Placeholder Content Image

Why do I need to get up during the night to wee? Is this normal?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/christian-moro-121754">Christian Moro</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/charlotte-phelps-1187658">Charlotte Phelps</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a></em></p> <p>It can be normal to wake up once or even twice during the night to wee, especially as we get older.</p> <p>One in three adults over 30 makes <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30085529">at least two</a> trips to the bathroom every night.</p> <p>Waking up from sleep to urinate on a regular basis is called <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK518987/">nocturia</a>. It’s one of the most commonly reported <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32249998/">bothersome urinary symptoms</a> (others include urgency and poor stream).</p> <p>So what causes nocturia, and how can it affect wellbeing?</p> <h2>A range of causes</h2> <p>Nocturia can be caused by a variety of <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/nocturia-going-to-the-toilet-at-night_0.pdf">medical conditions</a>, such as heart or kidney problems, poorly controlled diabetes, bladder infections, an <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-023-44916-8">overactive bladder</a>, or gastrointestinal issues. Other causes include pregnancy, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/nau.24839">medications</a> and consumption of alcohol or caffeine before bed.</p> <p>While nocturia causes disrupted sleep, the reverse is true as well. Having broken sleep, or <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4055528/">insomnia</a>, can also cause nocturia.</p> <p>When we sleep, an antidiuretic hormone is released that slows down the rate at which our <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-urine-sterile-do-urine-therapies-work-experts-debunk-common-pee-myths-191862">kidneys produce urine</a>. If we lie awake at night, less of this hormone <a href="https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajprenal.00025.2023">is released</a>, meaning we continue to produce normal rates of urine. This can accelerate the rate at which we fill our bladder and need to get up during the night.</p> <p>Stress, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153377/">anxiety</a> and watching television <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK518987">late into the night</a> are common causes of insomnia.</p> <h2>Effects of nocturia on daily functioning</h2> <p>The recommended amount of sleep for adults is between <a href="https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/sleep/how-much-sleep">seven and nine hours</a> per night. The more times you have to get up in the night to go to the bathroom, the more this impacts <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3602727/#:%7E:text=Nocturia%20is%2C%20however%2C%20an%20important,(QoL)%20and%20general%20health.">sleep quantity and quality</a>.</p> <p>Decreased sleep can result in increased <a href="https://hqlo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12955-019-1251-5">tiredness</a> during the day, poor concentration, forgetfulness, changes in mood and impaired <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28425062/">work performance</a>.</p> <p>If you’re missing out on quality sleep due to nighttime trips to the bathroom, this can affect your quality of life.</p> <p>In more severe cases, nocturia has been compared to having a similar impact on <a href="https://www.racgp.org.au/getattachment/b43c05ba-e29e-47c3-b816-ec47ceeafe97/Nocturia-a-guide-to-assessment-and-management.aspx">quality of life</a> as diabetes, high blood pressure, chest pain, and some forms of arthritis. Also, frequent disruptions to quality and quantity of sleep can have longer-term health impacts.</p> <p>Nocturia not only upsets sleep, but also increases the risk of <a href="https://www.auajournals.org/doi/10.1097/JU.0000000000000459">falls</a> from moving around in the dark to go to the bathroom.</p> <p>Further, it can affect sleep partners or others in the household who may be disturbed when you get out of bed.</p> <h2>Can you have a ‘small bladder’?</h2> <p>It’s a common misconception that your trips to the bathroom are correlated with the size of your bladder. It’s also unlikely your bladder is <a href="https://youtu.be/blVmyrBPves">smaller</a> relative to your other organs.</p> <p>If you find you are having to wee more than your friends, this could be due to body size. A smaller person drinking the same amount of fluids as someone larger will simply need to go the bathroom more often.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/blVmyrBPves?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><figcaption><span class="caption">Can you have a small bladder?</span></figcaption></figure> <p>If you find you are going to the bathroom quite a lot during the day and evening (<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5903463/">more than eight times</a> in 24 hours), this could be a symptom of an overactive bladder. This often presents as frequent and sudden urges to urinate.</p> <p>If you are concerned about any lower urinary tract symptoms, it’s worth having a chat with your family GP.</p> <p>There are some medications that can assist in the management of nocturia, and your doctor will also be able to help identify any underlying causes of needing to go to the toilet during the night.</p> <h2>A happy and healthy bladder</h2> <p>Here are some tips to maintain a happy and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3206217/">healthy</a> bladder, and reduce the risk you’ll be up at night:</p> <ul> <li> <p>make your <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-position-should-i-sleep-in-and-is-there-a-right-way-to-sleep-189873">sleep environment comfortable</a>, with a suitable mattress and sheets to suit the temperature</p> </li> <li> <p>get to bed early, and limit <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK518987/">screens</a>, or activites before bed</p> </li> <li> <p>limit foods and drinks that irritate the bladder, such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9811496/">coffee or alcohol</a>, especially before bedtime</p> </li> <li> <p>sit in a <a href="https://theconversation.com/does-it-matter-if-you-sit-or-stand-to-pee-and-what-about-peeing-in-the-shower-206869">relaxed position</a> when urinating, and allow time for the bladder to completely empty</p> </li> <li> <p>practice <a href="https://www.continence.org.au/about-continence/continence-health/pelvic-floor">pelvic floor muscle exercises</a></p> </li> <li> <p>drink an adequate amount of fluids during the day, and avoid becoming <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/nocturia-going-to-the-toilet-at-night_0.pdf">dehydrated</a></p> </li> <li> <p>maintain a healthy lifestyle, eat <a href="https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/advan.00052.2023">nutritious foods</a> and do not do anything harmful to the body such as smoking or using illicit drugs</p> </li> <li> <p>review your medications, as the time you take some <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/nocturia-going-to-the-toilet-at-night_0.pdf">pharmaceuticals</a> may affect urine production or sleep</p> </li> <li> <p>if you have <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28675633/">swollen legs</a>, raise them a few hours before bedtime to let the <a href="https://www.racgp.org.au/afp/2012/june/nocturia-a-guide-to-assessment-and-management">fluid drain</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/224160/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> </li> </ul> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/christian-moro-121754">Christian Moro</a>, Associate Professor of Science &amp; Medicine, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/charlotte-phelps-1187658">Charlotte Phelps</a>, Senior Teaching Fellow, Medical Program, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-do-i-need-to-get-up-during-the-night-to-wee-is-this-normal-224160">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Three-bedroom home on the market for unbelievably cheap price

<p>A three-bedroom home located on the border of Victoria and South Australia is up for sale for just $65,000. </p> <p>But there is a catch to future homeowners who want to experience the “quiet and cheap country living”, as they might need to be handy with a hammer. </p> <p>“If you’re a handyman and willing to put some elbow grease into it, then this one might be for you,” the listing read. </p> <p>The home itself is located on two plots of land measuring 2,100m2 in Serviceton, Victoria, and is only 16 minutes away from Bordertown, South Australia. </p> <p>“Being on two titles, you can utilise both or sell the vacant allotment as all the dwellings are on one,” the listing read. </p> <p>It also features a large lounge room with wood-fire heater, and a centrally located bathroom with a bath and vanity. </p> <p>There's plenty of room to cook in the massive kitchen, despite it needing a lot of work, it features a formal dining area that has a sliding servery window which connects to the lounge room.</p> <p>Outside, the future homeowner can find a large shed, rain water storage, and a gate that opens up to a park. </p> <p>“It went under contract ... an hour and a half (after it was listed),” Ray White agent Hayden Obst told<em> 7News</em>. </p> <p>The condition of its electrical, plumbing and appliances are unknown, but people are still expressing their interest.</p> <p>Despite this, many people from different parts of the country and a few investors are still calling the real estate agent, just in case the contract falls through. </p> <p><em>Images: 7News.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

All the reasons you might be having night sweats – and when to see a doctor

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/siobhan-banks-18473">Siobhan Banks</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/linda-grosser-1461631">Linda Grosser</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p>You’ve finished a workout, so you’re hot and drenched with perspiration – but soon you begin to feel cool again. Later, it’s a sweltering summer evening and you’re finding it hard to sleep, so you kick off the covers.</p> <p>Sweating is a normal part of the body’s cooling system, helping to release heat and maintain optimal body temperature. But regularly waking up during the night, soaked through from excessive sweating is not.</p> <p>Night sweats are <a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/night-sweats/basics/definition/sym-20050768">repeated episodes</a> of excessive or intense sweating at night. They are an unpleasant part of life for many people.</p> <p>Many conditions and factors can trigger night sweats by changing the body’s tightly regulated temperature set point, at which the body attempts to maintain its <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.4161/temp.29702">core temperature</a>. Some triggers are harmless (a hot bedroom) or even related to positive lifestyle changes (exercise). Others have an underlying cause like menopause, infection, disease or medication.</p> <h2>Temperature control and sweating</h2> <p>The hypothalamus, located in the brain, is part of the <a href="https://www.hormones-australia.org.au/the-endocrine-system/">endocrine system</a> and the temperature control centre for the body. It contains <a href="https://www.statpearls.com/point-of-care/29920#ref_19631766">temperature sensors</a> that receive information from nerve cells (thermoreceptors) located centrally (in the organs) and peripherally in the skin.</p> <p>Thermoreceptors detect changes in body temperature, sending signals back to the hypothalamus. These <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876034111000256">signals</a> will either activate sweating to cool the body or shivering to warm the body.</p> <h2>Hormones and night sweats</h2> <p>Anyone, regardless of age or gender, can experience night sweats. But women experience night sweats more often than men, largely because menopause and associated changing hormone levels are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/13697137.2011.608596">a leading cause</a>.</p> <p>Approximately 80% of women experience <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00737-007-0209-5">hot flashes</a> (also called hot flushes) or night sweats after <a href="https://www.menopause.org.au/hp/information-sheets/what-is-menopause">menopause</a> (when periods have ceased for 12 months) and during <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/perimenopause">perimenopause</a> (the time leading up to it).</p> <p>While both hot flashes and night sweats produce a feeling of overheating, they are different experiences associated with menopause. Hot flashes occur during the day, are transient episodes of flushing and may involve sweating. Night sweats occur at night and involve an intense period of <a href="https://www.proquest.com/docview/2821423865?accountid=14649">sweating</a>. Changing oestrogen levels are thought to impact norepinephrine and serotonin levels, two neurotransmitters that influence <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6459071/#:%7E:text=%5B21%5D%20Estrogens%20stimulate%20the%20production,norepinephrine%20which%20disturbs%20hypothalamic%20thermostat">temperature regulation</a> in the hypothalamus.</p> <p>Hormones also influence night sweats in men, particularly those with low <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/testosterone">testosterone</a> levels, known as <a href="https://www.hormones-australia.org.au/endocrine-diseases/hypogonadism/">hypogonadism</a>. Around 38% of men aged 45 years or older have low testosterone <a href="https://www.scielo.br/j/ibju/a/RZqqfTn5tY6BFpV6rp3GMxJ/">levels</a> but it can affect men at any age.</p> <h2>Infections, disease and medications</h2> <p>When fighting infection, our body temperature often <a href="https://europepmc.org/article/nbk/nbk562334">rises</a>. This can stimulate sweating to cool and decrease body <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876034111000256">temperature</a>.</p> <p>Minor infections like the common cold can cause night sweats. They are also a symptom of serious infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and diseases such as <a href="https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2020/0101/p34.html">Hodgkin’s</a> and <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00002018-200831020-00002">non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma</a>. However, night sweats are rarely the only symptom present.</p> <p>Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), corticosteroids, thyroid hormone replacement and methadone can cause night sweats. These medications affect parts of the <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00002018-200831020-00002">brain</a> and neurotransmitters that control and stimulate sweating.</p> <p>Regular alcohol (particularly alcohol dependence) and recreational drug use can also <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00002018-200831020-00002">increase the risk</a> of night sweats.</p> <h2>Stress, snoring and strenuous exercise</h2> <p>Night sweats are commonly reported by people with <a href="https://karger.com/spp/article-abstract/26/2/92/295722/Psychological-Sweating-A-Systematic-Review-Focused?redirectedFrom=fulltext">anxiety</a>.</p> <p>Psychological stress activates the body’s fight or flight system releasing neurotransmitters that increase heart rate, respiration, and blood pressure. This causes the body to heat up, at which point it starts sweating to cool the body back down. Night sweats may also increase anxiety, causing more sweating which in turn leads to less sleep and more anxiety.</p> <p>If anxiety causes night sweats and this causes distress, it’s best to get up, move around and engage in a <a href="https://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/symptoms/night-sweats">calming routine</a>, preferably in a dark or dimly lit room.</p> <p>Night sweats have similarly been connected with sleep disorders like <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/obstructive-sleep-apnoea">obstructive sleep apnoea</a>, where the airway is repeatedly blocked during sleep and there is loud snoring. About one third of people with obstructive sleep apnoea regularly <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11325-011-0502-4">experience night sweats</a>. The exact cause is undetermined but research shows it is linked with low blood oxygen levels (<a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11325-022-02701-3">hypoxemia</a>) and/or <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2009.00743.x">high blood pressure</a>.</p> <p>People can experience night sweats after high-intensity workouts. Vigorous exercise can stimulate the thyroid, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK500006/#:%7E:text=Thyroid%20hormone%20increases%20the%20basal,respiration%20rate%2C%20and%20body%20temperature">increasing basal metabolic rate</a> and body temperature for up to <a href="https://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2011/09000/A_45_Minute_Vigorous_Exercise_Bout_Increases.6.aspx">14 hours post exercise</a>. So night sweats can occur even after a vigorous morning workout.</p> <p>Night sweats can indicate overtraining and/or under-fuelling. If not enough calories are consumed to support the increase in training, blood sugar could drop and you could experience <a href="https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2003/0301/p1019.pdf">hypoglycaemia</a>, which can cause night sweats.</p> <h2>When to seek help and 5 things to try</h2> <p>There are <a href="https://www.aafp.org/pubs/afp/issues/2020/1001/p427.html">numerous</a> health conditions and medications that can cause night sweats and interfere with sleep.</p> <p>If night sweats are regular, distressing, interfere with sleep or are accompanied by symptoms such as fatigue or weight loss (not related to lifestyle or diet changes) talk to a doctor to help determine the cause. They might suggest alternative medications to any you’re taking or recommend tests or investigations.</p> <p>In the meantime, you can try the following ideas:</p> <p><strong>1.</strong> sleep in a cool room and use a fan if needed</p> <p><strong>2.</strong> don’t overdress for bed. Wear breathable cotton or linen pyjamas</p> <p><strong>3.</strong> choose lightweight bedding you can kick off. Avoid synthetic fibres and flannel bedding</p> <p><strong>4.</strong> consider a cooling mattress or pillow and avoid those (such as foam ones) that can limit airflow</p> <p><strong>5.</strong> avoid spicy foods, caffeine or alcohol before bed.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/211436/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/siobhan-banks-18473"><em>Siobhan Banks</em></a><em>, Research professor, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/linda-grosser-1461631">Linda Grosser</a>, , <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/all-the-reasons-you-might-be-having-night-sweats-and-when-to-see-a-doctor-211436">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Iconic Crocodile Dundee pub hits the market

<p>The iconic Aussie pub that was made famous in <em>Crocodile Dundee</em> has hit the market. </p> <p>The Walkabout Creek Hotel, located in the remote Western Australian town of McKinlay, is up for sale with an asking price of $1.4 million. </p> <p>The local watering hole, which featured in the famous Paul Hogan film, features a public bar, pool room, store room, office, kitchen and a veranda.</p> <p>It also has nine rooms for accommodation and an attached caravan park for out of town visitors. </p> <p>The <a href="https://www.vzrealestate.com.au/listings/rural_sale-3742335-mckinlay/?doing_wp_cron=1694572016.2800199985504150390625" target="_blank" rel="noopener">listing</a> for the pub reads, "This could be the perfect opportunity to purchase a piece of Australian movie history and a great business all while enjoying true country atmosphere and breaking away from busy city life."</p> <p>The property was listed for sale by its owners Debbie and Frank Wust, who are retiring after owning the pub for nine years. </p> <p>“One thing that will always stick in my mind is when we first took over the joint, we had to keep pinching ourselves," Mr Wust told <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-22/crocodile-dundee-pub-for-sale/101256696" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>ABC</em></a>.</p> <div data-component="EmphasisedText"> <p>"We were like, 'Holy moly, we own the <em>Crocodile Dundee</em> pub!'"</p> </div> <p>"It definitely took a bit of getting used to, but honestly, we've been living the dream."</p> <p>"Who doesn't want to own a pub? Any time you want a drink you just go behind the bar and help yourself."</p> <p>Mr Wust said travellers from the UK and the US had made the trek all the way to Australia just to see the pub.</p> <p>Although Debbie and Frank are looking forward to their retirement, they admitted they will be sad when the day comes to had the keys over to the pub's new owner. </p> <p class="paragraph_paragraph__3Hrfa" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 1rem; font-family: abcsans, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif;">"I'm really gonna miss the people out here — there are so many great characters," Mr Wust said.</p> <p class="paragraph_paragraph__3Hrfa" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 1rem; font-family: abcsans, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif;">"But I reckon we'll be back each year."</p> <p class="paragraph_paragraph__3Hrfa" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-bottom: 1rem; font-family: abcsans, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif;">"It'll be exciting to see what the next lot do with it — if you're gonna buy a pub, may as well make it a famous one."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / VZ Real Estate</em></p>

Domestic Travel

Placeholder Content Image

How to stay awake after a terrible night’s sleep

<p><strong>How to stay awake </strong></p> <p>There are ideals and then there’s real life. In truth, you will at times find yourself tired but still obligated to stay alert. Here’s how to stay awake and make those moments as painless as possible.</p> <p><strong>Play music</strong></p> <p>This brain hack works best if you opt for something cheery, with a beat that’s strong and fast but not exhausting (100 to 130 beats per minute). Music with heart-rate lowering tempos – think 60 beats per minute or less – can actually induce sleep, so consider yourself warned.</p> <p><strong>Go outside or place yourself near a bright light</strong></p> <p>Your body takes its sleep-wake cues from light, so draw back the curtains and let in the sunshine. If it’s not a sunny day, fool your system into thinking it is by cranking the dimmer switch up to maximum, and ensuring your workspace is properly illuminated with task lighting.</p> <p><strong>Drink water</strong></p> <p>Dehydration increases sleepiness. According to Harvard Health, keeping yourself hydrated can help to curb fatigue. It doesn’t necessarily have to be water, either – there are plenty of hydrating drinks that can count towards your daily fluid intake, even caffeinated beverages!</p> <p><strong>Exercise</strong></p> <p>Aerobic activity pumps oxygen through your system and releases hormones that give you energy. There are plenty of other health benefits from increasing your physical activity level, of course.</p> <p><strong>Stimulate your mind </strong></p> <p>Boredom itself promotes fatigue. Break the cycle by starting a conversation, engaging in a new activity, or reading an article about a topic that interests you.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/how-to-stay-awake-after-a-terrible-nights-sleep" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

What to eat before bed if you want a good night’s sleep

<p><strong>What to eat before bed</strong></p> <p>It’s after 8 pm and you can feel your stomach grumbling. Should you stick it out until morning or head to the kitchen? Night-time eating tends to get a bad reputation – people often worry it causes weight gain, heartburn, indigestion or all three. But it all depends on what you reach for, says nutritionist Nishta Saxena.</p> <p>Saxena says there isn’t a clear-cut time of day that we have to stop eating. Studies have found that it’s not when you’re eating, but how much and what you’re eating which matters. Super salty snacks at the end of the day can, for example, make you dehydrated and interrupt your sleep – and they’re not the only culprits that can affect whether you have a good night’s rest.</p> <p>In general, it’s best to eat small portions before bed. Also try to stay away from foods high in protein or fat, which can be harder for our bodies to digest and can interrupt the natural cadence of our systems, which slow down for the night by producing sleep-inducing hormones like melatonin. Excessive sugar can also act like a stimulant – a bad choice if you’re trying to catch some Zzzs.</p> <p>Saxena suggests eating something that’s high in carbohydrates, which can promote sleep and help you to relax. This is because carbs don’t require as much blood flow or work from your body to digest and are therefore unlikely to interrupt your sleep. If you find yourself with an after-dinner case of the munchies, follow these tips on what to eat before bed.</p> <p><strong>Kiwis</strong></p> <p>Kiwis can help to promote sleep because they are rich in serotonin and antioxidants (such as Vitamins C and E). Serotonin helps to make you feel relaxed and certain antioxidants have sleep-promoting qualities.</p> <p>Plus, these fuzzy fruits are extremely high in vitamin C and our bodies can digest them quickly, says Saxena. They also support heart and digestive health as well as natural immunity.</p> <p><strong>Tart cherries</strong></p> <p>Tart cherries and tart cherry juice contain concentrated amounts of melatonin, a hormone that helps your body regulate sleep-wake cycles, says Saxena. Studies show that they can help to reduce insomnia, plus they also contain other sleep-inducing agents like tryptophan (a precursor of serotonin).</p> <p>Since tart cherries can be a little bit harder to find than other fruits, Saxena suggests keeping some in your freezer and using them to make a smoothie.</p> <p><strong>Nuts</strong></p> <p>Nuts are great for a variety of health benefits, says Saxena, and they’re also a good late-night snack. Just don’t dish out a whole cup of nuts, she warns, because they do contain surprising amounts of protein and fat.</p> <p>In particular, she recommends walnuts and almonds – they contain natural melatonin as well as magnesium, which has the potential to reduce insomnia in adults.</p> <p><strong>Popcorn</strong></p> <p>While pre-packaged microwave popcorn most likely contains too much salt to be a good bedtime snack, popping your own can satisfy people who are craving snack foods like chips.</p> <p>Popcorn is also relatively filling – just don’t drown your bowl in butter and salt.</p> <p><strong>Yoghurt</strong></p> <p>Dairy products, while not consumed by everyone, have a lot of components that stimulate sleep, says Saxena. Something like yoghurt doesn’t require a lot of digestive processes, and even full fat yoghurt doesn’t have a ton of fat in it, making it easy to digest.</p> <p>Plus, it’s filled with amino acids, like tryptophan, which promote sleep.</p> <p><strong>Green bananas</strong></p> <p>Saxena says a greenish banana, “almost the colour of a tulip stem,” is a great evening snack. At this point, the banana is full of starch, which means it hasn’t yet become sugar, and this can be great for our gut bacteria and also helps to promote sleep.</p> <p>She adds that the banana should be firm and have a tiny bit of yellow in the midsection. If it has black spots, it’s too ripe to help with sleep and won’t provide a benefit.</p> <p><strong>Warm milk</strong></p> <p>The benefits of warm milk for sleep are well-documented, says Saxena. This is in part because milk contains tryptophan, an amino acid that promotes sleep. Warm fluids in general can relax our digestive muscles.</p> <p>“It can be a self-care moment when you’re having something warm,” Saxena says. “Your hands are wrapped around the mug and it’s a sensory experience.”</p> <p><strong>Cottage cheese</strong></p> <p>While cottage cheese has lots of protein, it also has the benefits of dairy, including amino acids, that help to promote sleep. It’s also nutrient-dense, containing calcium, magnesium, iron, and phosphorus, which are essential for bodily function.</p> <p>It can also be a good late-night snack for athletes, because it’s high in the protein casein, which helps to reduce muscle breakdown overnight. Still, stay away from other cheeses before bed – most are very high in fat and easy to overeat, warns Saxena.</p> <p><strong>Oatmeal</strong> </p> <p>While people often think of oatmeal as a breakfast food, oats are high in melatonin and so can make a good bedtime snack. Like dairy products, oats also contain the amino acid tryptophan.</p> <p>You can also spice up your oatmeal with many of the other foods that are okay to eat before bed – tart cherries, yogurt, or almond butter, for example.</p> <p><strong>Pasta</strong></p> <p>If you’re really hungry, try some pasta – but keep the portion small and be careful to not load your dish with toppings that are high in protein or fat.</p> <p>For example, you don’t want to have a super-cheesy meatball pasta before bed, says Saxena. But a small serving of plain pasta with pesto sauce might do the trick.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/sleep/what-to-eat-before-bed-if-you-want-a-good-nights-sleep?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Food & Wine

Placeholder Content Image

Is the Barbie movie a bold step to reinvent and fix past wrongs or a clever ploy to tap a new market?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-gurrieri-5402">Lauren Gurrieri</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p>After a months-long marketing blitz, the much-hyped Barbie movie is released this week.</p> <p>From a <a href="https://news.airbnb.com/barbies-malibu-dreamhouse-is-back-on-airbnb-but-this-time-kens-hosting/">Malibu Barbie dreamhouse</a> listed on AirBnB, an AI tool that <a href="https://www.barbieselfie.ai/au/">transforms selfies into Barbie movie posters</a> and multiple Barbie-themed brand collaborations ranging from nail polish to roller skates, Barbie is everywhere.</p> <p>She has even gone viral as a fashion trend known as <a href="https://www.elle.com.au/fashion/barbiecore-27286">Barbiecore</a>, exploding across social media with people embracing vibrant pink hues and hyper feminine aesthetics. A Barbie world is upon us.</p> <p>Although some have criticised this <a href="https://twitter.com/MosheIsaacian/status/1673415496929267712">saturation</a> strategy, it is a very deliberate marketing ploy to revitalise and redefine a brand with a contested position and history.</p> <p>As well as attracting adults who grew up with Barbie and are curious to see what’s changed, the reinvention is drawing in those younger fans swept up by the tsunami of marketing and merchandise.</p> <p>Despite being one of the <a href="https://www.newsweek.com/brandspark-most-trusted-brands-america-2022">most trusted brands</a> with a value of approximately <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/1009126/barbie-brand-value-worldwide/">$US700 million</a>, Barbie has long attracted feminist criticism for fuelling outdated and problematic “plastic fantastic” sexist stereotypes and expectations.</p> <h2>The Barbie backlash</h2> <p>Only a few years back, Barbie was a brand in crisis. <a href="https://time.com/3667580/mattel-barbie-earnings-plus-size-body-image/">Sales plummeted</a> across 2011 to 2015 against the cultural backdrop of a rise in body positivity and backlash against a doll that represented narrow ideals and an impossible beauty standard.</p> <p>After all, at life-size Barbie represents a body shape held by <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01544300#page-1">less than 1 in 100,000</a> real people. In fact, she is so <a href="https://rehabs.com/explore/dying-to-be-barbie/#.UWs-5aKyB8F">anatomically impossible</a> that, if she were real, she would be unable to lift her head, store a full liver or intestines, or <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/305/6868/1575">menstruate</a>.</p> <p>The backlash has also been in response to growing concerns about how she influences child development, particularly how and what children learn about gender. Barbie has been identified as a <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1740144521000243#!">risk factor</a> for thin-ideal internalisation and body dissatisfaction for young girls, encouraging <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S174014451630208X">motivation for a thinner shape</a> that damages body image and self esteem.</p> <p>And despite the multiple careers Barbie has held over the decades, research highlights that girls who play with Barbie believe they have <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11199-014-0347-y">fewer career options than boys</a>. This speaks to the power of toys to reinforce gender stereotypes, roles and expectations, and how Barbie has imported narrow ideals of femininity, girlhood and womanhood into young girls’ lives.</p> <h2>Reinventing a long-established icon</h2> <p>In response to this backlash, Mattel launched a new range of Barbies in 2016 that were promoted as <a href="https://shop.mattel.com/collections/fashion-dolls#filter.ss_filter_tags_subtype=Fashionistas">diverse</a>, representing different body shapes, sizes, hair types and skin tones. This was not without criticism, with “curvy” Barbie still considered thin and dolls named in ways that drew attention foremost to their bodies.</p> <p>From a white, well-dressed, middle-class, girl-next-door with friends of a similar ilk, Barbie has since been marketed as a symbol of diversity and inclusion. To signify the extent of the transformation, Mattel’s executives gave this project the code name “Project Dawn”.</p> <p>Mattel - like many other brands joining the <a href="https://theconversation.com/victorias-secret-joins-the-inclusive-revolution-finally-realizing-diversity-sells-163955">“inclusivity revolution”</a> - knew that diversity sells, and they needed to make their brand relevant for contemporary consumers.</p> <p>Diversity initiatives included a line of <a href="https://shop.mattel.com/pages/barbie-role-models">female role model dolls</a>, promoted as “introducing girls to remarkable women’s stories to show them you can be anything”.</p> <p>Barbie was also given a voice in the form of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5BsRl9zFaeSKIL4XD-pdGHGbJRvkfe8S">Barbie Vlogs</a>, where she expressed her views on issues including depression and the <a href="https://www.bustle.com/p/barbies-vlog-about-the-sorry-reflex-is-the-feminist-pep-talk-all-90s-babies-need-to-hear-9852366">sorry reflex</a>. A gender neutral collection called “creatable world” was added in 2019 to open up gender expression possibilities when playing with Barbies.</p> <p>Such efforts were crucial to undoing missteps of the past, such as a “Teen Talk Barbie” that was programmed to say “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSL2-rbE9AM">Math class is tough!</a>”, or the compulsory heterosexuality that Barbie has long advanced.</p> <h2>The latest step in Barbie’s transformation</h2> <p>Barbie the film is simply the next step in an evolution to make brand Barbie inclusive. And with a rumoured film budget of $100 million, the supporting marketing machine provides a critical opportunity to reset the Barbie narrative.</p> <p>With Greta Gerwig, acclaimed director of female-led stories such as Little Women and Lady Bird at the helm, and a diverse cast of Barbies of different races, body types, gender identities and sexual preferences, the film and its creators have sought to assure audiences of the film’s feminist leanings.</p> <p>Addressing the complicated history of Barbie is crucial for audiences who grew up and played with the doll and are grappling with introducing her to the next generation of doll consumers.</p> <p>Yet, Robbie Brenner, executive producer of Mattel Films, has explicitly stated that Gerwig’s Barbie is “not a feminist movie”. Indeed, the main character still represents a narrow beauty standard - tall, thin, blonde, white - with diverse characters in place to support her narrative.</p> <p>Which begs the question: are these inclusion initiatives simply emblematic of diversity washing, where the language and symbolism of social justice are hijacked for corporate profit? Or do they represent a genuine effort to redress the chequered history of a brand that promotes poor body image, unrealistic ideals and rampant materialism?</p> <p>What is clear is that in today’s climate where brands are increasingly rewarded for taking a stand on sociopolitical issues, brand Barbie’s attempts to reposition as inclusive have paid off: sales are now booming.</p> <p>Seemingly, Barbie’s famous tagline that “anything is possible” has shown itself to be true.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/209394/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-gurrieri-5402">Lauren Gurrieri</a>, Associate Professor in Marketing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-the-barbie-movie-a-bold-step-to-reinvent-and-fix-past-wrongs-or-a-clever-ploy-to-tap-a-new-market-209394">original article</a>.</em></p>

Movies

Placeholder Content Image

How a secret plan 50 years ago changed Australia’s economy forever, in just one night

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-millmow-4462">Alex Millmow</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/federation-university-australia-780">Federation University Australia</a></em></p> <p>At a time when governments are timid, keener to announce <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/productivity/report">reviews</a> than decisions, it’s refreshing to remember what happened 50 years ago today – on July 18 1973.</p> <p>Inflation had surged to <a href="https://www.datawrapper.de/_/vu9by/">14%</a>. Australia’s biggest customer, the United Kingdom, had joined the <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/1/newsid_2459000/2459167.stm">European Economic Community</a>, agreeing to buy products from it rather than Australia. And the newly formed Organisation of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries had <a href="https://advisor.visualcapitalist.com/historical-oil-prices/">doubled</a> the price of oil.</p> <p>The tariffs imposed on imported goods to protect Australian manufacturers from competition were extraordinarily high. For clothing, they reached <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/textile-clothing-footwear-1997/59tcf2.pdf">55%</a>; for motor vehicles, <a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1077&amp;context=commwkpapers">45%</a>.</p> <p>Then, with absolutely <a href="http://andrewleigh.org/pdf/Trade%20liberalisation%20and%20the%20ALP.pdf">no</a> public indication he had been considering anything as drastic, at 7pm on Wednesday July 18, the recently elected prime minister Gough Whitlam made an <a href="https://pmtranscripts.pmc.gov.au/sites/default/files/original/00002971_0.pdf">announcement</a>.</p> <h2>Every tariff cut by one quarter overnight</h2> <p>From midnight, all tariffs would be cut by 25%. As Whitlam put it: “each tariff will be reduced by one quarter of what it is now”.</p> <figure class="align-right "><figcaption></figcaption></figure> <p>If Australian businesses (and the Australian public) were caught by surprise, it was because Whitlam had planned the whole thing in secret.</p> <p>He had given a six-person committee just three weeks to work out the details.</p> <p>Although the committee was chaired by the head of the Tariff Board, Alf Rattigan, and included an official from Whitlam’s own department, the department of industry and the department of trade, it met in an obscure location in Canberra’s civic centre rather than in public service offices, where the project might be discovered.</p> <p>Not included in the committee was a representative of the treasury, which its then deputy head John Stone said “<a href="https://cdn.theconversation.com/static_files/files/2744/Stone__The_Inside_Story_of_Gough%E2%80%99s_Tariff_Cut__in_The_Australian__18_July_2003..pdf">knew nothing</a>” about what was unfolding.</p> <p>But driving the work of the committee were two academic outsiders – Fred Gruen, an economics professor at the Australian National University and adviser to Whitlam, and Brian Brogan, an economics lecturer at Monash University who was advising the trade minister, Jim Cairns.</p> <h2>Outsiders, not treasury insiders</h2> <p>As economists rather than bureaucrats, Gruen and Brogan were able to see benefits where others saw entrenched interests. Going to the tariff board and asking for extra tariffs, whenever it looked as if your prices might be undercut by imports, had become a reflex action for Australian businesses.</p> <p>In the words of <a href="https://esavic.org.au/385/images/2013_GaryBanks.pdf">Gary Banks</a> – later to become head of the successor to the tariff board, the Productivity Commission: “it was not a shameful thing for a conga line of industrialists to be seen wending its way to Canberra”.</p> <p>Tariffs were good for business owners, although bad for their customers, who had to pay much higher prices and often got <a href="https://www.afr.com/opinion/bill-scales-the-rise-and-fall-of-the-australian-car-manufacturing-industry-20171018-gz3ky4">worse goods</a>. They were also good for government – bringing in tax revenue.</p> <p>Whitlam was more interested in bringing down inflation. His announcement said increased competition would "have a salutary effect upon those who have taken advantage of shortages by unjustified price increases which have exploited the public".</p> <p>Any firm seriously hurt by the extra imports could apply to a newly established tribunal for assistance, but the tribunal "should not provide relief as a matter of course – that is, simply because the question of relief had been referred to it".</p> <p>So Whitlam offered “rationalisation assistance” to encourage firms to refocus their operations, and “compensation for closure” where that couldn’t be done and production had to cease.</p> <p>For displaced workers, the 7pm announcement offered anyone who lost their job retraining, as well as "a weekly amount equal to his [sic] average wage in the previous six months until he obtains or is found suitable alternative employment."</p> <p>Over the next seven years, manufacturing employment fell by <a href="https://www.bitre.gov.au/sites/default/files/report_136_CHAPTER_6_WEB_FA.pdf">80,000</a>, but few of those job losses were immediate. Fifteen months after the 25% tariff cut, fewer than <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/20634782?seq=10">6,000</a> people had claimed the wage replacement offered on the night of the announcement.</p> <p>When Whitlam went to the polls a year after the cut in the double dissolution election of May 1974, 122 university economists signed an <a href="https://pmtranscripts.pmc.gov.au/release/transcript-3267">open letter</a> of support.</p> <p>The letter said the general thrust of the government’s policy responses had been in the best interests of the nation as a whole, and added, "more importantly, we seriously doubt that the previous government would have had the wisdom or the courage to undertake it. It had certainly given no indication of moving in that direction while it was in power, even though the need for such policies had become obvious".</p> <p>In its later days in office, the Whitlam government was roundly criticised for its irresponsible public spending. Ironically, in its approach to tariffs in the 1970s, it had taken the first steps in a neoliberal direction that characterised western governments of the 1980s.</p> <p>By acting boldly after decades of inaction, Whitlam showed what a government could do. It was a lesson his Labor successor Bob Hawke took to heart a decade later, when he floated the dollar, revamped Australia’s tax system and put in place a series of further cuts that reduced tariffs to near zero.</p> <p>It’s something we see less of today.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/209378/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-millmow-4462">Alex Millmow</a>, Senior Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/federation-university-australia-780">Federation University Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-a-secret-plan-50-years-ago-changed-australias-economy-forever-in-just-one-night-209378">original article</a>.</em></p>

Money & Banking

Placeholder Content Image

"A night in hospital and a trip to the burns unit later”: Concerned mum's warning against popular fruit

<p><em><strong>Warning: This article contains images that some readers may find distressing.</strong></em></p> <p>A mother has taken to the internet and shared photos of her son’s severe burns that came as a result of him playing with a popular fruit. “A night in hospital and a trip to the burns unit later.” She began in her Facebook post.</p> <p>Her son Otis was playing happily outside with a lime in the sunshine, but the next day horror ensued.</p> <p>“It wasn’t until the next day that we noticed a rash appeared.” The mother said.</p> <p>The parents had assumed the rash must’ve been an allergic reaction to the lime juice, however, the rash quickly developed into a “horrific burn,” she added.</p> <p>The parents took Otis to the hospital where they were informed their son was suffering from a condition called phytophotodermatitis.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cku5QH2thxE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cku5QH2thxE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Tiny Hearts (@tinyheartseducation)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Phytophotodermatitis, more commonly known as margarita burn, is a little-known condition which causes burns to the skin when a chemical called furocoumarin reacts to sunlight.</p> <p>The chemical is found in limes, citrus fruit and some plants.</p> <p>“The small lime he had been innocently playing with - had now burnt his skin horrifically!“ The mum said. “If our story can help raise awareness into phytophotodermatitis at least something good has come out of our horrific experience!”</p> <p>The woman has urged parents to be on the lookout for this little-known skin condition.</p> <p>To minimise the risks of phytophotodermatitis, <a href="https://www.healthline.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Healthline</a> suggests washing hands and other exposed parts of the skin immediately after being outdoors, wearing gloves when gardening, putting on sunscreen before going outdoors and wearing long-sleeved tops and pants in wooded areas.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: Getty</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Richard Wilkins' big night out with Russell Crowe after his Oscars win

<p>While Richard Wilkins has been hosting Nine's coverage of the Oscars red carpet for two decades, one year sticks in his memory as being particularly unforgettable. </p> <p>In 2001, Wilkins' second year hosting, he rubbed shoulders with the Hollywood elite on the red carpet before they went inside for the all important ceremony. </p> <p>He spoke with actor Russell Crowe, who later won the Best Actor award for his performance in <em>Gladiator</em>. </p> <p>Following the win, Wilkins and Crowe joined forces for the celebrations. </p> <p>"I was fortunate enough to be hanging out with him and his posse that night, roaring around town," the journalist remembers with a cheeky grin on his face.</p> <p>"When you win an Oscar, on Oscar night, the city is yours," says Dickie, before revealing they were driven around Los Angeles in two huge black SUVs to endless parties.</p> <p>"Popping into Elton John's party and going here and there and everywhere."</p> <p>Despite the fun and chaos of the afterparty, Wilkins explained that a lot of work goes into the coveted hosting gig. </p> <p>"I would spend weeks beforehand ringing all the publicists and telling them where we were gonna be," he said.</p> <p>Wilkins also shared that there a lot of people working behind the scenes on the big night, with producers feeding him information in an ear-piece before he conducts his interviews. </p> <p>"Having producers in my ear and saying Nicole's just arrived, she's wearing a blue dress. She's coming down there and then doing radio interviews and things," he says.</p> <p>"For me and my producer... you know you've earned your pay at the end of Oscars Day that's for sure."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Hot flushes, night sweats, brain fog? Here’s what we know about phytoestrogens for menopausal symptoms

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/caroline-gurvich-473295">Caroline Gurvich</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jane-varney-963066">Jane Varney</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jayashri-kulkarni-185">Jayashri Kulkarni</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p>While some women glide through menopause, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26271251/">more than 85%</a> experience one or more unpleasant symptoms, which can impact their physical and mental health, daily activities and quality of life.</p> <p>Hot flushes and night sweats are the most common of these, affecting <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29393299/">75% of women</a> and the symptom for which most women seek treatment. Others include changes in weight and body composition, skin changes, poor sleep, headaches, joint pain, vaginal dryness, depression and brain fog.</p> <p>While menopause hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for menopausal symptoms, it is sometimes not recommended (such as following breast cancer, as there is conflicting evidence about the safety of menopause hormone therapy following breast cancer) or avoided by people, who may seek non-hormonal therapies to manage symptoms. In Australia it is estimated <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26224187/">more than one-third</a> of women seek complementary or alternative medicines to manage menopausal symptoms.</p> <p>But do they work? Or are they a waste of time and considerable amounts of money?</p> <h2>What’s on the market?</h2> <p>The <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30868921/">complementary or alternative interventions</a> for menopausal symptoms are almost as varied as the symptoms themselves. They include everything from mind-body practices (hypnosis, cognitive behavioural therapy and meditation) to alternative medicine approaches (traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture) and natural products (herbal and dietary supplements).</p> <p>There is some evidence to support the use of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23435026/">hypnosis</a> and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22336748/">cognitive behaviour therapy</a> for the treatment of hot flushes. Indeed these therapies are recommended in <a href="https://www1.racgp.org.au/getattachment/bfaa5918-ddc4-4bcb-93cc-d3d956c1bbfd/Making-choices-at-menopause.aspx">clinical treatment guidelines</a>. But there is less certainty around the benefit of other commonly used complementary and alternative medicines, particularly nutritional supplements.</p> <p>The most popular <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26224187/">nutritional supplements</a> for hot flushes are phytoestrogens (or plant estrogens). This trend has been driven in part by <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11915645/HRT-not-supplement-created-experts-women-RAVING-effects.html">supplement companies</a> that promote such agents as a safer or more natural alternative to hormone therapy.</p> <h2>What are phytoestrogens?</h2> <p>Phytoestrogens are plant-derived substances that can show oestrogen-like activity when ingested.</p> <p>There are numerous types including isoflavones, coumestans and lignans. These can be consumed in the form of food (from whole soybeans, soy-based foods such as tofu and soy milk, legumes, wholegrains, flaxseeds, fruits and vegetables) and in commercially produced supplements. In the latter category, extracts from soy and red clover yield isoflavones and flaxseed gives us lignans.</p> <p>Because declining oestrogen levels drive menopausal symptoms, the theory is that consuming a “natural”, plant-based substance that acts like oestrogen will provide relief.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/528788/original/file-20230529-17-mh3zlk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Soy-rich foods on a table: edamame, soy milk, soy sauce" /></a><figcaption><span class="caption">Phytoestrogens can be consumed in foods like tofu or soy milk.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/soy-bean-tofu-other-products-187030769">Shutterstock</a></span></figcaption></figure> <h2>What does the evidence say?</h2> <p>In the case of isoflavones, initial support came from <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23562010/">epidemiological data</a> showing <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15919681/">women in Asian countries</a>, consuming a traditional, phytoestrogen-rich diet (that is, one including tofu, miso and fermented or boiled soybeans), experienced fewer menopausal symptoms than women in Western countries.</p> <p>However, several factors may influence the effect of dietary phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms. This includes gut microbiota, with research showing only around <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15919681/">30% of women</a> from Western populations possess the gut microbiota needed to convert isoflavones to their active form, known as equol, compared to an estimated 50–60% of menopausal women from Japanese populations.</p> <p>Circulating oestrogen levels (which drop considerably during menopause) and the <a href="https://academic.oup.com/humupd/article/11/5/495/605995">duration of soy intake</a> (longer-term intake being more favourable) may also influence the effect of dietary phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms.</p> <p>Overall, evidence regarding the benefit of phytoestrogens for hot flushes is fairly mixed. A <a href="https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001395.pub4/full">Cochrane review</a> synthesised study results and failed to find conclusive evidence phytoestrogens, in food or supplement form, reduced the frequency or severity of hot flushes or night sweats in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.</p> <p>The review did note genistein extracts (an isoflavone found in soy and fava beans) may reduce the number of hot flushes experienced by symptomatic, postmenopausal women, though to a lesser extent than hormone therapy.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36253903/">recent study</a> showed marked reductions in hot flushes in women following a low fat, vegan diet supplemented with daily soybeans. However, it was questioned whether concurrent weight loss contributed to this benefit.</p> <p>In Australia, <a href="https://ranzcog.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Managing-menopausal-symptoms.pdf">clinical guidelines</a> do not endorse the routine use of phytoestrogens. <a href="https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng23/chapter/Recommendations#managing-short-term-menopausal-symptoms">Guidelines for the United Kingdom</a> note some support for the benefit of isoflavones, but highlight multiple preparations are available, their safety is uncertain and interactions with other medicines have been reported.</p> <h2>Can phytoestrogens help the psychological symptoms of menopause?</h2> <p>Less research has explored whether phytoestrogens improve psychological symptoms of menopause, such as depression, anxiety and <a href="https://theconversation.com/brain-fog-during-menopause-is-real-it-can-disrupt-womens-work-and-spark-dementia-fears-173150">brain fog</a>.</p> <p>A recent systematic review and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33987926/">meta-analysis</a> found phytoestrogens reduce depression in post- but not perimenopausal women. Whereas a more <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9022873/">recent clinical trial</a> failed to find an improvement.</p> <p>Some research suggests phytoestrogens may reduce the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960076015301254?via=ihub">risk of dementia</a>, but there are no conclusive findings regarding their effect on menopausal brain fog.</p> <h2>The bottom line</h2> <p>At present there is uncertainty about the benefit of phytoestrogens for menopause symptoms.</p> <p>If you do wish to see if they might work for you, start by including more phytoestrogen-rich foods in your diet. Examples include tempeh, soybeans, tofu, miso, soy milk (from whole soybeans), oats, barley, quinoa, flaxseeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds, chickpeas, lentils, red kidney beans and alfalfa.</p> <p>Try including one to two serves per day for around three months and monitor symptoms. These are nutritious and good for overall health, irrespective of the effects on menopausal symptoms.</p> <p>Before you trial any supplements, discuss them first with your doctor (especially if you have a history of breast cancer), monitor your symptoms for around three months, and if there’s no improvement, stop taking them.<img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/204801/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/caroline-gurvich-473295">Caroline Gurvich</a>, Associate Professor and Clinical Neuropsychologist, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jane-varney-963066">Jane Varney</a>, Senior Research Dietitian in the Department of Gastroenterology, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jayashri-kulkarni-185">Jayashri Kulkarni</a>, Professor of Psychiatry, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/hot-flushes-night-sweats-brain-fog-heres-what-we-know-about-phytoestrogens-for-menopausal-symptoms-204801">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

MP proposes schools remain open until night-time

<p>A NSW Liberal MP has proposed that Australian schools should remain open until 6pm to better accommodate “modern employment”.</p> <p>During his maiden speech to parliament, Member for Ryde Jordan Lane said that "local schools should become hubs for after-school activity”, where the government guarantees that a child can remain on school campuses after 3pm.</p> <p>"It affords parents flexibility, while at the same time making school a place for extracurricular excellence," he said.</p> <p>"By engaging providers and community organisations, we avoid overworking our tirelessly hardworking teachers but expose more children to rounded experiences, such as coding classes, culture and language, art, dance, music and sport.</p> <p>"I care deeply about the academic results that our students are able to achieve, and about ensuring they can compete on a global stage, but I care even more that our education system helps us to create a new generation of Australians with the content of character we need to be successful as a country.”</p> <p>The move could lead to an extra year of education as a result of the extended hours of teaching, Lane added.</p> <p>"Greater flexibility for parents, a productivity and employment boost to the state, financial relief from the high cost of child care and an injection of hope for potential but reluctant parents who, like me, struggle to rationalise how to afford, in terms of both time and money, children, a home and equal employability between partners," he said.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty / Instagram</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Weekend Sunrise host’s pup-tailored property hits the market

<p>Channel 7 Weekend <em>Sunrise</em> host Matt Doran has put his apartment on the market, in the exclusive eastern Sydney suburb of Bellevue Hill.</p> <p>Doran plans to take advantage of the recovery in the cramped winter property market as he failed to sell the two-bedroom apartment in mid-2021.</p> <p>It has a June 24 auction guide of $1.8 million through BresicWhitney agents Maclay Longhurst and Zakir Abdallaoui.</p> <p>After securing the Tresscourt apartment from <em>Sky News</em> presenter Laura Jayes and her husband, former Seven reporter Alex Hart, for $1.385 million in 2017, Doran commissioned a complete remodel by Sydney designer Dylan Farrell.</p> <p>Doran began his “absolute passion project” with art tailored to the home by artist Vicki Lee.</p> <p>“It’s honestly going to be tough to part with this place,” Doran told The Sell.</p> <p>Doran and his wife, Weekend Today executive producer Kendall Bora are yet to purchase.</p> <p>“I bought it before I met Kendall after I moved back from LA. “The redesign was a big job; the lights and doors and windows custom-made … the centrepiece is a sliding steel door to the loungeroom, which needed 12 people to carry up and install.</p> <p>“We also extended the outdoor space, almost entirely to satisfy the demands of the galaxy’s most spoilt and demanding and glorious Italian greyhound, Murphy.”</p> <p>Per PopTrack, the median unit price in Bellevue Hill is $1.357,500, dipping 9.5 per cent over the past year.</p> <p>It is believed that Murphy will have the final say in their next acquisition.</p> <p>Doran and Bora will hold onto the Sunny Corner Cottage, a retreat accessed by boat and Berowra Waters and where they tied the knot in July 2021.</p> <p>The pair paid $1.75 million in 2021 for the 1905 waterfront property and had designer Tasmin Johnson work on its redesign into a luxury private holiday rental and event space.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram / Realestate.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Picture perfect property hits the market

<p dir="ltr">Casa Campana, the “most Instagrammable” house in Australia, has returned to the market in search of a new owner.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Nunderi property, located between the Gold Coast and Byron Bay at <a href="https://www.domain.com.au/61-garden-avenue-nunderi-nsw-2484-2018539383">61 Garden Avenue</a>, comes equipped with more than just four walls and a roof - it also boasts a following of almost 20k on social media. </p> <p dir="ltr">And while no price has been listed for the stunning property, offers are likely to settle somewhere in the millions, as it last sold in mid-2022 for $3.3 million. </p> <p dir="ltr">The property has demanded attention for its picture perfect appearance, for savvy social media models to hire as a set, for engaged couples to lock in as the venue for their big day, and for people seeking the ultimate holiday-home-away–from-home. </p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the home’s popularity, it is a “verdant oasis of the utmost tranquillity and privacy”, according to its listing. </p> <p dir="ltr">Inspired by the Mediterranean lifestyle, it features “stylish surroundings, sublime interiors, and stunning backdrop that will be excitingly familiar to some” across 1.31ha.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Quietly unassuming from street level”, the white-on-white home is “set against a backdrop of lush rainforest” with a series of “curved edges, archways, whitewashed timber floors, and expanses of glass” to both draw the eye and “frame the outdoors in a living canvas to behold from every vantage point”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The bright and breezy property has an open floor plan, with living and entertaining areas throughout, with “abundant natural light” to spark the feeling of being part of the “laid-back hinterland lifestyle without compromise”.</p> <p dir="ltr">With four bedrooms, an entertainer’s kitchen and butler’s pantry, and a resort-style master suite with outdoor terrace, as well an entire second-level studio for work and wellness, Casa Campana is prepped for groups and families of all sizes.</p> <p dir="ltr">The fun doesn’t stop indoors, either, with “custom design and jaw-dropping features” in place to amaze outside. From an outdoor pool to an entertaining pavilion with an outdoor kitchen, pizza oven, and abundant seating, visitors can rest assured that they won’t be missing out on any of their home - and holiday - luxuries. </p> <p dir="ltr">And for anyone who might be looking to explore what lies beyond, the property is just 15 minutes from Cabarita Beach, 25 from the Gold Coast’s Coolangatta International Airport, and 40 from Byron Bay. </p> <p dir="ltr">And as the listing states, all of these features come together to create “the opportunity to truly live your best life!” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Real estate agent fired over "disgusting" comments about renters

<p>A young real estate agent in Sydney's south has been fired after making "vicious" comments online about renters, and bragging about "inflating the market". </p> <p>Abhnit Kumar from Ray White Macarthur Group in Campbelltown shared an advertisement of a property for sale to his professional Facebook page, with the seemingly innocent post gaining attention for its caption. </p> <p>The post read, "The market doesn't dictate your home's price, the agent does. If you're thinking about selling don't leave money on the table, give me a call &amp; let's discuss strategy."</p> <p>The comment was quickly deciphered by his online followers, with one person asking if the market doesn't contribute to a property's price, then "why are you artificially inflating house prices during a period of high inflation?".</p> <p>The 23-year-old real estate agent responded by asking "wouldn't you like to maximise on the profits you can make" when "selling your biggest asset".</p> <p>"Unless you wouldn't then feel free to contact me as I have a buyer for your place," Mr Kumar wrote.</p> <p>The follower quickly hit back, saying "that's not what your post said". "You said you inflate prices, so that the market is overpriced. Your words, not mine ...".</p> <p>The disgruntled commenter added that they would keep "well away" form Mr Kumar and his agency for his future housing needs. </p> <p>The agent fired back, writing, "Hey buddy you clearly must be a renter. Please stay away from my agency as we would not like to deal with people like you."</p> <p>Mr Kumar's last comment, which was quickly deleted, was met with a wave of scrutiny online, prompting one of his followers to screenshot the exchange and send it to Mr Kumar's employer. </p> <p>The individual who contacted Mr Kumar's place of work branded his behaviour "disgusting" and asked the company to confirm whether his comments reflected its morals, forcing the company to speak out.</p> <p>"We pride ourselves on customer service. We respect and value each and every one of our tenants," Ray White Macarthur Group wrote in a statement on Monday, addressing the outrage.</p> <p>"The views of Abhnit Kumar do not align with the values of our group," it continued. "As a result, we've made the business decision to suspend his employment immediately while we conduct an internal investigation."</p> <p>The backlash spilt over into the post's comment section, with one person slamming the "predatory behaviour" of real estate agents as "vicious", while another shared how "shocked" they were by the agent's comments in the face of Australia's ongoing housing crisis. </p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok / Ray White</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Glorious private island hits the market

<p>A private island, sitting on about 27 hectares of land with a magnificent home offering 360-degree views of the water, has been posted online for sale.</p> <p>The “luxury bespoke” property was built with high-end finishes, and designed so “abundant sunshine reaches every inch of the home”.</p> <p>“It’s an incredible opportunity. There’s a fantastic panorama, the water surrounding you. It’s a pretty awesome part of the world,” Peterswald For Property agent Nick Morgan said.</p> <p>Located on Ram Island in Little Swanport, Tasmania, the property is suited to those looking to get away from the chaos of the city, he said.</p> <p>It offers two kitchens, three bedrooms, a study, a media room and two bathrooms.</p> <p>Peterswald For Property has listed it for $7 million dollars.</p> <p>“Harmonious indoor to outdoor living transitions from the main lounge and dining to a wrap-around north-facing timber deck, from where the views are simply magical and unmatched,” the online advertisement read.</p> <p>The home has been designed with an eco-friendly mindset and is supposed to be completely self-contained with 45kW solar, and 250,000-litre capacity water tanks.</p> <p>Visitors can access the island via boat with private jetty access.</p> <p>“Entertain within complete seclusion anywhere on the island, where birdlife visitors include oystercatchers, rosellas, white-bellied sea eagles, wedge-tailed eagles, and owls. Wallabies and kangaroos also appear frequently,” the advertisement said.</p> <p>“Take a short stroll from the main house to the water’s edge, via the outdoor fire pit, where dolphins and seals are known to frequent close to the shore.”</p> <p>Morgan revealed the current owner had purchased the piece of land on Tasmania’s east coast about 20 years ago, and the home has never been lived in.</p> <p>“We’ve had some good inquiries. Our marketing reach has been fantastic. I’ve had a number of inquiries from both local and interstate people,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Peterswald For Property</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Historic church hits the market - with a catch

<p>A magnificent country church has been through the works and is now perfectly habitable for modern living - but there’s a catch.</p> <p>Covering 2000sq m of land, No. 2 Chauncy Vale Rd, Bagdad was originally the congregational Bagdad Chapel, established in 1842.</p> <p>It later became part of the Uniting Church in 1977, before its de-consecration in 2006.</p> <p>Harcourts Signature property representative Leesa Harrison said the former church has been transformed into a unique residence.</p> <p>She described the property as an “incredibly rare” opportunity to purchase a piece of Tasmanian history.</p> <p>“It is a property with a wealth of historic heritage significance,” she said.</p> <p>It’s undeniably enticing, so, what’s the catch?</p> <p>There is a cemetery on the property and Ms Harrison has said the buyer will have to become a cemetery manager, but that hasn’t prevented the public’s interest.</p> <p>“The property has generated a significant amount of inquiry, well above average. Inquiries are coming in from local Hobart buyers, plus statewide and interstate interest, too,” she said.</p> <p>“Most purchasers are looking for a property with a difference, or former churches specifically.</p> <p>“Many have a keen interest in history or a desire to preserve history.”</p> <p>Ms Harrison added that it was a property with a lot of highlights.</p> <p>“There are many standout features, starting with the incredible stone architecture,” she said.</p> <p>“The stunning renovation the current owners have lovingly undertaken, where history meets the present as you step from the original building into the newer area. It is fantastic.</p> <p>“The original features and heritage pieces that stay with the property are a major talking point.”</p> <p>Many authentic pieces will remain with the property, such as the pulpit, organ and flower stands, original light fittings, glass windows and stained glass gazed with religious scenes.</p> <p>There is now a formal living and dining area, which has been designed to maintain the integrity of the historic construction while complying with the Heritage Council’s guidelines.</p> <p>In the 1950s, an extension was built for a Sunday school.</p> <p>In a more modern section of the interior, there is a contemporary kitchen and a second living area.</p> <p>The kitchen has new light fittings, modern cabinetry, countertop space, a large island bench and stainless steel appliances.</p> <p>The property has a generously sized master bedroom with a large four-door built-in wardrobe and a large bathroom with a separate shower bay and a corner spa bath.</p> <p>Access the outdoors via the kitchen with views of the lush surroundings.</p> <p>So long as you’re happy to be take on the responsibility of a cemetery manager, No. 2 Chauncy Vale Rd, Bagdad could be yours.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Realestate.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

5 negotiation tactics to grab crazy property deals in a slowing market

<p>Rising interest rates have started to put the handbrakes on Australia’s runaway property market, and that’s good news for homebuyers who are now in a far stronger position to negotiate on a property than they have been over the last few years.</p> <p>One of the most apparent advantages for buyers in the current market is the reduced levels of competition. Fewer buyers mean that prices aren’t being driven higher, and if you’re a good negotiator, it’s possible to swoop in and find yourself a bargain.</p> <p>If you’re new to negotiating for property or unsure where to start, here are five tactics that will help you achieve a strong result at the negotiating table.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Know the market</strong></li> </ol> <p>You can’t succeed in a negotiation if you don’t know the value of the asset that you’re trying to buy in the first place. That’s why any good negotiator will always start by doing their research. You need to know the market better than your competition and don’t get caught up in any hype or opinions from a sales agent.</p> <p>Start by finding what comparable properties are selling for in the market. Look for the last three months of sales around your property. The sales should be of similar property types, sizes, ages, and land components. Another good way to get an idea of the price is to speak with local agents in the area. When you have a fair market value, you then know your “walk away price,” and you won’t find yourself getting emotional and overbidding.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Understand the vendor’s motivations</strong></li> </ol> <p>In any negotiation, there is a saying that whoever needs the deal least will likely be the one that comes out on top. When looking at potential properties to buy, you can be the world’s best negotiator, but if the vendor doesn’t need to sell, they will likely either wait for their price or walk away.</p> <p>Whenever you start looking at a property, try to ascertain as much information about the vendor as possible. That will give you an understanding of how motivated they are to sell, which will then impact how much you initially want to offer.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Be the strong bidder, not the highest</strong></li> </ol> <p>In a property transaction, price is just one piece of the puzzle. When a vendor weighs up an offer on their property, they are interested in the price, but the terms can also play a big part.</p> <p>For example, if you’re a cash buyer who can settle quickly, that might be far more appealing to a vendor than a higher offer that needs three months to settle. Similarly, a larger deposit could give a vendor more certainty that the transaction will occur.</p> <p>As a buyer, getting your finances in place ahead of time and then tailoring your terms to suit the vendor might give you an edge in a negotiation even if you’re not the highest bidder. Ultimately, the vendor wants their problem solved, and your job is to find out what it is and then make a strong offer that addresses those immediate needs.</p> <p>If you are ever tempted to make an unconditional offer, be sure you’ve done extensive due diligence and can secure finance, as there could be significant costs if you have to back out of the deal.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Unique offers</strong></li> </ol> <p>A great way to make your offer seem stronger than it might actually be is to come in with an odd-numbered amount. An offer price of $596,200 instead of $590,000 or $600,000 reflects that you’ve taken the time to do your due diligence, making your offer stand out.</p> <p>Another approach is to make a written offer with a deadline. That way, you can speed up the negotiation process, and it might prevent the sales agent from pitting your bid against another buyer to drive up the price.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Know the property</strong></li> </ol> <p>It’s critical to clearly understand what you’re buying before entering any negotiation. While you might have done your comparable sales analysis and have an excellent overall picture of what similar properties are selling for, you still need to investigate this particular property.</p> <p>Several things can impact the property’s value, which can help you negotiate. For example, if an awkward tenant occupies the property, it will be less appealing to many homebuyers, which you can use to your advantage. There may also be issues with the property, such as problematic zoning, service locations, or even large trees that can alter its value.</p> <p>The most obvious factor to consider is the state of the property and whether it needs renovation or repairs. In the current market, homebuyers are less interested in buying a property that needs work due to the cost of materials and difficulty finding tradespeople. That will give you a strong starting point to negotiate around the price.</p> <p>While getting a great deal is essential, it’s crucial not to compromise on the property’s quality. Quality is more important than a bargain, and a property’s performance will ultimately determine its value.</p> <p>A slowing real estate market presents an opportunity for buyers to negotiate and secure a great property deal. By understanding the local market, paying attention to the vendor’s motivations, and putting forward intelligent offers, you can potentially grab an excellent property deal in a slowing market.</p> <p><strong><em>Rasti Vaibhav is the author of The Property Wealth Blueprint (RRP $39.95) and Founder of Get RARE Properties, a bespoke independent buyers' agency that has been helping hundreds of clients across Australia secure their financial freedom through property. </em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>For more information, visit <a href="https://getrare.com.au">https://getrare.com.au</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p style="margin: 0px; font-stretch: normal; font-size: 12px; line-height: normal; font-family: Helvetica; color: #0d0d14; min-height: 14px;"> </p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Property from a galaxy far, far away heads to the market

<p dir="ltr">The time has come for dreams to be realised, particularly if you’re someone with a passion for outer space - or more specifically, a galaxy far, far, away - and want to live among the stars while keeping your feet planted firmly on the ground. </p> <p dir="ltr">Approved plans for a <em>Star Wars </em>light cruiser-inspired property are heading to the auction block, with a Melbourne-based IT specialist launching his 131 Pipers Creek Road campaign on May 4 - better known as ‘Star Wars Day’. </p> <p dir="ltr">With a price guide of $1.05m-$1.15m, the 2.42ha block in Kyneston is perfect for any buyer with enough passion to carry out Shyam Avatapalli’s galactic-level plans. </p> <p dir="ltr">As Avatapalli explained, his intention was to either build the home and sell it, or just to sell it along with the appropriate permits. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s inspired by one of the space ships from one of the older films and The Mandalorian TV series, called a<em> Star Wars</em> light cruiser,” he told <em>Herald Sun</em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve always been a <em>Star Wars </em>fan and always like to think outside of the box when designing or building something.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It isn’t the first unique approach to property planning that Avatapalli has taken, with his own home in Donvale boasting a kitchen that also draws heavy inspiration from<em> Star Wars</em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">The potential Kyneston home’s location was selected for its otherworldly and treeless landscape, with Avatapalli even securing a permit for “a low cost culvert crossing” over the block’s creek, along with those for the property itself. </p> <p dir="ltr">The five-bedroom home was designed in collaboration with an architect, and would feature Colorbond steel as well as a hallway resembling one aboard a fictional spacecraft, and three water tanks that may draw Boeing 747 jet engine’s to mind, as they were inspired by the real-life planes.</p> <p dir="ltr">As for where the hallway’s ‘middle cylinder’ might come from, Avatarpalli intends to put the buyer in contact with an art dealer who could help them to get their hands on a jet engine “built by Rolls Royce in the 1970s”. According to Avatarpalli, it would even be from a “real British Airways flight”.</p> <p dir="ltr">As Ray White’s Brendan Milner said, “the sky was the limit” for the property’s next proud owner, as well as noting that they were likely to be someone searching for “a bit of a wow factor, one-off property, with eccentric taste that goes with the design …</p> <p dir="ltr">“Because it’s a spaceship anyone with an otherworldly fascination would definitely have an interest.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: realestate.com.au </em></p>

Real Estate

Placeholder Content Image

Remote Scottish island hits the market

<p>If you’ve ever dreamt of escaping the rat race and living a life of complete isolation, then look no further.</p> <p>A remote island situated off the southern coast of Scotland, Carlocco Island is up for sale, priced at offers over £150,000 ($A280,317).</p> <p>“There’s still a very romantic sentiment attached to owning your very own Scottish private island, where you can escape the hustle and bustle of everyday life and enjoy some peace and tranquillity in the most beautiful scenery around,” Aaron Edgar of Galbraith Group, the agent handling the sale, said in a statement.</p> <p>The nearest town is almost 10km away with the closest train station Dumfries an hour bus ride from that town. London is more than 563km away with Edinburgh over 160km away.</p> <p>With lush green grass and rocky outcrops reaching the sea, the island covers an area of around 10 hectares, but there are no buildings, only a flood pond providing water to livestock and wildlife in the colder months.</p> <p>According to the listing, no one has ever applied for permission to build on the island, so it would be up to the buyer to investigate any development possibilities with local authorities.</p> <p>At low tide, the island can be reached on foot, by tractor or quad bike. As for the rest of the time, a boat is required for travel, with a pebble beach for them to be anchored, “the perfect base to explore the island, partake in some cold water swimming…and enjoy a waterside picnic,” Edgar said.</p> <p>The island sits in a Site of Special Scientific Interest, an area in the UK defined as of particular interest due to the rare species of fauna and flora it’s home to, and is also a shelter for all types of wildlife, including great black-backed gulls, and rare plants like rock sea lavenders and fragrant orchids.</p> <p>Mr Edgar expects a lot of interest in the unique property, “We have witnessed strong demand from domestic and international parties for entire private islands, having handled the sale of several in Scotland,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Galbraith Group</em></p>

Real Estate

Our Partners