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"Move over": Vyleen White's daughter slams Queensland premier

<p>The grieving daughter of Vyleen White, who was <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/grandmother-fatally-stabbed-in-front-of-granddaughter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fatally stabbed</a> in a shopping centre car park, has slammed the Queensland premier over his comments claiming her mother's death could not have been prevented.</p> <p>A 16-year-old boy from Bellbird Park has been <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/update-on-tragic-stabbing-of-queensland-grandmother" target="_blank" rel="noopener">charged with murder</a>, with four other teenagers charged with the unlawful use of a motor vehicle.</p> <p>Following the tragic incident, White's daughter, Cindy Micallef joined the Queensland African Communities Council (QACC) to call for "peace" and more action against youth violence, following <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13059179/Vyleen-White-Ipswich-stabbing-Family-white-grandmother-allegedly-murdered-South-Sudanese-boy-joins-African-community-plead-calm-racial-tensions-flare.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reports</a> of abuse and harassment towards the African-Australian community. </p> <p>Micallef said that while her family had been "torn apart from the heart", she did not want the community to react in anger. </p> <p>"Mum's legacy will live on in peace. She was never one to be prejudiced, she always looked for the best in people," she said at a media conference in Redbank Plains. </p> <p>Micallef has also called on Queensland Premier Steven Miles to take stronger action on crime prevention. </p> <p>"He promised to protect the community and make changes," she told the press conference. "There's no substance to what he says.</p> <p>"If this government isn't going to make a change move over, because we're going to get someone in to make the changes we need."</p> <p>This comes after the Queensland premier told reporters "nobody can seriously stand up and say they could have prevented this murder". </p> <p>Miles had reportedly been unaware that the accused teen had been out on bail at the time of the alleged murder. </p> <p>Micallef expressed her concern that the premier is not standing with them, so her and her family have joined the African community in calling for action. </p> <p>"You know what, I was really glad he said it because I'm like, 'You're not the man for the job if you can't reassure people in the community this is the utmost priority'," Micallef said.</p> <p>"We all need to feel safe."</p> <p>She also called for support for the African community. </p> <p>"You don't judge the whole community by a couple of bad apples," she said.</p> <p>This news comes just days after Vyleen White's <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/tragic-new-details-emerge-as-vyleen-white-s-husband-speaks-out" target="_blank" rel="noopener">husband</a> spoke out on her death. </p> <p><em>Images: 9News</em></p>

Family & Pets

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"Pathetic": Council slammed after move against FREE health program

<p>A woman who runs a free mental health yoga program has been ordered to pay the council $10,000 because her classes at St Kilda beach in Melbourne have become too popular. </p> <p>The City of Port Phillip Council was slammed for their actions after they told Eliza Hilmer she must pay them hundreds of dollars  per session for her <em>Feel Good Flows </em>classes.</p> <p>Hilmer, who does not make a profit from the classes, said she started the program during the pandemic to help people manage their mental health. </p> <p>“I play by the rules as much as I can,”  Hilmer told <em>Yahoo News</em>, adding that she acquired personal trainer permit as requested by the council. </p> <p>“We’ve been operating as an outdoor gathering for mental health practices more than anything, and it’s been really incredible." </p> <p>The classes, which initially attracted a few people, has gained a bit of traction with around 50 to 80 regular attendees. </p> <p>Hilmer encourages her attendees to leave a donation and provides free hot drinks and a live musician at the biweekly sessions. </p> <p>Because of its popularity, the council have classified <em>Feel Good Flows </em>as a commercial event, as the classes exceed the number of people covered by Hilmer's personal training license, and she was ordered to pay $400 a session. </p> <p>Hilmer was also given the option to cap the sessions at 15 people a time, but she said that "this isn't an option" as “many vulnerable people” rely on the service.</p> <p>With Hilmer having to pay three months upfront to keep classes running, the total adds up to $10,000, and locals are furious. </p> <p>"Another pathetic decision by useless bureaucrats,” one wrote on social media. </p> <p>“This council is being very mean spirited. Leave her alone!!”</p> <p>“Keep on going love don’t bow to the council,” a third added. </p> <p>Despite the outrage and being asked to pay to host her free yoga sessions, Hilmer remains positive. </p> <p>“I don’t want to fight,” she said.</p> <p>“The council can be the solution”.</p> <p>Port Phillip Mayor Heather Cunsolo replied saying that while she was "delighted" to see so many taking part in yoga sessions, "the business needs to adhere to its Personal Training Licence" to "ensure our popular public spaces remain available, safe and enjoyable for everyone." </p> <p>“We encourage Feel Good Flows to look at hosting additional yoga sessions on the foreshore to support its growing popularity," the <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Port Phillip </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">mayor said. </span></p> <p>“Other businesses operating along the foreshore pay a licence fee for the use of public open space and adhere to the 15 person limit per session.</p> <p>"These capacity limits help provide fair access for many businesses operating with a Personal Training Licence, while minimising any potential disruption for visitors to our foreshore." </p> <p>She added that she has been in contact with  Feel Good Flows, and are happy to discuss details further. </p> <p>"If the petition is sent to Council the matter will be heard in the Council Chamber.”</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Legal

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Christina Applegate's Emmy’s appearance moves audience to tears

<p dir="ltr">Christina Applegate has moved audiences to tears after making a courageous appearance at the Emmy Awards. </p> <p dir="ltr">Applegate announced at the beginning of 2023 that she would be taking a step back from acting after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), with the disease making a drastic impact on her life. </p> <p dir="ltr">Now, the 52-year-old took to the stage, supported by a cane, at the Peacock Theatre in downtown Los Angeles on Monday night, with the crowd rising to their feet in a round of applause. </p> <p dir="ltr">Applegate immediately began to tear up as she leaned on host Anthony Anderson for support, telling the audience, “I’m gonna cry more than I’ve been crying.”</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jOJNgHgKnFs?si=Y8K-e2H8gFq1Pr0u" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p dir="ltr">Keeping her sense of humour, she said to the sea of celebrity faces, “Thank you so much! Oh my God! You’re totally shaming me (and my) disability by standing up.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Applegate presented the award for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series, with the award going to Ayo Edebiri for her role in <em>The Bear</em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">The heartfelt moment of the standing ovation was shared on X, with fans saying, “She deserves that ovation and more.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The iconic actress has been candid about her battle with MS since she was first diagnosed in 2021, keeping her fans updated as her illness progressed. </p> <p dir="ltr">In 2023, Applegate told <em>Vanity Fair</em> that her work on the hit Netflix TV show <em>Dead To Me</em> would be her last as an actor, saying “I can’t even imagine going to set right now.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m probably not going to work on-camera again,” Applegate said at the time, adding that while she loved her cast and crew, working had been a “struggle.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Qantas' big move ahead of record-breaking holiday season

<p>As the festive season approaches, Qantas is gearing up for its busiest Christmas holiday period in years. The airline has taken proactive measures to handle the anticipated surge in passenger numbers, with an additional boost to its international cabin crew.</p> <p>More than 8.5 million passengers are expected to fly on Qantas and Jetstar services in December and January, marking a significant increase from the previous year – and the most passengers since the 2019-20 festive season.</p> <p>To meet the demands of the busy holiday season, Qantas has expanded its international cabin crew team with the addition of 16 new faces. These recruits, having completed an eight-week intensive training program, are set to embark on their first flights just in time for the peak travel period. The new recruits will be contributing to flights destined for key international locations such as Japan (Narita), Hong Kong, and Singapore.</p> <p>Phil Capps, Qantas executive manager for product and service, emphasised the airline's commitment to investing in staff training across all departments, including ground staff and cabin crew. The significant recruitment efforts in 2023, with 991 new international cabin crew and 394 new domestic cabin crew, reflect Qantas's dedication to providing exceptional service during the holiday season and beyond.</p> <p>To ensure operational readiness, Qantas has brought forward maintenance on its aircraft, and up to 13 planes will be on standby as operational spares. The airline has also made a substantial boost to reserve staff to address unexpected sick leave situations. Over the past 12 months, almost 3,300 additional operational employees, including cabin crew, pilots, engineers, and airport customer service staff, have been recruited to enhance overall efficiency.</p> <p>As part of the preparations for the busy travel period, Qantas and Jetstar are urging travellers to check-in online for domestic flights, arrive ahead of schedule, and adhere to baggage limits. The airlines emphasised that bringing excess carry-on baggage could lead to delays and urged passengers to be respectful and patient during the holiday rush. Additionally, Qantas warned about potential delays and cancellations due to bad weather and air traffic control issues.</p> <p><em>Image: Qantas</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Top 80s songs to get you moving

<p class="Default">While the fashion from the 1980s might only come out of the closet for dress up parties these days, the music is still considered some of the best of our time. Especially for music to get you moving.</p> <p class="Default">From dance and pop hits to a little rap and rock, it’s got to be one of the most diverse, eclectic and extravagant decades in recent cultural history.</p> <p class="Default">Here, we have been busy rifling through the tracks to whittle down a decade of music into 40 of the best tracks to move to. From dancing to exercise, if you want to get up off that couch, these are the songs to hit play on.</p> <p>1. “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” by Cindy Lauper (1983)<br />2. “Hit Me with Your Best Shot” by Pat Benatar (1980)<br />3. “Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor (1982)<br />4. “Love Shack” by The B-52's (1989)<br />5. “Beat It” by Michael Jackson (1982)<br />6. “Manic Monday” by The Bangles (1986)<br />7. “Let's Dance” by David Bowie (1983)<br />8. “Livin' on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi (1986)<br />9. “I Love Rock N' Roll” by Joan Jett &amp; The Blackhearts (1982)<br />10. “Thriller” by Michael Jackson (1982)<br />11. “Faith” by George Michael (1987)<br />12. “Jump” by Van Halen (1984)<br />13. “Don't Stop Believin’" by Journey (1982)<br />14. “Walking on Sunshine” by Katrina &amp; The Waves (1983)<br />15. “Kiss” by Prince (1986)<br />16. “Holiday” by Madonna (1983)<br />17. “Celebration” by Kool and the Gang (1980)<br />18. “Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson (1982)<br />19. “Love is a Battlefield” by Pat Benatar (1983)<br />20. “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)” by Eurythmics (1983)<br />21. “White Wedding” by Billy Idol (1982)<br />22. “Take on Me” by a-ha (1985)<br />23. “Video Killed the Radio Star” by The Buggles (1981)<br />24. “Karma Chameleon” by Culture Club (1983)<br />25. “The Tide is High” by Blondie (1980)<br />26. “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” by Wham (1984)<br />27. “Let's Hear It for the Boy” by Deniece Williams (1984)<br />28. “A Little Respect” by Erasure (1988)<br />29. “Sweet Child O' Mine” by Guns N' Roses (1987)<br />30. “Footloose” by Kenny Loggins (1984)<br />31. “Wild Thing” by Tone-Loc (1989)<br />32. “Tainted Love” by Soft Cell (1981)<br />33. “Borderline” by Madonna (1983)<br />34. “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” by Whitney Houston (1987)<br />35. “Just Can't Get Enough” by Depeche Mode (1981)<br />36. “Never Gonna Give You Up” by Rick Astley (1987)<br />37. “Always Something There to Remind Me” by Naked Eyes (1983)<br />38. “You Got It (The Right Stuff)” by New Kids on the Block (1988)<br />39. “It Takes Two” by Rob Base (1988)<br />40. “Down Under” by Men at Work (1981)</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Music

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"A moving time": Hunter Valley bus crash victims honoured at AFLW grand final

<p>Avid footy fans Nadene and Kyah McBride were among the ten wedding guests killed in the <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/more-than-we-can-bear-hunter-valley-bus-crash-victims-identified" target="_blank" rel="noopener">horror bus crash</a> on the June long weekend.</p> <p>They are survived by grieving dad and husband, Graham McBride, who was also on the bus at the time of the crash, but only suffered neck and arm injuries. </p> <p>On Sunday, their lives and love for the sport have been honoured during the during the AFLW grand final between North Melbourne and Brisbane. </p> <p>“We thank all of those involved in community football for their tireless efforts in making our game the best it can be,” the game's MC and Seven commentator Nat Edwards said as they brought out the cup. </p> <p>Nadene, who was the founder and coach of the Singleton Roosterettes, has been named an official AFLW community hero. </p> <p>Her daughter Kyah was a star player in the team, and was also part of the Sydney Swans AFL women's development squad.</p> <p>Graham joined the guard of honour as his wife and daughter were acknowledged. </p> <p>He paid a touching tribute to his loved ones before the game. </p> <p>"Nadene has done a lot for football so to get their recognition back hits home," a teary-eyed Graham told <em>Nine News</em>.</p> <p>"Everyone enjoyed being around the girls, they made you smile," he added. </p> <p>In another interview with 7News he told the publication:  “I think that cup will be full of happy tears and sad tears. It’ll be a proud moment." </p> <p>”(Nadene) bled Sherrin in her veins. Footy was everything to her.</p> <p>”I’m going to do it for my girls ... I bloody love them and they love their football.”</p> <p>Just months prior to the tragic accident, Nadene and Kyah celebrated their teams win. </p> <p>“For Singleton AFC when we first started, we were actually not very good,” Nadene said in a Ladbrokes video that resurfaced following the crash. </p> <p>“One of our biggest deficits was about 263-to-nil I’m pretty sure. We only kicked two goals for that whole season, and I kicked them both and I was playing centre halfback.</p> <p>“We’ve come a massive way since then and in 2020, miraculously and through a lot of hard work, we actually took out the premiership.</p> <p>“We beat a team we definitely shouldn’t have beaten on the day and we did.”</p> <p>Bus driver Brett Andrew Button was <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/52-new-charges-levelled-at-hunter-valley-bus-driver" target="_blank" rel="noopener">charged</a> over the crash and remains before court. </p> <p><em>Images: Getty/ Nine</em></p>

Caring

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Steve Price slams "buffoon" Kyle Sandilands over move to Melbourne airwaves

<p>The radio waves have been rocked once again after Steve Price, a man with the subtlety of a sledgehammer, dubbed fellow radio shock jock Kyle Sandilands a "grubby buffoon".</p> <p>The saga unfolded as Sandilands and his radio partner-in-crime, Jackie O Henderson, inked a deal reportedly worth a staggering $200 million. Yes, you heard that right – $200 million. </p> <p>But the real kicker as far as Price is concerned? The show is expanding to Melbourne next year, leaving the current breakfast hosts, Jason Hawkins and Lauren Phillips, with a one-way ticket to radio oblivion.</p> <p>In a tearful farewell on their Melbourne morning show, Phillips lamented: "This is certainly not the way we wanted to bow out."</p> <p>Price, the unsolicited guardian of Melbourne's radio sensibilities, didn't hold back in his assessment of Sandilands, calling him a "grubby buffoon" and then backpedaling to settle on "just a grub". </p> <p>“Kyle’s a grubby buffoon," Price said to the bemused panel on a recent episode of <em>The Project</em>. "And I don’t think grubby buffoons work in Melbourne. I probably shouldn’t call him a grubby buffoon. He’s just a grub.”</p> <p>Price also predicted that Melbourne might not be ready for the explicit nature of the Kyle and Jackie O Show. “Some of the sexually explicit material is off-putting," he explained. "Sarah [Harris] would know better than anyone else that it’s school drop-off time for kids. You don’t want people talking about anal sex at breakfast time, in my view. That’s what they do on that show.</p> <p>"Melbourne people are not going to embrace that. Look, the company that is putting them on the air has a different view to that, and I may be proven to be completely wrong, but that doesn’t happen very often.”</p> <p>Despite Price's dire predictions, Sandilands remains unfazed, his ageless charm apparently defying the laws of time. Given that the $200 million deal extends for the next ten years, that would put Sandilands well into his sixties – quite a challenging age for a "shock jock" to remain relevant. </p> <p>“Can a 60-year-old be smutty?” Price was asked by the panel. “I don’t think they can, and that is part of the problem,” he replied. “But Kyle seems to be ageless. I don’t know how, with that unhealthy lifestyle he has. But he doesn’t seem to age much. So perhaps he can, at 62 . . . You can’t imagine he’s going to be appealing to the 18 to 28-year-old demographic that the radio station is paying him to drag in. I find that really puzzling.”</p> <p>So brace yourselves, Melbourne: the radio waves are about to get a whole lot grubbier, buffoonier and possibly more explicit. It's the Kyle Sandilands extravaganza, and no amount of Price's disapproval can stop the buffoonery.</p> <p><em>Images: KIIS FM / Network 10</em></p>

TV

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"I've moved on": Barnaby Joyce's former wife speaks out after "media circus" wedding

<p>Barnaby Joyce's <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/barnaby-joyce-and-vikki-campion-tie-the-knot-in-bush-bash-wedding" target="_blank" rel="noopener">"bush-bash" wedding</a> to Vikki Campion has stirred up a whirlwind of emotions and media attention, prompting Natalie Abberfield, his first wife, to finally break her silence.</p> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/leaders/barnaby-joyces-first-wife-breaks-silence-on-his-bush-bash-wedding-to-vikki-campion/news-story/e4527b65acee73ac552246771e4d018e" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a>, Abberfield revealed that she has successfully moved on from the heartbreak of her 24-year marriage to the former Deputy Prime Minister coming to an end.</p> <p>Abberfield acknowledged that life has taken a positive turn for her and her family since the divorce, and that she is focused on herself and the well-being of her loved ones.</p> <p>“All I want to say is, I would just like to wish the happy couple all the best,’’ she told news.com.au. “I am just looking after me and no one else I suppose. That’s probably it. Yeah. I’ve got a really good group of friends. My family is great. The girls are great. Yeah. I’ve moved on now. Totally moved on.</p> <p>“I suppose that was one chapter of my book and now I am in a few new chapters of my book.”</p> <p>The absence of an invitation to the wedding for Natalie's daughter, Odette, added a layer of complexity to the family dynamics. Odette, a 20-year-old aspiring individual, criticised the media circus surrounding the event as "tacky". Despite the strained relationship, Natalie remains close to her adult daughters, who chose not to attend their father's wedding.</p> <p>Post-divorce, Natalie has found solace and empowerment in bodybuilding, a passion she adopted as a means to "escape" the chaos that followed the end of her marriage. Contrary to media speculations, she clarified that bodybuilding was not about achieving a "revenge body" but rather a journey towards rediscovering her identity beyond the roles of wife and mother.</p> <p>The Joyce family saga has not escaped the public eye, drawing comments from then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, who described Joyce's behaviour as a "shocking error of judgment". The fallout from the affair has left Natalie and her daughters grappling with hurt and humiliation.</p> <p>Joyce's youngest daughter, Odette, confirmed that none of his four daughters attended the wedding, underlining the fractured relationships within the family. Odette's criticism extended to her father's decision to involve the media in the ceremony, deeming it both "tacky" and in "poor taste".</p> <p>Prior to the recent nuptials, in a surprising yet light-hearted twist, Barnaby's daughter Julia posted an Instagram video wearing a bridal dress while Natalie appeared to wear a veil. The caption, "Getting ready to crash my dad’s wedding I didn’t get invited to, in my mum’s wedding dress," hinted at a coping mechanism for the family, with Natalie explaining that it was all "for a laugh".</p> <p>Ultimately, in the face of public scrutiny and strained family relationships, <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Natalie Abberfield appears to have </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">chosen a path of strength, focusing on her well-being, her passions and the positive aspects of her life. </span></p> <p><em>Images: Office of the Deputy Prime Minister / Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Fast-moving bushfire threatens Australia Zoo

<p>Australia is no stranger to bushfires, and once again, the country finds itself in the throes of a dangerous blaze. Evacuation warnings have been issued as a bushfire inches dangerously close to the boundary of the beloved Australia Zoo, operated by the Irwin family.</p> <p>The zoo, famous for its conservation efforts and charismatic wildlife, spans an impressive 283 hectares and holds a special place in the hearts of many.</p> <p>The blaze, described as a "large, fast-moving fire", had triggered initial evacuations on Saturday night. However, by 10:30pm, locals were allowed to return home as firefighting efforts temporarily contained the blaze. But the respite was short-lived. The situation escalated, and on Sunday, evacuation orders were issued once more.</p> <p>Firefighters have been working tirelessly to control the blaze, but the threat remains. The fire, as of 5pm on Sunday, was at the "watch and act" level and was steadily advancing toward Hardwood Rd.</p> <p>Residents in the vicinity, specifically those between Steve Irwin Way, Graham Drive, Fraser Rd, and Hardwood Rd, have been urged to be prepared to leave at a moment's notice. The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) emphasised that residents should not expect firefighters to arrive at their doors, as resources are stretched thin.</p> <p>The bushfire near Australia Zoo is not an isolated incident; it is part of a larger crisis that has seen multiple fires raging across Queensland. More than 20,000 hectares of land and 41 homes have been lost near Tara on the Western Downs. Exhausted residents in Landsborough, on the Sunshine Coast, had to evacuate for the second time in as many days as conditions worsened. These repeated evacuations underscore the volatile and unpredictable nature of bushfires.</p> <p>Firefighters are racing against time as they brace for worsening conditions this week, with scorching temperatures forecast. Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Inspector Ross Stacey has warned that Tuesday does not look promising, and they are aware that fires can start rapidly under certain conditions. The local crews have been working non-stop, with reinforcements arriving from interstate and across Queensland. The need for vigilance and preparedness is paramount.</p> <p>The fires have already taken a heavy toll, with more than 70 structures, including 41 homes and 25 sheds, lost over the past week. The tireless efforts of over 70 firefighters and two water bombing helicopters were needed to prevent the blaze from engulfing homes on the outskirts of Landsborough. The fire, which broke out in the forestry outside the town, threatened the iconic Australia Zoo, coming within less than a kilometre of the cherished institution. Authorities remain in close contact with the zoo's staff to keep them informed and ensure the safety of the animals.</p> <p>A fire ban is currently in place for several regions, underlining the heightened fire risk.</p> <p><em>Image: Australia Zoo / <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">QFES</span></em></p>

News

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The move to a cashless society isn’t just a possibility, it’s well underway

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/angel-zhong-1204643">Angel Zhong</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p>When was the last time you used cash? For many Australians using cash or even swiping a card has become a rare event.</p> <p>The move towards a cashless society started 50 years ago with the introduction of the Bankcard and was driven by technological advancements. But it really took off with the COVID pandemic when consumers and retailers were reluctant to handle potentially infected notes and coins.</p> <p>The federal government last week underscored its recognition of this trend by <a href="https://ministers.treasury.gov.au/ministers/jim-chalmers-2022/media-releases/modernising-payments-regulation">unveiling reforms</a> to regulate digital payment providers.</p> <p>Treasurer Jim Chalmers said: "As payments increasingly become digital, our payments system needs to remain fit for purpose so that it delivers for consumers and small businesses. We want to make sure the shift to digital payments occurs in a way that promotes greater competition, innovation and productivity across our entire economy."</p> <p>From big cities to remote rural corners the shift towards digital payments is evident. This raises the question, is a cashless society inevitable?</p> <h2>The phenomenal growth of the digital payments</h2> <p>The convenience of digital transactions has become irresistible for consumers and businesses and has led to the sector eclipsing traditional payment methods.</p> <p>The relentless march of technology has produced myriad innovative platforms from mobile wallets to buy-now-pay-later (BNPL) schemes, each vying for a piece of this burgeoning market.</p> <p>A recent <a href="https://www.ausbanking.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2023/06/Bank-On-It-%E2%80%93-Customer-Trends-2023-1.pdf">report</a> by the Australian Banking Association paints a vivid picture of the digital payment industry’s explosive expansion.</p> <p>The use of digital wallet payments on smartphones and watches has soared from $746 million in 2018 to over $93 billion in 2022. Cash only accounts for 13% of consumer payments in Australia as of the end of 2022, a stark contrast to 70% in 2007.</p> <p>Digital wallets are popular with most age groups. Young Australians aged between 18 and 29 are leading the pack, with two thirds <a href="https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2023/jun/consumer-payment-behaviour-in-australia.html">using digital wallets</a> to pay for goods and services.</p> <p>About <a href="https://www.ausbanking.org.au/almost-40-leave-wallets-at-home/">40% of Australians</a> are comfortable leaving home without their actual wallets or even credit or debit cards, as long as they have their mobile devices with digital wallets.</p> <p>The astonishing speed at which Australians have embraced digital payments places the country among the top users of cashless payments globally, surpassing the United States and European countries.</p> <p>Digital wallets are not the only players in this space. The use of BNPL products is also growing rapidly in Australia, which was where many of the large-scale products in this category started.</p> <p>The Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) reports the total value of all BNPL transactions increased by <a href="https://asic.gov.au/regulatory-resources/find-a-document/reports/rep-672-buy-now-pay-later-an-industry-update/">79% in the 2018–19 financial year</a>. This continues into 2022 with an annual growth beyond 30% according to the <a href="https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/annual-reports/psb/2022/the-evolving-retail-payments-landscape.html">Reserve Bank of Australia</a> (RBA).</p> <p>PayID and PayPal payments are also claiming their shares in this space.</p> <h2>Are government regulations necessary?</h2> <p>The government’s planned regulation of the system, contained in amendments to the Reforms to the Payment Systems (Regulation) Act 1998, is a big step towards establishing a secure and trustworthy cashless society in Australia.</p> <p>It will subject BNPL and digital wallet service providers like Apple Pay and Google Pay to the same oversight by the RBA as traditional credit and debit cards.</p> <p>The regulations will require providers meet clear standards for security measures, data protection and dispute resolution to give Australians confidence their funds and personal information are safeguarded.</p> <p>With increasing concern over cyber attacks, the regulations will help reduce the risk of fraudulent activities and money laundering and help identify suspicious transactions, maintaining the integrity of the financial system.</p> <p>Also, regulation will promote fair competition and market stability by levelling the playing field and by preventing monopolies.</p> <p>While banks support the forthcoming regulation, new market players are less positive. For example, Apple Pay says it is merely <a href="https://www.afr.com/companies/financial-services/new-rba-powers-to-regulate-apple-google-payments-20231010-p5eb6d">providing technical architecture</a> rather than payment services.</p> <p>The current regulatory debate is not new. When credit cards made their debut in Australia in the early 1970s, there were hardly any safeguards for consumers. This led to card users being hit with high interest rates on money owed, sneaky fees and aggressive marketing tactics.</p> <p>Consequently, regulations were introduced to hold card providers to a standard of responsible behaviour. Today, they must openly disclose interest rates, fees and charges, and follow stringent guidelines in advertising their products and services.</p> <p>Regulating digital wallet providers strikes a crucial balance between innovation and accountability, ensuring life-changing technology continues to serve the public interest.</p> <p>The shift towards a cashless society in Australia isn’t just a possibility, it’s already well underway.</p> <p>The blend of technological advancements, changing consumer preferences and regulatory adaptations has set the stage for this transformation. The new regulations will help Australians navigate this transition more confidently.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/215446/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/angel-zhong-1204643"><em>Angel Zhong</em></a><em>, Associate Professor of Finance, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-move-to-a-cashless-society-isnt-just-a-possibility-its-well-underway-215446">original article</a>.</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"She's my heartbeat": Man's touching move after mum buys him $730k winning lottery ticket

<p>A man from South Australia has vowed to shower his mother in gifts after she bought him a winning lottery ticket for his birthday. </p> <p>The man held one of the seven winning division one tickets, seeing him rake in a hefty prize of $738,668.19. </p> <p>The winning ticket was purchased by the man's mother, at the George Avenue Deli in Whyalla Norrie, north of Adelaide, with the family in disbelief at the extraordinary win. </p> <p>"My mum bought me this ticket for my birthday last week,” the man said.</p> <p>“I rang her yesterday after calling The Lott and she didn’t believe me at all.”</p> <p>The man said that while he is thrilled with the win, it still doesn't seem real. </p> <p>“Honestly, I’ve been holding off getting excited until the money is in my account,” he said. </p> <p>The grateful winner has promised to repay his mother for all she’s done for him by spoiling her “rotten” with his winnings. </p> <p>“She’s my heartbeat, she’s everything to me,” he said.</p> <p>“I wouldn’t have had a great birthday if it wasn’t for her, so I look forward to giving back to her.”</p> <p>The owner of George Avenue Deli, Lorna-Jane Anderson, said learning of the winning entry had been “wonderful news”.</p> <p>“There’s no doubt the local community will be happy to hear another Whyalla Norrie customer has won big with a ticket purchased at our outlet,” she said.</p> <p>“We’ve sold many major lottery prizes in the past two years and in fact, almost a year ago we sold a top prize-winning Instant Scratch-Its ticket worth $100,000."</p> <p>“We’re glad to hear the mystery winner has come forward to claim their prize and we wish him all the best with the win.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: The Lott</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"Totally insensitive": Kate Middleton slammed for "hypocritical" move

<p>Kate Middleton has come under fire after using a taxpayer-funded helicopter to travel a short distance for an offical royal engagement. </p> <p>On Monday, the Princess of Wales travelled to the Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton by helicopter, while the journey by car would've taken just under two hours.</p> <p>She visited the airfield as Commodore-in-Chief of the Fleet Air Arm, an honorary title given to her by King Charles.</p> <p>After news of her mode of travel hit social media, many were quick to slam her decision to use the helicopter, given the royal family's preaching about protecting the environment against climate change. </p> <p>Anti-monarchists took to X, formerly known as Twitter, to share their frustrations with the "hypocrisy". </p> <p>One person wrote, "She could have gone by car. About two hours from Windsor. But instead flies by helicopter for an entirely pointless visit."</p> <p>Many others agreed, with one user writing, "What about climate change, didn’t Charlie also use a private jet this week to fly people to meet him .. do what I say, not do what I do."</p> <p>"While her husband preaches to the rest of us about the environment," another added.</p> <p>"Ahhh the Uber Helicopter again! And it costs the taxpayer £5,000 [A$9,600] each time!" a third pointed out.</p> <p>"We pay for their travel so they take advantage!" another user said.</p> <p>"Use a car, Kate!" someone else begged.</p> <p>"More climate change hypocrisy," one annoyed user wrote.</p> <p>"A waste of taxpayers money... not to mention the carbon footprint of her trip," yet another said.</p> <p>Others labelled the Princess of Wales as "totally insensitive" and "disgusting" for choosing not to drive, given Prince William's dedication to climate change efforts. </p> <p>The uproar comes after a new poll revealed the British public believes Prince William and Kate need to work harder before they rise to the throne.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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What is cognitive functional therapy? How can it reduce low back pain and get you moving?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-osullivan-48973">Peter O'Sullivan</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jp-caneiro-1463060">JP Caneiro</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mark-hancock-1463059">Mark Hancock</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-kent-1433302">Peter Kent</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></p> <p>If you haven’t had lower back pain, it’s likely you know someone who has. It affects <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22231424/">around 40% of adults</a> in any year, ranging from adolescents to those in later life. While most people recover, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29112007/">around 20%</a> go on to develop chronic low back pain (lasting more than three months).</p> <p>There is a <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/12/698">common view</a> that chronic low back pain is caused by permanent tissue damage including “wear and tear”, disc degeneration, disc bulges and arthritis of the spine. This “damage” is often described as resulting from injury and loading of the spine (such as bending and lifting), ageing, poor posture and weak “core” muscles.</p> <p>We’re often told to “protect” our back by sitting tall, bracing the core, keeping a straight back when bending and lifting, and avoiding movement and activities that are painful. Health practitioners often <a href="https://theconversation.com/having-good-posture-doesnt-prevent-back-pain-and-bad-posture-doesnt-cause-it-183732">promote and reinforce these messages</a>.</p> <p>But this is <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/12/698">not based on evidence</a>. An emerging treatment known as <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29669082/">cognitive functional therapy</a> aims to help patients undo some of these unhelpful and restrictive practices, and learn to trust and move their body again.</p> <h2>People are often given the wrong advice</h2> <p>People with chronic back pain are often referred for imaging scans to detect things like disc degeneration, disc bulges and arthritis.</p> <p>But these findings are very common in people <em>without</em> low back pain and research shows they <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24276945/">don’t accurately predict</a> a person’s current or future experience of pain.</p> <p>Once serious causes of back pain have been ruled out (such as cancer, infection, fracture and nerve compression), there is <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27745712/">little evidence</a> scan findings help guide or improve the care for people with chronic low back pain.</p> <p>In fact, scanning people and telling them they have arthritis and disc degeneration can <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33748882/">frighten them</a>, resulting in them avoiding activity, worsening their pain and distress.</p> <p>It can also lead to potentially harmful treatments such as <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27213267/">opioid</a> pain medications, and invasive treatments such as spine <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19127161/">injections</a>, spine <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12709856/">surgery</a> and battery-powered electrical stimulation of spinal nerves.</p> <h2>So how should low back pain be treated?</h2> <p>A complex range of factors <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29112007/">typically contribute</a> to a person developing chronic low back pain. This includes over-protecting the back by avoiding movement and activity, the belief that pain is related to damage, and negative emotions such as pain-related fear and anxiety.</p> <p>Addressing these factors in an individualised way is <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29573871/">now considered</a> best practice.</p> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15936976/">Best practice care</a> also needs to be person-centred. People suffering from chronic low back pain want to be heard and validated. They <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35384928/">want</a> to understand why they have pain in simple language.</p> <p>They want care that considers their preferences and gives a safe and affordable pathway to pain relief, restoring function and getting back to their usual physical, social and work-related activities.</p> <p>An example of this type of care is cognitive functional therapy.</p> <h2>What is cognitive functional therapy?</h2> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29669082/">Cognitive functional therapy</a> is about putting the person in the drivers’ seat of their back care, while the clinician takes the time to guide them to develop the skills needed to do this. It’s led by physiotherapists and can be used once serious causes of back pain have been ruled out.</p> <p>The therapy helps the person understand the unique contributing factors related to their condition, and that pain is usually not an accurate sign of damage. It guides patients to relearn how to move and build confidence in their back, without over-protecting it.</p> <p>It also addresses other factors such as sleep, relaxation, work restrictions and engaging in physical activity based on the <a href="https://www.restorebackpain.com/patient-journey">person’s preferences</a>.</p> <p>Cognitive functional therapy usually involves longer physiotherapy sessions than usual (60 minutes initially and 30-45 minute follow-ups) with up to seven to eight sessions over three months and booster sessions when required.</p> <h2>What’s the evidence for this type of therapy?</h2> <p>Our recent clinical trial of cognitive functional therapy, published in <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(23)00441-5/fulltext">The Lancet</a>, included 492 people with chronic low back pain. The participants had pain for an average of four years and had tried many other treatments.</p> <p>We first trained 18 physiotherapists to competently deliver cognitive functional therapy across Perth and Sydney over six months. We compared the therapy to the patient’s “usual care”.</p> <p>We found large and sustained improvements in function and reductions in pain intensity levels for people who underwent the therapy, compared with those receiving usual care.</p> <p>The effects remained at 12 months, which is unusual in low back pain trials. The effects of most recommended interventions such as exercise or psychological therapies are <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34580864/">modest in size</a> and tend to be of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32794606/">short duration</a>.</p> <p>People who underwent cognitive functional therapy were also more confident, less fearful and had a more positive mindset about their back pain at 12 months. They also liked it, with 80% of participants satisfied or highly satisfied with the treatment, compared with 19% in the usual care group.</p> <p>The treatment was as safe as usual care and was also cost-effective. It saved more than A$5,000 per person over a year, largely due to increased participation at work.</p> <h2>What does this mean for you?</h2> <p>This trial shows there are safe, relatively cheap and effective treatments options for people living with chronic pain, even if you’ve tried other treatments without success.</p> <p><a href="https://www.restorebackpain.com/cft-clinicians">Access to clinicians</a> trained in cognitive functional therapy is currently limited but will expand as training is scaled up.</p> <p>The costs depend on how many sessions you have. Our studies show some people improve a lot within two to three sessions, but most people had seven to eight sessions, which would cost around A$1,000 (aside from any Medicare or private health insurance rebates). <!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/207009/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-osullivan-48973">Peter O'Sullivan</a>, Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jp-caneiro-1463060">JP Caneiro</a>, Research Fellow in physiotherapy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mark-hancock-1463059">Mark Hancock</a>, Professor of Physiotherapy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-kent-1433302">Peter Kent</a>, Adjunct Associate Professor of Physiotherapy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-is-cognitive-functional-therapy-how-can-it-reduce-low-back-pain-and-get-you-moving-207009">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

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The 10 step process to get moving and keep moving for a healthier you

<p>Looking at the <a href="https://mind.uci.edu/research-studies/90plus-study/">research</a>, especially around longevity, the answer to a healthier you lies in the way we live. It’s really about the choices we make every day and the little things we do that accumulate to form the larger picture.</p> <p>If we look around, our lifestyles are full and quite sedentary. We run busy schedules, we work long hours and have many commitments that leave us with little to no time to be active. We spend all day at a desk to then go home and relax, sitting some more, this time on the couch. </p> <p>We need to move more. It is really that simple. Life quality goes hand in hand with being (and keeping) active. When I work with my clients to help them uncover their inner athlete, I follow a 10 step process that helps them shift perspective and move from a short term fix to a framework that lasts the test of time. At the heart of this process is the belief that everyone can learn these steps and create their very own formula, embracing what works for them and them alone. Let’s take a look:</p> <p><strong>1) Rediscover</strong></p> <p>Think back to a time when being active was second nature to you, something you would just do. Follow the clues that lit you up to understand where your passions lie. Your past is the teacher that can help you rekindle your love of movement.</p> <p><strong>2) Driving Forces</strong></p> <p>Your beliefs, your values as well as those little things that warm your heart and make you smile carry great power and meaning. They can ignite a spark in you so use them to drive change.</p> <p><strong>3) Athletic Mindset</strong></p> <p>What goes on between your ears is the difference between being active and letting gravity pull you back down to the couch. Look at your mindset, the way you talk to yourself and the questions you ask. The aim is to remove internal hurdles to help you stay on track.</p> <p><strong>4) Your Why</strong></p> <p>Think of who you want to become and why. Your why will give you strong roots to weather the storms and a reason to keep moving.</p> <p><strong>5) Realistic Goals</strong></p> <p>When you work towards a realistic goal you automatically bring order into your life. Structure fosters change and tightens our priorities.</p> <p><strong>6) Energy Boost</strong></p> <p>To bring about change you require energy. There are 5 elements you can tweak (one at a time and gradually) to boost your energy: food, sleep, breath work, timing and movement.</p> <p><strong>7) Maximum performance</strong></p> <p>It takes time to develop the skills that go hand in hand with an active lifestyle. The secret is to make your movement incremental, follow your pace (slow burn it) and be deliberate in what you do.</p> <p><strong>8) Rituals and routines</strong></p> <p>How you greet the morning determines the flavour of every day. Slowly build habits that keep you hungry for more and align with the person you want to become.</p> <p><strong>9) Recognise Progress</strong></p> <p>Recognising your progress helps you shift perspective and understand that every journey has its setbacks. In life’s transitions you are still moving forward and your focus is now the long game.</p> <p><strong>10) Celebrate the Wins</strong></p> <p>Take time to pat yourself on the back, celebrate you and how far you’ve come. Lightness and laughter are key ingredients in building momentum.</p> <p>There will be bumps along the way. Nothing is a straight line. Moving challenges every aspect of your being: the physical, the emotional and the cognitive. But to make the change you have all you need inside of you. Enjoy the ripple effects that moment brings into your life. Be playful, creative and make it your own.</p> <p><strong><em>Dr Brett Lillie, author of Rediscover Your Athlete Within, is a sought-after speaker, coach and rehab professional who helps people rekindle their love for movement and find their mojo so they can live their best life. To find out more about Dr Brett’s programs, go to his website www.brettlillie.com </em></strong></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p style="margin: 0px; font-stretch: normal; font-size: 11px; line-height: normal; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; -webkit-text-stroke-width: initial; -webkit-text-stroke-color: #000000; min-height: 12px;"> </p>

Body

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Stan Grant reveals big career move after quitting ABC

<p>Following his departure from the ABC due to racial abuse, Stan Grant has unveiled his next career move. He is now set to embark on a new journey as a journalism professor at Monash University in Melbourne.</p> <p>Grant made public on Tuesday his decision to resign from his permanent role at the ABC. This move comes several months after he took a leave of absence due to the racial abuse he endured. His departure from his position as the host of Q+A occurred in May, a step he took following an onslaught of "relentless racial filth" directed at him subsequent to his participation in a panel discussion centred around colonialism in anticipation of King Charles' Coronation.</p> <p>Monash University has now revealed that Grant has been selected to lead as the inaugural Director of the Constructive Institute for the Asia Pacific region within its Faculty of Arts. In this capacity, Grant will spearhead various projects and discussions aimed at embracing global solutions, nuanced perspectives, and meaningful dialogues within newsroom environments. Simultaneously, he will take on the role of a journalism professor.</p> <p>While the Constructive Institute is primarily located in Denmark, Grant is scheduled to travel there for a six-week period, commencing on Wednesday. Despite this, he will remain based in Sydney, dividing his time between Melbourne, Denmark and Sydney for his responsibilities.</p> <p>Expressing his enthusiasm, Grant stated, 'This is an incredibly exciting opportunity for me. It aligns with my values and draws on my 40 years in journalism, as well as my commitment to doing public interest journalism better in a way that serves the public at a time when the stakes couldn't be higher for our country and for the world." </p> <p>Grant's mission includes efforts to reform what he perceives as a toxic news culture. Professor Katie Stevenson, the Dean of Monash University's Faculty of Arts, praised Grant's appointment, affirming that he is ideally positioned to champion a journalism approach centred on solutions and democracy. She remarked, "Beyond the Institute's mission, our media students will have the privilege of drawing upon Stan's rich experience and knowledge of media, and his passion to change news culture for the better,"</p> <p>Although Grant confirmed his departure from the ABC as a permanent staff member weeks prior, he emphasised that his relationship with the public broadcaster remains amicable. He conveyed his willingness to collaborate with the network in the future, citing his eagerness to pursue other endeavours.</p> <p>In recent weeks, the ABC announced that Grant would not be resuming his role as the host of Q+A, yet highlighted that he would be exploring "fresh undertakings" within them.</p> <p><em>Images: Q+A / Instagram</em></p>

TV

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Kochie’s next big career move

<p dir="ltr">Former <em>Sunrise</em> host David Koch has revealed his next career venture after a 21-year long career on breakfast TV.<span id="docs-internal-guid-1bcd9942-7fff-653c-5b17-f01723a37578"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Kochie left the Seven Network program <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/tv/kochie-s-emotional-farewell-on-sunrise" target="_blank" rel="noopener">last month</a> to spend more time with his family and focus on his work in finance, with his latest investment being Australian beverage company Goodness Group Global’s Nexba drink.</p> <p dir="ltr">This is the  67-year-old founder of Pinstripe Media's biggest investment since leaving <em>Sunrise, </em>contributing to the $7.75 million fundraising effort for Nexba.</p> <p dir="ltr">The move was one that Kochie was planning for a while, after he revealed that he had met with the brand’s founders a decade ago, and that it is one of the few brands he's invested in over the years. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I met the Nexba founders on a plane 10 years ago and have followed and admired their journey ever since. When the opportunity came to become a shareholder, I jumped at the chance,” he said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I love supporting young Aussie entrepreneurs and Nexba joins a group of six other start-ups and scaleups I’ve invested in over recent years. Whenever I assess the suitability of a company for potential investment, there are a few key principles that guide me.</p> <p dir="ltr">“One is the quality and integrity of the founders of the business and the other is having a strong purpose to deliver value and impact long term.</p> <p dir="ltr">"In the case of Nexba and Goodness Group Global – I overwhelmingly support both," he added. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We know that Nexba is on a mission to create a lasting impact of better health and wellness and that’s not only a worthy journey to join, but is hopefully a good investment decision as well.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Nexba specialises in "naturally sugar free” soft drinks and is available across Australia, New Zealand, South Korea, UK and Europe. </p> <p dir="ltr">Aside from crafted soft drinks they also sell kombucha, nootropics, iced tea and mixers. </p> <p dir="ltr">Kochie's decision comes after Pat Cummins was named the company’s global brand ambassador and is also a shareholder of Goodness Group Global. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Seven </em></p>

Money & Banking

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Young royal moving to Australia in just weeks

<p>Denmark's Count Nikolai is busy preparing to relocate to Sydney for his university studies, but not before making a quick stop in France for the summer.</p> <p>The 23-year-old grandson of Queen Margrethe II travelled to France to stay at Château de Cayx, near Cahors in the south of the country.</p> <p>The estate is owned by the Danish royal family as a private residence after it was purchased by the Queen and her late husband Prince Henrik in 1974.</p> <p>He stayed in the picturesque estate with his long-time girlfriend Benedikte Thoustrup, before the couple were later joined by Nikolai's younger siblings, Count Felix, 20, Count Henrik, 14, and Countess Athena, 11.</p> <p>The Danish royals often holiday at the chateau and over the years, many have shared photos from their time there including the Queen, Crown Princess Mary and Crown Prince Frederik and Nikolai's father Prince Joachim and his wife Princess Marie.</p> <p>Count Nikolai stopped in at the estate in France to enjoy the summer before he and his girlfriend prepare for their big move to Australia. </p> <p>Nikola and Benedikte are set to move to Sydney for their university studies, with the couple both being enrolled at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), as reported by a Danish newspaper. </p> <p>The pair will be studying in Australia for one semester, with their classes commencing at the university from August 1st and ending on November 30th.</p> <p>The move was confirmed to the newspaper by press advisor Helle von Wildenrath Løvgreen in May.</p> <p>Von Wildenrath Løvgreen said Count Nikolai and Thoustrup were excited about experiencing Australia and, at the time, were looking for an apartment to rent in Sydney while they study. </p> <p>Count Nikolai is one of Queen Margrethe's four grandchildren who were stripped of their royal titles late last year.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

International Travel

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Hero tradie’s daring move saves toddler who wandered onto busy street

<p>In an awe-inspiring act of bravery that will leave you breathless, shocking <a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/tradie-scary-move-save-child-095600259.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">dash cam footage</a> has captured a heart-pounding moment that will forever be etched in the annals of heroism. </p> <p>Laurie Owens, a true guardian angel who fearlessly soared into action on the Salisbury Highway in Adelaide, embarked on a heart-stopping mission to save a young child's life, giving no thought to his own safety or that of his vehicle</p> <p>It was just another day for working tradie Laurie Owens as he navigated the bustling roadways. But with eagle eyes and a heart tuned to protect, Laurie spotted a young boy, still adorned in his nappy, wandering innocently into the treacherous path of oncoming vehicles on a busy highway.</p> <p>In a surge of adrenalin-fuelled heroism, Owens sprang into action as – u<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">ndeterred by the imminent danger, he gallantly mounted the median strip and fearlessly directed his own vehicle into the path of the charging traffic, all in an effort to shield the toddler from harm's way. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">His words echo with undying determination: "I'd rather take the damage of a car running into me because I'm safe rather than the child be killed because what protection do they have?" he told 9News. </span></p> <p>In a dazzling display of divine intervention, the unsuspecting little boy, named Aaryan, instinctively turned and bolted towards the safety of his family driveway, under the watchful gaze of Owens.</p> <p>Owens then gathered the child in his arms, poised to reunite him with his worried parents, who confirmed that Aaryan was indeed their precious child. The driveway gates had been left ajar, allowing the child, who grapples with autism, to embark on an unplanned adventure onto the perilous road.</p> <p>In the tearful aftermath, Aaryan's mother, overwhelmed with gratitude, expressed her deepest appreciation, declaring, "Thank you, I'm really grateful that [he] saved my child."</p> <p>For Owens, the humble champion of this heart-stopping saga, the joy of knowing that the little boy made it home safely was an immeasurable reward. Bursting with pride, he triumphantly proclaimed, "I've saved a kid's life. He's got a future now!"</p> <p><em>Images: 9 News</em></p>

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Hollywood A-listers quietly move to Australia

<p>Hollywood couple Dave Franco and Alison Brie are the latest A-listers to make the move Down Under. </p> <p>The A-list couple kept their relocation under the radar, as they moved to the quiet coastal town of Byron Bay on the New South Wales north coast. </p> <p>The married couple, who are usually based in Los Angeles, now join the likes of Chris Hemsworth and Elsa Pataky, Matt Damon and Luciana Barroso, and Zac Efron as the latest famous Byron Bay residents. </p> <p>Alison Brie, best known for her roles in TV series <em>Community</em> and <em>GLOW</em>, is in Australia filming her latest project, TV miniseries <em>Apples Never Fall</em> based on the best-selling novel by Australian author, Liane Moriarty, with her actor husband by her side. </p> <p>The actress’ Instagram page showcases plenty of moments of the couple’s happy new life in the popular coastal town, as well as pictures of them taking in the sights of Sydney and Melbourne, where they celebrated Franco’s birthday.</p> <p>The famous couple met in 2011 after being introduced by a mutual friend, and got married six years later during Mardi Gras celebrations in New Orleans.</p> <p>Byron Bay has long attracted high-profile celebrities looking for a slower pace of life. </p> <p>Chris Hemsworth brought plenty of attention and star power to the town back in 2014 when he purchased a 4.2 hectare property for $7 million.</p> <p>He and wife Elsa Pataky lived in the original eight-room home before knocking it down to build a $20 million mega-mansion.</p> <p>Zac Efron also famously rode out most of the pandemic living in the coastal town, while American actress Melissa McCarthy chose to base herself there for a small stint after wrapping up production on Nicole Kidman’s <em>Nine Perfect Strangers</em> TV series in 2021.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

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“I want to move on”: Rod Stewart announces the end of an era

<p dir="ltr">After more than six decades establishing himself as a legend in the wide world of rock’n’roll, Rod Stewart has announced that he’ll be taking things in a whole new direction. </p> <p dir="ltr">The British music star was chatting to host of <em>BBC Breakfast</em>, Charlie Stayt, when he made the revelation in response to a comment about how “rock stars are performing into incredible ages now.” </p> <p dir="ltr">“I am actually stopping,” Stewart declared, before going on to share that “I’m not retiring, but I want to move on.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He noted that he’d enjoyed “great success” with his album, <em>It Had to Be You: The Great American Songbook</em>, and that he’d “just done a swing album with Jools Holland” that is set to release in 2024. </p> <p dir="ltr">“So,” he said, “I want to go in that direction.” </p> <p dir="ltr">The 78 year old had more to say on the matter, offering more in the way of an explanation to fans who may still be struggling to come to terms with his decision when he said, “I just want to leave all the rock’n’roll stuff behind. For a while, maybe.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Everything has to come to an end sooner or later.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Stewart, who was joined by Boy George for the interview ahead of their tour together, also shed some light into his immediate plans after his 2023 tour, telling Stayt that he was “really looking forward to doing something else, especially singing with Jools’ band.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“It borders on rock‘n’roll anyway,” he noted, “it’s just not ‘Maggie May’ and ‘Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?’”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">'Everything has to come to an end sooner or later'</p> <p>Singer Rod Stewart has told <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BBCBreakfast?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BBCBreakfast</a> he's giving up rock and roll as he prepares to go on tour with Boy George<a href="https://t.co/Y29oI6E5Pk">https://t.co/Y29oI6E5Pk</a> <a href="https://t.co/odrQmQkOlT">pic.twitter.com/odrQmQkOlT</a></p> <p>— BBC Breakfast (@BBCBreakfast) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBCBreakfast/status/1667049131867529217?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 9, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And while some fans of the singer weren’t immediately onboard with the change of tune, others were supportive, taking to social media to share their well wishes ahead of Stewart’s new venture. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Good for him - I loved the <em>American Songbook</em> album,” a fan wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Something to look forward to- Love them both,” another shared. </p> <p dir="ltr">One user took the opportunity to reflect on Stewart’s career so far, writing, “he put on AMAZING shows!  Saw him first in 1975, and three others before 2010.  He really could blow!!!”</p> <p dir="ltr">And another followed suit, telling the others that “I would HAPPILY hit a Rod Stewart convert just to hear him play his <em>Great American Songbook </em>tracks. Just loved it when he did those tunes. I like all of it! Look forward to the swing album, too! Music!”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: BBC Breakfast / Twitter</em></p>

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