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Why you shouldn’t worry if the plane cabin fills with fog

<p dir="ltr">A savvy traveller has shared why plane cabins can fill with fog, and why you need not to worry about it. </p> <p dir="ltr">Passenger Savannah Gowarty posted a video of the suspiciously looking inflight mist and condensation on a domestic US flight, with the video garnered over 13.1 million views, and amazing and confusing commentators questioning what was going on.</p> <p dir="ltr">In response to the viral video, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) spokesperson told <em><a href="https://cnn.com/travel">CNN Travel</a></em> what it means. </p> <p dir="ltr">The short answer: it's a natural occurrence that usually only lasts a short while, and it's nothing to worry about.</p> <p dir="ltr">"On hot and relatively humid days, cold air from the aircraft's air conditioning system mixes with the warmer, humid cabin air and lowers it to the dew point, creating fog," the spokesperson said. </p> <p dir="ltr">"The fog is generally short-lived as the cooled air quickly warms above the dew point."</p> <p dir="ltr">When an airplane is waiting on the ground pre-departure, the aircraft cabin air is kept cool "either from an external ground air conditioning unit or the aircraft's own Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)," as the FAA spokesperson explains.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Both provide cold air (usually much cooler than the ambient temperature) which can temporarily lower the dew point of the aircraft cabin air enough to create fog."</p> <p dir="ltr">Climate scientist Indrani Roy emphasised that neither mist nor any resulting condensation is "cause for alarm."</p> <p dir="ltr">The FAA spokesperson went on to explain that "aircraft cabin fog usually dissipates very quickly."</p> <p dir="ltr">"This is due to the colder air (which lowered the cabin air temperature to its dew point) quickly warms back above the dew point. Once that happens, the fog will disappear.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Many times, the fog only appears as it comes out of the vent, exists for 1-2 seconds and then is gone."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Travel Trouble

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"You don’t know why they’re filming or what they’ll do with it": flight attendants on being unwilling stars of viral videos

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/liz-simmons-1376255">Liz Simmons</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/gui-lohmann-1476773">Gui Lohmann</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rawan-nimri-1482182">Rawan Nimri</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a></em></p> <p>As any frequent social media user knows, airline passengers often record and post in-flight incidents – from frightening turbulence to unruly members of the public.</p> <p>Often, these viral videos feature flight attendants just trying to do their duties, while being filmed without their consent.</p> <p>These videos usually portray flight attendants either as heroes effortlessly managing difficult passengers or “villains” accused of being rude and unprofessional. Either way, the trend is emerging as an industrial issue, with unions arcing up about it and airlines bringing in new rules aimed at curbing the practice.</p> <h2>Unkind comments about appearance and age</h2> <p>Going to work knowing that at any moment you may become the unwilling star of a viral video can exact a considerable toll on the wellbeing of flight attendants.</p> <p>I (Liz Simmons) speak daily with flight attendants in Australia and abroad as part of my PhD research. From these discussions, I’ve heard from attendants who worry often about discovering videos of themselves featuring unkind comments about their appearance, age or employer.</p> <p>One flight attendant, Kate*, described the disconcerting feeling of someone aiming a smartphone camera at her while she was simply trying to do her job, saying: "You don’t know why they’re filming or what they’ll do with it."</p> <p>Marie spoke of being featured in a TikTok video during a safety demonstration, with viewers making fun of her appearance.</p> <p>Charlotte, after refusing to serve more alcohol to an intoxicated passenger, had a camera thrust in her face, accompanied by threats to her job.</p> <p>Mark told of how uncomfortable he felt having to ask a passenger to stop taking photos of the crew during service.</p> <p>These personal accounts illustrate the <a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/health-safety/flight-attendant-reveals-creepy-passenger-behaviour/news-story/3b2b1ad25f758e24ef37b74794684ea6">distress</a> flight attendants can experience when being filmed or photographed without their knowledge.</p> <h2>A broader industrial issue</h2> <p>This issue is drawing the attention of policymakers, airlines and the unions that represent flight attendants.</p> <p>Japan recently introduced <a href="https://japannews.yomiuri.co.jp/society/crime-courts/20230408-102309/">laws</a> aimed at curbing sneak photography in a range of settings, which may be used to prevent passengers voyeuristically filming flight attendants. <a href="https://mondortiz.com/japan-flight-attendants-call-for-action-versus-stolen-photo-taking/">Research</a> by Japan’s aviation workers union found that about 70% of the 1,573 flight attendants surveyed believed they’d had their pictures taken surreptitiously while they were working.</p> <p>Passengers have been arrested in <a href="https://www.jpost.com/israel-news/crime-in-israel/article-748799">Turkey</a> and <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3554181/IndiGo-passenger-arrested-recording-video-flight-attendants.html">India</a> after unauthorised filming.</p> <p>And flight attendant unions in <a href="https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2023/03/09/national/crime-legal/flight-attendant-photo/">Japan</a>, <a href="https://www.thestandard.com.hk/breaking-news/section/4/204104/Union-says-flight-attendants-can-ask-passengers-to-delete-photos-and-videos-taken-without-consent">Hong Kong</a> and <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/300750512/why-you-shouldnt-film-your-cabin-crew">Australia</a> have voiced concerns about the issue.</p> <p>Of course, videos can occasionally play a crucial role in understanding what transpired during an <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/passenger-assault-attendant-detained-fbi-american-airlines-mexico-cabo-rcna48884">in-flight incident</a>, and flight attendants themselves can also be found on social media sharing their stories, consenting to the video. But many videos still feature airline staff simply going about their job (while being filmed, without their consent).</p> <h2>Unclear rules</h2> <p>News <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/traveller/reviews-and-advice/why-you-shouldnt-film-your-cabin-crew-20221122-h2813d.html">reports</a> suggest staff aboard Dutch carrier KLM “now commonly make an announcement during the safety briefing asking passengers not to take photos of any crew members.”</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.klm.com.au/information/legal/conditions-carriage">rules</a> on the KLM website are less clear, saying only that, "Recording videos and/or taking photographs other than personal videos and photographs is prohibited on board the aircraft."</p> <p>Virgin Australia’s rules state anyone travelling on their planes must "use cameras or photographic devices (including mobile phones) for personal use only. You must comply with the directions of flight crew when using cameras or photographic devices while on board.</p> <p>In November 2023, Qantas introduced new <a href="https://www.qantas.com/au/en/book-a-trip/flights/conditions-of-carriage.html#conduct-during-flight">rules</a> requiring passengers to "seek consent before filming or photographing Qantas Group staff, contractors or other customers."</p> <p>This is a start. For most airlines, however, there is a notable absence of clear guidelines against recording and publishing footage of flight attendants in their workplace. The existing rules are often buried in the fine print of terms and conditions, which few passengers take the time to read. This underscores the necessity for airlines to reconsider how these restrictions are communicated to passengers.</p> <p>Looking ahead, it may be timely for more airlines to establish clearer rules on filming cabin crew while they work. There should be an acknowledgement that unsolicited filming is frequently unfair, invasive and distressing. Developing a framework to enforce these provisions and enhancing communication about these rules would help inform passengers about how to respect the privacy and comfort of flight attendants in their workplace.</p> <p><em>* All names have been changed to protect identities.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/217089/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/liz-simmons-1376255">Liz Simmons</a>, PhD Candidate, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/gui-lohmann-1476773">Gui Lohmann</a>, Professor in Air Transport and Tourism Management, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rawan-nimri-1482182">Rawan Nimri</a>, Lecturer in Tourism and Hospitality, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: </em><em>Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/you-dont-know-why-theyre-filming-or-what-theyll-do-with-it-flight-attendants-on-being-unwilling-stars-of-viral-videos-217089">original article</a>.</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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The best cruise cabin for every type of need

<p><strong>So many options</strong></p> <p>Cruise accommodations – also known as staterooms or cabins – are your home away from home while at sea. Far from a one-size-fits-all decision, there are numerous factors to consider when determining the best rooms on a cruise ship to fit your and your companions’ needs.</p> <p>From size to location to view and beyond, there are many things to keep in mind when selecting your stateroom, says Gianluca Corneli, hotel director at Royal Caribbean International. “How many will stay in the room? Is your room a place to hang out or just where you sleep?” Also, think about what you’d like to be near on the ship. “For example, consider if you would like to be near the elevator for convenience or prefer a location down the hallway with fewer guests passing by,” she says. Also factor in any ways you’d like to elevate your stay, like maybe a balcony or a suite for your next Caribbean cruise.</p> <p>It’s no wonder that some of the best cruise lines offer up to 28 different types of rooms on a single ship – they want to ensure there’s an ideal solution for every guest. Let’s focus on upgrading your room choice to the perfect fit for your specific needs.</p> <p><strong>Best for avoiding seasickness</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: the middle of the ship, on a low deck</p> <p>Picture a ship like a seesaw – the most movement will be felt on either end, while the middle stays fairly even-keel. “Middle and low, that’s where you want to be,” says cruise expert Dori Saltzman, senior editor with trade publication Travel Market Report. “While you don’t need to be on the absolute lowest passenger deck, you don’t want to go above the middle of the ship (vertical wise). You also want to try to be as middle (horizontal wise) as possible.</p> <p>If cabins in the middle of the ship aren’t available, she says to choose aft over forward, because the more forward a cabin is, the more you’ll feel the motion of the ocean. And while this may seem counter-intuitive, be sure to book a cabin with a window or balcony, so you can keep your eyes on the horizon if you start feeling queasy.</p> <p><strong>Best for great views</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: a cabin with a balcony, preferably at the back of the ship</p> <p>While you can always go to the upper decks of any ship for 360-degree views of your surroundings, there’s no greater cruise ship luxury than enjoying the scenery from your own private balcony. They may also be called verandah cabins. Balconies are the perfect place to enjoy a cup of coffee in the morning or glass of champagne during a spectacular sunset and pretend you’re all alone at sea.</p> <p>And some of the absolute best rooms on a cruise ship are located at the rear, where you’ll also be treated to the photo-worthy wake left behind, which is a fun way to mark your ship’s progress. Balconies are also nice for having access to fresh air when you want it, it can be very soothing to listen to the sounds of the ocean from your stateroom, and you’ll have a better chance of spotting wildlife along your cruise too.</p> <p><strong>Best for light sleepers</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: a deck filled with other guest cabins and away from elevators</p> <p>Finding the best rooms on a cruise ship for light sleepers usually takes a little research, but that due diligence will pay off come bedtime. “You need your cabin to be located away from any bank of elevators, but also away from crew entrances,” says Saltzman. So being surrounded by other cabins of people who want to sleep too is a safe bet. “You also don’t want your cabin to be located above the ship’s main theatre, underneath any restaurants where you can hear the chairs scraping on the floor or under/over any of the lounges that have music late into the night.”</p> <p>Finally, you don’t want to be on a low deck that’s too aft or too forward, as you may end up above the engines or the anchor, which makes a lot of noise when it’s lowered and raised. You may feel a bit like Goldilocks trying to choose that perfect cabin on your next romantic cruise, but the reward of peace and quiet will be priceless.</p> <p><strong>Best for a little more space</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: a forward-facing cabin</p> <p>While you aren’t likely to find a balcony on a forward-facing cabin, you may find more interior space than similarly priced mid-ship cabins. Why? There are some odd angles in forward-facing cabins that the designers had to work around, thanks to the slanted style of the front of a ship. Those odd angles may work in your favour when it comes to square footage.</p> <p>It’s important to note that while these are some of the best rooms on a cruise ship for extra space, you will experience the most movement in a front-facing cabin, so this choice is not an ideal position for anyone prone to motion sickness.</p> <p><strong>Best for cruising with little kids</strong></p> <p>Most cruise lines offer family-friendly cruises and specific cabins suited for kids, which can be a mix of in-room amenities and proximity to other areas of the ship children will love. “On Disney’s ships, all cabins have two bathrooms, one with a sink and toilet and the other with a shower/bath combo (a small minority of rooms do not have the tub) for families that need the little one to be able to take a bath, while everyone else is still able to wash up,” says Saltzman.</p> <p>“Another good option is the Family Harbour cabins on Carnival’s Vista-class ships (Vista, Horizon, Panorama) and Excel-class ships (Mardi Gras, Celebration). Similar to the Disney cabins, these have two bathrooms, one a full one with a shower, sink and toilet, and the other with a sink and shower/tub combo.”</p> <p><strong>Best for staying on a budget</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: an interior cabin</p> <p>Unless you’re worried about feeling claustrophobic – since there will be no porthole or window to the outside world – an interior cabin is a nice option for saving money (we’re talking $300 for 7-day cruises). Not only is it the lowest-priced cabin type, which means you’ll have more funds to put toward excursions, a drink package or souvenirs, but you’ll also be able to take midday naps or sleep in later because there won’t be any light sneaking in.</p> <p>Another positive is that an interior cabin might encourage you to spend more of your free time roaming around the ship, meeting other people and getting more involved in activities, since you may not find it desirable to spend your time beyond sleeping and showering in a windowless box.</p> <p><strong>Best for mobility disabilities </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: an accessible stateroom</p> <p>For passengers with limited mobility or no mobility, most major cruise lines offer accessible staterooms in a variety of room types (inside cabin, ocean view and balcony). These options do vary based on the cruise line and the age of the ship, so it’s best to research this in advance and factor the accessible options available into your cruise planning process.</p> <p>Accessible rooms tend to be larger than standard cabins to accommodate wheelchair or scooter users, and they also feature larger bathrooms. Additionally, some rooms will have emergency-call buttons or specific amenities for hearing or vision-impaired guests. For instance, the fully accessible rooms on Holland America Line provide adequate turning space, accessibility routes throughout the room, roll-in showers, wheelchair access on both sides of the bed, handlebars in the shower and hand-held shower heads, says Sissel Bergersen, director of rooms division, Holland America Line. Before you lock in a booking, it may be best to call the cruise line and explain your needs so they can help steer you toward the perfect cabin.</p> <p><strong>Best for being spoiled rotten</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Choose</em></span>: a cabin with butler service or a spa cabin</p> <p>For travellers who like adult-only cruises or who are yearning for a little extra pampering, the best rooms on a cruise ship fall into one of two categories. The first is a suite that comes with butler service, where you’ll have someone helping with all the details you don’t want to spend your precious holiday time tending to – like reserving prime-time dinner slots at specialty restaurants, booking shore excursions, packing and unpacking and even drawing rose petal bubble baths. Rooms at this level may also come with exclusive access to private pools, clubs and lounges with more luxurious touches and solitude than you’ll find elsewhere on the ship.</p> <p>The other category that’s becoming increasingly popular is spa suites. On Norwegian Cruise Line, the Haven Spa Suite, Spa Club Balcony Suites and Spa Balcony (available on the Norwegian Escape, Norwegian Bliss and Norwegian Epic) have varying amenities that range from more tranquil room décor with an oversized shower and body spray jets to priority access to Mandara Spa. And on Celebrity Cruises, the AquaClass staterooms are focused on wellness, with a pillow menu, complimentary fitness pass, preferential rates on spa packages, healthy room-service menu options, an exclusive restaurant, a spa concierge, access to the SEA Thermal Suite and a yoga mat for use onboard.</p> <p><strong>Best for solo cruisers</strong></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Choose</span></em>: a cruise line that offers single rooms or waives single supplements</p> <p>Solo cruises are a wonderful experience, yet so many cruise lines penalise single cruisers by forcing them to pay a ‘single supplement.’ This surcharge is added to the fare of a solo passenger, since cruise room pricing is generally based on double occupancy. This fee can be an additional 10 per cent all the way up to a full 100 per cent of the rate, making solo cruising unaffordable for many travellers.</p> <p>Instead, look for cruise lines that offer single staterooms, like Celebrity, which has the Edge Single Stateroom with Infinite Veranda (available on Celebrity Edge, Celebrity Apex, Celebrity Beyond and Celebrity Ascent) and the Single Inside Stateroom on Celebrity Silhouette. Other cruise lines, including Holland America Line, Royal Caribbean and Norwegian Cruise Line, also offer single cabins – these special solo and studio cabins aren’t subject to single supplements. Occasionally, you may even find cruise lines running special promotions and waiving their single supplement for a regular-size room.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/cruising/the-best-cruise-cabin-for-every-type-of-need" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Cruising

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Woman’s “ultimate” cleaning hack for cruise cabins goes viral

<p dir="ltr">An Aussie woman has shared her “ultimate” hack for keeping things clean in your cruise ship cabin, claiming her tips will “change your life”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Cruising fanatic Olivia believes there are few things worse when on a cruise than waiting around for dirty dishes to be collected and replaced. </p> <p dir="ltr">She has found a unique way to get around this problem with her “game-changing” hack, that only requires three items: a cheap sponge, dishwashing liquid and a reusable ziplock bag. </p> <p dir="ltr">In a now-viral clip that has racked up almost one million views, Olivia explained she came across the nifty hack on YouTube and was surprised to discover it actually worked. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Go to your local supermarket and purchase the cheapest sponge you can find or use a sponge you have already got at home,” she began. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Once you’ve done this, grab one to two sponges and cut them into little squares.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Place them all on a plate, grab dishwashing liquid and make sure you drizzle it over sponge squares (evenly).”</p> <p dir="ltr">She then said to place the sponges outside in the sun to dry. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You want the dishwashing liquid to dry into the sponge,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Olivia then demonstrated how it works, taking one of the squares and running it under water before using it to wash the dirty dishes. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Instead of having to wait for your mugs, plates, cutlery in your state room or cabin to be replaced every day or cleaned, if you are staying in a cabin with multiple people and they need to use it, you can (now) clean it so easily in no time.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She said the squares can be used multiple times before the dishwashing liquid is completely used up.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It will last for about a two-week cruise; it’s fantastic,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">While hundreds of thousands of people have viewed Olivia’s video, many people were torn in the comment section about the unusual tip.</p> <p dir="ltr">Some praised the unique trick, thanking Olivia for sharing the information. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Okay that’s actually really good,” one TikTok user wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Thanks! Doing this with the wine glasses before I use them” said another.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, while many were impressed by the hack, some wondered why she was washing dishes on a holiday. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Great idea but no…,” one TikTok user wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Girl, we’re not going on a cruise to do the dishes … margaritas and mojitos don’t go into cups,” another joked.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: TikTok</em></p>

Cruising

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This house is out of this world

<p>Tiny houses can act as the perfect passion project for anyone with the drive - and resources - to give it a try. Even, as it turns out, those who dream of soaring to new heights with their success. </p> <p>And for one property in southern Hungary, that’s exactly where it looks to be heading! </p> <p>Dubbed the ‘Jet House’, this aeroplane-shaped home invites all who stay there to “fasten your seatbelts, [and] get ready to take off with our newest cabin”. </p> <p>Described by its creators, the team at Hello Wood, this “not-so-everyday tiny house” is said to have “flown out of a cartoon and landed on the meadow.” </p> <p>Boasting “friendly arcs and curves and round windows”, it seems something straight out of a child’s wildest fantasies. And, it turns out, it is! </p> <p>The team’s brief was simple, and came directly from their “youngest client ever - 12-year-old Lujzi”. Lujzi wanted something that could double as a playhouse for time with her friends, and for sleep, before later being “converted into lodging”, as explained on Hello Wood’s project page. As they put it, “the concept was to create a full-fledged, functional tiny house that is more reminiscent of a beautiful design toy than a building.”</p> <p>The team noted on social media that the house is “fitted out with a kitchen, bathroom and a bedroom with [a] built-in desk and bench”. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CnjmMi4oJVn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CnjmMi4oJVn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by HELLO WOOD (@hellowood)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Though, since the shape of the home is not typical, “it had design questions as well as building challenges” that the team were faced to overcome to complete their ambitious project. And luckily for Lujzi, they found a way. </p> <p>The jet home was constructed with wings made from “spacious terraces”, a circular window that covers its nose, and airport stairs to get to the front door. Comprising more than a thousand structural pieces, the property could not feature the likes of junctions or sewers on its exterior if the team hoped to “maintain the clean silhouette”. To combat this, they employed the use of “a ‘protective coating’, an innovative waterproofing layer that secures the durability of the tiny house.”</p> <p>Inside the cabin, which can sleep two, the team achieved a retro feel by implementing rounded shapes at every opportunity, and wooden elements wherever made sense. Two real aeroplane seats sourced from Sky Art completed the vision. with a series of other “aviation relics” that Lujzi and her father had collected - including, but not limited to, boarding passes, inflight brochures, plane-shaped trinkets, and a Pan Am model plane. </p> <p>"We were happy to accept the unusual assignment,” said Tamás Fülöp, the Jet House’s project architect. “As an architect, it is an inspiring task to design a structure that has to be cute. It was also a challenge to incorporate traditional architectural elements into the sculptural shape, such as waterproofing, vapour barrier, and thermal insulation.”</p> <p><em>Images: @hellowood @@zsuzsa.darab / Instagram</em></p>

Real Estate

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Flight attendants reveal the strangest things people do on planes

<p>The flight crew at Qantas are known for being a friendly bunch, but oh boy, do they have stories to share about the travellers they have encountered.</p> <p>These stories are shared by flight attendants under an alias name to conceal their identities and to keep their jobs.</p> <p>First off, the attendants revealed one specific category of flight passengers, “we call them the ‘Gimme, Gimme, Gimme’ travellers,” shared a flight attendant using the alias ‘Martin’.</p> <p>“These are the passengers who if it’s not bolted down, will try to take it,” he elaborates.</p> <p>The second flight attendant by the alias of ‘Melissa’ explained, “With some passengers, if they see something is available, they want it – no matter what it is. Some are out for everything they can get.”</p> <p>On a rest between two long trips, Martin and Melissa compared stories of passengers which fell into the “Gimme, Gimme, Gimme” category and came up with some hilarious and shocking stories.</p> <p>The first story Melissa shared is one of humour. A lady on a flight quietly asked Melissa for a sanitary pad, and she discreetly passed the item to the passenger. Meanwhile, the man sitting next to the woman observed the exchange and asked for a sanitary pad too.</p> <p>“I said quietly to him, ‘Sir, it’s a sanitary [pad], you don’t need one of those,’” apparently the man was not impressed by this response and demanded “whatever it is, I also want one right now”.</p> <p>So, Melissa went and fetched another sanitary pad before handing it to the man, who without hesitation, unwrapped it, put his seat in recline and placed the pad over his eyes as an eye mask.</p> <p>Martin added, “That happens all the time, we do our best not to laugh as we walk through the cabin seeing men with sanitary [pads] across their eyes. They actually think that’s what they are for!”</p> <p>The next story, shared by Martin, was an experience before landing in Sydney, Martin had a man come into the galley and ask for a glass of water.</p> <p>“We had a tray of refreshments out, so I said to him, ‘Sir, please help yourself to whatever you can find in here,’ then I turned my back to stack up a trolley.”</p> <p>The passenger however, took this invite very seriously and began removing the galley curtains from to hooks.</p> <p>“I rushed over and asked him to stop, as this was part of the actual plane,” Martin explains. “The man then said to me, ‘But you said I could have whatever is in here, and I can use these on our window at home.’”</p> <p>The absurdity of passengers on flights continues. Melissa has observed some weird things in her time as a flight attendant and usually these observations occur towards the end of the flight, as passengers and flight crew are preparing for landing.</p> <p>Passengers usually shove bits and pieces into their carry-on bags in a frenzy although one woman caught Melissa’s eye.</p> <p>The woman was struggling to shove the plane cushion of her seat into her bag.</p> <p>“I said, ‘Madam, you can’t have that – it’s part of the plane and you’ll need to sit on it for landing,” Melissa said whilst attempting to get the cushion out of the bag.</p> <p>The woman responded, “You have so many of these on the plane, surely you won’t miss just one. I want it for my sofa.”</p> <p>That’s not all passengers have tried to sneak into their bags. According to Martin toilet rolls are a prized possession on flights and are usually the first things to disappear.</p> <p>“There are flights when before we’ve even taken off, passengers raid the toilets for every roll of toilet paper they can find, and stuff the lot into their bags,” Martin reveals.</p> <p>“So, we sometimes have to return to the toilets throughout the flight to replace the paper, roll by roll. I remember one occasion where everything ran out, as it had all disappeared into carry-on luggage.”</p> <p>Additionally, international travellers are fascinated by mini soft drink cans.</p> <p>“We have many international passengers who are obsessed with little cans of soft drinks,” Melissa says. “They like to stockpile them in their bags, asking for can after can, but always insist we leave them unopened. We see them later stuffing the cans into their bags.”</p> <p>Martin shares his belief into this extreme interest: “There are passengers who plan to party later in their hotel rooms and want to save a few dollars on buying mixers.”</p> <p>As they continue, Martin and Melissa shared that it is easy to spot a regular Jetstar flyer “as they will fight over the blanket at the end of a flight,” Melissa revealed.</p> <p>The difference being, when a blanket is purchased on Jetstar, the customer can keep it and take it home with them after the flight. Although Qantas doesn’t have the same protocol.</p> <p>“When we ask these passengers to leave the blanket behind, they get annoyed and respond, ‘But I can do this on Jetstar – why is Qantas so mean?’” Melissa says.</p> <p>“Why anyone would want to use an airline blanket again is beyond me!”</p> <p>The final story to be shared involved the luxury of business class. When flying business class with Qantas an amenity kit packed with designer creams is a prized perk that passengers love.</p> <p>Although one woman loved it a bit too much as she gathered every single kit before other people had attended their seats.</p> <p>“She had her arms full as we explained there were now none for the other passengers – something that didn’t seem to faze her,” Martin recalled.</p> <p>“We attempted to get back as many kits as we could, but almost had a tug of war erupt as she was not giving up without a fight.”</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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6 ways to make your cruise ship cabin feel bigger

<p>Cruise ship cabins can be pretty snug, so you will want to do everything you can to maximise your space. Here's how.</p> <p><strong>1. Unpack straight away</strong></p> <p>Once you get onboard, you probably want to go and check out the restaurant or have a quick swim. But it’s worth taking the time to completely unpack your bag, make sure all your clothes and extras are neatly stored, and then have your steward put your suitcases away under the bed. You’ll thank us later.</p> <p><strong>2. Keep things neat</strong></p> <p>Nothing makes a room (on land or water) feel smaller than clutter. Take the time to hang your clothes up when you take them off, keep the benches and table tops clear, and try not to throw things on the floor. It will only take a couple of minutes to do it each day and will make all the difference.</p> <p><strong>3. Make use of all the storage</strong></p> <p>You’d be surprised how many little cupboards and hidey holes you’ll find all over your cabin. Check all the benches, cupboards and walls for extra drawers or hooks, and you’ll be able to find a place for everything.</p> <p><strong>4. And bring your own</strong></p> <p>Expert cruisers know to bring along some clever extras to make even more storage space for themselves. Hanging cosmetic bags will keep your bathroom organised and over the door shoe fabric shoe organisers provide lightweight storage space for all your accessories. Most cabin walls are metal, so bring some magnets or magnetic hooks to create your own message board.</p> <p><strong>5. Move the furniture</strong></p> <p>If you’re really serious, you can do a little interior design of your own in the cabin. Most of the furniture is moveable, so you can shuffle around your tables, couches or even the bed to suit your needs. As long as you aren’t blocking a door or walkway, it should be fine.</p> <p><strong>6. Utilise natural light</strong></p> <p>Keep your curtains open to your window or balcony door to make the most of the natural light. You’ll be amazed at how much more spacious it makes the room feel. If you're in an inside cabin, turn on the TV and find the channel showing the bow camera. It will act just like a window!</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Cruising

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Flight attendant reveals cabin crew’s “least favourite” passenger

<p dir="ltr">A former flight attendant has revealed the type of passenger that cabin crew hate the most. </p> <p dir="ltr">After working on planes for six years, Kat Kamalani knows a thing or two about how to deal with difficult passengers. </p> <p dir="ltr">And while most people may think it's the screaming babies that cause the most issues, Kat said it's actually the people who complain about the noise who prove the most troublesome. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I promise you, there's nothing that irritates us more as a flight attendant when people complain about a baby crying,” Kat said in her now-viral TikTok video. </p> <p dir="ltr">“DON'T even ask to be moved to a different seat, no one wants that baby to stop crying more than that parent.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“So if you're travelling, bring noise-cancelling headphones, or maybe ask the parent if they need help.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The short video has been viewed more than 1.4 million times, with thousands of people commenting in support. </p> <p dir="ltr">One mother recalled the time she was in the exact situation when her baby was crying on a flight and wrote, “I had a flight attendant tell me ‘let her cry, you won't see these people again anyways’. It helped me so much.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Babies cry probably because height pressure causes them ear pains,” another TikTok user wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">A current flight attendant also weighed in on the discussion, saying, “I am a flight attendant and I get really mad when passengers complain to me about the crying baby...like what do you want me to do?”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: TikTok / Instagram</em></p>

Travel Tips

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Cabin staff reveal what it’s really like to work on a cruise ship

<p>It’s undoubtable – cruises are a fantastic way of meeting new people. Couples, families, individuals and even the staff themselves can help make a trip memorable. But have you ever wondered what it’s like to work on a cruise, meeting new people every single day? <a href="http://experience.usatoday.com/cruise/story/best-of-cruising/2015/04/03/what-its-like-to-be-a-cruise-ship-cabin-steward/70842246/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">USA Today</span></strong></a> sat down with two Carnival Cruise crew members to find out.</p> <ol start="1"> <li><strong>Prepare to be pranked</strong> – Carnival Breeze worker Galyna Berzina from the Ukraine revealed that some passengers like to play pranks on the crew and vice versa! Some of these practical jokes include stuffing a bed with pillows to make it look like someone’s lying there. One staff member took it a step further, creating a “pillow person” sitting in the bathroom, giving one passenger the fright of her life!</li> <li><strong>You hear all types of requests</strong> – young couples often ask the crew members to make adults-only “naughty” towel animals for them, but Berzina says staff aren’t allowed to.</li> <li><strong>It’s always busy</strong> – Carnival cabin staff work in five-hour shifts with a four- to five-hour break in between. They usually have to take care of around 26 cabins a day. Carnival Fascination crew member Merlyn Parola from the Philippines says, “to work as a cabin stewardess is not much different than working at a hotel, though you need to be more speedy.”</li> <li><strong>You get a decent break</strong> – cabin crew usually work for between six and eight months at a time, followed by a two-month break. In between their shifts, staff can go onshore or remain on the ship like a regular passenger.</li> <li><strong>You get paid well</strong> – staff are mostly paid from passenger tips, which are pooled together and distributed amongst the crew. Berzina says the income is enough to keep her and her family financially comfortable. “The salary is good, I can't complain. I pay for my son's education and I support my family.”</li> <li><strong>The crew quarters are comfortable</strong> – staff have access to a phone, Internet, TV, and a decent selection of food. However, unlike regular passengers, they don’t have windows.</li> <li><strong>Meeting people is the best part</strong> – Berzina says meeting the passengers is the highlight of the job, particularly children who are fascinated by towel animals. “People come from the U.S., Europe, Asia, and honestly, it's interesting. They talk about different things. It's stuff you can't learn in a book.”</li> </ol> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p> </p>

Cruising

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Outrage after 1830s "slave cabin" listed for rent

<p>Airbnb have copped an online slating after one of their listings, which was advertised as a bed and breakfast, was exposed as a former slave cabin. </p> <p>A user on TikTok found “The Panther Burn Cottage at Belmont Plantation” listing in Greenville, Mississippi, which was described as an “1830s slave cabin” and used as a “tenant sharecropper’s cabin”.</p> <p>The property was available to rent for $165 per night, and was slammed by TikTokker and lawyer Wynton Yates, who expressed his shock over the property saying it was anything but quaint and charming as described by some of its guests in reviews.</p> <p>“This is not OK in the least bit,” he said.</p> <p>“And I know there’s going to be someone saying ‘Oh you’re looking for controversy where it doesn’t exist.’ No."</p> <p>“This is an 1830s slave cabin up on Airbnb as a bed and breakfast."</p> <p>“They say it in the listing, ‘This particular structure, the Panther Burn Cabin, is an 1830s slave cabin from the extant Panther Burn Plantation to the south of Belmont.’"</p> <p>“How is this OK in someone’s mind to rent this out? A place where human beings were kept as slaves.”</p> <p>While the listing itself was alarming, what really concerned and infuriated Wynton was the reviews from previous guests. </p> <p>“We stayed in the sharecropper cabin and ate in the main house. The house tour was great and so was the breakfast,” one review read.</p> <p>“’We stayed in the cabin and it was a historic but elegant’ – a slave cabin is elegant?” a furious Wynton asked.</p> <p>“The history of slavery in this country is constantly denied and now it is being mocked by being turned into a luxurious vacation spot.”</p> <p>Wynton's video was viewed over 3 million times, which prompted Airbnb to remove the listing entirely. </p> <p>“Properties that formerly housed the enslaved have no place on Airbnb,” Airbnb said in a statement to <a title="www.usatoday.com" href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/news/2022/08/01/airbnb-banning-former-slave-quarters/10209183002/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">USA Today</a>.</p> <p>“We apologise for any trauma or grief created by the presence of this listing, and others like it, and that we did not act sooner to address this issue.”</p> <p>The company said it’s working with experts on developing new policies for dealing with properties tied to slavery.</p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok</em></p>

Real Estate

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How flight attendants deal with super annoying passengers

<p dir="ltr">A flight attendant has revealed the sneaky way he annoys difficult passengers on his flight that he doesn’t like. </p> <p dir="ltr">Former cabin crew member James revealed that the main thing he would do to avoid talking to irritating passengers is hold a sick bag. </p> <p dir="ltr">He told KIIS FM’s <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/radio/furious-kyle-storms-out-after-onair-fight-with-jackie-o/news-story/511e0ac37bf9aaaf180e39409883d778">Kyle &amp; Jackie O</a>, “Every time I used to go from one end of the plane to the other to eat my lunch, someone would always ask me something.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“So I used to put a can of coke in a sick bag, put a rubber glove on, and walk through the cabin so it looked like I am holding vomit – no one would ask me for anything.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He would also flat out lie to passengers he didn’t like, saying he would be back to help them with a request… and then never return. </p> <p dir="ltr">He said, “If a flight attendant ever says to you, ‘I’ll be right back,’ we don’t like you.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another former flight attendant, who runs the Passenger Shaming Instagram account, said that she would often put more ice in drinks for people who annoyed her.</p> <p dir="ltr">In an interview with Yahoo, she said that she would “take a cup and scoop in a lot of ice, and when I pour the soda or juice in, there’s, like, two tablespoons.”</p> <p dir="ltr">This watered down cocktail is what she calls “The ‘A***hole Special”, and it’s one that she thinks other flight attendants make as well as a sneaky way to combat difficult passengers. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Travel Tips

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TikTok shows bird inside cabin on flight from Europe to US

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A passenger on a flight from Europe to the US has shared a video of a bird that was trapped inside the cabin during her flight.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brooke Frazier uploaded a video to TikTok of a bird flying throughout the cabin of the plane she was on, writing, "Bird stuck on our eight hour flight from Europe lil guy about to be so confused.” In the caption, she wrote that the bird had “hopped on” the flight in Belgium and was “going crazy” during the flight to the US.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <div class="embed"><iframe class="embedly-embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7051627241830403374&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40totallychillfemale%2Fvideo%2F7051627241830403374&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2F7dd3104a4c624e7ebda67ae7affa603c_1641834912%7Etplv-tiktok-play.jpeg%3Fx-expires%3D1642078800%26x-signature%3D26FoJY0C1LvfiLhbFiJa3bTZQBc%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" scrolling="no" title="tiktok embed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; fullscreen" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video has received almost 12 million views, almost 2 million likes, and over 20,000 comments. Commenters were quick to see the humour in the situation, with one suggesting it was something out of a movie, writing, “Pixar movie. European bird runs away cuz all his family bullied him for being small. now he's raised by a bunch of pigeons from Jersey”. Brooke herself responded with her own movie synopsis, saying, “migrant bird opens a bakery in jersey to show his pursuit of the american dream while going back to his roots with family recipes”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another commented “Omg I hope he speaks English,” while another said, “He’s gonna have to learn to fly on the right side.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brooke posted a followup video once they’d touched down, asking, “Does anyone know if Pfizer protects against bird flu?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many users wanted more information on the bird’s fate, with one person writing, “They should provide a free return trip for him”, while another said, “It’s gonna be so lonely without its friends”. Brooke herself commented, “I started tearing up bc it's whole family is in Belgium and it's gonna get off and have to make new friends."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: TikTok</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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4 things they don’t tell you before becoming a flight attendant

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While being a flight attendant seems like a dream job for many, the perks can sometimes be outweighed by the parts of the job no one talks about. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While air cabin staff enjoy benefits like free travel, airport perks, lounge access and chic uniforms, there are also a lot of aspects of being a flight attendant that aren’t quite so desirable. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">From in-flight incidents and complaints, to screaming kids and anti-social hours, some cabin staff are feeling the toll of their chosen profession. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Melbourne flight attendant Michelle spoke with </span><a href="https://travel.nine.com.au/recommended/what-you-didnt-know-about-becoming-a-flight-attendant/562b360d-9734-4ba2-a8f3-6c9bf8d17a15"><span style="font-weight: 400;">9Honey</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> to chat about the parts of being an air steward that fly well under the radar. </span></p> <p><strong>1. You’ll be exhausted </strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Members of the cabin crew are often on their feet for hours at a time, which can take both a physical and mental toll. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It is exhausting, you will feel tired and fatigued like you have never felt before," Michelle tells 9Honey.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Along with this exhaustion, Michelle says that your shifts as a flight attendant don’t really ‘end’, as airline staff often spend nights away from home and are constantly lugging suitcases through airport terminals to start work at ungodly hours. </span></p> <p><strong>2. You’ll miss major life events</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Michelle, missing big moments in life is such a given that airlines will actually warn you about this when you apply for the job. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"You miss out on a lot, a lot of events," Michelle says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Until you're in it, you don't realise just how much you'll be missing. Weddings, funerals, birthdays and even births."</span></p> <p><strong>3. Friends and family won’t always understand why you’re always away</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once becoming a flight attendant, you become known as “that person” who is always jet-setting and is impossible to pin down. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle explains that the exhausting nature of the job can have a habit of pulling you away from events you would usually love to go to. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"A lot of people don't understand the job you do. So many people don't get that you can't just go to an event for a couple of hours when you have a 3am wake-up the next day, or go to an event when your day started at 3am that day. It can be super hard," she says.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Your work colleagues will be constantly changing</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While many people think you work with the same group of attendants, Michelle says this is actually a myth. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Due to the fast-paced role and the busy world of overseas travel, the staff are on a high rotation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle says, "You rarely work with the same person twice, which really sucks, especially if you love the people you worked with on a shift."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Travel Tips

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Flight attendants swear by these packing hacks

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are many so-called hacks floating around the internet to determine how to best pack a suitcase for your holiday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s the rolling-folding debate, how to avoid overpacking unnecessary items and what to put in your carry-on luggage instead of your suitcase. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To debunk some of these myths and give actual fool-proof advice, </span><a href="https://travel.nine.com.au/recommended/7-packing-hacks-flight-attendants-swear-by/1d80bd51-2361-4f9f-87c4-b0693267bb4a"><span style="font-weight: 400;">9Honey</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> caught up with Michelle*, a cabin crew member with years of experience. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She revealed her travel must-buys and nifty travel tips, to share her seven holy grail packing hacks. </span></p> <p><strong>1. Invest in a packing cube</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These nifty packing cubes are a must for any suitcase to stay clean and organised, as the small, sealable bags help to compartmentalise your luggage. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It helps keep me organised, especially if I only have a carry-on," Michelle says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Nothing worse than opening your suitcase in the airport and having all your clothes fall on the floor - this helps avoid that.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These simple packing tools can be bought for just $14 at Kmart, showing that organisation doesn’t have to cost a fortune. </span></p> <p><strong>2. The roll vs. fold method</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s the age-old debate over how to save space in your suitcase: to roll or fold your clothes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Michelle, all travellers should consider moving to the rolling method to save both time and space. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Roll your clothes, don't fold. Trust me when I say this is a huge space saver," Michelle says.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Double your chargers</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Device chargers are one of the most commonly forgotten items when packing for a holiday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle’s advice is to double up in case one goes missing or someone forgets to pack them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I have doubles of all my chargers, and I carry them in my carry-on luggage," she says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"This way I don't have to worry about forgetting all my important chargers and they're easily accessible."</span></p> <p><strong>4. Make a list</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With so many things to pack and airport guidelines to adhere to, writing down a list is the easiest way to make sure everything goes to plan. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This also eliminates packing unnecessary items that just end up taking up valuable space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you're only packing a carry-on, pack smart and only pack the things you need," Michelle advises.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Writing lists when packing does actually help."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle also says investigating the weather in your destination can greatly help your packing schedule. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Wear your biggest and heaviest items on the days of travel so you save space in your bag."</span></p> <p><strong>5. The shower cap trick</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to keep dirty shoes off clean clothes for your trip, Michelle recommends investing in cheap plastic shower caps to slide over the soles of your shoes to keep everything in order. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"This will help to protect your clothing and keep everything clean," she explains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle also suggests stuffing your shoes with personal items "to really maximise space."</span></p> <p><strong>6. Make it spill-proof</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some pesky liquid containers can be prone to spilling and ruining items in your suitcase when not stored upright. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To avoid this, Michelle shared a genius precaution you can take. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"When travelling with liquids, put some cling wrap on the opening and then put the lid on, to save any potential spills," Michelle says.</span></p> <p><strong>7. Choose your suitcase thoughtfully</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A commonly overlooked part of precision packing can often be the weight of the actual suitcase itself. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This can result in travellers being stung with unexpected overweight baggage fees on airlines, prompting Michelle to think of a solution. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Most airlines only allow a 7kg carry-on – try getting yourself a bag that is lightweight yet sturdy," Michelle suggests.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">*Name has been changed.</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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What the code words and phrases used by cabin crew really mean

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Most cabin crew members converse with each other in an interesting way to not alert passengers to their conversations. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Flying doctor Ben MacFarlane has spent a lot of time on planes, and has become privy to the unique ways cabin crew discuss parts of the job while in the air. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many of their phrases would seem like gibberish to the average flyer, but once you know what keywords to look out for, they all start to make sense. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are just a few of the phrases cabin crew have decoded for the flying doctor, as he told </span><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-9965305/Is-Tom-Cruise-board-crack-cabin-crew-code-hear-holiday-flights.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">MailOnline</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.  </span></p> <p><strong>“Is Tom Cruise on board?”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you ever hear cabin crew use this phrase, it is actually not linked to the famous movie star being a passenger. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead, it refers to the identical pots of tea and coffee on the meal service trolleys, and helps staff identify which pot is which. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Ben says, “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">If 'Tom Cruise is on board' then crew are following T&amp;C positions that day.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Tea, Tom, is in the pot on the left of the cart. Coffee, Cruise, is in the identical pot on the right. Simples.”</span></p> <p><strong>“Do you want to sing or dance?”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This phrase refers to the safety demonstration at the beginning of a flight.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Some crew like to have the microphone and read out the words of the PA,” said Ben.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Others prefer to stand in the cabin doing the actions with the seat belt and life jacket.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Pick the PA role and you sing. Do the demo and you dance.”</span></p> <p><strong>“Have you found Bob yet?”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This phrase is more likely to be heard on a long haul flight when cabin crew have more time on their hands. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bob is not an individual person, but rather refers to the Best On Board. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the flying doctor, “Every cabin crew member looks for theirs: the most beautiful woman or hottest guy they fancy the most.”</span></p> <p><strong>“That’s my ABP”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABP is cabin crew code for an Able-Bodied Person.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cabin crew often earmark a strong, able-bodied person to help in case of an emergency landing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This person may be asked to organise passengers in a calm and orderly queue while waiting for emergency aids. </span></p> <p><strong>“I’m off to the coffins”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This doesn’t refer to actual coffins, but a designated sleeping zone for cabin crew during a longer flight. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Following a ‘crew rest rota’, flight attendants punch a secret code into a secret door, climb the ladder and find half a dozen bunks built into the ceiling above the economy cabin,” says Ben.</span></p> <p><strong>“Have we met?”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This doesn’t refer to introducing yourself, but rather to passenger’s seat belts being buckled for landing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If one flight attendant is checking the cabin from front to back and the other is going from back to front, they have to say out loud that they've 'met' in the middle.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This then indicates that the plane is ready to make a safe landing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Have you ever heard these phrases used while flying? Let us know!</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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How plane cabins can clean up their act

<p>Qantas has <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-19/qantas-social-distancing-coronavirus-covid19-measures/12263242">unveiled a range of precautions</a> to guard passengers against COVID-19. The safety measures expected to be rolled out on June 12 include contactless check-in, hand sanitiser at departure gates, and optional masks and sanitising wipes on board.</p> <p>Controversially, however, there will be no physical distancing on board, because Qantas claims it is too expensive to run half-empty flights.</p> <p>The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing airlines to look closely at their hygiene practices. But aircraft cabins were havens for germs long before the coronavirus came along. The good news is there are some simple ways on-board hygiene can be improved.</p> <p><strong>Common sense precautions</strong></p> <p>As an environmental microbiologist I have observed, in general, a gradual loss of quality in hygiene globally.</p> <p>Airports and aircrafts have <a href="https://abcnews.go.com/WNN/video/overcrowding-concerns-planes-70616212">crammed ever larger numbers</a> of passengers into <a href="https://time.com/5636154/airplane-legroom-shrinking-asia/">ever smaller economy-class seats</a>.</p> <p>Although social distancing can’t do much in a confined cabin space – as the virus is reported to be able to travel <a href="https://academic.oup.com/jid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/infdis/jiaa189/5820886">eight metres</a> — wearing face masks (viral ones in particular) and practising hand hygiene remain crucial.</p> <p>Since microorganisms are invisible, it is hard to combat such a powerful enemy. During flights, I have observed a vast array of unwitting mistakes made by flight crew and passengers.</p> <p>Some crew staff would go to the bathroom to push overflowing paper towels down into the bins, exit without washing their hands and continue to serve food and drinks.</p> <p>We have the technology for manufacturers to install waste bins where paper towels can be shredded, disinfected and disposed of via suction, as is used in the toilets. Moreover, all aircraft waste bins should operate with pedals to prevent hand contamination.</p> <p>Also, pilots should not share bathrooms with passengers, as is often the case. Imagine the consequences if pilots became infected and severely ill during a long flight, to the point of not being able to fly. Who would land the plane?</p> <p>For instance, the highly transmissible <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/about/symptoms.html">norovirus</a>, which causes vomiting and diarrhoea, can manifest within 12 hours of exposure. So for everyone’s safety, pilots should have their own bathroom.</p> <p><strong>Food and the kitchen</strong></p> <p>Aircraft kitchen areas should be as far as possible from toilets.</p> <p>Male and female toilets should be separated because, due to the way men and women use the bathroom, male bathrooms are more likely to have droplets of urine splash outside the toilet bowl. Child toilets and change rooms should be separate as well.</p> <p>Food trolleys should be covered with a sterile plastic sheet during service as they come close to seated passengers who could be infected.</p> <p>And to allow traffic flow in the corridor, trolleys should not be placed near toilets. At times I have seen bread rolls in a basket with a nice white napkin, with the napkin touching the toilet door.</p> <p>Also, blankets should not be used if the bags have been opened, and pillows should have their own sterile bags.</p> <p><strong>Mind your luggage</strong></p> <p>In March, luggage handlers <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-31/qantas-baggage-handlers-test-positive-to-coronavirus-in-sa/12107258">were infected</a> with COVID-19 at Adelaide Airport.</p> <p>As a passenger, you should avoid placing your hand luggage on the seats while reaching into overhead lockers. There’s a chance your luggage was placed on a contaminated surface before you entered the plane, such as on a public bathroom floor.</p> <p>Be wary of using the seat pocket in front of you. Previous passengers may have placed dirty (or infected) tissues there. So keep this in mind when using one to hold items such as your passport, or glasses, which come close to your eyes (through which SARS-CoV-2 <a href="https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/news/novel-coronavirus-covid-19-how-it-spreads-transmission-infection-prevention-protection">can enter the body</a>).</p> <p>Also, safety cards in seat pockets should be disposable and should be replaced after each flight.</p> <p>In facing the COVID-19 crisis, it’s important to remember that unless an antiviral drug or a vaccine is found, this virus could come back every year.</p> <p>On many occasions, microbiologists have warned of the need for more <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30912268/">microbiology literacy</a> among the public. Yet, too often their calls are dismissed as paranoia, or being overly cautious.</p> <p>But now’s the time to listen, and to start taking precaution. For all we know, there may be even more dangerous <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-pandemic-is-paving-the-way-for-an-increase-in-superbugs-135389">superbugs</a> breeding around us – ones we’ve simply yet to encounter.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/134552/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ipek-kurtboke-1006582"><em>Ipek Kurtböke</em></a><em>, Senior Lecturer, Environmental Microbiology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-the-sunshine-coast-1068">University of the Sunshine Coast</a></em></span></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/plane-cabins-are-havens-for-germs-heres-how-they-can-clean-up-their-act-134552">original article</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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“Terrifying”: Qantas plane passengers evacuated after smoke filled cabin

<p>Passengers on a Qantas flight was forced to evacuate through slides at Sydney Airport after smoke and “burning” smell filled the cabin.</p> <p>The airline’s spokesperson said the Sydney to Perth flight QF575 on Sunday morning was forced to turn around 20 minutes into the flight due to hydraulic issues.</p> <p>Passengers told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-15/qantas-plane-evacuated-at-sydney-airport-due-to-smoke-in-cabin/11801034">ABC</a> </em>the plane was on the tarmac after landing when smoke began to fill the cabin.</p> <p>“We were on the runway waiting to be towed in and we started to smell burning,” passenger Dillon Parker said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Just had to evacuate my flight to Perth after engineering issues. Everyone had to exit the plane via slide onto Sydney tarmac after the cabin filled with smoke and the captain screamed evacuate. Terrifying.</p> — Ally Kemp (@politic_ally) <a href="https://twitter.com/politic_ally/status/1205992177903366144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 14, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/Qantas?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Qantas</a> flight <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/QF575?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#QF575</a> mid-flight hydraulic issue, landed back in Sydney, smoke in cabin, passengers told to evacuate, flight crew could not taxi correctly after landing due to hydraulic issues, slides activated. <br />Brother was on flight. <a href="https://twitter.com/SevenPerth?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@SevenPerth</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Channel7?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Channel7</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/abcnews?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@abcnews</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/9NewsSyd?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@9NewsSyd</a> <a href="https://t.co/SzrzhbcxDh">pic.twitter.com/SzrzhbcxDh</a></p> — Richo Hannington (@RichoHannington) <a href="https://twitter.com/RichoHannington/status/1205992556380639232?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 14, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The flight took off from Sydney Airport at around 8.45am (AEDT) and returned before 9.30am.</p> <p>The Airbus A330 was unable to taxi upon landing and had to be towed to the gate.</p> <p>The Qantas spokesperson told <em><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/terrifying-incident-leads-to-qantas-flight-delays-011242798.html">Yahoo News Australia</a> </em>the flight did not require an emergency landing.</p> <p>“Once back at the gate, the captain made the decision to evacuate the aircraft as a precaution and three emergency slides were deployed,” the spokesperson said. “Passengers were evacuated through both the slides and normal exits.”</p> <p>Qantas Fleet safety captain Debbie Slade said some of the passengers may have had “itchy eyes” or a “scratchy throat” from exposure to the hydraulic fluid leak.</p> <p>“The crew did a great job of putting their training into action and following the procedures for a set of circumstances like this,” Slade said.</p> <p>“We’ll investigate exactly what happened, including liaising with Airbus, before this aircraft is returned to service.”</p> <p>Slade said what appeared to be smoke might have been “mist from the hydraulic system”.</p> <p>Some people said they sustained injuries to their arms and legs as they were exiting the aircraft.</p> <p>NSW Ambulance said “all patients had been evacuated” with one passenger being taken to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital for “minor injuries”.</p> <p>Qantas said it would assist the Civil Aviation Safety Authority and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau in its investigation.</p> <p>“Qantas is providing support to customers on the affected flight and managing some delays to other flights that occurred as a result of this incident,” the airline said.</p> <p>“The airline extends its thanks to all customers for their patience and understanding.”</p>

Travel Trouble

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Husband shocked as cabin crew threaten to kick wife off flight

<p>British journalist Mehdi Hasan was furious as he watched his wife leave the flight in tears after she was told she would be “escorted off the plane” allegedly because she wanted to sit with her family.</p> <p>The horrific incident took place on a Southwest Airlines flight between Houston, Texas and Washington DC and was shared online by her husband.</p> <p>Hasan explained that him and his family were flying home when the incident occurred.</p> <p>The airline in question operates on an open-seating policy, which means that here are no allocated seats. Passengers can sit in any available seat on a first-come-first-served basis.</p> <p>Hasan explained that his wife had asked another passenger “politely” if they could switch seats so that the family could sit together, which the other passenger agreed to.</p> <p>The Twitter thread, which has now gone viral, explains the situation as it happened.</p> <p>“Hey @SouthwestAir: not a good look for your flight attendant on SW5539 to DC last night to loudly tell a brown woman in a headscarf she’ll be “escorted off the plane” for making people feel “uncomfortable” – because she wanted to sit with her husband &amp; kids!” he wrote.</p> <p>“The flight attendant called ground staff onto the plane, complained about the Muslim woman – my wife! – to them, &amp; escalated rather than de-escalated the situation – simply because my wife politely asked a guy if he’d give up his seat for our family (which he was fine with!).”</p> <p>Hasan added that another flight attendant who was called to the incident agreed with the family.</p> <p>“Even her own @SouthwestAir colleague from the ground staff who came onboard to check things wondered why the flight attendant wouldn’t shut up &amp; let things go so we could take off,” he said.</p> <p>He then sarcastically thanks the airline for “ruining the end of our Thanksgiving trip”.</p> <p>“Thanks @SouthwestAir for ruining the end of our Thanksgiving trip and leaving my wife in tears – because she wanted us all to sit together as a family while your flight attendant wanted to single her out and humiliate her. Thanks a lot.</p> <p>“FYI: @SouthwestAir flight staff seem to have form when it comes to mistreating brown/Muslim passengers. Hadn’t flown with them for years and, at this point, don’t plan to do so again anytime in the near future. Not worth it.”</p> <p>Hasan’s thread struck a chord and received many messages of support.</p> <p>“I’m so sorry this happened to your wife. How upsetting for her &amp; distressing for your children to see,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“I hope the airline takes action against their staff member. @SouthwestAir Isn’t it quite normal for a family to want to sit together? This is totally unacceptable behaviour.”</p> <p>An airline spokesperson said that they had started to “gather information internally” about the incident.</p> <p>“Once we learned about the customer’s social media message, we began to research the flight and gather information internally.</p> <p>“We also reached out to the customer directly to discuss his family’s experience prior to departure.</p> <p>“From our initial discussions, we understand that some passengers on Flight 5539 were involved in a disagreement over seat selection near the end of boarding. (Southwest does not assign seats; customers select their seats as they board the aircraft.)</p> <p>“The flight crew requested a customer service supervisor come on-board to help address the situation, and the conversation was resolved before the plane left the gate.</p> <p>“The family was able to sit together, and the flight arrived safely in Washington, D.C. on Sunday night. We remain in communication with the customer who sent the tweet and are working to address his concerns directly.”</p> <p>Hasan has rejected this statement entirely, saying that the airline have made up a “totally false narrative”.</p> <p>“Update &amp; a new thread from me: @SouthwestAir have apologized privately but refuse to apologize publicly; offered travel vouchers to fly with them (!) that don't cover the costs of our flights; &amp; have made up a totally false narrative,” he wrote.</p> <p>“.@SouthwestAir told The Sun "we understand that some Passengers...were involved in a disagreement over seat selection." This is false. There was no disagreement, only a flight attendant who was trying to incite passengers against my hijab-wearing wife.”</p>

International Travel

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Why you should always avoid this cruise cabin

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While cruisers will surely be keen to spend most of their time out of their cruise cabin and above deck, or out at the islands and beaches they’ve paid to venture to - that doesn’t mean they won’t spend much time in their cruise cabin. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are often a number of rooms to choose from when booking an ocean getaway, which range in size, price and location. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is one category of a ship cabin however that travellers should avoid at all costs unless they are willing to make a big risk. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Online cruising specialist is </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise Bulletin </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">has urged those looking for advice for when booking a cruise to avoid “guaranteed cabins” unless they are willing to book a room that might not meet their expectations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While guaranteed cabins sounds like a good idea considering travellers could end up with the better end of the stick for an awesome price - they do run the risk of getting a cabin they might not have anticipated. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Guaranteed cruising may offer a room that seems great because of the price, but you never truly know what you’re gonna get until you’ve already booked. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These types of cabins are sold with a big discount on them (which is why they get booked),” </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise Bulletin</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The cruise lines do tend to use them to fill up those ‘awkward’ spots that guests wouldn’t normally choose to book.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These include cabins above the theatre, below the sundeck and next to the lifts are common examples.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This means travellers might end up with a stateroom that could be too noisy, cramped, or badly positioned on the vessel for them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Experts recommend thorough research ahead of booking a cruise to ensure they are satisfied with their room decision. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are thinking of going with a guaranteed booking, just remember you always run the risk of ending up with an unsuitable room. </span></p>

Cruising

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Cruise insider reveals trick to bagging cabin upgrade that WORKS

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise ships are not so different from hotel rooms and come in a variety of shapes, sizes and amenities. While some passengers would prefer to save a few hundred dollars by going for a smaller room so they can enjoy their time out in the sun or in the ocean - there are passengers who prefer a level of luxury that can cost. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A former Carnival Cruise Line employee Joshua Kisner told </span><a href="https://www.express.co.uk/travel/cruise/1147756/cruises-2019-cruise-2020-ship-cabin-upgrade-crew-purser-passenger"><span style="font-weight: 400;">express.co.uk </span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">there are simple tips to get a free upgrade so passengers might enjoy lapping in luxury without scraping the back of their wallets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Kisner’s book, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Truth About Cruise Ships, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">he wrote sometimes the ships he worked on were fully booked, meaning the only way to get an upgrade was if there were no-shows (cruisers who paid but for some reason or another couldn’t make it onboard). </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The pursers didn’t know if there were any no shows until the ship sailed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Most of the time the cruise line was very accommodating and unfortunately, the ones who complain themes usually got the most compensation.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If a passenger goes out of their way to seek out the cruiser after the cruise ship has set sail, they may be able to get a room upgrade. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are looking to do this, it is advised not to unpack - so scooting to another cabin will be of ease. </span></p>

Cruising

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