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Cops charged after allegedly assaulting 92-year-old

<p>Two police officers have been charged after allegedly assaulting a 92-year-old man in Sydney’s southwest.</p> <p>The officers attended a home at Campbell Street, Picton, after 8:45pm on January 21, following reports of a domestic incident. </p> <p>"The 92-year-old man received injuries which were allegedly the result of an interaction with the officers," a NSW Police statement reads.</p> <p>"He was taken to hospital where he was admitted with a fracture to his right elbow, and significant bruising to his head and arms."</p> <p>Following an internal investigation - which began the day after police attended the home - a male senior constable and a male constable, both from the South West Metropolitan Region, were given court attendance notices yesterday for assault occasioning actual bodily harm.</p> <p>The constable is also facing a further charge of assault. </p> <p>NSW Police Commissioner Karen Webb said that police responded to over 140,000 domestic violence matters every year and they review all the responses the following day. </p> <p>She also said that it was "too hard to say" whether a domestic violence matter took place at the home, and it appeared that a resident at the home had dementia. </p> <p>"It's obviously a complex matter when you have someone elderly, someone who has mental decline through dementia, or through something else, that can actually articulate any concerns to police properly."</p> <p>However, no-one has been charged with domestic violence. </p> <p>One of the officers will appear at Campbelltown Local Court on July 30, and the other is due to appear at the same court on August 6. </p> <p>Both officers will be suspended with pay. </p> <p><em>Image: Nine</em></p> <p> </p>

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Result of Chris Dawson's appeal announced

<p>In a significant decision, the state's highest criminal appeal court has denied Chris Dawson's attempt to overturn his conviction for the calculated murder of his wife, Lynette, whose mysterious disappearance in 1982 remains one of Sydney's most perplexing cases.</p> <p>Dawson was found guilty in 2022 of murdering Lynette Joy Simms, who was 33 years old when she disappeared from their Bayview home in January 1982. Despite extensive investigations, her body has never been recovered.</p> <p>Justice Ian Harrison, who presided over the trial, determined that Dawson, a former teacher and rugby league player, murdered Lynette to remove what he saw as an obstacle to a new life with "JC", his former student and the babysitter of the couple's two children. JC moved into Dawson's home within days of Lynette's disappearance. Harrison sentenced Dawson to a maximum of 24 years in prison, with a non-parole period of 18 years.</p> <p>Now 75, Dawson appealed the conviction in the NSW Court of Criminal Appeal. On Thursday at 2pm, the court dismissed his appeal, solidifying the initial verdict.</p> <p>Compounding his legal woes, Dawson's non-parole period was extended by a year after his conviction for unlawful sexual activity with a student in 1980. Consequently, Dawson will not be eligible for release until 2041, when he will be 93 years of age.</p> <p>After Lynette was officially declared missing, Dawson remarried twice. He wed JC on January 15, 1984, at the Bayview home he had shared with Lynette. Later that year, the couple relocated to Queensland. JC left Dawson in early 1990 and made her first police statement regarding Lynette's disappearance in May that year, prompting renewed investigations.</p> <p>Dawson's legal team presented five grounds for appeal. They argued that the delay in criminal proceedings disadvantaged Dawson and that Harrison's verdict was unsupported by evidence. They claimed the Crown failed to disprove that Lynette was alive on January 9, 1982, and that the evidence as a whole did not substantiate Dawson's guilt.</p> <p>Harrison maintained in his August 2022 judgment that proving Lynette's death around January 8, 1982, was crucial to the Crown's case. Dawson's barrister, Belinda Rigg, SC, argued that it was plausible Lynette was alive on January 9 and had contacted Dawson at his part-time job, suggesting she needed time away to resolve personal issues. However, Harrison found Dawson's claim – solely supported by his own testimony, which he did not present at trial – was a lie.</p> <p>Justice Christine Adamson, one of the appellate judges, highlighted the absence of phone records, noting the uncertainty they posed: "We don’t have the phone records, and there’s no way of knowing whether the phone records are going to be completely neutral, or exculpatory, or inculpatory."</p> <p>Rigg contended during the appeal that Dawson's ability to verify his account independently had been compromised by the delay.</p> <p>The court's decision to dismiss Dawson's appeal reinforces the gravity of his crimes and underscores the enduring quest for justice in one of Australia's most enduring mysteries.</p> <p><em>Images: Twitter (X) | Nine</em></p>

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King Charles' official portrait vandalised

<p>The first offical portrait of King Charles has been vandalised by a group of animal rights activists. </p> <p>The portrait, which is hanging in London's Philip Mould gallery until June 21st, was targeted by campaign group Animal Rising, who took to the painting with a paint roller to stick signs over the portrait of the monarch.</p> <p>A video posted to the group's social media accounts captured the vandalism, showing the moment two activists covered the king’s head with an image of the British cartoon character Wallace, from the Wallace and Gromit comedy series.</p> <p>A speech bubble sign was then also tacked onto the painting with the following caption, “No cheese Gromit, look at all of this cruelty on RSCPA farms.”</p> <p>The action was designed to bring attention to a new report, released on Sunday by the group, which investigated 45 farms whose welfare standards are guaranteed by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), while the Animal Rising group described their findings as “damning,” alleging that they found “severe animal cruelty” at all farms visited.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">‼️BREAKING: No Cheese Gromit! King Charles Portrait Redecorated‼️ <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@RoyalFamily</a> </p> <p>‼️Find out why King Charles, Patron of the RSPCA should ask them to drop the Assured Scheme -&gt; <a href="https://t.co/pTneW0QCWf">https://t.co/pTneW0QCWf</a> 👈 <a href="https://t.co/jYLHFuxtHB">pic.twitter.com/jYLHFuxtHB</a></p> <p>— Animal Rising (@AnimalRising) <a href="https://twitter.com/AnimalRising/status/1800498356441198721?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 11, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>The vandalism was also a direct response of  King Charles became the royal patron of the RSPCA last month despite the allegations of animal cruelty, as the monarch is a self-professed animal lover. </p> <p>In a statement provided to <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/06/11/vegan-activists-vandalise-portrait-of-king/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Telegraph</a>, an Animal Rising activist explained, “With King Charles being such a big fan of ‘Wallace and Gromit,’ we couldn’t think of a better way to draw his attention to the horrific scenes on RSPCA Assured farms! Even though we hope this is amusing to His Majesty, we also call on him to seriously reconsider if he wants to be associated with the awful suffering across farms being endorsed by the RSPCA.”</p> <p data-uri="cms.cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/clxaj1nt7000g3b6ldc3v3ptz@published" data-editable="text" data-component-name="paragraph" data-article-gutter="true">The RSPCA responded to Animal Rising’s claims in a statement provided to CNN on Tuesday, stating that “any concerns about welfare on RSPCA Assured certified farms are taken extremely seriously and RSPCA Assured is acting swiftly to look into these allegations.”</p> <p data-uri="cms.cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/clxaj3ers000n3b6l776d50zk@published" data-editable="text" data-component-name="paragraph" data-article-gutter="true">“We have responded openly and transparently to Animal Rising’s challenges to our farming work,” the statement continued. “While we understand that Animal Rising, like us, want the best for animals, their activity is a distraction and a challenge to the work we are all doing to create a better world for every animal.”</p> <p data-uri="cms.cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/clxaj3ypx000p3b6lwmbijygj@published" data-editable="text" data-component-name="paragraph" data-article-gutter="true">The organisation also said it was “shocked” by the vandalism of the painting, saying “We welcome scrutiny of our work, but we cannot condone illegal activity of any kind.”</p> <p data-uri="cms.cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/clxah17cu00003b6lms79fnj7@published" data-editable="text" data-component-name="paragraph" data-article-gutter="true">According to Philip Mould, owner of the gallery where the portrait is on display, the painting sustained “no damage” since it was protected by a layer of Perspex, as Mould told CNN the adhesive stickers used by the activists stayed on the portrait for “less than ten seconds.”</p> <p data-uri="cms.cnn.com/_components/paragraph/instances/clxah17cu00003b6lms79fnj7@published" data-editable="text" data-component-name="paragraph" data-article-gutter="true"><em>Image credits: X (Animal Rising - Twitter)</em></p>

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New link to Madeleine McCann suspect revealed for the first time

<p dir="ltr">Detectives have uncovered an email account belonging to convicted paedophile Christian Brueckner that ties him to the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, a court has heard. </p> <p dir="ltr">Detective Titus Stampa told a court that the German FBI had identified two email accounts linked to the man, but was unable to discuss one of them because it was “related to the killing” of the child. </p> <p dir="ltr">The second email account was used for trading child pornography images with people online. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, the account had all of the messages deleted from the first half of 2007: the time Maddie vanished.</p> <p dir="ltr">Detective Stampa refused to confirm if the “murder” account contained any “photos”, but he said investigators were also in possession of a hard drive related to the “murder” which he was not allowed to discuss.</p> <p dir="ltr">The detective told the court, “An external hard drive is also belonging to the killing case – and I am not allowed to talk about it.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Asked about the account used for swapping child sex abuse images, Detective Stampa said, “I can remember that things were ‘massively’ deleted in the inbox.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There was nothing in there from January 2007.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The revelation offered the first glimpse into the physical proof that has led German investigators to believe Brueckner kidnapped and killed Maddie.</p> <p dir="ltr">Brueckner has long been the main suspect in the case of Maddie’s disappearance, after a key witness came forward in 2017 to report the man, who claimed that while discussing the McCann case, Brueckner said, “She didn’t scream.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Madeleine was last seen when she was just three years old in 2007 in Praia da Luz on Portugal’s Algarve coast, when she was on holiday with her family. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: MGG/Shutterstock Editorial </em></p>

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Grandmother in critical condition after stabbing

<p>A grandmother is in hospital in a critical condition after she was stabbed multiple times in an alleged DV incident in Perth's east. </p> <p>Police were called to a home on Jessie Road in Gooseberry Hill just after 5pm on Wednesday after neighbours allegedly heard  60-year-old Paulette Mountford's screams. </p> <p><em>Nine News </em>reported that her neighbours found her in the garden and were attempting to apply pressure to her neck and body before paramedics arrived. </p> <p>She was rushed to hospital where she underwent emergency surgery and remains in a serious but stable condition. </p> <p>Christopher John Sullivan, 72, was taken into custody at the property before being charged with one count of attempt to unlawfully kill.</p> <p>Her alleged attacker reportedly barricaded himself inside the home before tactical response officers negotiated for him to leave.</p> <p>Mountford is a church volunteer who has helped support victims of domestic violence. </p> <p>In a statement, her daughters said: "We are devastated and utterly heartbroken that our dear mother has endured such a horrifying ordeal." </p> <p>"All we want is for our mother to overcome her injuries."</p> <p>They also thanked everyone who rushed to her aid and those who are continuing to care for her. </p> <p>“For such a kind-hearted person to suffer so deeply is hard for us to understand," they said.</p> <p>“All that we want at this time is for our mother to overcome her injuries, and we pray and hope that she gets better soon.</p> <p>“She is a strong woman and we know she will be using all her strength to get better.”</p> <p>Sullivan appeared before the Perth Magistrates Court on Wednesday charged with attempted murder. </p> <p>He told the magistrate he intended to plead guilty but no official plea was entered, and the matter was stood down while he was provided legal advice. </p> <p>He did not apply for bail and was remanded in custody. </p> <p><em>Image: Nine</em></p>

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Remains found of backpacker who disappeared 23 years ago

<p>Police have located the remains of a backpacker who was last seen 23 years ago. </p> <p>In 2001, Kellie Ann Carmichael, who was 24 at the time, left her hostel in Katoomba to go for a walk and was never seen again.</p> <p>Now during an unrelated search in the Blue Mountains bushland, NSW Police have located human remains that, after initial testing, have been confirmed to be the young backpacker from Geelong. </p> <p>At the time of her disappearance, Kellie was last seen by staff at a Katoomba hostel on 29th April 2001, as she had told staff she would return that day to collect her belongings.</p> <p>Her parents contacted hostel staff on May 5th, and after discovering her belongings were still at reception, they reported her missing to police.</p> <p>After police launched an investigation into her disappearance, it was believed that Carmichael had taken her own life, due to her ongoing struggles with schizophrenia. </p> <p>However, Kellie's mother Margaret knew her daughter wouldn't commit suicide, telling the <em><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/subscribe/news/1/?sourceCode=DTWEB_WRE170_a&amp;dest=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailytelegraph.com.au%2Fnews%2Fgeelong%2Fnagging-questions-after-bones-of-geelong-backpacker-kellie-ann-carmichael-found-in-blue-mountains%2Fnews-story%2F6fcb6509f4d56312b67c46993e99c0cd&amp;memtype=anonymous&amp;mode=premium&amp;v21=LOW-Segment-1-SCORE" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Geelong Advertiser</a></em>, "We know that, and everyone who knew her knows that."</p> <p>"She wasn't well at the time but she loved life and was a beautiful girl."</p> <p>Her father, John, said the grim developments had taken their toll on the couple, who are now hoping to take her remains back home to Victoria. </p> <p>In 2011, a $200,000 reward was issued for information related to the case, after a coronial inquest ruled Carmichael had died but was unable to provide a direct cause or circumstances.</p> <p>Carmichael’s parents have previously said they felt robbed by their daughter’s mysterious disappearance.</p> <p>“We’ve never had the chance to have our daughter … our family has never been the same,” Margaret Carmichael said in 2011.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Missing Persons Register / NSW Police </em></p> <p> </p>

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“He tried to kill me": Shock claims against former TV presenter

<p>Former Channel Seven presenter Liam David Cox has appeared via audiovisual link in Sydney Downing Centre Local Court on Monday, following claims that he forcefully strangled a woman during a domestic dispute. </p> <p>The woman told police that Cox had wrestled her to the ground, straddled her, and proceeded to forcefully strangle her until she lost consciousness.</p> <p>“He tried to kill me,” she told police. </p> <p>The court heard that police found the woman bleeding from her nose and coughing up blood, when they attended the scene. </p> <p>They also found blood splattered on the bedsheets and pillows, and on tissues in the toilet. She was treated by paramedics before being hospitalised for her injuries. </p> <p>The alleged incident occurred at a house in Vaucluse, in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, on the night of May 4, and Cox was arrested at a hotel in Bondi Beach the following day. </p> <p>Cox has spent nearly a month behind bars, and was applying for bail during the court hearing on Monday. </p> <p>The court heard that the altercation occurred after he had attended a charity fundraiser with the woman where he had a few drinks before they became embroiled in a heated argument. </p> <p>Magistrate Greg Grogin said the facts stated that the woman had been “the instigator” and “quite aggressive”, adding that he wasn't "victim blaming" but adding context to the “extremely serious allegations” where Cox allegedly lashed out  after an “ongoing” argument. </p> <p>Cox's lawyer Ben Barrack told the court the couple had clashed three times that night, and the woman had punched and kicked him in the lead up to the alleged assault. </p> <p>The former TV presenter also claimed that he was acting in self-defence, but admitted that he had not used reasonable force. </p> <p>His lawyer added that the woman’s allegations were “highly problematic” and emphasised she had not yet provided a statement to police about the alleged assault.</p> <p>Police prosecutor Nellia Ng argued that Cox should not be granted bail because there was a risk that he would further endangered the alleged victim commit further offences, or fail to appear in court.</p> <p>However, the Magistrate determined that the risks could be mitigated if Cox resided in Queensland and was barred from contacting his alleged victim.</p> <p>He granted bail with strict conditions including having to surrender his passport, report to police, and abstain from contacting the woman.</p> <p>“Domestic violence should not occur anywhere at any time with anybody for any reason,” Magistrate Grogin said.</p> <p>“Any temptation to contact (the woman) will be a short-course way to come back before the court via AVL wearing green. You don’t need to do that.”</p> <p><em>Image: YouTube</em></p>

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“Just return it”: Tragic appeal after grandma’s home robbed during her funeral

<p>A family has been left "traumatised" after the home of their 81-year-old grandmother was broken into by heartless thieves on the day of her funeral. </p> <p>The house of 81-year-old Nola Bulkeley was targeted last Friday as her family and friends farewelled the mother of three and grandmother of 10, after she died from pancreatic cancer on May 27th. </p> <p>Nola's son Andrew recalled the moment they found out about the robbery, telling 2GB radio on Monday,  "Some of the children and grandchildren went back to the house and when they arrived, they discovered that someone had accessed the house and taken a range of things."</p> <p>"Not only was it very, very sad, but it was confronting. Was someone else still in the house? We just didn't know. [We were] a bit blown away and it brought the wake to a pretty quick end."</p> <p>Andrew went on to describe Nola as a "wonderful woman" and "special grandmother", as their family continue to grieve their loss.</p> <p>"Mum lived in that house for 42 years and not once did someone access it in that way, it's very disappointing," he said.</p> <p>"Mum didn't have a lot of expensive jewellery but she had a whole little range of items that over the years she talked about with the grandkids."</p> <p>"She'd talk about when she left Earth... she'd be pleased to see them have it."</p> <p>He urged those responsible to return the jewellery, saying, "Please, just return it ... just leave it on the front doorstep, or something like that."</p> <p>"It's really broken the family's heart. I thank God she was not there to experience this injustice. She would have been so upset."</p> <p>Nola's grandchildren, who had been staying at the house in Sydney's north-west, discovered the theft when they returned to the house after the wake following Nola's funeral.</p> <p>Nola's daughter-in-law Celine said her three children felt "traumatised" by the break-in, saying, "We feel she has been violated ... her special items have been taken."</p> <p>Police were called to the home and forensic experts carried out an examination to identify the thieves, with the investigation still ongoing. </p> <p><em>Image credits: 2GB </em></p>

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“I’m sick of it": Boy's heartbreaking plea after racist abuse

<p>An Anawain Gamilaroi woman has demanded change after her nine-year-old nephew was left crushed by racist abuse that he allegedly experienced at AFL training.  </p> <p>Shaylee Matthews shared the heartbreaking video of Jarmilles breaking down in a car on LinkedIn. </p> <p>The young boy was still wearing his team jersey and was in tears as he repeated the racist abuse that was allegedly targeted towards him. </p> <p>"I hate it when you call me Black," he said through tears. </p> <p>"I hate when you call me monkey. It's got to stop."</p> <p>"I'm sick of this. I don't want there to be racism. I'm sick of it. It needs to be over."</p> <p>When asked if he was okay, Jarmilles replied: "No. I want to go home and go to bed now."</p> <p>Matthews, who works for the ACT government, said the video exposes the "harsh reality" of racism experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.</p> <p>“This post and videos shared is of my 9 soon to be 10 year old nephew’s experience at AFL training (playing a game he loves) which highlights the harsh reality of racism that persists in our society, especially during National Reconciliation Week (with the theme being Now More Than Ever),” she said.</p> <p>“It’s a call to action for us all to confront privilege, challenge learned racism, and dismantle the systemic issues that perpetuate injustice for Indigenous youth.”</p> <p>"The hurtful comments and behaviours faced by Jarmilles not only reflect individual ignorance but also contribute to larger systemic inequalities," she added. </p> <p>She then called for the public to use Reconciliation Week as an opportunity to fight racism and advocate for change. </p> <p>"We must advocate for change, demand accountability, and ensure that all children, regardless of their background, are treated with dignity and respect," she said. </p> <p>"By standing in solidarity, raising our voices, and actively working towards a more just and inclusive society, we can create a future where every child feels safe, valued, and supported.</p> <p>"Let's turn this moment of pain into a catalyst for meaningful change and a brighter tomorrow for all our children."</p> <p><em>Image: LinkedIn/ news.com.au</em></p>

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Racist street name set to change

<p>The name of a street in northern NSW is set to be changed after an Uber driver stumbled across it and alerted locals to its racist background. </p> <p>Byron Shire Council announced that Hottentot Crescent in Mullumbimby, will soon be renamed Moonlight Close, after the council deemed Hottentot - a racist term for Indigenous South Africans - no longer appropriate for use. </p> <p>Jonny Simons, a local man who moved to Australia from South Africa in the 1980s, was the first person to petition for the name change back in November, after the Uber driver tipped him off. </p> <p>He garnered 383 signatures in the petition, but not all residents and community members supported the change. </p> <p>Last year, there were 12 submissions from past and present residents objecting to the council's name change proposal. </p> <p>One resident insisted on keeping the name saying: “My understanding is that our street name was chosen decades ago, after a tree, the Hottentot Bean Tree (Schotia Brachypetala). Never in my time as a resident here, have I heard another person ever relate the street name in regards to a racial slur." </p> <p>“While I appreciate the concerns raised, it is essential to acknowledge that names can change in meaning and connotation over the years.</p> <p>“Altering the street name would greatly impact residents and the council long term with endless administrative changes and potential financial costs.”</p> <p>However, five other submissions were in favour of the change, with one writing: “a racial slur is a racial slur even if a tree is named after it. As much as I loved the sound of the name, it has to go.” </p> <p>A few other names were put forward, including Drunken Parrot Place - named after a nearby tree full of lorikeets getting drunk in spring and summer - but the council ultimately decided on Moonlight Close. </p> <p>In November, following community consultation, the council’s director of infrastructure services Phillip Holloway, recommended the name change “on the basis that there is more lasting value in trying to minimise the type of hurt this particular name could cause some people over the long term", over avoiding costs to the residents in the short term.</p> <p>He added that many of the residents were unaware of the racist connotation of the name "beyond naming the relevant tree", and that "the tree name itself is racially loaded" because it is linked to the slur used towards the Khoisan people "who used the tree for food during South Africa’s colonisation.”</p> <p>Simons, who petitioned for the change, said he doesn't hold anything against the residents who were against the name change as "they didn't know what it meant". </p> <p>"They thought it was the name of a tree, but that tree was named as such because the Khoisan people of South Africa ate the fruit of that tree," he said. </p> <p><em>Image: Google Maps</em></p>

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Lisa Wilkinson's hefty legal fees revealed

<p>The eye-watering costs of Lisa Wilkinson's legal battle against Bruce Lehrmann after he unsuccessfully sued her for defamation has been revealed.</p> <p>Lehrmann took Wilkinson and her former employer Network Ten to court following the airing of allegations by Brittany Higgins that she was raped in Parliament House in 2019.</p> <p>The defamation suit was lost by Lehrmann in April after Justice Michael Lee found that Lehrmann had, on the balance of probabilities, assaulted Ms Higgins, therefore cannot be defamed for the allegations. </p> <p>Ms Wilkinson has now returned to court in an attempt to recuperate approximately $1.8 million in legal fees from Network 10 after she decided to be represented separately to her former employer. </p> <p>Documents released by the Federal Court on Thursday reveal the eye-watering cost behind Ms Wilkinson’s defence by high-profile defamation lawyer Sue Chrysanthou SC.</p> <p>The documents detail numerous invoices issued to Ms Wilkinson throughout the years-long legal battle; the most recent being an invoice dated May 9th for $405,328.</p> <p>The fee is listed as being for Ms Sue Chrysanthou‘s counsel; similar fees dating back to mid-2023 ranged in size from $10,340 to $97,988 before GST was added.</p> <p>The largest single invoice issued to Ms Wilkinson was dated February 29th 2024 and amounted to a whopping $576,224.72 after GST, which included news subscriptions and lunches. </p> <p>Early costs agreements sent to Gillis Delaney Lawyers, who Ms Wilkinson had retained to represent her, and Ms Chrysanthou quoted fees of $8,000 per day.</p> <p>A range of other expenditures are included in the documents, including thousands of dollars for printing and folders, USB drives, and subscriptions to <em>The Australian</em>.</p> <p>A referee is expected to be appointed for certain items that the Network claims did not come under legal costs, with Justice Lee foreshadowing a similar process for costs being asked of Mr Lehrmann.</p> <p>In earlier written submissions, Network 10 said it did not have to pick up the bill for Ms Wilkinson’s legal costs which were “unnecessarily duplicative or wasteful”.</p> <p>The referee, called for by Network 10, will be tasked with combing through the legal bills incurred by the former <em>The Project</em> host to decide whether the costs were reasonable, and whether she would be compensated.</p> <p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ddba61a4-7fff-2ae6-53fc-4cc05f56fefb">Image credits: Steven Markham/Speed Media - MICK TSIKAS/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Editorial</span></em></p>

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Donald Trump facing jail after guilty verdict

<p>Former US president Donald Trump is facing the possibility of jail time after being found guilty on all 34 counts of a hush money trial in New York. </p> <p>Trump was found to be unanimously guilty by the jury on Thursday afternoon, making him the first former US President with a criminal conviction.</p> <p>In the New York courtroom, he was accused of 34 counts of fraud by falsifying business records to cover up payments of $200,000 ($US130,000) to adult star Stormy Daniels.</p> <p>It was reported that Mr Trump wanted to buy her silence about an alleged extramarital sexual encounter which was in danger of becoming public knowledge in the run up to the 2016 US Presidential election.</p> <p>While paying hush money to cover up a potentially damning story isn't illegal, Trump's falsifying of business records to bury the payments is a criminal offence in the state of New York. </p> <p>Mr Trump, 77, denied a sexual encounter with Ms Daniels took place and denied all the charges.</p> <p>After the guilty verdict was handed down, Trump spoke to reporters outside the courtroom, saying the trial was “rigged” and a “disgrace”.</p> <p>“This was a rigged trial by a conflicted judge who is corrupt,” he said.</p> <p>“The real verdict is going to be November 5 by the people and they know what happened here and everybody knows what happened here.”</p> <p>He insisted “we didn’t do anything wrong”.</p> <p>“I’m a very innocent man and it’s OK, I’m fighting for our country, I’m fighting for our Constitution,” he said.</p> <p>A sentencing hearing has been set for July 11th, just four days before the Republican National Convention, when the party will officially nominate him for President ahead of the election in November.</p> <p>He faces a minimum of probation and a maximum of up to four years in prison.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-46607c99-7fff-4305-1a14-3fd4a2e9d2b3"><em>Image credits: Justin Lane/UPI/Shutterstock Editorial</em> </span></p>

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Former detective shares new theory on Samantha Murphy's murder

<p>After several weeks of no leads, police were happy to share their breakthrough on the case of Samantha Murphy's murder after they located her mobile phone. </p> <p>During a "<a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/major-update-in-search-for-samantha-murphy-s-body" target="_blank" rel="noopener">targeted search</a>", officers found Ms Murphy's iPhone on the bank of a dam, in what is one of the most significant developments in the case as police continue to search for Ms Murphy’s missing body.</p> <p>However, retired detective Charlie Bezzina has urged police and members of the public that just because the phone has been located, it could still be some time until Ms Murphy's body is found. </p> <p>Bezzina suggested that the phone had been planted in the dam and then concealed Ms Murphy’s body elsewhere in a bid to mislead police.</p> <p>Mr Bezzina, a veteran cop with decades of experience, said he found it perplexing that police could locate the submerged phone without prior intelligence. </p> <p>He speculated that authorities might have had some degree of tracking information while the phone was still active, hinting that the police may know more than they’re disclosing.</p> <p>Mr Bezzina went on to suspect that someone may have been in possession of Ms Murphy's phone for some time before discarding it. </p> <p>“With phones it’s amazing. There’s a lot the carrier, or carriers, don’t tell us about the capabilities of a phone,” Mr Bezzina said via Herald Sun.</p> <p>“When you’ve got a phone that’s off, people ask the question, ‘is it still transmitting’, and ‘if the battery goes flat does it still transmit?’ Some do and some don’t.”</p> <p>Mr Bezzina said it’s not uncommon for offenders to keep items for a while before discarding them, particularly mobile phones. </p> <p>“We don’t know when that phone was dumped in there, it is not unusual for offenders to keep items for a while, especially mobile phones … for all we know that might have been discarded just weeks ago,” he said.</p> <p>“Often offenders go back and do things, keep the phone somewhere or with them, and then dump it later on."</p> <p>“And that’s where they’ll get any evidence, if it’s been pinging … people can think ‘I’ll drive 10 or 15 kilometres away and I’ll dump the phone there to really put them off the scent, if the phone is in some way traceable’ … so not unusual at all for it to be dumped in a separate location (to the body).”</p> <p>Ms Murphy was last seen on February 4th, and although 22-year-old Patrick Orren Stephenson has been charged with her murder, her body has yet to be found. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine News</em></p>

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Commonly overlooked estate planning matters

<p>Estate planning is a complex business, making it easy to overlook some important considerations, potentially with costly results.</p> <p>Aside from basic issues like forgotten assets (always keep written records) and inaccurate details (double check everything before signing), seven of the most commonly disregarded estate planning matters are as follows:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Wills</strong></li> </ol> <p>Unlike many younger people, for over sixties the more common issue is not the lack of a will, but one which is out of date.</p> <p>Out-of-date wills complicate matters for executors, can delay probate for your beneficiaries, and may not reflect your true wishes (imagine inadvertently leaving everything to your ex or omitting one or more grandkids!).</p> <p>Update your will as your circumstances change – relationships (divorce, new partner etc), births and deaths, adult children getting married or divorced, exiting a business, asset sales, and so on.</p> <p>Retirement often brings its own changes too – e.g. a sea or tree change, new boat or caravan – which also should be updated in your will.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Letter of wishes</strong></li> </ol> <p>Wills are typically not read until after a funeral. As such, a letter of wishes is a useful addition for loved ones to have accessible immediately after your death.</p> <p>It can cover everything from funeral arrangements, burial vs cremation, and where you wish to be laid to rest to outlining intentions longer term, such as how any underage children are to be raised and educated, or care arrangements for any pets.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Super beneficiaries</strong></li> </ol> <p>One of the biggest myths about superannuation is that it is covered by your will. </p> <p>Super is treated separately, meaning you must nominate your beneficiaries within your super fund. And update them as circumstances change.</p> <p>This can be useful for blended families – leaving your super to children/grandchildren from a past relationship without encroaching on the assets of your current partner.</p> <p>Without nominating beneficiaries, the funds could go somewhere else entirely – even to government coffers.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Advanced Health Directive (a ‘living will’)</strong></li> </ol> <p>Estate planning doesn’t just cover your wishes once you’re gone. Yet people often focus solely on this aspect and overlook how they want to be looked after in the event of ill health or injury preventing them from being able to make decisions (e.g. stroke, terminal illness, severe accident).</p> <p>An Advanced Health Directive can express your wishes and values on everything from life support and resuscitation to palliative care, medical treatments, and who you wish to be able to speak on your behalf. </p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Insurances</strong></li> </ol> <p>Rarely do people have adequate insurance coverage for their needs.</p> <p>There are insurances in super, which may cover death and permanent disability. Insurance of assets. Income protection insurance. And health insurance.</p> <p>It’s important to right-size your insurance for your current needs and adapt that cover as your circumstances change. That means:</p> <ul> <li>Taking out new policies for new assets and investments.</li> <li>Updating policy inclusions and exclusions, such as relating to age.</li> <li>Cancelling insurances you no longer need (e.g. sold assets or professional indemnity once you retire).</li> </ul> <ol start="6"> <li><strong>Tax implications</strong></li> </ol> <p>Because Australia has no inheritance tax, many people are lulled into a false sense of complicity over tax implications in estate planning matters.</p> <p>However, beneficiaries can be liable for both Capital Gains Tax and income tax on inherited assets – potentially outweighing the value of those assets altogether.</p> <p>Additionally, your own tax status should be considered. For instance, you may be paying more tax by holding an income-producing asset rather than transferring ownership to a loved one before you pass away.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong>Tailored professional advice</strong></li> </ol> <p>DIY will kits, self-titled “expert” authors, and avoiding advisers to save money overlook the true value of tailored, professional advice given the complexity of estate planning.</p> <p>You don’t know what you don’t know, meaning the margin for error is huge. And when it comes to money, tax and estate law, errors can be expensive indeed.</p> <p>A good lawyer, accountant and financial adviser can more than pay for themselves by helping you avoid overpaying taxes, complex legal disputes, insufficient asset protections and lost wealth creation opportunities.</p> <p>And given estate planning is ultimately about peace of mind, can you – or your family – really afford to overlook such valuable insight?</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em><strong>Helen Baker is a licensed Australian financial adviser and author of On Your Own Two Feet: The Essential Guide to Financial Independence for all Women. Helen is among the 1% of financial planners who hold a master’s degree in the field. Proceeds from book sales are donated to charities supporting disadvantaged women and children. Find out more at <a href="http://www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au/">www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au</a> </strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>Disclaimer: The information in this article is of a general nature only and does not constitute personal financial or product advice. Any opinions or views expressed are those of the authors and do not represent those of people, institutions or organisations the owner may be associated with in a professional or personal capacity unless explicitly stated. Helen Baker is an authorised representative of BPW Partners Pty Ltd AFSL 548754.</strong></em></p> <p><strong><em> </em></strong></p>

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Laura Tingle shares "regret" over racism comments

<p>Laura Tingle has shared her "regret" over her <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/laura-tingle-under-fire-after-declaring-australia-a-racist-country" target="_blank" rel="noopener">comments</a> that Australia is "a racist country", as the ABC Director of News responded to her claims. </p> <p>Tingle caused outrage after she made the claims about Australia being inherently racist during a panel on Sunday as part of the Sydney Writer's Festival. </p> <p>Now, ABC News director Justin Stevens says her comments did not meet the organisation's editorial standards.</p> <p>“Although the remarks were conversational, and not made in her work capacity, the ABC and its employees have unique obligations in the Australian media,’’ he said in a <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/about/media-centre/statements-and-responses/justin-stevens-statement-on-laura-tingle/103909056" target="_blank" rel="noopener">statement</a>. </p> <p>“Today she has explained her remarks in more detail to ensure there is a factual record of the relevant context and detail."</p> <p>“The ABC’s editorial standards serve a vital role. Laura has been reminded of their application at external events as well as in her work and I have counselled her over the remarks."</p> <p>In response to much nation-wide backlash over her comments, Tingle issued a lengthy statement clarifying her remarks and also sharing her "regret". </p> <p>“I did indeed make the observation on Sunday that we are a racist country, in the context of a discussion about the political prospects ahead,’’ Tingle said.</p> <p>“I wasn’t saying every Australian is a racist. But we clearly have an issue with racism. Without even going into the historic record, there is also ample evidence that racism remains a particular problem in our legal and policing systems."</p> <p>“In my commentary at the ABC, and at the Sydney Writers’ Festival, I expressed my concern at the risks involved in Peter Dutton pressing the hot button of housing and linking it to migration for these reasons," she continued. </p> <p>“Political leaders, by their comments, give licence to others to express opinions they may not otherwise express. That does not make them racist, but it has real world implications for many Australians.”</p> <p>She went on to add a statement of "regret", saying, “I regret that when I was making these observations at the Writers’ Festival the nature of the free-flowing panel discussion means they were not surrounded by every quote substantiating them which would have – and had – been included in what I had said earlier on the ABC."</p> <p>“This has created the opportunity for yet another anti-ABC pile-on. This is not helpful to me or to the ABC. Or to the national debate. I am proud of my work as a journalist at the ABC, on all its platforms, and I let that work speak for itself.”</p> <p>ABC News boss Justin Stevens confirmed on Thursday that Tingle had been “counselled over her remarks” and "reminded of their application at external events as well as in her work."</p> <p><em>Image credits: ABC News / DANNY CASEY/EPA-EFE / Shutterstock Editorial </em></p> <p> </p>

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Alleged killer cop files lawsuit against NSW Police

<p>The former police officer accused of murder has now filed a lawsuit against the NSW Police for bullying and harassment. </p> <p>Former NSW Police senior constable Beau Lamarre-Condon is accused of shooting Jesse Baird, 26, and his partner Luke Davies, 29, at Baird’s Paddington house in February and disposing of the bodies on a rural property near Goulburn.</p> <p>While still awaiting trial over the alleged murders, the suit against the police force has been filed, with <em>Sunrise</em> newsreader Edwina Bartholomew sharing the updates. </p> <p>“The defence lawyer for accused killer cop Beau Lamarre-Condon says his client is continuing with a lawsuit against the NSW Police Force for bullying and harassment while he was a constable,” Bartholomew said.</p> <p>Lamarre-Condon's lawyer John Walford confirmed the move to <a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/subscribe/news/1/?sourceCode=DTWEB_WRE170_a_TCA&amp;dest=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailytelegraph.com.au%2Ftruecrimeaustralia%2Fpolice-courts-nsw%2Fchilling-unseen-photos-of-beau-lamarrecondon-cosying-up-with-exlover-he-allegedly-killed%2Fnews-story%2F4fdbac4f0dac6d7ea38b3094e808e3ab&amp;memtype=anonymous&amp;mode=premium&amp;v21=LOW-Segment-1-SCORE" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>The Daily Telegraph</em></a>, saying, “Yes, action against police is continuing … it’s huge.”</p> <p>The former officer has been in protective custody at the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Silverwater in Sydney's west for the past four months and sources close to the 28-year-old say his mental state is deteriorating.</p> <p>"He's not doing real well at the moment," a source told <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13471215/Beau-Lamarre-Condon-Chilling-pictures-accused-killer-Jesse-Baird-Luke-Davies.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Daily Mail Australia</em></a> in April. </p> <p>"Obviously it's set in now - what's happened and the allegations and where he is. I think the rot's set in mentally-wise. He's at a low point at the moment. He's very down. He's hit the lows."</p> <p>Lamarre-Condon is expected to front court again on June 18th. </p> <p><em>Image credits: 7News / Shutterstock </em></p>

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"Repeatedly ignored": Daughter of Perth gunman breaks her silence

<p>The daughter of the Perth man who has been accused of murdering a 59-year-old woman and her 18-year-old daughter has broken her silence. </p> <p>Mark Bombara <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/health/caring/the-most-gorgeous-family-tributes-flow-for-slain-mother-and-daughter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shot and killed</a> Jennifer Petelczyc and her youngest daughter Gretl at their home in Floreat, Western Australia, on Friday afternoon while searching for his ex-wife before taking his own life.</p> <p>Now, his daughter Ariel has released a powerful statement sharing how she repeatedly warned police of the danger he posed as a licensed firearms holder, admitting that her and her mother had feared for their lives. </p> <p>"We were ignored by five different male officers across three occasions of reporting," Ms Bombara said. "By that point we felt completely helpless and I had to focus on getting mum to safety."</p> <p>"I did everything I could to protect my mother, and when my father couldn't find us he murdered her best friend and her best friend's daughter."</p> <p>Ms Bombara explained that her and her mother fled their family home on March 28th, "in fear of our lives and to remove ourselves from an abusive situation", and over the span of four days, contacted police three times to notify them about her father's gun collection. </p> <p>"I felt there was a real and imminent threat to our lives," she said.</p> <p>"I specifically mentioned that there was a Glock handgun which was unaccounted for," Ms Bombara said.</p> <p>"My understanding is this ultimately would be one of the weapons my father used take the lives of two innocent women."</p> <p>She was adamant that the deaths of Jennifer and Gretl Petelczyc were "an act of domestic violence".</p> <p>"My mother and I made clear that lives were at risk, and we were repeatedly ignored. Repeatedly failed. Those failures have cost the lives of two incredible women."</p> <p>"My father should always be considered accountable for his actions. They were his and his alone, however, there are authorities who should have helped us stop him, and they failed."</p> <p>"I want answers."</p> <p>Following the deaths of Ms Petelczyc and her daughter, WA Police did not classify them as domestic violence-related.</p> <p>A police spokesperson said in a statement, "Police have always accepted that the motivation for these crimes were family and domestic violence (FDV) related, however the crimes committed were murder, and ultimately the contributing factors will be a matter for the coroner to consider." </p> <p><em>Image credits: ABC News / 9News</em></p>

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Charlise Mutten's mother flees court in tears

<p>Charlise Mutten's mother has broken down and fled the courtroom in tears after being accused of murdering her nine-year-old daughter.</p> <p>Kallista Mutten was grilled by her ex-fiancé Justin Stein's lawyer on Tuesday about her excessive methamphetamine use, including while pregnant with his child.</p> <p>The grilling began when Carolyn Davenport SC accused her by saying, "You shot and killed your daughter", to which Ms Mutten replied, "Are you serious?"</p> <p>She then burst into tears, crying out "I didn't even know where she was shot" before Ms Davenport added that Mr Stein "had seen you deliver the second shot".</p> <p>After being excused from the witness box, Ms Mutten ran out of the courtroom in tears, while the jury were temporarily sent out.  </p> <p>The dramatic moment came after Ms Mutten admitted taking methamphetamine even when her daughter came to visit.</p> <p>Ms Mutten was being cross-examined on day 12 of Stein's trial, who has been charged with Charlise's murder in January 2022. </p> <p>The 40-year-old admitted to having psychotic episodes while on using ice and had continued to take the drug despite her Charlise's visit during the summer school holidays in 2022.</p> <p>She denied she and Charlise were not getting along in the days before her death, or that she had been told to leave the Stein's Mount Wilson property, and instead left of her own accord.</p> <p>"I chose to leave because I didn't want to be there any more. Yeah, I was very hormonal, I was pregnant. Yeah, I was using, yeah. My emotions were very strong at the time," she said.</p> <p>Stein, 33, has pleaded not guilty to murdering Charlise, but has admitted to disposing the schoolgirl's body.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Daily Mail / Facebook / Nine News</em></p>

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