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"Heartbreaking": Teen dies after collapsing on badminton court

<p>Rising badminton star Zhang Zhijie has died after he collapsed in the middle of a match at the Badminton Asia Junior Championships in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on Monday.</p> <p>In an interview with the BBC,  Indonesia’s badminton association PBSI said that the  17-year-old athlete suffered a sudden cardiac arrest. </p> <p>The Chinese athlete was facing Japan’s Kazuma Kawano when he fell to the floor and appeared to convulse. </p> <p>He was stretchered off the floor and taken to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead after they failed to resuscitate him. </p> <p>Viral footage of the tragic incident has sparked fury on Chinese social media platform Weibo, after it showed that it took first medical responders more than 35 seconds to finally arrive and check his condition. </p> <p>According to a PBSI spokesman, medical teams were only following the rule where they needed to get the referee's permission before entering the court. </p> <p>“That is in accordance with the regulations and standards of procedure that applies to every international badminton tournament,” the spokesman said.</p> <p>The Badminton World Federation said it will investigate if the correct protocols were taken during the tragic incident.</p> <p>“Zhang’s death at the Badminton Asia Junior Championships in Yogyakarta, Indonesia is a tragic occurrence, and we are taking all necessary steps to thoroughly review this matter in consultation with Badminton Asia and Badminton Association of Indonesia,” they told <em>TMZ</em>. </p> <p>It is also reported that the medical responders did not have an AED machine to react to the cardiac arrest. </p> <p>Zhijie's death has been a trending topic on Weibo for days, with many outraged over the medical response. </p> <p>One person wrote: “Which is more important - the rules or someone’s life?” </p> <p>Another added: “Did they miss the ‘golden period’ to rescue him?”</p> <p>The badminton community have since paid tribute to the athlete, and they observed a moment of silence in memory of him at the championship on Tuesday. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">One minute of silence as we pay our respects to the late Zhang Zhi Jie.</p> <p>Rest in peace. <a href="https://t.co/DhP4actMDJ">pic.twitter.com/DhP4actMDJ</a></p> <p>— BAM (@BA_Malaysia) <a href="https://twitter.com/BA_Malaysia/status/1807601602460819621?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 1, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>The Badminton Association of Malaysia also held a moment of silence at tournament on Sunday, as seen in a video posted on X.</p> <p>“One minute of silence as we pay our respects to the late Zhang Zhijie. Rest in peace," they wrote. </p> <p>China’s badminton association also said that they were “deeply saddened” by the loss. </p> <p>“Zhang Zhijie loved badminton and was an outstanding athlete of the national youth badminton team,” they said in a statement. </p> <p>His parents have since travelled to Yogyakarta to retrieve his body. </p> <p><em>Images: Twitter/ Wide Awake Media</em></p>

Caring

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Charlise Mutten's mother flees court in tears

<p>Charlise Mutten's mother has broken down and fled the courtroom in tears after being accused of murdering her nine-year-old daughter.</p> <p>Kallista Mutten was grilled by her ex-fiancé Justin Stein's lawyer on Tuesday about her excessive methamphetamine use, including while pregnant with his child.</p> <p>The grilling began when Carolyn Davenport SC accused her by saying, "You shot and killed your daughter", to which Ms Mutten replied, "Are you serious?"</p> <p>She then burst into tears, crying out "I didn't even know where she was shot" before Ms Davenport added that Mr Stein "had seen you deliver the second shot".</p> <p>After being excused from the witness box, Ms Mutten ran out of the courtroom in tears, while the jury were temporarily sent out.  </p> <p>The dramatic moment came after Ms Mutten admitted taking methamphetamine even when her daughter came to visit.</p> <p>Ms Mutten was being cross-examined on day 12 of Stein's trial, who has been charged with Charlise's murder in January 2022. </p> <p>The 40-year-old admitted to having psychotic episodes while on using ice and had continued to take the drug despite her Charlise's visit during the summer school holidays in 2022.</p> <p>She denied she and Charlise were not getting along in the days before her death, or that she had been told to leave the Stein's Mount Wilson property, and instead left of her own accord.</p> <p>"I chose to leave because I didn't want to be there any more. Yeah, I was very hormonal, I was pregnant. Yeah, I was using, yeah. My emotions were very strong at the time," she said.</p> <p>Stein, 33, has pleaded not guilty to murdering Charlise, but has admitted to disposing the schoolgirl's body.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Daily Mail / Facebook / Nine News</em></p>

Legal

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New details emerge in Sam Kerr incident

<p>Court documents have revealed that Sam Kerr was taken into custody was taken into custody and placed in a holding cell on the night she <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/sam-kerr-s-alleged-racial-comments-revealed-by-uk-paper" target="_blank" rel="noopener">allegedly verbally abused</a> a UK police officer. </p> <p>The Matildas captain has pleaded not guilty to the public disorder charge of using insulting, threatening or abusive words that caused alarm or distress towards a police officer in Twickenham, London, on January 30, 2023.</p> <p><em>The Sun </em>reported that Kerr allegedly vomited in a taxi, was involved in a dispute about the taxi fare, and allegedly called an attending police officer a “stupid white b*****d”, which her legal team have argued that she actually called him a "stupid white cop".</p> <p>Kerr was <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/sam-kerr-s-lawyers-request-police-station-cctv-footage-interview-be-retained-20240314-p5fc9w.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reportedly</a> placed in a police custody suite inside a police station and was interviewed during that time.</p> <p>According to court transcripts, there were also numerous body cam clips filmed by police during the alleged incident, which will be used as evidence in court. </p> <p>Kerr's legal team have reportedly requested for video footage of the incident to be made available to them, and  last week they asked the Kingston Crown Court for any CCTV footage from outside a Twickenham station or from inside the custody suite to be provided to them.</p> <p>According to News Corp, her legal team is also yet to receive footage taken from two police body cam clips, and the transcript and audio from her interview while she was detained over the incident. </p> <p><em>The Daily Telegraph </em>reported that during her plea hearing, Kerr was also warned about delaying any decision to change her plea to guilty — should that change of plea occur.</p> <p>“Should there be any change in your position … the sooner you plead guilty to this matter, if that is your intention and your wish, the earlier you do that the better, do you understand?” Judge Judith Elaine Coello  said.</p> <p>“You will lose credit as time goes on and should you be convicted after trial; you will lose all credit you might otherwise have obtained. Are you clear on all of that?”</p> <p>Kerr is due to face trial in February 2025, and if found guilty could face up to six months in jail or an unlimited fine. </p> <p>Her lawyers are preparing to apply for the charges to be dismissed next month. </p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p> <p> </p>

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Former world champion cyclist to face court over Olympian wife's death

<p>Rohan Dennis, the husband of former Olympic cyclist Melissa Hoskins, will face court after allegedly causing her death. </p> <p>Dennis, a former world champion cyclist, was arrested in January and charged with  causing death by dangerous driving, driving without due care and endangering life.</p> <p>It is alleged that he recklessly struck his wife with his car in front of their home in Medindie in Adelaide on December 30.</p> <p>Hoskins was rushed to the Royal Adelaide Hospital but died later that night. </p> <p>The pair share two children together, and Dennis is due to appear at the Adelaide Magistrates Court today.</p> <p>If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison. </p> <p>The Australian cycling community were devastated when news of Hoskins' death first broke. </p> <p>"Melissa described her team pursuit gold medal at the 2015 world championships as the highlight of her career but for the rest of us, the highlight was just having her around," AusCycling chief executive Marne Fechner said at the time.</p> <p>"Although she retired in 2017, her presence as an alumnus of the sport has been felt and appreciated by many in the cycling and riding community."</p> <p>Hoskins competed in the 2012 Summer Olympics as a member of the Australian track cycling team pursuit, that finished fourth place. </p> <p>She also competed at the 2016 Olympics for the same team, and was in the squad that won the 2015 world title in the event. </p> <p>The Olympian was laid to rest in her hometown, Perth, in January with a public memorial service held in Adelaide during what would've been her 33rd birthday a month later.</p> <p>Dennis, who has been on bail since January, attended both ceremonies. </p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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"Who cares?": Kyle Sandilands backs Sam Kerr

<p>Kyle Sandilands has weighed in on Matildas captain Sam Kerr's court battle, after it was alleged that she called a police officer in London a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/sam-kerr-s-alleged-racial-comments-revealed-by-uk-paper" target="_blank" rel="noopener">"stupid white b*****d"</a> during a dispute over a taxi fare.</p> <p>Sandilands was quick to defend the Matildas captain during the <em>Kyle And Jackie O show </em>on Tuesday and insisted that calling someone that didn't warrant a criminal conviction. </p> <p>"It's not even a big deal. She call some guy 'white b*****d'. Who cares?" the 52-year-old shock jock said.</p> <p>"White b******s don't care about that. That's for the other races to worry about," he added, before newsreader Brooklyn Ross quickly changed the topic. </p> <p>Kerr, 30, is preparing to face a four-day trial next February, following the incident that occurred after a night out in Twickenham on January 30, 2023.  </p> <p>The football star appeared in a London court on Monday after she was accused of using insulting, threatening or abusive words that caused alarm or distress to the officer.</p> <p>Kerr has maintained her innocence, pleading not guilty to the charges brought against her.</p> <p>Her legal team hope to have the case thrown out when they return to court next month.</p> <p>In response to the controversy, the sport's governing body Football Australia (FA) said that while they were aware of the legal proceedings, they didn't know about the charges laid against Kerr. </p> <p>"As this is an ongoing legal matter, we are unable to provide further comment at this time. Our focus remains on supporting all our players, both on and off the field. We will continue to monitor the situation and provide support as appropriate," they said in a statement. </p> <p><em>Images: Kyle and Jackie O show/ Getty</em></p>

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"I was shocked": Lisa Wilkinson's text messages shown in court

<p>A series of explosive texts revealed in court have shown how Lisa Wilkinson's controversial Logies speech led to her untimely dismissal from <em>The Project</em>. </p> <p>The texts are contained in an affidavit that Wilkinson and her lawyers have submitted to the Federal Court in relation to a dispute over who will pay her million-dollar legal fees after being sued by Bruce Lehrmann for defamation. </p> <p>In an affidavit to the Federal Court, Wilkinson said she was shocked when she found out she was being let go from <em>The Project</em>, after she discovered her agent Nick Fordham had a meeting with Network Ten CEO Beverley McGarvey.</p> <p>“I was shocked, embarrassed and deeply disappointed by Ms McGarvey’s decision to remove me from <em>The Project,</em>” she said.</p> <p>“At that time, my most recent contract as co-host of The Project had only been signed 11 months before and still had more than two years to run.”</p> <p>Speaking of her agent's meeting, she said, “He told me that Ms McGarvey had informed him that Ten was doing a ‘rebrand’ of <em>The Project</em> with a number of hosting changes. He told me that she had said that those hosting changes included me."</p> <p>“He also told me that she had said that, because there had been too much heat on me in the months since the Logies speech – and, as a result, too much ‘brand damage’ – it was best that I be removed from my hosting role on <em>The Project</em>.”</p> <p>When she said farewell to <em>The Project</em> in 2022, Wilkinson blamed the “targeted toxicity” of sections of the media.</p> <p>“The last six months have not been easy,” Wilkinson told viewers of the panel show when she announced she would be leaving the show. </p> <p>“And the relentless, targeted toxicity by some sections of the media has taken a toll not just on me but on people I love."</p> <p>“I have had a ball,” she said. “But for me right now it’s time for a change. To be clear. I’m not leaving Ten and we’re looking at some very exciting work ideas ahead.”</p> <p>In the affidavit, she says that Ms McGarvey approved Wilkinson’s on-air explanation for her departure and suggested that they “sound very authentic”.</p> <p>“I said to her that this decision to remove me from <em>The Project</em> would result in yet more negative publicity for me, for <em>The Project</em>, and for Ten, particularly if my sudden departure was without explanation,” Wilkinson said.</p> <p>Ms McGarvey told Wilkinson in texts “Perfect delivery, you spoke from the heart.” </p> <p>“It was a beautiful sentiment and you are so generous to your colleagues. Thank you. The media should all be kind, you deserve it.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

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Jumping castle operator in court over Hillcrest tragedy

<p>A jumping castle operator who was charged over the 2021 <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/news/news/children-killed-in-hillcrest-tragedy-identified-amid-overwhelming-support" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Hillcrest Primary School tragedy</a> is expected to face court for the first time.</p> <p>Six children, Peter Dodt, Jye Sheehan, Jalailah Jayne-Maree Jones, Zane Mellor, Addison Stewart and Chace Harrison, were killed when the inflatable castle was lifted into the air on December 2021. </p> <p>The students were enjoying the end-of-year celebrations with their classmates on the oval of the school in Devonport in Tasmania's northwest, when the tragic incident occurred. </p> <p>Rosemary Anne Gamble, the operator who worked for Taz-Zorb - the company who supplied and set up the castle - was charged in November after failing to comply with workplace health and safety requirements. </p> <p>It is alleged that the castle was tethered at four of its eight anchorage points and the pegs  recommended by the manufacturer, or a suitable alternative, weren't installed properly. </p> <p>According to court documents, seven students were on the castle when it became dislodged and airborne due to a "significant" weather event, causing them to fall from a height of about 10 metres.</p> <p>A few others were <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/heartbreaking-detail-as-mother-of-jumping-castle-victim-speaks" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reportedly</a> injured, with one nearby student being struck by the blower attached to the castle. </p> <p>It is alleged that Gamble failed to ensure the anchorage system was sufficient to prevent the castle from lifting, and failed to ensure there were pegs at each anchor point as per the manufacturer's instructions. </p> <p>It is also alleged that Gamble failed to provide adequate information, including manufacturer's operating manual to the two workers she was in charge of at the time. </p> <p>She is expected to face the Devonport Magistrates Court for the first time on Friday. </p> <p>Preparations for the coronial <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/update-on-inquest-into-hillcrest-primary-deaths" target="_blank" rel="noopener">inquest</a> was put on hold because of the criminal charges. </p> <p><em>Image: Twitter/ ABC News</em></p>

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Twist for cop accused of killing Clare Nowland

<p>Senior Constable Kristian James Samuel White, 33, who was accused of killing 95-year-old Clare Nowland <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/family-horrified-by-police-statement-on-tasering-of-clare-nowland" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with a taser</a> at an aged care home in Cooma, regional NSW has been deemed a “flight risk”. </p> <p>White was charged with recklessly causing grievous bodily harm, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, and common assault over the alleged “excessive use of force”.</p> <p>It is alleged that Nowland was using a walker and holding a serrated steak knife at the time of the incident, when the 33-year-old said “stop, just … nah bugger it” before allegedly tasering her. </p> <p>The great-grandmother fell backwards and fractured her skull, causing an inoperable brain injury that unfortunately led to her death just days later. </p> <p>Just last week, White's charges were upgraded to include an additional charge of manslaughter on advice from the Director of Public Prosecutions.</p> <p>White appeared in court on Wednesday, for the first time since his charges were upgraded, and received two new bail conditions. </p> <p>The Constable was required to surrender his passport and not leave the country due to the upgraded charges. </p> <p>However, prior to his bail conditions being approved, Magistrate Roger Clisdell criticised both Crown prosecutor Victoria Garrity, and White's defence lawyer Warwick Anderson for negotiating the new terms of bail without his input. </p> <p>“I make the decision,” he said.</p> <p>“I would have thought my last explosion would have caused you to be more sensitive to my position.”</p> <p>This comes after the prosecutors failed to tell the Magistrate that they had agreed to allow White to appear in court via video link in May, without the court's consent.</p> <p>The Crown prosecutor defended her actions by saying that she asked him to surrender his passport to mitigate the risk of flight. </p> <p>“With the more serious charge now being faced, there is a heightened risk that he would leave the jurisdiction and not face court,”  she explained. </p> <p>“Those two new conditions are now appropriate.”</p> <p>While the police officer's defence lawyer added that “He has no intention of fleeing the jurisdiction," and agreed to the additional bail conditions “to facilitate the speedy resolution”. </p> <p>White will return to court in February next year. </p> <p>Nowland's family members released a statement via their lawyer after the proceedings on Wednesday. </p> <p>“The family does not wish to comment further on the criminal process at this time given the extremely serious nature of the charge against Mr White, who continues to be a sworn NSW police officer,” the statement read. </p> <p>NSW Police confirmed that White remained suspended from duty with pay.</p> <p><em>Images: ABC News South East NSW: Floss Adams/ News.com.au</em></p>

Legal

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"Shame on you!" Robert De Niro's courtroom outburst

<p>Robert De Niro has lost his temper in court, as his former assistant accused him of being abusive. </p> <p>The Oscar-winning actor is being sued by Graham Chase Robinson, who worked as his assistant from 2008 until several months into 2019, for millions of dollars after claiming he was abusive when they worked together. </p> <p>Robinson, 41, seeks $US12 million (approximately AUD$18 million) in damages for emotional distress and harm to her reputation, that she claims has left her jobless and unable to recover from the trauma of working for De Niro.</p> <p>The jury is also considering evidence pertaining to a lawsuit De Niro filed against Robinson in which he claimed that she stole things from him, including five million points that could be used for airline flights.</p> <p>De Niro is countersuing his former employee, seeking the return of three years of Robinson's salary.</p> <p>Robinson's attorney Andrew Macurdy interrogated the actor over some of his questionable behaviour, including allegations that he spoke to Robinson while he was urinating, and claims that he called her a "b***h" to her face.</p> <p>De Niro admitted that while he "got angry" at his former assistant, he was "never abusive".</p> <p>Growing frustrated with the line of questioning, he exclaimed, "You got us all here for this?" </p> <p>Eventually, he angrily looked toward Robinson and shouted, "Shame on you, Chase Robinson!"</p> <p>De Niro was also asked by Macurdy if he he sued Robinson before she sued him because he wanted publicity.</p> <p>"It draws attention to me. It's the last thing I wanted to do," De Niro said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Queen Camilla meets . . . Princess Margaret?!

<p>In a collision of regal proportions, the world witnessed an unforgettable convergence of the fictitious and the real, as the one and only Helena Bonham Carter, famous for her portrayal of the indomitable Princess Margaret in seasons three and four of <em>The Crown</em>, found herself in the splendid company of none other than the Queen Consort herself, Camilla, at Clarence House.</p> <p>The rendezvous occurred at a glitzy reception held to celebrate 30 years of the Forward Arts Foundation. The Foundation, on a mission to spread the love of poetry throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland, decided to throw this soiree just as London was gearing up for another artistic extravaganza: Frieze Week. Clearly, this was a battle for the city's cultural heart, and poetry had the honour of setting the stage.</p> <p>The highlight of the evening, however, was the majestic meeting of the minds between Bonham Carter and the Queen Consort. As they locked eyes, it was hard to tell who was more starstruck. The actress executed a curtsey so profound it nearly reached the Earth's core before engaging the Queen in delightful conversation.</p> <p>In a refreshing break from her usual attire, which would make even the most extravagant peacock jealous, Bonham Carter sported a dress adorned with bright florals and black feathers, accented by pink ribbons in her hair. Camilla, on the other hand, stole the sartorial spotlight in an arresting peacock feather print shirt dress that must've made any nearby birds quite envious.</p> <p>But Bonham Carter wasn't content with merely being a guest; she also graced the audience with her talents by reciting a poem. Her choice was William Stafford's "Yes," a poem that would have moved Shakespeare himself to stand up, clap and stomp his booted feet.</p> <p>William Sieghart, the founder of the Forward Arts Foundation, expressed his immense pride in the work of the foundation and thanked the Queen for her involvement, calling it "proof of the pudding" that they were indeed making progress.</p> <p>Among the distinguished guests at this intimate soirée were previous winners of the Forward Prizes for Poetry, including the Poet Laureate Simon Armitage, the actress Karen Bryson, and Bonham Carter’s former <em>The Crown</em> co-star, Natascha McElhone. </p> <p>Speaking of royalty, Netflix's juggernaut series, <em>The Crown</em>, has once again captured our attention. The recent announcement of the November and December release dates for the final season has ignited a whirlwind of excitement and speculation. The promotional artwork for this last hurrah features a moody and atmospheric image of the Queen, played by the talented Imelda Staunton, and a reimagining of the iconic photograph of Princess Diana poised on the diving board of a yacht in Portofino, just a week before her untimely departure from this world.</p> <p>While fans eagerly anticipate the upcoming season, it hasn't been without its controversies. Critics have <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/tv/major-twist-in-store-for-final-season-of-the-crown" target="_blank" rel="noopener">raised their eyebrows at reports</a> suggesting that the show will include depictions of Princess Diana's "ghost". </p> <p>Bonham Carter herself, who graciously passed her fictitious tiara to Leslie Manville for the final seasons, has spoken out about the show's duty to distinguish between fact and artistic license. During a chat on the show's official podcast back in 2020, she insisted that <em>The Crown</em> carries a "moral responsibility" to remind viewers that this is a work of fiction inspired by facts, not an educational documentary. It's a reminder to us all that even the fanciest of crowns can come with a little disclaimer.</p> <p>So, as the final season of <em>The Crown</em> approaches, we can only wonder what other regal surprises are in store for us. In the meantime, let's raise a glass to the poetic evening at Clarence House, where fact met fiction, and where, for a brief moment, we were all kings and queens of our own whimsical kingdom.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Jubilant scenes as High Court hands down judgment against Qantas

<p>In a landmark decision that saw former employees pumping their fists in celebration inside the courtroom, Qantas has issued a formal apology to its workforce after the High Court declared its actions unlawful when it terminated the employment of over 1,700 ground crew members during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>The court upheld two prior rulings from the Federal Court that deemed the airline's outsourcing of baggage handlers, cleaners and ground staff to be in violation of the law.</p> <p>The judgment delivered by Justices Susan Kiefel, Stephen Gageler, Jacqueline Gleeson, and Jayne Jagot underscores that taking "adverse action against another person for a substantial and operative reason of preventing the exercise of a workplace right by the other person contravenes (part of section 340 of the Fair Work Act) ... regardless of whether that other person has the relevant workplace right at the time the adverse action is taken."</p> <p>In essence, Qantas could not evade the law by taking such actions before the employees possessed the specific workplace rights the airline sought to obstruct.</p> <p>Australian Council of Trade Unions secretary Sally McManus, who was there for the judgment's announcement, posted a celebratory photo on social media, declaring, "The workers win against Qantas in the High Court. We will always have the backs of workers, well done ⁦@TWUAus"</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">The workers win against Qantas in the High Court. We will always have the backs of workers, well done ⁦<a href="https://twitter.com/TWUAus?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TWUAus</a>⁩ <a href="https://t.co/wvZr7ouULX">pic.twitter.com/wvZr7ouULX</a></p> <p>— Sally McManus (@sallymcmanus) <a href="https://twitter.com/sallymcmanus/status/1701749294947291564?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 13, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p> </p> <p>This legal battle began when the Transport Workers' Union brought a case against Qantas in the Federal Court, asserting that the airline had violated the Fair Work Act by outsourcing its ground operations to circumvent enterprise bargaining rights. Qantas, which had laid off workers in 2020, suffered significant financial losses due to the pandemic's severe impact on the aviation sector.</p> <p>In its response to the High Court's decision, Qantas clarified that it made the decision to outsource its remaining ground handling function in August 2020, at a time when borders were closed, lockdowns were widespread, and COVID-19 vaccines were not yet available.</p> <p>The airline stated, "The likelihood of a years-long crisis led Qantas to restructure its business to improve its ability to survive and ultimately recover."</p> <p>Qantas then expressed deep regret for the adverse personal impact this decision had on the affected employees and offered an apology:</p> <p>"As we have said from the beginning, we deeply regret the personal impact the outsourcing decision had on all those affected and we sincerely apologise for that.</p> <p>"A prior decision by the Federal Court has ruled out reinstatement of workers but it will now consider penalties for the breach and compensation for relevant employees, which will factor in redundancy payments already made by Qantas."</p> <p>The airline outsourced the positions of baggage handlers and cleaners at ten airports in response to a drastic decline in business, citing sound commercial reasons as the motivation, as its operations had plummeted by over 90 percent.</p> <p>However, the Transport Workers' Union argued that Qantas had also sought to preempt industrial action once business returned to normal, contending that the dismissals were in violation of the Fair Work Act, which prohibited actions impeding workers' rights.</p> <p>After losing twice in the Federal Court, Qantas escalated the case to the High Court, which was tasked with determining whether the workers possessed the rights claimed by the union at the time of the outsourcing decision. The unanimous decision of the High Court now paves the way for the workers to pursue compensation.</p> <p>Images: Twitter (X)</p>

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Andrew O’Keefe breaks down in court

<p dir="ltr">Andrew O’Keefe has broken down in court after promising the magistrate he would steer clear of drugs. </p> <p dir="ltr">The embattled TV host and his lawyer fronted court to make an unexpected guilty plea, after he was arrested for allegedly breaching an AVO. </p> <p dir="ltr">On August 19th, police were called to a unit in Point Piper and took O’Keefe to Waverley Police Station where he was charged with contravening a restriction of prohibition of an apprehended violence order.</p> <p dir="ltr">He was then refused bail in Parramatta Bail Court the following day, with the matter set down for August 30th.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, O’Keefe’s solicitor Sharon Ramsden fronted court on Friday for an unexpected mention where she told Magistrate Greg Grogin her client would be entering a plea of guilty.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ramsden told the court that O’Keefe was at the apartment, which he was prohibited from attending, to collect some of his belongings. </p> <p dir="ltr">“There was no contact between the parties, and she returned to the property at 11:45pm having been on a walk,” Ms Ramsden said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Ramsden asked the Magistrate to consider sentencing O’Keefe to a conditional release order without a conviction, to which the police prosecutor Michael Cleaver did not oppose.</p> <p dir="ltr">Magistrate Grogin then addressed O’Keefe directly, asking if the former television presenter could abstain from drugs which aren’t prescribed by his doctors.</p> <p dir="ltr">“One thing I don’t do, I don’t try to set people up to fail … can you fulfil that obligation?” the magistrate asked.</p> <p dir="ltr">O’Keefe responded: “Your Honour, I can guarantee that will be my sincere endeavour.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Grogin sentenced O’Keefe to a conditional release order with no conviction, to which O’Keefe thanked the magistrate through tears.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Mr O’Keefe, on a personal basis you have been through some hard times,” the magistrate said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You’re going to have good days and bad days and you’re going to go forward and go back, you must comply with court orders … the leniency will not be extended forever.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Officer charged with fatal tasering causes chaos in court

<p>A magistrate has expressed his "absolute disgust" after the NSW police officer charged with the fatal tasering of a 95-year-old failed to show up in person for court. </p> <p>Kristian White, 33, appeared via audiovisual link in Cooma Local Court on Wednesday after being charged with discharging his weapon at Clare Nowland, a dementia patient at an aged care facility in Cooma, who fell backwards from the tasering and sustained fatal injuries.</p> <p>As the virtual court began, Magistrate Roger Clisdell blasted the crown prosecutor’s decision to allow the suspended police officer to appear via a video link. </p> <p>“Who runs this court, Ms Stuart? You or me?” he asked crown prosecutor Sally Stuart in a raised voice.</p> <p>He said he felt “absolute disgust” that the decision had blindsided him, which meant that “dumbo here sitting on the bench just has to suck it up.”</p> <p>The magistrate went on to note that the court had employed several extra security personnel “at great expense” in anticipation of the highly publicised appearance, given the media storm surrounding Ms Nowland's death. </p> <p>There was no reason given as to why Mr White didn't show up for court in person, given he is currently living in the community under no restrictions. </p> <p>In a confusing move, Ms Stuart asked the court to impose a condition which would compel him to appear in court in future.</p> <p>Mr Clisdell blasted the hypocritical application, asking, “You excused him today, so why should I put him at your beck and call, not mine?”</p> <p>Ms Stuart eventually conceded that police should have imposed bail conditions on Mr White when he was charged with the serious offences. </p> <p>“It is probably something that should have been considered at the time but that decision was made by police,” she said.</p> <p>Mr White’s lawyer Warwick Anderson opposed the request for his client to be placed on bail, telling the court it had no “meaningful efficacy”.</p> <p>Despite the magistrate's previous outrage, he agreed and branded the crown application an attempt to placate anyone who might be “upset” about the officer’s lack of restrictions. </p> <p>He declined to impose bail on the 33-year-old and said he would be excused from attending court on the next occasion.</p> <p>Mr White maintained a blank face as he listened to the Magistrate’s tirade from an undisclosed location. </p> <p>The matter will return to court in September and it will be managed by the DPP.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine News / Facebook</em></p> <div class="media image" style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; box-sizing: inherit; display: flex; flex-direction: column; align-items: center; width: 705.202209px; margin-bottom: 24px; max-width: 100%;"> </div>

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Hunter Valley bus driver faces court

<p dir="ltr">The driver behind the wheel of the bus that overturned on a Hunter Valley roundabout, <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/more-than-we-can-bear-hunter-valley-bus-crash-victims-identified">claiming the lives of 10 and injuring dozens more</a>, has faced Cessnock Local Court. </p> <p dir="ltr">Brett Andrew Button was reportedly emotional as he was charged with 10 counts of dangerous driving occasioning death, as well as one count of negligent driving.</p> <p dir="ltr">Strict bail conditions were imposed on the 58 year old, with Magistrate Robyn Richardson noting that Maitland local Button had significant connections to the area, while acknowledging the emotional weight now upon his shoulders. Additionally, she said that there was a strong prosecution case for the 11 charges.</p> <p dir="ltr">Prosecutor Broom opposed an application for bail on the grounds that Button may not attend future court appearances and might interfere with witnesses, stating that 10 had already given evidence to police officials regarding Button’s “prolonged behaviour and dangerous driving, where he said ‘fasten your seatbelts’.” </p> <p dir="ltr">“Bail is strongly opposed,” she said. “It is conceded he has [a] limited traffic record.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There are seven offences over some 30 years of driving and no criminal record. This is a serious motor vehicle collision that resulted in the death of 10 persons. </p> <p dir="ltr">“There are currently 14 victims in hospital, two in ICU, and the injuries range in variety - some include grievous bodily harm.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Broom went on to inform the court that there was a “high likelihood” of further offences being laid before him, and of him serving full time custody.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Magistrate Richardson did grant bail, explaining that bail shouldn’t be denied as a punishment, and drew attention to the man in question, who she believed to be suffering in the wake of the tragedy. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Mr Button has sat in court head down throughout these proceedings and it is clear to the court he suffers, along with the rest of his family,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Button is deeply linked to his community and has support here today … I note the stringent proposed bail conditions.”</p> <p dir="ltr">In accordance with those conditions, Button must abide to a curfew of 8 pm to 6 am unless he is with certain members of his family, report to the police three days each week, surrender his passports, remain at least 5 km from any international departure point, and refrain from applying for any travel documents.</p> <p dir="ltr">Additionally, he had to put forward $10,000 surety for his bail, avoid both drugs and alcohol, and keep well away from the driver’s seat of any motor vehicle.</p> <p dir="ltr">Before bail was granted, Acting Assistant Commissioner David Waddell shared that law enforcement would allege Button had been driving “too quick” for the conditions at the roundabout that night.</p> <p dir="ltr">"He entered that roundabout driving in a manner that was inconsistent with the conditions," he said. "The speed was too quick for him to negotiate that roundabout, causing the vehicle to fall onto its left side and cause those injuries."</p> <p dir="ltr">He went on to note that many of the officers who had been at the scene had been left “visibly distraught”, and that while there had been reports of fog in the area, he would not comment on whether or not visibility had been a factor. </p> <p dir="ltr">"The whole conditions will be examined as part of the investigation," he said. "So, it will be about how the driver drove in relation to the conditions."</p> <p dir="ltr">Button’s lawyer, Chris O’Brien, argued for both Button’s bail and his release, citing a number of medical conditions - including mental health concerns - though further information was not provided. He added that if the case were to go to trial, there was a chance it would see “long delays”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Button is currently scheduled to face Newcastle Local Court on August 9. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: 9News / Nine</em></p>

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AFL star released on bail following burglary charges

<p>Richmond AFL premiership player Marlion Pickett has been granted bail after allegedly stealing more than $380,000 during a series of burglaries of commercial properties.</p> <p>The athlete faced Perth Magistrates Court on June 12 for at least 12 separate charges, including aggravated burglary, criminal damage and stealing.</p> <p>The charges relate to a string of alleged incidents which police claim occurred between December 2022 and January 2023, during the AFL off-season.</p> <p>Pickett was arrested by WA Police on June 11, just hours after helping his team score a 15-point win over the Fremantle Dockers at Perth Stadium.</p> <p>He was freed from custody the following day after securing $50,000 bail and depositing a further $50,000 surety.</p> <p>Pickett has over 70 games with the Richmond Tigers under his belt following his debut in the 2019 AFL Grand Final, the first player to have done so in almost 70 years.</p> <p>The Richmond Football Club told the <em>ACB</em> in a statement that it “would continue to support Marlion and his family while these matters are dealt with”.</p> <p>Pickett’s Perth-based manager Anthony Van Der Wielen told the broadcaster that the AFL giant intended to fight the charges.</p> <p>“Due to the ongoing legal nature of the proceedings, Marlion, or myself will not be able to provide any further details, comment or clarification about the matter at this stage,” he said in a statement.</p> <p>“We understand and respect the public’s interest in this matter, but we also implore all to respect the presumption of innocence until proven otherwise, and to allow the legal proceedings to follow their due course without prejudice.”</p> <p>Pickett is due to face the same court in August.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

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“It’s the court of public opinion”: Sarah Ferguson condemns Phillip Schofield backlash

<p dir="ltr">Sarah Ferguson has spoken out against the wave of judgement directed at former This Morning presenter Phillip Schofield and the relationship scandal that swept the world. </p> <p dir="ltr">The 63-year-old Duchess of York was chatting to businesswoman Sarah Jane Thomson on her podcast, <em>Tea Talks</em>, when conversation turned to Schofield, and his controversial affair with a man - and co-worker - 30 years younger than him. </p> <p dir="ltr">When news of the affair broke, Schofield stepped down from his 20 year position as the face of This Morning. He later confessed to the Daily Mail that he had lied about the relationship, and <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/i-will-die-sorry-phillip-schofield-breaks-his-silence-on-his-career-ending-affair">informed <em>The Sun </em>that he was “not a groomer”</a>, despite public opinion.</p> <p dir="ltr">Criticism for the disgraced host flooded social media in the wake of the whole ordeal, with the story and its related rumours splashed across publications worldwide, and it was the backlash that Ferguson wanted to address, namely the idea of ‘cancel culture’ at the centre of it all. </p> <p dir="ltr">Thomson prompted the discussion by comparing social media’s take to a “huge game of Chinese whispers”, to which Ferguson responded that “it’s like the court of public opinion.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“And then [that can lead to] massive bullying to the point of extermination of a soul,” she added. “I don’t believe that anybody has that right to judge and exterminate a person’s own beliefs.”</p> <p dir="ltr">From there, Ferguson encouraged listeners not to leap to assumptions, as “we all have failings”. She asked that everyone instead take a moment “or make a cup of tea before you judge another human being without knowing all the facts”. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We don’t know the facts,” she pointed out. “We certainly don’t know what people get up to.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Thomson had her own thoughts to share on the matter, noting that “the problem is, when you’re in the public eye, any failing you make is there to be talked about, and the rest of us don’t have that. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We don't have that deep examining of where we've gone wrong, and then it's reflected over and over and over.”</p> <p dir="ltr">And while the two had made their point, Ferguson took a moment to discuss a - in her opinion “spot on” - article by Jeremy Clarkson for the<em> Sunday Times</em>, in which he wrote about the public’s race to condemn Schofield.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve never seen a witch-hunt like it,” he said, “and what baffles me most of all is that, as things stand, no crime has been committed. I don’t know him at all well and have no skin in the game, but it seems to me he is only guilty of being what he said he was: gay.”</p> <p dir="ltr">In the article, Clarkson went on to note that the age gap between Schofield and his partner in the affair was receiving a different degree of attention to heterosexual stars in similar relationship situations - from the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, who frequently dates women significantly younger than himself, and Al Pacino’s 54-year age gap with his pregnant partner.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Phil is no longer the genial host of some morning-time televisual cappuccino froth,” Clarkson surmised. “According to the people's court of social media, he's like his brother, a nonce.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p> <p> </p>

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Melissa Caddick mystery officially laid to rest

<p>A corner has revealed missing fraudster Melissa Caddick is dead but it’s difficult to determine when and how she died.</p> <p>Deputy State Coroner Elizabeth Ryan released her findings after a lengthy coronial inquest examined the circumstances surrounding the 49-year-old’s mysterious disappearance.</p> <p>“I believe it’s appropriate at the outset to say I have concluded Melissa Caddick is deceased,” Ryan said as she handed down her findings at the NSW Coroner’s Court in Lidcombe.</p> <p>However, Ryan said it was tricky to make an accurate finding as to how, when and where she died.</p> <p>Caddick disappeared from Sydney’s eastern suburbs in November 2020, hours after her Dovers Heights mansion, which doubled as her place of business, was raided by the AFP and ASIC.</p> <p>The corporate watchdog had accused Caddick of operating a Ponzi scheme and misappropriating $24 million, including from her friends and family, to fund a lavish lifestyle including holidays, designer jewellery, clothing and shoes.</p> <p>The case has sparked a number of conspiracy theories and even inspired a television series.</p> <p>The inquest examined Caddick’s final hours, the actions of her husband Anthony Koletti, and the police investigation.</p> <p>The court heard that Caddick had taken her own life by jumping off the cliff at Rodney Reserve, approximately 500 metres from her home, on the morning of November 12, 2020.</p> <p>Caddick was heard walking out her front door at about 5:30am before disappearing and failing to turn up to a court appearance the following day.</p> <p>However, Koletti did not report his wife missing to the Rose Bay Police Station until 11:45am on November 13 - 30 hours since she was last seen.</p> <p>Amid his evidence, Koletti told the court he was under the mistaken belief he had to wait 24 hours to report someone missing.</p> <p>“Did you delay reporting her missing until that point in order to give her time to try to go somewhere?” Counsel assisting the coroner Jason Downing asked.</p> <p>“No,” Mr Koletti said.</p> <p>NSW Police Sergeant Trent Riley told the court during the inquest that he found it “extremely strange and unusual behaviour” that Koletti had initially told police he did not want them to come to his house or go to the station to make a statement.</p> <p>“I thought it was strange that a husband would ring the police station, report his wife missing from two days ago and wasn’t prepared to come to the police station and didn’t want police to go around and speak with him because he had too much work on that day,” Sergeant Riley told the court.</p> <p>Sergeant Riley also told the court that Koletti provided conflicting versions of when he had last seen his wife alive.</p> <p>He described Koletti as, “evasive, vague and inconsistent”.</p> <p>Colette has been consistently critical of the ASIC investigation.</p> <p>In an affidavit tendered to the court, he claimed he and Caddick were denied food, water and medical attention during the 12 hours when ASIC and AFP were present at their home.</p> <p>However, the court heard that during the raid, Caddick drank a protein shake, Koletti made her several coffees and they occasionally smoked cigarettes in their backyard.</p> <p>In a statement, he said, “I believe (Caddick) died as a direct result of ASIC’s negligence, cruelty and inhumanity.”</p> <p>Despite conceding Caddick was responsible for defrauding millions of investors and that they were allowed to be in their home on the day of the raid, he still maintained ASIC was responsible for her death.</p> <p>In February 2021, a foot washed up on Bourdna Beacon on the NSW south coast which was later identified as Caddick’s.</p> <p>The court had previously heard that Caddick’s shoe was covered in 250g of goose barnacles when it washed ashore.</p> <p>An expert's report stated the barnacle growth suggested the shoe would have been free floating on the surface of the water for three-seven days before washing up.</p> <p>The court heard that it’s possible the shoe drifted on the ocean floor for several months before floating to the surface and onto the beach.</p> <p>Oceanographer Dr David Griffin said that according to calculations using ocean currents, it’s plausible the show went into the water at Dover Heights and was found 400km south three months later.</p> <p>Pathologist Jennifer Pokorny told the inquest in a statement that it was not possible to determine the full extent of Caddick’’s injuries as there were no other remains aside from the decomposed foot.</p> <p>She added it was also not possible to determine a cause of death.</p> <p>Forensic psychiatrist Dr Kerri Eagle told the inquest that after reviewing Caddick’s medical record, along with witness statement, it appeared she had narcissistic personality disorder.</p> <p>She said that for people suffering from the disorder, their self-esteem and sense of well-worth latches onto external admiration and impressing others.</p> <p>Dr Eagle revealed to the court that as a result of being charged, Caddick would have also been in danger of losing her work and the “respect and admiration” of others.</p> <p>She told Ryan that when ASIC raided her home, it was possible it had a “very huge” impact on her self-esteem.</p> <p>“Ms Caddick appeared to experience problems with low mood, depression and anxiety and problems coping with extraordinary stress … the low mood symptoms persisted as long as the stress persisted,” Eagle said.</p> <p>She also noted that people with similar disorders have been known to take their own lives after a “major insult to their self-esteem”.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram</em></p>

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“Pattern of bigotry”: Pauline Hanson being sued by senator over tweet

<p>Greens deputy leader Mehreen Faruqi has launched legal action against Pauline Hanson over a tweet telling her to "pack your bags and piss off back to Pakistan”.</p> <p>Documents filed in the Federal Court on May 3 allege the One Nation leader breached section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act with the tweet in 2022.</p> <p>Faruqi is seeking a sum of $150,000 be donated to a not-for-profit or community organisation of her choice.</p> <p>She also wants Hanson to undertake anti-racism training and pay legal fees.</p> <p>Faruqi revealed in a statement that she had “taken on bullies” her whole life and had no choice but to take on Hanson.</p> <p>"I refuse to let Senator Hanson get away with racist bullying and harassment," she said.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson crossed a line when she tweeted those hateful comments and I am hoping the Federal Court puts an end to this pattern of bigotry.</p> <p>"Not just for me, but for the almost 30 per cent of Australians born overseas, and their next generations.</p> <p>"I shouldn't have to take the personal risk and trauma of taking Senator Hanson to court."</p> <p>In 2022, the Greens attempted to reprimand Hanson in the upper house but the motion was amended by the government and opposition to instead condemn all forms of racism.</p> <p>Hanson defended her comments and denied she is racist.</p> <p>Farqui said she decided to launch proceedings following Hanson’s refusal to apologise for her tweet and her rejection of conciliation attempts from the Australian Human Rights Commission.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson has used her decades in the spotlight and immense public platform to spew vicious hate towards people of colour," Faruqi said.</p> <p>"She has caused incalculable harm and gotten away with it for far too long.</p> <p>"It's time that she was held accountable.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson has been contacted for comment on the court action."</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty/Instagram</em></p>

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Andrew O’Keefe opens up about drug charge

<p>Former TV presenter Andrew O’Keefe will fight allegations that he drove with methamphetamine in his system, challenging the reliability of saliva testing, a court has been told.</p> <p>O’Keefe, 51, returned to court and entered a not guilty plea after allegedly failing a roadside breath test.</p> <p>The 51-year-old was driving his grey Mercedes C200 through Sydney’s Point Piper, when he was pulled over by police on January 20, 2023.</p> <p>He underwent a random roadside breath test not long after midnight, which returned a positive result for methamphetamine, according to police.</p> <p>O’Keefe was then taken to Waverley Police Station for a second oral fluid test and his driver’s licence was suspended.</p> <p>He was arrested at his home in April and was charged with driving a vehicle with an illicit drug present in blood and breaching his bail conditions.</p> <p>The former TV personality appeared inside Sydney’s Downing Centre Local Court as his solicitor Sharon Ramsden entered a not guilty plea on his behalf.</p> <p>O’Keefe plans to contest the matter at a hearing later in the year, with Ramsden telling the court, “The analysis is in issue.”</p> <p>Speaking outside the court, he said he was looking forward to testing the allegations during a hearing in December.</p> <p>“There are certain things that might affect the credibility of a saliva test or urine test,” O’Keefe responded when asked what he hoped the outcome of the hearing would be.</p> <p>Pressed on his concerns about the testing, he said, “My particular reaction to the testing.”</p> <p>The eastern suburbs resident was initially refused bail in April 2023, after being given conditional release after appearing in court the day after the incident.</p> <p>He was granted bail on the condition that he undergo drug and alcohol testing, not take alcohol or non-prescription drugs and be treated by a psychologist or psychiatrist.</p> <p>O’Keefe is also due to return to court in November 2023 where he will contest numerous unrelated charges, including two counts of common assault, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, two counts of possessing a prohibited drug and two counts of contravening an AVO.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

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