and the content was not endorsed by me or the Board of Professionals and does not represent our company's expectations of communication with our property renters," she said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Flower tycoon pays $76 million in CASH for epic mansion

<p>A Sydney businessman and flower mogul has expanded his real estate portfolio, snapping up one of NSW's most prestigious properties. </p> <p>Leo Lynch and his wife Christina have bought a Federation mansion in Sydney's Bellevue Hill, with the eight-bedroom eight-bathroom property boasting impressive views of Sydney Harbour. </p> <p>The mansion, which was built in the 1890s, also showcases a pool, tennis court, and endless luxury amenities for the well-off buyers. </p> <p>"Designed by architect Walter Vernon," read the listing for the property, "the home is considered his most significant residence. Other heritage buildings designed by Vernon include the Australian Museum, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and Central Railway Station. A truly rare offering to earn a piece of Australian history."</p> <p>While securing the house seems like a huge feat in itself, the Lynch's decided to take the purchase to the next level, buying the home for $76 million in cold hard cash. </p> <p>Despite paying the whopping eight-figure for the mansion, the home needs work and is set to undergo renovations. </p> <p>The purchase of the property, named Leura, comes just after the Lynch's sold their former home for $52.4million more than he bought it.</p> <p>The same night he made the enormous purchase for the Leura estate, he sold his mystery home, just blocks away, for $61.5 million after rebuilding the property he had bought for just $9.05 million in 2014.</p> <p>Leo Lynch, 60, is a third generation of the wholesale flower family's company, founded in 1915 and for which private equity group Next Capital took a majority interest in 2015, before it was publicly listed in 2021.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Domain</em></p>

Real Estate

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Three-bedroom home on the market for unbelievably cheap price

<p>A three-bedroom home located on the border of Victoria and South Australia is up for sale for just $65,000. </p> <p>But there is a catch to future homeowners who want to experience the “quiet and cheap country living”, as they might need to be handy with a hammer. </p> <p>“If you’re a handyman and willing to put some elbow grease into it, then this one might be for you,” the listing read. </p> <p>The home itself is located on two plots of land measuring 2,100m2 in Serviceton, Victoria, and is only 16 minutes away from Bordertown, South Australia. </p> <p>“Being on two titles, you can utilise both or sell the vacant allotment as all the dwellings are on one,” the listing read. </p> <p>It also features a large lounge room with wood-fire heater, and a centrally located bathroom with a bath and vanity. </p> <p>There's plenty of room to cook in the massive kitchen, despite it needing a lot of work, it features a formal dining area that has a sliding servery window which connects to the lounge room.</p> <p>Outside, the future homeowner can find a large shed, rain water storage, and a gate that opens up to a park. </p> <p>“It went under contract ... an hour and a half (after it was listed),” Ray White agent Hayden Obst told<em> 7News</em>. </p> <p>The condition of its electrical, plumbing and appliances are unknown, but people are still expressing their interest.</p> <p>Despite this, many people from different parts of the country and a few investors are still calling the real estate agent, just in case the contract falls through. </p> <p><em>Images: 7News.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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"I'm not myself": The real reason why Kyle Sandilands stormed off the show

<p>Jackie O Henderson has revealed the real reason why her co-host, Kyle Sandilands, <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/music/kyle-sandilands-storms-out-of-studio-after-argument-with-jackie-o" target="_blank" rel="noopener">walked out</a> just 11 minutes into their hit breakfast show on Tuesday morning. </p> <p>The shock jock was nowhere to be seen on Wednesday, so Jackie O had to explain his absence. </p> <p>One of their producers revealed that Sandilands had been "struggling with his shoulder." </p> <p>"He sent me a message saying, 'Honey, I'm so sorry. I'm on medication and I'm not myself. I'm in so much pain," Henderson said. </p> <p>"I actually feel so bad for him," admitted the radio star.</p> <p>Sandilands had recently injured his rotator cuff and was prescribed Oxycodone to manage the pain. </p> <p>A few of the side effects of using the painkiller can include light-headedness, confusion and unusual tiredness or weakness.  </p> <p>Henderson also admitted that she may have pushed him off the edge during their discussion about Covid-19 yesterday, as she had reportedly cussed him out. </p> <p>"Calling him a c**ksucker was the turning point," she said. </p> <p>Their argument had escalated into name-calling before Sandilands stormed out. </p> <p>Sandilands had previously used the derogatory term to attack newsreader Brooklyn Ross, and he couldn't when his co-host used the same insult back at him. </p> <p>This incident comes almost a week into the radio duo signing a record-breaking $200 million 10-year deal on air. </p> <p><em>Image: Kyle and Jackie O Show/ Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Historic lighthouse keeper's cottage up for sale

<p>A cottage next to Macquarie Lighthouse has been put up for sale, and one lucky buyer will have the chance to say they live next to one of the country's oldest lighthouses. </p> <p>Located on beautiful South Head Vaucluse, the lighthouse itself has stood since 1883 and it is the second tower built there after the first convict-designed one deteriorated. </p> <p>You don't have to worry about any noise as there's only one neighbour in sight. </p> <p>"How many houses can you buy with a lighthouse next door," McGrath sales agent Robert Alfeldi said. </p> <p>For $12 million,  the lucky buyer will get the heritage home that was built 1881, with most of its original fittings still in tact and an old stables building, perched on 2600 square metres of land. </p> <p>Although the property has kept most of its original elements, the interior - specifically the kitchen and bathroom - have been updated into more modern versions of the original. </p> <p>However, those looking to renovate the property and add a second floor should look for a different property as it is a heritage home, so it limits what future owners can add. </p> <p>“It’s quite a unique property. People show up thinking they can put a second storey on. But it is what it is for a reason," Alfeidi said. </p> <p>Iconic properties like this don't go for sale often, and tends to create a buzz among wealthy potential buyers. </p> <p>The property was previously sold in October 2016 for $7 million. </p> <p><em>Images: Domain/ Nine</em></p>

Real Estate

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James Packer's insane $132-million mansion up for grabs

<p>Aussie billionaire James Packer has put up his $132-million mansion up for sale.</p> <p>The 12-bedroom Beverly Hills home was previously owned by Hollywood star Danny DeVito, before Packer bought it off him in 2018 for $93-million, according to realtor.com.</p> <p>Dating back to the 1930's, the luxury estate has been named “Beverly Hills at its finest," as it sits on 2260 sqm and boasts a three-storey accessory dwelling, a separate maids quarter and a guesthouse. </p> <p>“Boasting living space across multiple structures, enjoy an unparalleled gem in one of the most coveted neighbourhoods in Southern California," the listing read. </p> <p>It's the embodiment of luxury and "iconic L.A. living", with a home theatre that's fully equipped with a bar, a game room, wine cellar, resort-style pool and cigar lounge. </p> <p>The primary suite has a fireplace, sitting room, dual bathrooms, and access to a terrace.</p> <p>With 18 bathrooms you don't need to worry about whether they are occupied as the master suite itself features two master baths, double vanities, a linen closet, powder room, and the option of a shower or a sub and steam shower.</p> <p>Not only that, the private balconies allow you to take in the magnificent views of the estate's lush yard, but also the surrounding canyons, so there's never a boring day in the multimillion dollar mansion. </p> <p>According to <em>The Daily Telegrap</em>h, the billionaire is selling the home because he has no desire to live in LA if his kid's won't be visiting, after his ex-wife Erica Packer and their three kids moved to London earlier this year. </p> <p><em>Images: realestate.com.au/ Getty</em></p>

Real Estate

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"It's just unbelievable": The Block winners become instant millionaires

<p><strong><em>Warning! Spoilers ahead</em></strong></p> <p><em>The Block</em> 2023 has official drawn to a close, with mixed emotions hitting the renovation couples at a chaotic auction day. </p> <p>Two teams became instant millionaires on Sunday night, while one couple walked away with nothing as their house failed to sell. </p> <p>NSW childhood sweethearts Steph and Gian emerged victorious as this year's winners, pocketing $1.65 million in a record-breaking auction. </p> <p>Their house was purchased for a whopping $5 million after the reserve was set at $3.35 million. </p> <p>Steph and Gian's win is the biggest in <em>Block</em> history, surpassing the $1.586 million last year’s winners Omar and Oz made over their reserve.</p> <p>On top of their auction earnings, the couple also take home the $100,000 prize money.</p> <p>Also becoming instant millionaires were Melbourne sisters Liberty and Eliza, pocketing $1.05 million after their house sold for $4.3 million. </p> <p>WA team Leslie and Kyle placed third in the competition, taking home a more modest profit of $130,000 after their house sold for $3.1 million. </p> <p>All three of those houses were bought by serial-bidder Adrian Portelli, who also purchased last year's winning house.</p> <p>In a bizarre twist, Portelli even bid against himself, repeatedly raising the price by $100,000 despite already having the highest bid.</p> <p>“That’s...never happened before,” said a dumbfounded Scott Cam, while the auctioneer called it “the strangest auction I’ve ever done.”</p> <p>Despite three major auction successes, South Australian couple Kristy and Brett only made a $65,00 profit for their hard work on the season, after their house sold for $3.035 million. </p> <p>In a devastating blow, Queenslanders Leah and Ash failed to sell their home after bids failed to climb above their $2.97 million reserve. </p> <p>After tense negotiations, the team decided to pass a low offer, with the home still on the market. </p> <p>There is some hope for the Queenslanders, as their house could still sell for more than its reserve after auction.</p> <p>Two of the three houses that were passed in during last year’s auctions eventually sold for well over their reserve, scoring their teams respective profits of around $170,000 each.</p> <p>Speaking after their win, Steph and Gian said their were “overwhelmed” and described auction day as “surreal.” </p> <p>“This will change our lives,” they said of their $1.75 million win. </p> <p>“We have no idea what we are going to do with the money yet. It’s going to clear our debts in Sydney. It’s going to set us up for whatever the next stage is. It’s just unbelievable.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Money & Banking

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The path to better hearing, today

<p>In 1902, Princess Alexandra of Denmark, who would very soon become Queen Consort of the United Kingdom alongside King Edward VII, found herself enraptured by a fascinating new device that was fast becoming the talk of Europe.</p> <p>The young princess had been fitted with one of the world’s first portable electric hearing aids, and it proved to be a life-changing success.</p> <p>Back in Denmark, the impact of this event became a clarion call to one Hans Demant, a bicycle manufacturer and purveyor of sewing machines. His wife, Camilla, also suffered from severe hearing loss and so, after a determined journey to London, Hans returned with a precious electric “Acousticon”.</p> <p>Witnessing Camilla’s progress served as a source of inspiration for Hans to extend his assistance to a broader community of individuals suffering with hearing loss, and so he initiated the import of hearing devices from America. In 1904, Hans Demant founded the company that would later become known as <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/">Oticon</a>, a name now synonymous with cutting-edge hearing solutions, paving the way for the modern hearing aids we know today and bringing new-found joy to millions worldwide.</p> <h3>Hearing health</h3> <p>Hearing health is a such critical aspect of our overall well-being, yet it often goes overlooked until problems arise. In New Zealand, hearing issues affect a surprisingly large portion of the population, with a 2022 EHIMA report estimating as many as one in ten New Zealanders are living with hearing loss. Sadly, a lack of awareness can lead to irregular hear- ing check-ups, which in turn leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment.</p> <h3><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50616" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/miniRITE_R_H1-2023_RightLeft_C090ChromaBeige_LEDgreen_Speaker60_OpenBassDome_500pctSize_w_shadow_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="642" /></h3> <h3>A new world of sounds</h3> <p>A far cry from the bulky hearing aids of over a century ago that were hailed as a miracle in the press and transformed Queen Alexandra’s life, the pinnacle of today’s devices – such as <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/hearing-aid-users/hearing-aids/products/real" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Oticon Real™ hearing aids</a> – continue to change the way we experience the world of sound.</p> <p>With their advanced processing capabilities and state-of-the-art technology, Oticon Real can help get back the real sounds of life, precise and optimally balanced, whether it’s the laughter of grandchildren, musical notes or simply the rustling of leaves in the wind.</p> <p>One of the standout features of Oticon Real hearing aids is a unique technology called Deep Neural Network (DNN). This built-in intelligence has learned to recognise all types of sounds, their details, and how they should ideally sound. This means they can instantly adapt to changes, keeping you at your best wherever life takes you.</p> <p>By analysing and adjusting to your environment, Oticon Real hearing aids ensure that they provide what you need to hear. They do this by reducing background noise, which can help enhance speech comprehension and allow you to engage effortlessly in conversations, even in noisy settings.</p> <h3>Connection is key</h3> <p>In today’s digital age, connectivity is paramount, and Oticon Real hearing aids certainly rise to the challenge, offering seamless connectivity to compatible* smartphones and other Bluetooth-enabled devices. You can effortlessly stream phone calls, music and other audio directly to your hearing aids, vastly enhancing your listening experience.</p> <h3><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50617" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/Oticon_Real_Still_Life_miniRITE_R_Wallet_JBS_24873_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="863" /></h3> <h3>Improved quality of life</h3> <p>Perhaps the most significant benefit of Oticon Real hearing aids is their positive impact on your quality of life. Improved hearing can lead to increased social engagement, better relationships and enhanced overall well-being. With the help of Oticon Real, you can participate more actively in social gatherings, make the most of your favourite activities and feel more connected to the world around you.</p> <p>Oticon Real hearing aids aren’t just devices; they are a life-changing gift that allow you to reconnect with the sounds and people you love. No longer are they fit just for a queen; they are readily available to anyone with the need and the longing to be truly present for life’s most cherished moments.</p> <p><em>For more information and to find your nearest hearing clinic, visit <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">oticon.co.nz</a></em></p> <p><em>*For information on hearing aid and device compatibility, visit <a href="https://www.oticon.co.nz/compatibility" target="_blank" rel="noopener">www.oticon.co.nz/compatibility</a></em></p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-50618" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/11/Oticon_Real_miniRITE_R_9_colors_lineup_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="125" /></p> <p><em>All images: Supplied.</em></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with Oticon.</em></p>

Hearing

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Adele called herself a ‘borderline alcoholic’. But is that a real thing?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicole-lee-81635">Nicole Lee</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></p> <p>British singer-songwriter Adele says she has quit drinking, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/music/2023/oct/18/adele-says-she-has-quit-drinking-after-being-a-borderline-alcoholic">describing herself</a> as a “borderline alcoholic” when she was in her 20s.</p> <p>She joins a <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-are-young-people-drinking-less-than-their-parents-generation-did-172225">growing number of people</a> who are trying to quit or reduce their drinking.</p> <p>But what does “borderline alcoholic” mean and is it a real thing?</p> <h2>It’s not all-or-nothing any more</h2> <p>In the <a href="https://theconversation.com/does-alcoholics-anonymous-actually-work-179665">early days</a> of alcohol treatment, people used to think of problems with alcohol as all-or-nothing. They used to believe there was something different about people who had problems with alcohol and those who didn’t. That’s how the idea of the “<a href="https://theconversation.com/is-there-really-such-a-thing-as-an-addictive-personality-184137">addictive personality</a>” came about.</p> <p>But now we think of drinking on a continuum. It goes from not drinking at all to dependent drinking. And people can move up and down that continuum at different points in their lives. The old saying “once an alcoholic, always an alcoholic” doesn’t apply any more.</p> <h2>How much is it OK to drink?</h2> <p>The Australian national alcohol <a href="https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-advice/alcohol">guidelines</a> say healthy men and women should drink no more than ten <a href="https://alcoholthinkagain.com.au/resources-and-tools/standard-drink-tool">standard drinks</a> a week and no more than four a day. So that’s about two to three drinks three to four times a week. <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/health-conditions-and-risks/alcohol-consumption/latest-release">Most Australians</a> drink within these guidelines.</p> <p>If you drink over those guidelines you are more likely to experience a number of long- and short-term <a href="https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/australian-guidelines-reduce-health-risks-drinking-alcohol">problems</a> including alcohol dependence, cancers, diabetes and heart disease. The risk of problems increases the more you drink and the more frequently you drink.</p> <p>About 25% of Australians drink at <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/illicit-use-of-drugs/national-drug-strategy-household-survey-2019/data">risky levels</a> and around 6% drink at such high levels that they would probably be dependent. Daily drinking is associated with dependence.</p> <h2>So when is someone an alcoholic or a borderline alcoholic?</h2> <p>The term “alcoholic” is rarely used by health professionals any more. It can make people believe there is nothing they can do about the problems they might be experiencing. Historically, that’s what the early treatment providers believed in the 1930s and that <a href="https://theconversation.com/alcohol-problems-arent-for-life-and-aa-isnt-the-only-option-8-things-film-and-tv-get-wrong-about-drug-and-alcohol-treatment-180946">myth has continued</a>. But some people find identifying as an “alcoholic” helpful to maintain their goal of quitting drinking.</p> <p>Health professionals have never used the term “borderline alcoholic”. But in describing herself that way Adele is really saying alcohol is having too much of a negative impact on her life, and like many others has decided to do something positive about it by taking a break.</p> <h2>Which terms do we use now?</h2> <p>Now, we tend to talk about “dependence” on a continuum from mild to moderate to severe. We also talk about the range of problems other than dependence that people can experience, which also lie on a continuum.</p> <p>The threshold for whether someone is a problem or dependent drinker is not just how much they drink (although that is important), but also how severe the alcohol-related problems are.</p> <p>Problems with alcohol don’t always correlate with consumption. Some people can drink a moderate amount and have a lot of problems and others can drink a lot and appear not to have many negative consequences.</p> <h2>I’m worried about my drinking. What next?</h2> <p>If you are wondering if you are drinking too much you can <a href="https://hellosundaymorning.org/nib_alcohol_self-assessment/">check online</a> with a free and anonymous assessment.</p> <p>Signs you may have a <a href="https://alcoholtreatmentguidelines.com.au/resources/appendix-3-diagnostic-criteria-for-alcohol-dependence">problem with alcohol</a> include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>having trouble stopping once you start drinking</p> </li> <li> <p>wanting or trying to cut back but slipping up frequently</p> </li> <li> <p>spending a lot of time drinking or recovering from drinking</p> </li> <li> <p>having cravings to drink alcohol, such as if you come home from work and reach straight for a drink</p> </li> <li> <p>dropping the ball at work, study or home because you’ve been drinking, such as not being able to do your work because you’re hungover</p> </li> <li> <p>continuing to drink alcohol even though you know it’s causing problems with your health, friends, work or relationships</p> </li> <li> <p>giving up or reducing social and work activities to drink instead</p> </li> <li> <p>drinking when it’s not safe, such as before driving or swimming.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If you find you aren’t getting the same effects from alcohol as you used to or you need more and more alcohol to get the same effect, you have probably developed a dependence.</p> <p>Sometimes people who are very dependent can experience withdrawal symptoms when they stop – strong cravings, nausea, sweating, agitation and anxiety.</p> <p>The more of these signs you have, the more likely you are to be dependent on alcohol.</p> <p>If you have any of these signs, taking a break from alcohol for a few months or longer can help. If you find that’s too hard, you can try sticking within the Australian alcohol guidelines by reducing the number of drinks per occasion and increasing your drink-free days.</p> <h2>There’s help</h2> <p>Sometimes when people experience some of these problems they need a bit of help to keep them on track. You can talk to your GP who can refer you to a psychologist or treatment service. Or you can try self-help options such as the Hello Sunday Morning’s <a href="https://hellosundaymorning.org/daybreak/">Daybreak app</a> (a community of people supporting each other to change their relationship with alcohol). If your problems are more severe, you can try something like <a href="https://smartrecoveryaustralia.com.au">SMART Recovery</a> (evidence-based group support for alcohol and other drug problems).</p> <hr /> <p><em>If you are worried about your own or someone else’s alcohol or other drug use, you can contact the National Alcohol and other Drug Hotline on 1800 250 015 for free, confidential advice.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/215987/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicole-lee-81635"><em>Nicole Lee</em></a><em>, Professor at the National Drug Research Institute (Melbourne), <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/adele-called-herself-a-borderline-alcoholic-but-is-that-a-real-thing-215987">original article</a>.</em></p>

Caring

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Princess Diana's childhood home up for rent

<p>The house Princess Diana spent her childhood and teenage years in is now available for the public to rent. </p> <p>Althorp House, located in West Northamptonshire in England, is owned by Diana's brother Earl Spencer, who has lived on the sprawling property as custodian of the estate since 1992. </p> <p>The expansive property has been listed for royal fans with deep pockets to rent on <a href="https://www.elysian-estates.co.uk/althorp/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Elysian Estates</a>, an upmarket equivalent of Airbnb.</p> <p>Althorp House, which is a 90 minute drive out of London, was built in 1508 and has been in the Spencer family for 19 generations.</p> <p>Lady Diana lived in the 90-room stately home for most of her childhood and teenage years, before she married the then-Prince Charles in 1981.</p> <p>Not just one grand property, the estate covers 13,000 acres of countryside as it encompasses cottages, farms, woodlands and villages, which are open to visitors but only at certain times of the year.</p> <p>Now, the home is once again available to rent via Elysian Estates.</p> <p>"Althorp offers unparalleled levels of service, privacy and luxury to rival the finest properties anywhere in the world; yet retains the truly welcoming and homely feel that makes Althorp so special," the listing says.</p> <p>"Walk in the footsteps of kings and queens, feast or celebrate in spectacular surroundings, marvel at the sense of history and artwork, and slumber in pure luxury."</p> <p>In the main house, there are six state bedrooms to choose from offering "a level of opulence befitting royalty, with these very rooms playing as much a part of English history as any royal palace".</p> <p>Prices for the rental are not yet publicly available as an enquiry must be sent to reserve the opulent property.</p> <p>The listing stated that the stay includes "butler service, a team of private chefs and housekeeping, with a dedicated concierge service".</p> <p>Althorp is today most famous for being the final resting place of Princess Diana following her death in Paris.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Instagram</em></p>

Real Estate

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Royal family's 175-year-old right to hunt comes to an end

<p>The royal family can no longer hunt at the five-century old Abergeldie Estate that is next door to Balmoral Castle. </p> <p>Abergeldie's new owner, Alastair Storey, has terminated the royal family's sporting rights lease,  established by Prince Albert in 1852, which means they can no longer go hunting, deer stalking or fishing at the estate, ending the 175-year-old tradition. </p> <p>Storey reportedly has plans to "transform" buildings on the estate into private accommodation and hunting lodges, according to the <em>Daily Telegraph</em>.</p> <p>Planning documents filed with Aberdeenshire council confirmed this: "For the last 175 years the Royal family have leased the sporting rights at Abergeldie but this has now ceased, and will be actively run by the new Laird.</p> <p>"To facilitate the transformation and to effectively run the estate, new facilities will be required."</p> <p>The documents also stated that the buildings around the farmhouse "facilitate accommodation for the running of the estate and will include a social space for paying visitors to support the sporting activities on the estate".</p> <p>This is a huge change from the original agreements Prince Albert drew up with the Gordon family, who previously owned the estate. </p> <p>This also comes after the late Queen agreed to pay more for the shooting and hunting rights on the sporting estate 25 years ago, after she was asked to increase the nominal rent that was being paid by the royal family for access. </p> <p>The 11,532-acre estate is nestled between the late Queen Elizabeth's former estate and the King's residence, Birkhall. </p> <p>It was sold in 2021 after the death of the 21st Baron of Abergeldie, John Gordon, to Storey who bought the estate for £23 million. </p> <p>Although Storey purchased 34 properties dotted around the vast estate, he has not bought out Abergeldie Castle, which still belongs to the Gordon family.</p> <p>Storey, 70, is a Scottish businessman and chief executive of WSH, and was labelled the  "most influential man in the UK hospitality industry" in 2012. </p> <p>He was made an Order of the British Empire (OBE) by Queen Elizabeth in 2017.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p> <p> </p>

Family & Pets

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Eye-watering price tag for Melissa Caddick's penthouse

<p>A penthouse formerly owned by fraudster Melissa Caddick is on the market for an estimated $5.5 million.</p> <p>The apartment, which was previously occupied by her parents Ted and Barbara Grimley, was listed for auction on October 10 and boasts stunning panoramic views of the city skyline.</p> <p>“Spacious throughout and stylishly presented with understated contemporary finishes, this is the perfect opportunity for downsizers, executives and families who seek undeniable quality and convenience,” read an online listing.</p> <p>Viewings for the apartment located in Eastpoint Tower at Edgecliff are only available through appointments, according to managing agents Richardson and Wrench.</p> <p>Liquidators hope that the sale of the penthouse will help recover some of the money Caddick stole from over 50 investors as part of her ponzi investment scam.</p> <p>The 49-year-old lived a life of luxury after stealing up to $30 million from the investors, many of whom were reportedly her close friends and family.</p> <p>Jones Partners, the accounting firm in charge of liquidating Caddick's former assets, have already recouped $3 million to investors after the sale of her share portfolio and Dover Heights cliff-top mansion.</p> <p>At the time, Jones Partners principal Bruce Gleeson said that it wasn't rare for investors to not get anything back from ponzi schemes.</p> <p>However, he has said that the sale of the Edgecliff apartment in Sydney's eastern suburbs, would allow for further significant distributions to investors.</p> <p>Caddick disappeared in November 2020, just days after her home was raided by ASIC investigators.</p> <p>She is believed to be dead after her badly decomposed right foot was found washed up on a beach in the south coast of NSW on February 2021, but the rest of her body has not been found.</p> <p><em>Images: </em><em>Richardson &amp; Wrench </em></p>

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Is it okay to kiss your pet? The risk of animal-borne diseases is small, but real

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sarah-mclean-1351935">Sarah McLean</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/enzo-palombo-249510">Enzo Palombo</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p>Our relationship with pets has changed drastically in recent decades. Pet ownership is at an all-time high, with <a href="https://animalmedicinesaustralia.org.au/media-release/more-than-two-thirds-of-australian-households-now-own-a-pet/">a recent survey</a> finding 69% of Australian households have at least one pet. We spend an estimated A$33 billion every year on caring for our fur babies.</p> <p>While owning a pet is linked to numerous <a href="https://www.onehealth.org/blog/10-mental-physical-health-benefits-of-having-pets">mental and physical health benefits</a>, our pets can also harbour infectious diseases that can sometimes be passed on to us. For most people, the risk is low.</p> <p>But some, such as pregnant people and those with weakened immune systems, are at <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/specific-groups/high-risk/index.html">greater risk</a> of getting sick from animals. So, it’s important to know the risks and take necessary precautions to prevent infections.</p> <h2>What diseases can pets carry?</h2> <p>Infectious diseases that move from animals to humans are called zoonotic diseases or <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/basics/zoonotic-diseases.html">zoonoses</a>. More than <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3668296/#B18">70 pathogens</a> of companion animals are known to be transmissible to people.</p> <p>Sometimes, a pet that has a zoonotic pathogen may look sick. But often there may be no visible symptoms, making it easier for you to catch it, because you don’t suspect your pet of harbouring germs.</p> <p>Zoonoses can be transmitted directly from pets to humans, such as through contact with saliva, bodily fluids and faeces, or indirectly, such as through contact with contaminated bedding, soil, food or water.</p> <p>Studies suggest <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500695/">the prevalence of pet-associated zoonoses is low</a>. However, the true number of infections is likely <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/17/11/3789">underestimated</a> since many zoonoses are not “<a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/notification-of-illness-and-disease">notifiable</a>”, or may have multiple exposure pathways or generic symptoms.</p> <p>Dogs and cats are major reservoirs of zoonotic infections (meaning the pathogens naturally live in their population) caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. <a href="https://www.who.int/data/gho/data/themes/topics/rabies">In endemic regions in Africa and Asia</a>, dogs are the main source of rabies which is transmitted through saliva.</p> <p>Dogs also commonly carry <em>Capnocytophaga</em> bacteria <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/capnocytophaga/index.html">in their mouths and saliva</a>, which can be transmitted to people through close contact or bites. The vast majority of people won’t get sick, but these bacteria can occasionally cause infections in people with weakened immune systems, <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/capnocytophaga/signs-symptoms/index.html">resulting</a> in severe illness and sometimes death. Just last week, such a death <a href="https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/tracy-ridout-perth-mum-dies-11-days-after-rare-bacterial-infection-from-minor-dog-bite-c-11748887">was reported in Western Australia</a>.</p> <p>Cat-associated zoonoses include a number of illnesses spread by the faecal-oral route, such as giardiasis, campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis and toxoplasmosis. This means it’s especially important to wash your hands or use gloves whenever handling your cat’s litter tray.</p> <p>Cats can also sometimes transmit infections through bites and scratches, including the aptly named <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/diseases/cat-scratch.html#:%7E:text=Cat%20scratch%20disease%20(CSD)%20is,the%20surface%20of%20the%20skin.">cat scratch disease</a>, which is caused by the bacterium <em>Bartonella henselae</em>.</p> <p>Both dogs and cats are also reservoirs for <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10122942/">methicillin-resistant bacterium <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em></a> (MRSA), with close contact with pets identified as an important risk factor for zoonotic transmission.</p> <h2>Birds, turtles and fish can also transmit disease</h2> <p>But it’s not just dogs and cats that can spread diseases to humans. Pet birds can occasionally transmit <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/pneumonia/atypical/psittacosis/">psittacosis</a>, a bacterial infection which causes pneumonia. Contact with <a href="https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/animal-health-literacy/pet-turtles-source-germs">pet turtles</a> has been linked to <em>Salmonella</em> infections in humans, particularly in young children. Even pet fish have been linked to a <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/pets/fish.html">range of bacterial infections</a> in humans, including vibriosis, mycobacteriosis and salmonellosis.</p> <p>Close contact with animals – and some behaviours in particular – increase the risk of zoonotic transmission. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19398275/">A study from the Netherlands</a> found half of owners allowed pets to lick their faces, and 18% allowed dogs to share their bed. (Sharing a bed increases the duration of exposure to pathogens carried by pets.) The same study found 45% of cat owners allowed their cat to jump onto the kitchen sink.</p> <p>Kissing pets has also been linked to occasional zoonotic infections in pet owners. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3298380/">In one case</a>, a woman in Japan developed meningitis due to <em>Pasteurella multicoda</em> infection, after regularly kissing her dog’s face. These bacteria are often found in the oral cavities of dogs and cats.</p> <p>Young children are also more likely to engage in behaviours which increase their risk of <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/specific-groups/high-risk/children.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fhealthypets%2Fspecific-groups%2Fchildren.html">getting sick</a> from animal-borne diseases – such as putting their hands in their mouth after touching pets. Children are also less likely to wash their hands properly after handling pets.</p> <p>Although anybody who comes into contact with a zoonotic pathogen via their pet can become sick, certain people are more likely to suffer from serious illness. These people include the young, old, pregnant and immunosuppressed.</p> <p>For example, while most people infected with the toxoplasmosis parasite will experience only mild illness, it can be life-threatening or <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/pregnancy/what-are-the-risks-of-toxoplasmosis-during-pregnancy/">cause birth defects in foetuses</a>.</p> <h2>What should I do if I’m worried about catching a disease from my pet?</h2> <p>There are a number of good hygiene and pet husbandry practices that can reduce your risk of becoming sick. These include:</p> <ul> <li>washing your hands after playing with your pet and after handling their bedding, toys, or cleaning up faeces</li> <li>not allowing your pets to lick your face or open wounds</li> <li>supervising young children when they are playing with pets and when washing their hands after playing with pets</li> <li>wearing gloves when changing litter trays or cleaning aquariums</li> <li>wetting bird cage surfaces when cleaning to minimise aerosols</li> <li>keeping pets out of the kitchen (especially cats who can jump onto food preparation surfaces)</li> <li>keeping up to date with preventative veterinary care, including vaccinations and worm and tick treatments</li> <li>seeking veterinary care if you think your pet is unwell.</li> </ul> <p>It is especially important for those who are at a higher risk of illness to take precautions to reduce their exposure to zoonotic pathogens. And if you’re thinking about getting a pet, ask your vet which type of animal would best suit your personal circumstances.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/210898/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sarah-mclean-1351935">Sarah McLean</a>, Lecturer in environmental health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/enzo-palombo-249510">Enzo Palombo</a>, Professor of Microbiology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty </em><em>Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-it-okay-to-kiss-your-pet-the-risk-of-animal-borne-diseases-is-small-but-real-210898">original article</a>.</em></p>

Family & Pets

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The real reason behind Australia's richest couple's split

<p>Andrew 'Twiggy' Forrest has broken his silence on his shock split from his wife of 31 years, saying the decision to separate was "better for everyone". </p> <p>The mining magnate and his wife Nicole, who are known as Australia's richest couple, <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/australia-s-richest-couple-call-it-quits" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announced their divorce</a> in a joint statement in July, saying they would remain friends and colleagues. </p> <p>At a trade forum in Perth on Wednesday, the Fortescue Metals Group CEO opened up about the split for the first time. </p> <p>"Nic and I are good mates, we speak all the time she's a fantastic lady," Mr Forrest told <em><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/andrew-forrest-twiggy-split-nicola-forrest-first-interview-fortescue-metals-group/b278d0bb-867b-40df-b157-573ce8cc2a8f" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Nine News</a></em>.</p> <p>"We made the call that it was better for everyone if we didn't live right on top of each other but we still absolutely support each other."</p> <p>Since announcing their split, the couple have insisted the separation won't affect the direction of their mining empire or philanthropic interests. </p> <p>Mr Forrest was asked what assurances he could give to shareholders that the former couple's new arrangement wouldn't impact the business, to which he announced that his estranged wife is now Fortescue's largest shareholder.</p> <p>"I give them complete reassurance - Nic and I are lockstep on that," Mr Forrest added.</p> <p>"We are completely committed to Fortescue, to Tattarang, all the objectives of Mindaroo, we are completely united."</p> <p>The news of the Forrest's split comes after Mr Forrest gave Ms Forrest half the ownership of their flagship company, Tattarang, and more than $1.1 billion worth of Fortescue shares was moved into a new company, Coaxial Ventures, owned by her, according to the <em><a title="Australian Financial Review" href="https://www.afr.com/companies/mining/andrew-and-nicola-forrest-to-pursue-separate-lives-20230712-p5dnpi" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Financial Review</a></em>.</p> <p>Mr Forrest remains Australia's second-richest person in the latest AFR <a title="Rich List" href="http://Australian%20Financial%20Review's%20annual%20Rich%20List" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Rich List</a>, with an estimated wealth of $31.44 billion, as only fellow mining magnate Gina Rinehart is richer, with $44.33 billion to her name.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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