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“Don’t marry him”: Bride-to-be shares wild altercation with her future in-laws over her wedding dress

<p dir="ltr">A woman has been told to “run” from her fiancé after sharing a wild conversation she had with her future in-laws about her wedding dress. </p> <p dir="ltr">The bride-to-be shared that ever since she was a child, she wanted to wear her mother’s wedding dress on her own big day. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, the woman was then confronted by her soon-to-be in-laws, with drama ensuing over her wedding dress.</p> <p dir="ltr">Taking to Reddit’s “Am I The A**hole?” page, the woman explained, "My mother's wedding dress has been passed down for generations and I remember being a little girl dreaming of walking down the aisle in it."</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite her wishes to wear the family heirloom on her big day, she said things went south at a dinner at her sister-in-law’s (SIL) house when she  "tapped her spoon against the glass and said that she had to make a toast."</p> <p dir="ltr">"She then said she would be right back before going into another room and returning with a large plastic bag," the bride continues.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Everyone seemed to be excited but I just felt confused."</p> <p dir="ltr">As she "awkwardly smiled", her SIL opened the bag to reveal her wedding dress from her wedding two years earlier as her in-laws began clapping, as her future sister-in-law announced she wanted the bride to wear her dress at her upcoming nuptials.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I tried to smile but I guess I didn't do a good job of hiding my disappointment and everyone began asking me what was wrong," the bride-to-be continues, adding that she tried to explain that she wanted to wear her mother's wedding dress.</p> <p dir="ltr">At this point, her SIL began to cry and her in-laws began berating her, causing the bride to burst into tears and run outside.</p> <p dir="ltr">"My fiancé didn't even come after me and after crying my eyes out on the steps for what felt like hours, he finally came outside and yelled at me to get into the car," she says.</p> <p dir="ltr">Confused, she got into the car only for her fiancé to berate her for making "such a big scene" leaving him feeling "embarrassed in front of his family."</p> <p dir="ltr">"He sounds so mad and he even said he couldn't believe he chose to marry such a 'bitchy c--t' (his exact words)."</p> <p dir="ltr">The woman tried to explain how important it was to her to wear her mother's dress and that she had already promised her mother she would be wearing it on her big day.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I felt like my fiancé's family planned this and put me on the spot thinking I wouldn't stand up for myself and just agree to wear SIL's dress," she continues.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I don't think I did anything wrong but a part of me thinks I should have just gone along with it and then told SIL in private that I wouldn't be wearing the dress."</p> <p dir="ltr">Hundreds of people were quick to comment on her post, suggesting that she “run” not only from her in-laws, but from her partner as well. </p> <p dir="ltr">"Ma'am you need to leave that whole family behind including your fiancé," one said. "You just had a peek into your future if you carry on with this relationship."</p> <p dir="ltr">"Don't you dare marry that man!!!" another said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The problem doesn't exist as the wedding shouldn't be happening anymore," another added.</p> <p dir="ltr">One Redditor suggested she "be thankful that he is showing you who he really is before you marry him."</p> <p dir="ltr">"You have just had a glimpse of what your future is going to look like if you go through with your wedding."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p> </p>

Family & Pets

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Bride slammed for “absolutely ridiculous” dress code rules

<p dir="ltr">A bride-to-be has gone viral for all the wrong reasons after her exhaustive list of wedding day dress code rules has divided the internet. </p> <p dir="ltr">A wedding guest took to a wedding shaming facebook group to share the list of attire rules she received alongside her invitation to the nuptials, sparking a heated debate over the “absolutely ridiculous” dress code.</p> <p dir="ltr">The specific dress code nitpicks at colour, fabric, length, print, and even the “vibe” clothes give off.</p> <p dir="ltr">The invite read: “Dress code: Formal (non-black tie) wear. Suits (preferably dark blue or dark grey, no tuxedos), ties, and dress shoes for men. No need to get creative!”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Linen is better suited for our welcome party; please wear a traditional fabric for the wedding.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“For women, tea-length dresses are great. Knee-length also works, but make sure it is not too casual (no summer floral dresses, for example) and floor-length is fine but make sure it is not an evening gala gown.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Avoid any outrageous necklines, cut-outs, or sparkles. The idea is to be formal and glam, but not like you are on the way to a black-tie gala. Solid jewel tones generally work better than florals. No black please!”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Most importantly, please make sure to cover your shoulders and back with a cardigan or light scarf!”</p> <p dir="ltr">The huge list sparked a debate online, with some people claiming the bride is “controlling” and “entitled”, while others defended the bride and groom. </p> <p dir="ltr">“When in the hell did we start telling guests what to wear?” one person commented, “This is utterly ridiculous and if I received this invitation, it would go directly into the bin.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another person wrote, “What is 'traditional fabric'? Am I supposed to show up in undyed wool? If we're being pedantic here, linen is pretty much the most traditional fabric in terms of historic use.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“They should just pick a uniform for the guests,” another said, while one wrote, “I honestly don't know if this type of dress or outfit exists?”</p> <p dir="ltr">Some claimed they would go against the dress code on purpose, as one person wrote, “I'd show up in an above-the-knee black floral number with cold shoulder cut outs and a sparkling neckline. For fun, it would be made out of linen.”</p> <p dir="ltr">However, a few people were quick to defend the bride and groom.   </p> <p dir="ltr">“They could be getting married in a church, mosque, or synagogue - where this is a requirement. I would rather an invite tell me this than show up and not have known. Telling people gives people the opportunity to RSVP no if it's an issue,” one wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“To me this isn't exactly unreasonable,” another said. “It's not some huge list of dos and don'ts or very specific colours that must be adhered to or avoided. It helps guests who have no idea what to wear.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Facebook / Shutterstock</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Queen Mary’s wedding dressmaker reveals process behind iconic gown

<p dir="ltr">The Danish designer and dressmaker who designed Queen Mary’s wedding gown has recalled the “rather terrifying” process of making the iconic dress.</p> <p dir="ltr">Birgit Hallstein created the custom gown for the Aussie-born royal for her to marry Prince Frederik in 2004, as the designer recalled having to adhere to an unusual royal tradition when creating the dress. </p> <p dir="ltr">Hallstein said that she put the finishing touches on the dress on the wedding day: a decision that was mentioned to her by Mary's new mother-in-law, Queen Margrethe.</p> <p dir="ltr">Hallstein admits the old tradition, which involves doing the final loops and stitches the morning of the wedding, also helped her process in the long run. </p> <p dir="ltr">"[It] was a thing I did because it's a tradition in some families, but honestly I don't remember if Queen Margrethe would have mentioned such a thing," Hallstein told <em><a href="https://style.nine.com.au/latest/queen-mary-of-denmark-20th-wedding-anniversary-wedding-dressmaker-birgit-hallstein-interview/9f0c57eb-2d7b-44fd-ae0b-487d1b3592a5">9Honey</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Maybe, because she knows a lot of those things... I am sure we talked about it, but anyway it was practical to gather the dress on the day because it's big."</p> <p dir="ltr">The process for Hallstein began in November 2003, as she admitted it was the most important garment she had ever worked on.</p> <p dir="ltr">"It was rather terrifying," she admitted with a laugh.</p> <p dir="ltr">"It's a bit like an exam, just a really big one, because if you fail everyone will see."</p> <p dir="ltr">Hallstein worked in a dedicated space at Amalienborg Palace to deliver the gown as well as the outfits worn by the bridesmaids, page boys and flower girls.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The sewing took hundreds of hours, starting in January 2004 and ending right before the wedding," she recalled.</p> <p dir="ltr">There was also the added pressure of adhering to royal traditions and protocols around the use of the antique veil and the lace attachment to the petticoat, which was from Queen Margrethe's private collection.</p> <p dir="ltr">"There are rules to follow, [you're] not allowed to cut in it and only skilled repairs [are allowed]," Hallstein said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I had to hide around two or three metres of the antique lace in between layers of organza inside the dress to make sure it was not damaged by high heels, chairs, cars and carriages during the day."</p> <p dir="ltr">In a social media post to mark 20 years since the world got their first look at the classic gown, the dressmaker explained to fans that "the wedding gown consists of three parts".</p> <p dir="ltr">“There's a big tulle petticoat, edged with almost 60 yards of Chantilly lace, on this a big light blue silk bow were placed, to make sure the first born would be a son," she said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Hounsfield-Klein-Zabulon/ABACA/Shutterstock Editorial</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Mother of the groom slammed for unacceptable wedding outfit

<p dir="ltr">A mother of the groom has been slammed online for wearing a white dress to her son’s wedding: committing a major wedding faux pas. </p> <p dir="ltr">The family photo, which has gone viral, shows the mother wearing “a dress even whiter than the bride’s”, complete with a sheet cape train, a cream hat and corsage. </p> <p dir="ltr">The mum's behaviour was criticised by thousands in a wedding-shaming Facebook group, while others defended the woman, saying she may have had permission for the look beforehand.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Really makes you wonder what in god's name happened with all these mothers-in-law to make them act like their son's wedding is her own wedding,” one person commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many claimed the older woman's dress was a clear attempt to upstage the bride, with many saying her outfit was simply unacceptable. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Makes me vomit when I see mothers like this,” a woman said.</p> <p dir="ltr">A second person added, “The cape, the gown, the fascinator... oh, my god. It would have been over the top, but fine if in any other colour. I hope to be as patient as this bride one day.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I cannot imagine doing this to any woman who decides to marry my son. Like, hon, I of all people know how difficult he can be to live with, may the old gods and the new bless you for your sacrifice,” another joked.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm 99 percent sure this wasn't bride-approved as it's white and the bride's dress is ever so slightly off-white. And the bride looks perfect!” a fourth added.</p> <p dir="ltr">A few even claimed someone should have “accidentally” spilled a glass of red wine on the mother's dress.</p> <p dir="ltr">“No way she should have made it to the pictures without someone spilling [wine]. That poor girl,” a woman said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Facebook</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Channel 10 presenter exposes on-air dress shaming

<p>Channel 10 presenter Narelda Jacobs has exposed a “humiliating” email she received from a viewer who commented on an outfit she wore on-air Tuesday. </p> <p>The Australian journalist, who hosts <em>10 News First</em>, wore a v-neck blouse and patterned blazer when she was reporting that day, when the unsolicited "feedback" came through. </p> <p>Jacobs shared a screenshot of the email that was sent to the Ten News group on Instagram. </p> <p>“Inappropriate dress sense for reading the news. Cleavage is for the nightclub,” the email read. </p> <p>Addressing the email, Jacobs began:  “Yes, we still receive emails like this. Yes, it went to the entire newsroom." </p> <p>“Yes, I was on air at the time. Yes, it is intended to shame and humiliate me," the 48-year-old added. </p> <p>“No, what I’m wearing is not inappropriate but your email sure is.”</p> <p>Followers took to the comments to back Jacobs, with fellow journalists sharing their own experience of receiving sexist criticism. </p> <p>Retired swimmer Giaan Rooney wrote:  “Yep. The number of emails the newsroom used to get attacking everything about my appearance when I was presenting the weather was incredible.” </p> <p><em>The Guardian</em> journalist Amy Remeikis recalled how “not that long ago” a woman felt that she had to “hide” her nine-year-old son from the TV when she was on-air.</p> <p>“Because he wanted to know why that woman (me) had ‘sex face’ and what my boobs were,” Remeikis wrote. “Had never seen breasts apparently, but could use the phrase ‘sex face’.”</p> <p><em>ABC Radio</em> host Yumi Stynes joked, “How dare you cleavage?” before complimenting Jacobs for her radiant look, while <em>Dessert Masters</em> judge Melissa Leong wrote, “File under ‘When you really hate yourself, so you decide to email random strangers to tell them.’”</p> <p>Comedian Janelle Koenig slammed the ‘feedback’ as “absolute insanity.”</p> <p>This comes after thousands attended <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/it-s-up-to-men-anthony-albanese-joins-violence-against-women-rally" target="_blank" rel="noopener">rallies</a> in late April calling on the government to take action against the recent spate of acts of violence against women. </p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

TV

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Kids dressing up as older people is harmless fun, right? No, it’s ageist, whatever Bluey says

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lisa-mitchell-1143692">Lisa Mitchell</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a></em></p> <p>A child once approached me, hunched over, carrying a vacuum cleaner like a walking stick. In a wobbly voice, he asked: "Do you want to play grannies?"</p> <p>The idea came from the children’s TV show Bluey, which <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ABCKidsCommunity/videos/bluey-grannies/468144817266668/">has</a> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ABCKidsCommunity/videos/new-bluey-episodes-the-grannies-are-back-abc-kids/371436135028190/">episodes</a>, <a href="https://www.bluey.tv/products/grannies-book/">a book</a>, <a href="https://www.discountmags.com/magazine/bluey-september-1-2023-digital">magazine</a> editions and an <a href="https://www.facebook.com/OfficialBlueyTV/videos/grannies-filter-bluey/5728362390510269/">image filter</a> about dressing up as “grannies”.</p> <p>Children are also dressing up as 100-year-olds to mark their first “100 days of school”, an idea <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/old-people-s-home-for-five-year-olds-prep-students-don-senior-citizen-attire-20230801-p5dszb.html">gaining popularity</a> <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/education/cardigans-wigs-and-canes-why-kindy-students-are-dressing-up-as-100-year-olds-20230720-p5dpu8.html">in Australia</a>.</p> <p>Is this all just harmless fun?</p> <h2>How stereotypes take hold</h2> <p>When I look at the older people in my life, or the patients I see as a geriatrician, I cannot imagine how to suck out the individual to formulate a “look”.</p> <p>But Google “older person dress-ups” and you will find <a href="https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/dress-up-like-youre-100-years-old-100thdayofschool--15199717464361356/">Pinterests</a> and <a href="https://www.wikihow.com/Dress-Up-Like-an-Old-Person#:%7E:text=Dress%20in%20comfortable%2C%20loose%2Dfitting,older%20people%20may%20wear%20include%3A&amp;text=Oversized%20sweatshirts">Wikihow pages</a> doing just that.</p> <p>Waistcoats, walking sticks, glasses and hunched backs are the key. If you’re a “granny”, don’t forget a <a href="https://www.facebook.com/OfficialBlueyTV/videos/games-you-can-play-at-home-grannies-bluey/645964056227345/">shawl and tinned beans</a>. You can buy “old lady” <a href="https://www.spotlightstores.com/party/costumes-and-accessories/costume-accessories/wigs-hair-accessories/wigs/spartys-kids-old-lady-wig-with-curlers/80578132?gclsrc=aw.ds&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds&amp;gclid=Cj0KCQjw0vWnBhC6ARIsAJpJM6emZHoNxO72pUa80Wc8ihYYiq3AohZ_w72jmuWBBDlficdCMy_rsK8aAj47EALw_wcB">wigs</a> or an “old man” <a href="https://www.bigw.com.au/product/facial-hair-set-old-man-3-pieces/p/305026">moustache and bushy eyebrows</a>.</p> <p>This depiction of how older people look and behave is a stereotype. And if dressing up as an older person is an example, such stereotypes are all around us.</p> <h2>What’s the harm?</h2> <p>There is <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/hypa.12170">some debate</a> about whether stereotyping is intrinsically wrong, and if it is, why. But there is plenty of research about the harms of <em>age</em> stereotypes or ageism. That’s harm to current older people and harm to future older people.</p> <p>The World Health Organization <a href="https://www.who.int/health-topics/ageism#tab=tab_1">defines ageism</a> as: "the stereotypes (how we think), prejudice (how we feel) and discrimination (how we act) towards others or ourselves based on age."</p> <p>Ageism <a href="https://www.who.int/health-topics/ageism#tab=tab_1">contributes to</a> social isolation, reduced health and life expectancy and costs economies <a href="https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article/60/1/174/5166947">billions of dollars</a> globally.</p> <p>When it comes to health, the impact of negative stereotypes and beliefs about ageing may be even <a href="https://academic.oup.com/gerontologist/article/60/1/174/5166947">more harmful</a> than the discrimination itself.</p> <p>In laboratory studies, older people perform <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4360754/">worse</a> than expected on tasks such as memory or thinking after being shown negative stereotypes about ageing. This may be due to a “<a href="https://www.simplypsychology.org/stereotype-threat.html">stereotype threat</a>”. This is when a person’s performance is impaired because they are worried about confirming a negative stereotype about the group they belong to. In other words, they perform less well because they’re worried about acting “old”.</p> <p>Another theory is “stereotype embodiment”. This is where people absorb negative stereotypes throughout their life and come to believe decline is an inevitable consequence of ageing. This leads to biological, psychological and physiological changes that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2927354/">create</a> a self-fulfilling prophecy.</p> <p>I have seen this in my clinic with people who do well, until they realise they’re an older person – a birthday, a fall, a revelation when they look in the mirror. Then, they stop going out, stop exercising, stop seeing their friends.</p> <p>Evidence for “stereotype embodiment” comes from studies that show people with more negative views about ageing are more likely to have higher levels of stress hormones (such as cortisol and C-reactive protein) and are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7182003/">less likely</a> to engage in health behaviours, such as exercising and eating healthy foods.</p> <p>Younger adults with negative views about ageing are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2666386/">more likely</a> to have a heart attack up to about 40 years later. People with the most negative attitudes towards ageing have a lower life expectancy by as much as <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12150226/">7.5 years</a>.</p> <p>Children are particularly susceptible to absorbing stereotypes, a process <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2007-09385-010">that starts</a> in early childhood.</p> <h2>Ageism is all around us</h2> <p><a href="https://www.who.int/health-topics/ageism#tab=tab_1">One in two people</a> have ageist views, so tackling ageism is complicated given it is socially acceptable and normalised.</p> <p>Think of all the birthday cards and jokes about ageing or phrases like “geezer” and “old duck”. Assuming a person (including yourself) is “too old” for something. Older people say it is harder to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-07-06/senior-job-seekers-struggle-to-get-a-foot-in-the-door/102563144">find work</a> and they face discrimination in <a href="https://www.hcnsw.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Ageism-in-Health-Care_final.pdf">health care</a>.</p> <h2>How can we reduce ageism?</h2> <p>We can reduce ageism through laws, policies and education. But we can also reduce it via <a href="https://www.who.int/health-topics/ageism#tab=tab_1">intergenerational contact</a>, where older people and younger people come together. This helps break down the segregation that allows stereotypes to fester. Think of the TV series <a href="https://iview.abc.net.au/show/old-people-s-home-for-4-year-olds">Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds</a> or the follow-up <a href="https://iview.abc.net.au/show/old-people-s-home-for-teenagers">Old People’s Home for Teenagers</a>. More simply, children can hang out with their older relatives, neighbours and friends.</p> <p>We can also challenge a negative view of ageing. What if we allowed kids to imagine their lives as grandparents and 100-year-olds as freely as they view their current selves? What would be the harm in that?<img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/212607/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lisa-mitchell-1143692"><em>Lisa Mitchell</em></a><em>, Geriatrician working in clinical practice. PhD Candidate at The University of Melbourne studying ethics and ageism in health care. Affiliate lecturer, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/kids-dressing-up-as-older-people-is-harmless-fun-right-no-its-ageist-whatever-bluey-says-212607">original article</a>.</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Princess Diana's dresses fetch an eye-watering sum at auction

<p>Three dresses worn by Princess Diana have sold for $2.5 million (AUD) at an auction in Beverly Hills, California. </p> <p>The gowns were sold in a <em>Legends: Hollywood And Royalty</em> sale, by Julien's Auctions and featured over 1,400 items to celebrate 100 years of Warner Bros. </p> <p>All three dresses sold for six-figures, with one selling for almost triple it's estimated price. </p> <p>Martin Nolan, the executive director, said the record-breaking sale of Diana's dresses "exceeded all expectations".</p> <p>Princess Diana's black and jade gown was the most expensive item, selling for $895,580. </p> <p>The dress was made by Catherine Walker - her personal designer for over 16 years - which she wore to a gala event in Toronto, Canada, in October 1991. </p> <p>The second most expensive dress sold was a red silk dress made by Bruce Oldfield, which she wore to the premiere of<em> Hot Shots</em> at the Odeon Leicester Square the following month. </p> <p>The Oldfield dress fetched a stunning $895,547 - which was almost triple it's estimated  $312,000 price tag.</p> <p>The final dress was a custom-made black velvet and ivory gown Diana wore to a private function, which was also designed by Walker, and fetched $796,070. </p> <p>The original price of the velvet and ivory gown was estimated to be around $93,000 - $125,000. </p> <p>The three dresses have not been seen in public for over 30 years, according to the auction house.</p> <p>They were originally bought by American businesswoman Ellen Petho, who bought five of Princess Diana's dresses for $234,000 at an auction in New York. </p> <p>Petho, who passed away in January aged 82, ended up only keeping three of the dresses, which her husband has now sold to help raise money for a scholarship fund for mature art and design students in memory of his wife.</p> <p>Petho's daughter Karrie, told the <em>Mail</em>:  "Our mother read the inscription inside [the auction catalogue] about Prince William telling his mother that the dresses should not sit in her closet, that they should be out in the world and doing good. I think that's what inspired her."</p> <p><em>Image: Brian Lawless/PA Images via Getty Images</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Why we should embrace the joy of dressing ‘outside of the lines’ like Gen Z

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/steven-wright-1416088">Steven Wright</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-wales-1586">University of South Wales</a></em> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/gwyneth-moore-1416089">Gwyneth Moore</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-wales-1586">University of South Wales</a></em></p> <p>Have you seen that <a href="https://www.voguescandinavia.com/articles/this-is-how-to-style-the-new-cargo-pant-according-to-these-danish-influencers">cargo pants are back</a>? Young people are once again swishing down hallways and they might even be wearing <a href="https://www.vogue.co.uk/fashion/article/crocs-lyst-hottest-product">Crocs</a> on their feet, because these are cool now too. For many this could be seen as dressing “badly” but Y2K (2000s fashion) is all the rage at the moment.</p> <p>Fashion has long been one of the most creative playgrounds to express yourself and also define your personal identity and status. Gen Z take this very seriously. However, they are no mere followers of fashion but are adventurously carving out their own trends and styles – joyfully playing with the way they dress and express themselves through their clothes.</p> <p>Gen Z are rejecting everything from outdated gender tropes <a href="https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/beauty/why-gen-z-yellow-will-never-be-millennial-pink/">to curated colour schemes</a> and <a href="https://www.vox.com/22697168/body-positivity-image-millennials-gen-z-weight">the idea of the “perfect” body</a>.</p> <p>For several hundred years, it was the fashion industry who controlled what was on trend. It was <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/42978704">in bed with</a> the media, style icons, designers and the tycoons of the industry. This relationship has enabled trends to be predicted and for aesthetic movements to be planned and consumers to be catered for. The masses watched and waited to be told what was new and “hot”.</p> <p>This relationship is now being short-circuited by a <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17569370.2022.2149837">generation of digital natives</a> who live in a world where the distinction between the digital and the physical is blended.</p> <p>Gen Z will not be dictated to, they are not anxiously waiting to be told they are on trend, on social media they are making heir own trends by breaking rules, embracing creativity and finding joy in dressing bravely.</p> <h2>The democratisation of fashion</h2> <p>Each generation has changed fashion. The baby boomers brought us flower power in the 1960s and 1970s using free love in contrast to their parents’ <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/30036343?searchText=free+love+counter+culture+fashion&amp;searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3Dfree%2Blove%2Bcounter%2Bculture%2Bfashion&amp;ab_segments=0%2FSYC-6744_basic_search%2Ftest-1&amp;refreqid=fastly-default%3A1b4986acdbd4197e33c408f8641061a6">clearly defined social and gender roles</a>.</p> <p>Boomers’ younger siblings brought us “punk” in the 1970s and 1980s, a subculture dedicated to using the symbols of the state against itself and deliberately playing with the obscene and vulgar. This was amid a global political climate of conservatism and repression.</p> <p>Then <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/742606?searchText=baby+boomer+fashion+flower+power&amp;searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3Dbaby%2Bboomer%2Bfashion%2Bflower%2Bpower&amp;ab_segments=0%2FSYC-6744_basic_search%2Ftest-1&amp;refreqid=fastly-default%3Af122f7705806e1673dfa550b2fc44c16">again in the 1990s</a> we saw grunge, Gen X’s response to a futureless world post-cold war.</p> <p>Well, Gen X have had children and those kids have decided that they find joy in dressing outside of the lines (so to speak), you can be anything, you can be everything and you can be nothing.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9GUkkenYvlY?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Gen Z (and even millenials) have witnessed the ever-increasing democratisation of fashion through social media sharing and the global reach of online platforms. They have seen thousands of tiny subcultures formed online where they undergo a near constant cycle of evolution, explosion and reformation.</p> <p>Take the early <a href="https://www.instyle.com/fashion/clothing/emo-style">2000s “emo” trend</a>. Once a big subculture, it was thrust to the corners of the internet where everyone thought it would languish and die.</p> <p>However, emo is experiencing a revival with people wearing all black, corsets becoming cool again and heavy eye makeup being sported by the likes of Gen Z darlings <a href="https://www.buzzfeed.com/mariasherm2/willow-smith-bullied-my-chemical-romance-paramore-emo">Willow Smith</a> and <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2021/12/juice-wrld-olivia-rodrigo-kid-laroi-emo-music/621069/">Olivia Rodrigo</a>.</p> <p>But Gen Z are not sticking to one style. Fashion has become a pick and mix of trends and ideas where an individual can use the ingredients to create and recreate identity as often as they desire. There is joy in dressing, not fear. There are no rules.</p> <h2>No rules</h2> <p>As new fashion consumers gleefully reinvent notions of good taste and beauty, the traditional trickle-down effect for trends has been replaced by a bubbling up from new sources defining what’s new and what’s next. From Instagrammers to icons, vloggers and TikTokkers, the <a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/JFMM-12-2020-0275/full/html">sources for trends are broad and varied</a>.</p> <p><iframe style="border: none;" src="https://www.tiktok.com/embed/7127790531932949766" width="100%" height="400" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <p>Young people are creating <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/14614448221146174">their own place in a new world</a>. A world where crocs are high fashion and what “goes” is in the eye of the beholder. Boxers as a headdress or leggings as scarf? sure. Why not even wear a <a href="https://www.highsnobiety.com/p/jw-anderson-ss23-womens-runway-collection/">keyboard</a> as a top? <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@saracampz/video/7127790531932949766">Maximalism</a> is being taken to new extremes as clothes are layered over more clothes and no colour, object or pattern is out of bounds.</p> <p>These are the COVID kids, a generation that came of age during a global calamity where the only form of communication was digital and two-dimensional.</p> <p>The loudest and boldest and most insane outfit is the one that will get you most attention on screen. For kids used to consuming media through TikToks rather than glossy editorials, <a href="https://myjms.mohe.gov.my/index.php/ijbtm/article/view/20001">only the most dramatic, fun and playful will do</a>. Fashion has taken itself way too seriously for way too long. A cleansing fire of young, creative people is exactly what is needed right now. We should all take a page out their book and find joy in dressing in whatever we want.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/199940/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/steven-wright-1416088">Steven Wright</a>, Head of Subject - Fashion Marketing and Photography, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-wales-1586">University of South Wales</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/gwyneth-moore-1416089">Gwyneth Moore</a>, Course coordinator - BA (Hons) Fashion Business &amp; Marketing &amp; BA (Hons) Fashion Design, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-wales-1586">University of South Wales</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-we-should-embrace-the-joy-of-dressing-outside-of-the-lines-like-gen-z-199940">original article</a>.</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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"We did it!" Mystery behind Fifi Box's wedding dress unveiled

<p dir="ltr">Fifi Box has been spotted in a wedding dress and veil while holding a bouquet in Las Vegas, leaving many to believe she has tied the knot. </p> <p dir="ltr">While on a work trip, the radio host and her co-host Brendan Fevola and Nick Cody went to see Adele perform at her resident show in Vegas. </p> <p dir="ltr">In order to get Adele’s attention, Fifi dressed in wedding attire and made a sign, despite having no intention of getting married. </p> <p dir="ltr">Explaining the stunt on their radio show on Monday morning, Fifi explained, “We went to Adele last night, Fev and I did have to try and get her attention. So that was the mission, can Adele speak to us.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“We know that halfway through the show she walks through the crowd and chats to people, and what we had noticed in a lot of news stories was that it’s people who had signs or had just gotten married.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Last week, the radio team had put a call out to their listeners to ask for suggestions on how they should get Adele’s attention at the show, with one person suggesting they dress up and act as newlyweds. </p> <p dir="ltr">“So I wore the wedding dress and the veil, I had a bouquet and we had a sign that said ‘I walked down the aisle to your song today’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Fifi then played a clip of the show in which you can hear Adele target the faux newlyweds and say “Congratulations!” while performing one of her hit songs. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We went to great lengths, but I'm going to point this out,” Fifi said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Our mission was to get Adele to speak to us, and she looked me in the eye and said ‘congratulations’. We did it! Pretty cool to get a call out from Adele.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Music

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Belgium royal accused of copying the Princess of Wales

<p dir="ltr">A dress worn by Belgium’s Princess Delphine has caused a stir over its similarity to one of Princess Kate’s recent looks.</p> <p dir="ltr">The original designer of Kate’s dress, Andrew Gn, has called out Belgian design label Atelier ExC for creating a “shameless copy” of his work.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Singaporean designer expressed his anger via an Instagram story which has since expired.</p> <p dir="ltr">Princess Delphine wore a dress that featured colourful swirls and a blue trim that was embellished by matching blue crystals, during the country's National Day celebrations on Friday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her dress bared a striking resemblance to the Princess of Wales’ green dress with satin trimmings and jewelled button-like decorations, which she wore at Trooping the Colour in June.</p> <p dir="ltr">Not only that, Gn had also worked closely with hat designer Philip Treacy to create a wide-brimmed hat for Kate, and Princess Delphine was pictured with a similar looking hat on Friday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The stylist who designed Princess Delphine’s outfit has denied the claims and said that her look was “inspired” by vintage Chanel.</p> <p dir="ltr">"For Princess Delphine's dress we were inspired by the Chanel style of the '60s," Jody Van Geert told <em>Vanity Fair </em>Spain.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Both the designer of Kate's dress and Atelier ExC copied from the best. Therefore, it is purely coincidental that the dresses are similar.</p> <p dir="ltr">"And, in fact, there are differences, like the ruffles on Princess Delphine's dress."</p> <p dir="ltr">Some royal fans were quick to judge, taking to Instagram to express their critiques.</p> <p dir="ltr">"When you ordered Kate's dress from wish," wrote one person.</p> <p dir="ltr">"It seems the Shein version of Catherine's outfit,” echoed another.</p> <p dir="ltr">However there were a few others who defended Atelier ExC’s design choices.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I'm a huge fan of AG so I can see why one would be inspired by him. His work is breath-taking,” wrote one person.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Everybody is inspired by someone. Kate's green dress by Andrew Gn was inspired by a hundred dresses before him, even with the buttons,” commented another.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Wimbledon’s history-making rule change comes into effect

<p dir="ltr">While Wimbledon is widely anticipated for its star-studded tennis line-up and fierce competition, the 2023 tournament is bringing something new to the table - or rather, to the dressing room. </p> <p dir="ltr">Since the tournament’s inception, the rules have required all players to wear white - including but not limited to the likes of bras and underwear - while competing in the prestigious event.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, in the wake of heavy criticism and petition from Wimbledon’s menstruating competitors, <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/beauty-style/wimbledon-to-make-key-change-to-all-white-dress-code">the All England Club finally relaxed the strict dress code</a>, allowing for players the opportunity to wear coloured undershorts rather than just white.</p> <p dir="ltr">And while the move was announced in 2022, the 2023 contest will be the first time players - and viewers - experience the update.</p> <p dir="ltr">Most were thrilled with the outcome, and were looking forward to reaping the benefits of the long-awaited update, but some players had their hesitations and weren’t sure if they’d be hopping onboard with the others. </p> <p dir="ltr">As 2022 Wimbledon finalist and Tunisian tennis star Ons Jabeur told <em>The Mirror</em>, there were “two things” holding her back. </p> <p dir="ltr">“One thing, it’s better definitely not to be paranoid,” she allowed, before noting that “the other thing, everybody will know that you have your period. So I’m not sure which part of it is good.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I don’t think I’m going to wear anything,” she revealed. “If all the girls will wear it, I think it will make it better. But I think it’s a great thing that Wimbledon is trying to help women feel more comfortable on the court.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The campaign behind that ‘help’ skyrocketed in 2022 when Judy Murray - tennis coach and mother to Andy and Jamie Murray - declared her support for the cause. </p> <p dir="ltr">She later voiced her support for the update while speaking to <em>CLAY</em>, telling the publication that “it was many years ago that perhaps Wimbledon didn't understand the trauma of women players playing during the period, fearing what might happen if you wear white. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Thank goodness that's changed."</p> <p dir="ltr">And the people in charge had positive words to share on the matter too, with All England Club CEO Sally Bolton releasing a statement that read, "we are committed to supporting the players and listening to their feedback as to how they can perform at their best …</p> <p dir="ltr">"It is our hope that this rule adjustment will help players focus purely on their performance by relieving a potential source of anxiety."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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Style secrets from the world’s best-dressed men

<p>Twice a year, in Florence’s Fortezza da Basso, an incredible event takes place – Pitti Uomo.<strong> </strong>Described as “the world’s most important platform for men’s clothing and accessory collections and for launching new projects in men’s fashion,” Pitti Uomo brings together the most stylish men in the world for four days of fashion. It’s also a street style hub, with hundreds of men strutting the streets as if they were catwalks. Here are some of their best style tips for men.</p> <p><strong>1. Invest in a good coat</strong> – A well-made, classic coat in a black, navy or any neutral tone will not only go with everything, but will last you decades.</p> <p><strong>2. Go beyond black –</strong> Yes, it’s slimming and easy to match, but black is rather predictable and bland. Go against the grain and give camel, tan, white and other natural hues a go.</p> <p><strong>3. Add your own flair</strong> – In a line-up of stylish men all wearing suits or trench coats, the ones who stand out are those who let their personality shine through their fashion. Add your own flair with patches, quirky buttons, and unexpected accessories like gloves, glasses, rings or a hat.</p> <p><strong>4. Get scruffy</strong> – Wild, untamed facial hair is having a bit of a renaissance, if the hundreds of bearded and moustachioed men at Pitti Uomo are anything to go by. Paired with a classic suit and long coat, there’s nothing trendier.</p> <p><strong>5. Be bold</strong> – Black and white and earthy tones always look good, but don’t be afraid to add a pop of colour with a bright jacket, scarf, tie or pocket square.</p> <p><strong>6. Layer up</strong> – As the temperature begins to dip, it’s the perfect opportunity to play around with layers. Short vests, long coats, jumpers and scarves can all work wonders if you can strike the right balance.</p> <p><strong>7. Watch it</strong> – No matter if you’re wearing a suit or a t-shirt and jeans, nothing says class and luxury quite like a good watch. You’d be hard-pressed to find a man without one at Pitti Uomo.</p> <p><strong>8. Think small</strong> – Finishing off the perfect outfit is all about the little things. Think cufflinks, collar pins and bars… it’s all in the details.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Mother-of-the-groom slammed for “wildly inappropriate” wedding dress

<p dir="ltr">A woman has caused quite the commotion over her outfit choice for her son’s big day, with one member of the family even taking to social media to find out how others felt about it. </p> <p dir="ltr">And while the story gained the most traction a year later, people had plenty to contribute to the conversation with it was shared to Reddit, with the majority of the opinion that the mother-of-the-groom had made a major wedding day faux pas. </p> <p dir="ltr">The post opened with a picture of the dress, an off-white floor length floral gown, with the text “MOG dress at my sister’s wedding” across the bottom of the image. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Surely they can’t be serious,” one user wrote after stumbling across the story on the internet forum, “absolutely not”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“First two words out [of] my mouth too. Absolutely not,” another agreed. </p> <p dir="ltr">When one announced that it looked just like a wedding dress to them, someone else chimed in to add that “she even did the photo of it hanging from the door that you often see in bridal ‘getting ready’ photos.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“You have to live on Mars not to realise this is entirely inappropriate,” one said. “I would have been pissed.”</p> <p dir="ltr">And as someone else put it, “I mean, if the theme is ‘everyone wear a wedding dress’ then she nailed it. If it’s literally any other wedding theme this is absolutely wildly inappropriate”.</p> <p dir="ltr">A member of the family eventually stumbled across the post, and swooped in to assure everyone that it had not been a joke, and to inform them that the mother-in-law had ended up wearing the dress in question. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I just stumbled across this subreddit and wanted to hear everyone’s opinion,” she said, “because my sister and I thought she was crazy for wearing it!”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Yikes on bikes,” someone said in response, before asking the questions on everyone’s minds, “what is her relationship with her son like? What was your sister’s relationship with her like before the wedding? What is it like now? Please spill ALL the tea!”</p> <p dir="ltr">And luckily for them, the woman was happy to oblige, sharing that the groom had been “the oldest of 5 and the last boy to get married. </p> <p dir="ltr">“They’re a close family and they all get along with my sister, before and after the wedding! She’s a super sweet lady but it was just such an odd choice and came out of left field.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Reddit</em></p>

Family & Pets

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“I am not ashamed”: Aussie model shuts down her wedding dress critics

<p dir="ltr">Australian model Ellie Gonsalves has spoken out against the wave of negativity surrounding her wedding look, putting pen to paper for <em>9Honey</em> to highlight the sheer importance of universal bodily autonomy. </p> <p dir="ltr">As Ellie wrote in her piece, the controversy aimed at her dresses - one a floor-length embellished lace gown for the ceremony, another a figure-hugging gown that also reached the floor, and the other a shorter tulle swept dress for the reception - had “shed light on the ongoing societal expectations imposed on women.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She noted that “in an era where women are encouraged to exercise agency over their bodies, it is disheartening to witness the barrage of hate and derogatory comments I received for what some have described as my ‘daring’ dress.”</p> <p dir="ltr">And it was this that prompted her to dive into the wider issues regarding women’s autonomy, and the “restrictive narratives” that influenced their choices. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to Ellie, the hateful feedback she’d gotten for her outfits on her happy day served to “highlight a fundamental misunderstanding of women's agency over their bodies” in a society where women were expecting to meet “predetermined standards” that only limited their individual choices and desires. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Every individual, regardless of gender, should possess the autonomy to decide what they wear, how they present themselves, and what they share with the world,” she continued. “By denying women this autonomy, we perpetuate a harmful culture of control that infringes upon their fundamental rights.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ellie noted that while “recognising and respecting” this autonomy would empower individuals, it would also have the added benefit of striding towards a society that was both “more inclusive and equitable”. </p> <p dir="ltr">As “when women are allowed to make decisions that shape their lives and bodies without judgement or interference, it leads to greater fulfilment and self-determination”, and embracing such agency assists in dismantling “harmful gender stereotypes” while supporting “individual choices and diversity”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It is liberating to wear what I want,” she shared, “express myself freely, and reject the notion that my body is meant to be controlled or owned by anyone but myself.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She then revealed that the act of embracing her own agency was a reminder of her worth, and how it isn’t defined by - or limited to - how other people perceive her, their opinions, or their expectations. Instead, what’s important is her “ability to honour” her own truths and values. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, she did take the opportunity to point out that “it’s important to understand everyone’s life experiences are different so their choices will ultimately reflect that”, and that her own story had been shaped - at least in part - by her lifetime of experience in the modelling industry.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It's crucial to understand that these differences are perfectly acceptable and should be embraced as well,” Ellie wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“While the choices I make may be daring, I am not ashamed of them,” she declared, before stressing that people of all genders had to work together in the fight to “inspire and motivate more push back against negatives stereotypes” </p> <p dir="ltr">As a result, Ellie believes that women would “receive the support and resources” needed to “nurture their individual personalities”, and that challenging such “restrictive narratives” would allow room to celebrate choices at an individual level, and empower women all over. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Body

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Bride’s online dress disaster

<p>Bride-to-be Zuzanna was full of excitement ahead of her engagement party - she was free of stress, and she had an amazing dress … until she didn’t. </p> <p>Zuzanna had been under the impression that her Amazon find - a gorgeous white lace maxi dress with nearly 3000 promising reviews - was going to be everything she dreamed. But that dream was destined to become a nightmare, with the online retail supergiant sending her a much shorter version of the garment. </p> <p>Gone was any vision of a long skirt swirling around her ankles as she strode in to her upcoming engagement party, with the new hem barely grazing Zuzanna’s knees in a picture she posted to Facebook group What I Asked For VS What I Got. </p> <p>“It’s not a bad dress at all,” she wrote, “but it’s really not what I was going for.” </p> <p>Continuing from there, Zuzanna took the opportunity to warn others who might have had the same idea as her, pleading for them to “be careful what you order. I bought this dress for my engagement party on Saturday … I definitely will not be wearing it!” </p> <p>She then explained that it had taken her by surprise to open her package and made the unexpected discovery, as the reviews for the product had been so positive. Her misfortunes weren’t to end there, however, with Zuzanna noting that the dress’ “material is super cheap feeling, but I feel like I could have worn it once before it fell apart in the wash.”</p> <p>She hadn’t had any problems with her Amazon purchases before, and hadn’t even considered that poor outcome, though it now meant she’d have to go out in search of another dress for her party. </p> <p>“I don’t hate the dress,” she surmised, “it's just not right for the occasion and that's so sad.”</p> <p>And although Zuzanna seemed to have come to terms with her fate, and didn’t seem too upset about it, people in the comments still wanted to offer her their support, with a few suggestions on how she should proceed with Amazon. </p> <p>“They have a short dress on the site, they probably scanned the wrong item when they sent it to you,” one said.</p> <p>'It's probably a mistake,” another wrote, before sharing that they actually “had several of these maxi dresses” and that Zuzanna should try contacting the company. </p> <p>Meanwhile, others seized the opportunity for some fun, with one asking “where's the other half of the dress?”</p> <p>“Wow,” said another, “you must be really tall!”</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Today presenter dazzles in reception dress

<p>When <em>Today</em>’s weather presenter Scherri-Lee Biggs married former AFL star Daniel Venables, it was a lavish affair filled with glitz, glamour, and beloved guests. </p> <p>And now, Scherri-Lee has offered her fans further insight into their big day, sharing a series of snaps from the fun-filled wedding reception. </p> <p>In the pictures, shared to Scherri-Lee’s social media, the newlyweds are holding hands, walking towards the camera, before embracing for a kiss. And while many took the opportunity to offer a fresh wave of congratulations, the couple’s love was not the focus of the series - not even for bride Scherri-Lee, who was there to showcase her second dress of the day. </p> <p>“Can we talk about this little party dress too?” she captioned the images, before adding that she’d “had so much fun” creating both of her show stopping dresses with “friends and creatives” Cappellazzo Couture and Lana Wilkinson, and offering her heartfelt gratitude. </p> <p>“Love love love,” Lana commented, “no thanks needed.”</p> <p>“You are simply magical beautiful beautiful,” wrote Cappellazzo Couture. </p> <p>“You look stunning in this little dress,” said one fan. </p> <p>“You look amazing!!” declared another, who also offered their congratulations to the couple. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqPz_Z9vo7p/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqPz_Z9vo7p/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Scherri-Lee Biggs (@scherri)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>And, as it turns out, the two wedding day dresses weren’t the only ones Scherri-Lee had for the whole affair. The couple had a celebration prior to the big day on the Swan River, where the former dancer dazzled in a yellow cocktail dress.</p> <p>Scherri-Lee’s latest wedding ‘throwback’ came alongside a video of the bride and groom walking towards the camera with their hands in the air - before sharing a kiss, just like in her series of photos. </p> <p>“Miss Australia = Mrs Australia,” someone commented, referencing Scherri-Lee’s 2011 Miss Universe Australia title - she also went on to represent Australia at Miss Universe, and placed in the competition’s top 10. </p> <p>“You make a beautiful bride,” said another supporter of the couple. </p> <p>And to Daniel, one noted that he was “lucky lucky man” along with their congratulations. </p> <p>While the lucky man himself wrote, “too good”.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Lara Worthington puts wedding dress mystery to rest

<p>When Lara Worthington - née Bingle - married actor Sam Worthington in 2014, it was a very private affair. </p> <p>The ceremony was held in Melbourne, and no more than 10 guests witnessed the exchanging of vows - which, apparently, they wrote themselves. The couple didn’t even hire an external caterer for their reception, with Lara’s mum overseeing the food instead. </p> <p>As the model explained to <em>Marie Claire</em>, “my mum instilled in me that it’s important to maintain a little bit of mystery. I think it’s hard in this day and age to achieve.”</p> <p>“We tend to try to keep our lives as normal as we can,” she made a point to add. “I don’t think about that stuff [the tabloids] ever. I don’t make it my reality.”</p> <p>And while many respect the couple’s desire to keep their private life to themselves, one detail about the day has eluded fans of the couple for almost a decade, begging the question “Lara, where the bloody hell’s your dress?” </p> <p>With no photographers at the event, and no magazine spread typical of a celebrity wedding, speculation is all anyone has had to work with. That, and a post from right after the event, when Lara uploaded a picture of herself in a charging room wearing a white Louis Vuitton gown. </p> <p>In the years since, Lara had kept tight-lipped, until <em>Marie Claire</em> finally got the answer out of her - the infamous dress seen on the then-7-months-pregnant Lara was, in fact, her wedding gown. </p> <p>“I bought it in London a couple of days before we were about to get married,” she explained. “It was lucky they had something to fit me because I was seven months pregnant with Rocket at the time. I don’t recommend being pregnant and getting married. </p> <p>“I still have the dress and would never part with it.”</p> <p>Lara - who has since moved to New York with her family, husband Sam and their three beloved children - is rumoured to have been able to secure the dress through certain connections forged as “Australia’s fashion darling”.  </p> <p>And while fashion is something that Lara clearly holds close to her heart - having explained in her interview that “fashion is something that, without saying anything, you can show your personality through” - her new life in America seems every bit as special. </p> <p>“I love the culture of living in New York with the boys,” she confessed. “We don’t have a car, so they ride their scooters home from school, which is a nice change from the LA bubble. </p> <p>“We often stop at museums or an art gallery on the way home from school, which I love because I didn’t get to experience that when I was growing up. The boys love the Museum of Natural History, although they’re also like, ‘we’ve been there five times now, can we not?’”</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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60-year-old influencer hits back at claims she’s “dressing inappropriately”

<p dir="ltr">A fashion influencer from Montreal, Canada, has taken on the trolls who see fit to tear her down for shamelessly embracing her style in her 60s. </p> <p dir="ltr">Roslyn Griner has had a passion for fashion for as long as she can remember - she credits her late mother, a seamstress who would often make Roslyn items to wear, with developing her love for the fashion world.</p> <p dir="ltr">Nowadays, she shares her style journey with over 11k followers on social media. She embraces chic looks, current trends, and dons pieces most commonly marketed to younger generations - and stuns in every single one of them. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cosy3rUJG3g/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cosy3rUJG3g/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And while the majority of her comments are positive, with many praising Roslyn for her bold choices, it hasn’t stopped the outspoken few from sharing their distaste.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Roslyn won’t be stopped quite so easily, and has spoken out against her haters, putting an end to the idea that anyone has to stop dressing the way that makes them happy just because they’ve celebrated another birthday. </p> <p dir="ltr">“People say I am dressing inappropriately,” Roslyn said, “but it's about your style, not your age number.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“We become this invisible minority when we hit a certain age and are known as mothers and grandmothers,” she continued, “but you can be sexy and all these things. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You don't lose the zest for life.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She went on to speak of her desire to inspire women, and show them that they “don’t have to stop dressing a certain way just because you’re 50 or 60.” </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoanFoAJmnq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoanFoAJmnq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And when it comes to the inspiration for her looks, Roslyn noted that she loves music, and that it has the power to help keep people youthful. As well as that, she’s an avid gym goer, and uses her fashion to highlight some of the things she likes most about herself. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m showcasing how I like to dress,” she said. “I wear mini-skirts, I like my legs, so I’m going to show them off.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My style of dressing isn’t for everyone,” she added, “but I don’t address the negative comments anymore. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You can be conservative in your 30s or trendy in your 50s. I'm showing young girls that it is not scary to age. It's cool to be my age.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl1CdRbuVof/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl1CdRbuVof/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">For those struggling with their confidence, Roslyn admitted that she herself “didn’t come into myself until my late 30s”, and that she wrestled with being shy and feeling unattractive for most of her 20s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I feel I'm much more confident now. As you go down the path of life you care less about everyone's opinions,” she explained. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm transparent and I have had Botox. Exercise keeps me ageless. I never feel like my age.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm not creaky, I'm dynamic. I'm living in the present.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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“It was a terrible mistake”: NSW premier admits to wearing Nazi costume

<p>NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet has admitted in a televised press conference that he dressed up in a Nazi uniform at his 21st “fancy dress” themed birthday party.</p> <p>During the press conference, Mr Perrottet said he chose to make the public admission after being called by a colleague two days ago who said they knew about the costume.</p> <p>“When it was raised to me two days ago, I realised I needed to tell the truth and not someone else,” he told reporters.</p> <p>Mr Perrottet also revealed that no-one else at the party wore Nazi garb, and that his mother and father – who also attended the party – told him the next day that his choice of costume was “in poor taste”.</p> <p>In an interview with 2GB’s Chris O’Keefe on Wednesday afternoon, Mr Perrottet clarified he did not dress up as Adolf Hitler and did not wear a fake moustache.</p> <p>Mr Perrottet said that he was unaware whether any images existed of him wearing the costume, but that he wanted to address the “massive mistake”.</p> <p>He said he was “deeply ashamed” of the decision and apologised for the hurt it would cause the wider community: “I wish I could go back in time and do that day again.”</p> <p>The premier admitted he studied World War II history in school and had Jewish friends at 21 but says he was “naive” and did not realise the gravity of his actions.</p> <p>“It was a terrible mistake at that age in my life, I just did not understand the gravity and the hurt of what that uniform means to people not just in our state but around the country and around the world,” he continued.</p> <p>Mr Perrottet said he had considered addressing the incident several times in the past and was aware that it was important the revelation came from him to apologise for “the hurt and the pain this is going to cause”.</p> <p>“When it was raised with me I didn’t want this difficult truth of a grave and terrible mistake that I made at my 21st birthday party to be told by someone else,” he said.</p> <p>“I have grappled with this. It has been something that’s personally anguished me.”</p> <p>In response, the NSW Jewish Board of Deputies posted a statement on their Facebook page and said they hoped the incident would “serve as a lesson” and reminder of the “abhorrent nature of the Nazi regime”. They also said Nazi symbolism should “not to be taken lightly and dressing as a Nazi is not a joke”.</p> <p>“We appreciate that the Premier personally reached out to the Jewish community this afternoon to express his deep and sincere regret about his poor choice of costume as a young man,” the post reads.</p> <p>“The Premier has been a staunch supporter and friend of the NSW Jewish community throughout his time in public life. In particular, as Treasurer, he ensured the Sydney Jewish Museum received funding to ensure that it could continue educating the community about the Holocaust and the horrors of the Nazi era.</p> <p>“The Premier has acknowledged this, recognising that wearing the costume was offensive and will distress many in our community.”</p> <p>The premier has also said he has spoken with Jewish leaders and would continue to apologise to the community.</p> <p>“I’ve become a very passionate supporter of the Jewish community,” he said.</p> <p>The revelation comes just months after Mr Perrottet spoke out strongly against a group of soccer fans who were spotted throwing Nazi salutes at the Australia Cup final, saying there should be lifetime bans for the act.</p> <p>“What we saw the other day was terrible. It was absolutely horrendous,” he said in October.</p> <p>“It has no place, not just at sporting games, but anywhere in our state.”</p> <p><em>Image: Twitter</em></p> <p> </p>

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"I want people to be afraid of the women I dress": the celebrated – and often controversial – designs of Alexander McQueen

<p>Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse was first conceived at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. </p> <p>That museum, like many around the world, is being <a href="https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/story/2022-10-13/lacma-funding-news-update-construction">completely redeveloped</a> to embrace not just spectacular new buildings, but new attitudes towards museum collections. </p> <p>Gone are the boundaries between materials, forms, cultures, nationalities and hierarchies of the arts. No more gallery of, say, “18th century North American silver” or “Medieval and Renaissance art in the European North”. Instead, arts from varied times, places and hierarchies all sit together. </p> <p>An exhibition of the work of Alexander McQueen (1968-2010) was an interesting response to this challenge of a new museum, which also highlighted the relatively late arrival of fashion as a category worthy of study in the global museum. </p> <p>It paired garments by McQueen – many specially donated by one woman collector – with the rich Los Angeles County Museum of Art collections in order to suggest the ways in which McQueen had generated his ideas. </p> <p>Now the exhibition has come to the National Gallery of Victoria, with most of the McQueens on display here donated by Melbourne fashion philanthropist Krystyna Campbell Pretty.</p> <h2>Flourishing postmodernism</h2> <p>This new show is extensive. We have 120 McQueen looks and 80 other works of art. Paintings and decorative arts star in this show, notably the spectacular Jean-Baptiste Greuze painting of a young French actress in Turkish-style dress, on loan from Los Angeles.</p> <p>The visual pairings, which range from 18th century English porcelain figures to lavish Russian gold-woven cloths, drive much of the tempo. </p> <p>Important loans from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art are joined by treasures from the NGV, including a spectacular Morris embroidered wall cloth and the Netherlandish flower paintings that contain within them the idea of memento mori – remember that you die.</p> <p>Lee Alexander McQueen was born in 1968, so he was young in the 1980s, absorbing all the flashes of art, design and culture in which postmodernism flourished. </p> <p>Working-class, McQueen did not first go to art school as his middle-class counterparts might. Instead, he apprenticed in Savile Row, the epicentre of bespoke British tailoring, mastering the cut of jackets and trousers.</p> <p>He became so technically proficient that when he applied to tutor technique at art school he was invited to enrol in a Masters. </p> <p>And so the celebrated – and often controversial – McQueen high fashion design was born.</p> <h2>An immersive experience</h2> <p>As well as new ways of dressing for women, McQueen gave us new ways of representing fashion: high concept runways, fashion films, live screenings and putting Paralympian Aimee Mullins on the runway, generating new modes of beauty.</p> <p>At the NGV we have a fully immersive experience and bold scenography.</p> <p>“Mythos” examines three collections through the filter of mythology and theology. McQueen loved to make the present strange by incorporating elements from religious practice, even prejudice, from the past. </p> <p>Everything from angels to demons, from witch burning to Catholic rites might be incorporated for design, fabrication or the runway. </p> <p>These go past simply being artistic source material to generate new ways of looking and appearing for women. “I want people to be afraid of the women I dress,” he said.</p> <p>This exhibition celebrates McQueen’s technical bravura across both tailoring and soft dressmaking, two categories of making clothes that were often conducted separate from the other in the west. </p> <p>Intimate backstage photographs are shown, indicating how the clothes were really worn by models and friends. Here the “muse” is no longer a house model or elegant confidant, but rather a whole set of cultural reflections.</p> <p>The third and final section is called “Fashion Narratives”. Here we see a visual imagination ranging across Siberia, Tibet and other exotic locales.</p> <p>McQueen might, in this section, be accused of cultural appropriation, but this would be unfair. </p> <p>Rather than appropriation, his fashion designs were about fantasy, and fantasy put to good ends, making things from gender to place to sexuality off centre or strange, so we are aware of the fragile accord we have between our identities and our appearances. </p> <p>As Catherine Brickhill, the first designer employed by McQueen to work on his label notes in the catalogue, McQueen, "delved deep into the differences between our culture and other cultures. It wasn’t cultural appropriation, but an openness to and curiosity to be explored and celebrated."</p> <p>Other narratives in this section include the most controversial ones that swirled around McQueen, notably <a href="https://blog.metmuseum.org/alexandermcqueen/tag/highland-rape/">Highland Rape collection</a>, in which McQueen suggested the appearance of Scottish widows during the Highland Wars in ripped and tattered clothes.</p> <p>It would be as silly to accuse McQueen of misogyny here as it would to claim Elsa Schiaparelli hated women for dressing them in <a href="https://spikeartmagazine.com/?q=articles/tears-dress-elsa-schiaparelli-and-salvador-dali">ripped dresses</a> suggestive of assault or accident in the 1930s. </p> <p>Instead, McQueen gives us clothes not just as theatre but as “choreographed deception”, in which male and female elements come together to cancel the other out.</p> <h2>Beyond good</h2> <p>In an era of increasing specialisation, vocational training and narrow fields of research and investigation, this exhibit shows us how a great designer goes beyond good.</p> <p>It shows us how his vision extended well beyond clothes to how they were imagined, and how women might imagine themselves, at all times.</p> <p>When you wear trousers with a very low rear; slip on a <a href="https://textilefocus.com/overview-digital-textile-printing-technology/">digitally printed</a> fabric or has allusions to nature – crystals, leaves, water; wear an asymmetrical outfit with slightly extended shoulders; don impossible shoes to your New Year’s party; or put on an eyeshadow that makes you look like a hummingbird: McQueen was there first. </p> <p>Alexander McQueen: Mind, Mythos, Muse is at NGV International, Melbourne, until April 16 2023.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/i-want-people-to-be-afraid-of-the-women-i-dress-the-celebrated-and-often-controversial-designs-of-alexander-mcqueen-194731" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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