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Tastes from our past can spark memories, trigger pain or boost wellbeing. Here’s how to embrace food nostalgia

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/megan-lee-490875">Megan Lee</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/doug-angus-1542552">Doug Angus</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-simpson-1542551">Kate Simpson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a></em></p> <p>Have you ever tried to bring back fond memories by eating or drinking something unique to that time and place?</p> <p>It could be a Pina Colada that recalls an island holiday? Or a steaming bowl of pho just like the one you had in Vietnam? Perhaps eating a favourite dish reminds you of a lost loved one – like the sticky date pudding Nanna used to make?</p> <p>If you have, you have tapped into <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2022.2142525">food-evoked nostalgia</a>.</p> <p>As researchers, we are exploring how eating and drinking certain things from your past may be important for your mood and mental health.</p> <h2>Bittersweet longing</h2> <p>First named in 1688 by Swiss medical student, <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/44437799">Johannes Hoffer</a>, <a href="https://compass.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spc3.12070">nostalgia</a> is that bittersweet, sentimental longing for the past. It is experienced <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2008.00595.x">universally</a> across different cultures and lifespans from childhood into older age.</p> <p>But nostalgia does not just involve positive or happy memories – we can also experience nostalgia for <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2F0022-3514.91.5.975">sad and unhappy moments</a> in our lives.</p> <p>In the <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Femo0000817">short and long term</a>, nostalgia can positively impact our health by improving <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fa0025167">mood</a> and <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Femo0000817">wellbeing</a>, fostering <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fa0017597">social connection</a> and increasing quality of life. It can also trigger feelings of <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Femo0000817">loneliness or meaninglessness</a>.</p> <p>We can use nostalgia to <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Fa0025167">turn around a negative mood</a> or enhance our sense of <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2Femo0000817">self, meaning and positivity</a>.</p> <p>Research suggests nostalgia alters activity in the <a href="https://academic.oup.com/scan/article/17/12/1131/6585517">brain regions associated with reward processing</a> – the same areas involved when we seek and receive things we like. This could explain the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352250X22002445?via%3Dihub">positive feelings</a> it can bring.</p> <p>Nostalgia can also increase feelings of loneliness and sadness, particularly if the memories highlight dissatisfaction, grieving, loss, or wistful feelings for the past. This is likely due to activation of <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X22002445?casa_token=V31ORDWcsx4AAAAA:Vef9hiwUz9506f5PYGsXH-JxCcnsptQnVPNaAGares2xTU5JbKSHakwGpLxSRO2dNckrdFGubA">brain areas</a> such as the amygdala, responsible for processing emotions and the prefrontal cortex that helps us integrate feelings and memories and regulate emotion.</p> <h2>How to get back there</h2> <p>There are several ways we can <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2006-20034-013.html">trigger</a> or tap into nostalgia.</p> <p>Conversations with family and friends who have shared experiences, unique objects like photos, and smells can <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352250X23000076">transport us back</a> to old times or places. So can a favourite song or old TV show, reunions with former classmates, even social media <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2015/3/24/8284703/facebook-on-this-day-nostalgia-recap">posts and anniversaries</a>.</p> <p>What we eat and drink can trigger <a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/QMR-06-2012-0027/full/html">food-evoked nostalgia</a>. For instance, when we think of something as “<a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-we-crave-comfort-food-in-winter-118776">comfort food</a>”, there are likely elements of nostalgia at play.</p> <p>Foods you found comforting as a child can evoke memories of being cared for and nurtured by loved ones. The form of these foods and the stories we tell about them may have been handed down through generations.</p> <p>Food-evoked nostalgia can be very powerful because it engages multiple senses: taste, smell, texture, sight and sound. The sense of <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09658211.2013.876048?casa_token=wqShWbRXJaYAAAAA%3AqJabgHtEbPtEQp7qHnl7wOb527bpGxzIJ_JwQX8eAyq1IrM_HQFIng8ELAMyuoFoeZyiX1zeJTPf">smell</a> is closely linked to the limbic system in the brain responsible for emotion and memory making food-related memories particularly vivid and emotionally charged.</p> <p>But, food-evoked nostalgia can also give rise to <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hpja.873">negative memories</a>, such as of being forced to eat a certain vegetable you disliked as a child, or a food eaten during a sad moment like a loved ones funeral. Understanding why these foods <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2022.2142525?casa_token=16kAPHUQTukAAAAA%3A9IDvre8yUT8UsuiR_ltsG-3qgE2sdkIFgcrdH3T5EYbVEP9JZwPcsbmsPLT6Kch5EFFs9RPsMTNn">evoke negative memories</a> could help us process and overcome some of our adult food aversions. Encountering these foods in a positive light may help us reframe the memory associated with them.</p> <h2>What people told us about food and nostalgia</h2> <p>Recently <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/hpja.873">we interviewed eight Australians</a> and asked them about their experiences with food-evoked nostalgia and the influence on their mood. We wanted to find out whether they experienced food-evoked nostalgia and if so, what foods triggered pleasant and unpleasant memories and feelings for them.</p> <p>They reported they could use foods that were linked to times in their past to manipulate and influence their mood. Common foods they described as particularly nostalgia triggering were homemade meals, foods from school camp, cultural and ethnic foods, childhood favourites, comfort foods, special treats and snacks they were allowed as children, and holiday or celebration foods. One participant commented:</p> <blockquote> <p>I guess part of this nostalgia is maybe […] The healing qualities that food has in mental wellbeing. I think food heals for us.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another explained</p> <blockquote> <p>I feel really happy, and I guess fortunate to have these kinds of foods that I can turn to, and they have these memories, and I love the feeling of nostalgia and reminiscing and things that remind me of good times.</p> </blockquote> <p>Understanding food-evoked nostalgia is valuable because it provides us with an insight into how our sensory experiences and emotions intertwine with our memories and identity. While we know a lot about how food triggers nostalgic memories, there is still much to learn about the specific brain areas involved and the differences in food-evoked nostalgia in different cultures.</p> <p>In the future we may be able to use the science behind food-evoked nostalgia to help people experiencing dementia to tap into lost memories or in psychological therapy to help people reframe negative experiences.</p> <p>So, if you are ever feeling a little down and want to improve your mood, consider turning to one of your favourite comfort foods that remind you of home, your loved ones or a holiday long ago. Transporting yourself back to those times could help turn things around.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/232826/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/megan-lee-490875">Megan Lee</a>, Senior Teaching Fellow, Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/doug-angus-1542552">Doug Angus</a>, Assistant Professor of Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-simpson-1542551">Kate Simpson</a>, Sessional academic, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/tastes-from-our-past-can-spark-memories-trigger-pain-or-boost-wellbeing-heres-how-to-embrace-food-nostalgia-232826">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Mind

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Happy Days star's warning to tourists after costly mistake

<p><em>Happy Days </em>star Henry Winkler has issued a warning to fans about rickshaw rides in London, after he was charged £134 (AU$250) for a short trip.  </p> <p>The star revealed on X, formerly Twitter, that he was left with the huge bill after taking a ride on the pedicab, and attached a picture from the back of the rickshaw. </p> <p>“TRAVEL TIP: Do not take one of these bicycle taxis without absolutely negotiating the price first. This person in London rode us around in circles then finally to our destination seven blocks away … for $170 US!" he wrote. </p> <p>“My fault, I paid, but passenger beware!</p> <p>A few hours later, he reiterated his point and added:  "Can NOT say this enough."</p> <p>Fans were quick to back the veteran actor, with one saying: “How can the guy do The Fonz like that?”</p> <p>Others urged him to take the tube or a cab instead, with one writing: "I would've taken you for free." </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">TRAVEL TIP: DO NOT take one of these bicycle taxis without absolutely negotiating the price first. This person in London rode us around in circles then finally to our destination 7 blocks away...for $170 US! My fault, I paid, but passenger beware! <a href="https://t.co/l9yxNUkOuM">pic.twitter.com/l9yxNUkOuM</a></p> <p>— Henry Winkler (@hwinkler4real) <a href="https://twitter.com/hwinkler4real/status/1808556199824273671?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 3, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>Another former cab driver added: "London cabbies are known for being honest, knowledgeable, and decent-It takes a full year for someone to gain all the Knowledge necessary to become a cab driver. I believe they drive black cars. Anyway, this is a former cabbie telling you to grab a real cab."</p> <p>To which Winkler replied: "I did all the time. For that moment I LOST my mind."</p> <p>According to the U.K's Local Government Association, pedicabs have been able to charge extortionate prices because they are "exempt from the regulations which cover taxis and private hire vehicles.</p> <p>"They do not need a [license] to operate, are able to set their own prices and are not subject to checks on the safety and ability of their drivers, or the road worthiness of their vehicles."</p> <p>However, Transport for London is stepping in to license rickshaw riders and regulate their fares to bring it into line with other forms of transport in the city. </p> <p><em>Image: Mark Doyle/ Shutterstock Editorial</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Jimmy Barnes warns fans about fake accounts

<p>Jimmy Barnes has issued a "fake account alert" to his fans.</p> <p>The Aussie singer took to Instagram to warn his followers that there have been an increase in the number of people online pretending to be him or claiming to have direct access to him. </p> <p>"There have been an increasing number of fake profiles appearing in the comments of my socials media posts, claiming to either be me, have direct access to me, sell tickets to shows, and even going as far as posing as a fan trying to connect with other fans," he wrote. </p> <p>"These accounts also send friend or follow requests, which then progresses to more false claims, often requesting large or small sums of money," the<em> Cold Chisel</em> star added. </p> <p>He then urged his followers to take action against these fake profiles. </p> <p>"Please block and report any profile and or comment that makes these claims, as it would never be myself or any of my team. Look after each other," he continued. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C84CmW9yKBs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C84CmW9yKBs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Jimmy Barnes (@jimmybarnesofficial)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>He then shared screenshots of all the social media accounts posing as him, and a montage of all the messages they send to fans. </p> <p>One of the scammers wrote: "Hello thank you for your like and comments on my official page and for being a fan, it's great to know I have such a devoted fan. Much love, click on this page to send me a message." </p> <p>Many of the scammers had similar messages, asking fans to message them, click on a link or add them on social media. </p> <p>This is not the first time scammers have tried using the singer's name to con devoted fans. </p> <p>In 2022, Barnes slammed scammers pretending to be him and using a fake "farewell" ad on social media, which was nothing more than a cryptocurrency scam, according to <em>The Daily Telegraph</em>. </p> <p>Speaking through his manager, John Watson, Barnes said at the time that he was angry about the "illegal and misleading ads" that have allowed "scammers to prosper". </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Legal

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Aussies warned over new nbn scam

<p>Aussies have been warned against a new nbn scam targeting businesses and residents. </p> <p>Last year,  about 1,800 Australians lost more than $1.2 million to scammers pretending to be nbn employees in a remote access scam. </p> <p>Now, they have found a new way to scam unsuspecting businesses and residents by pretending to be employees and getting people to hand over their personal details and money in areas where <em>actual</em> nbn employees are working. </p> <p>The opportunistic scammers have been randomly knocking on doors or cold calling homes in areas where nbn technicians are installing new fibre. </p> <p>A few people have already been duped, with nbn impersonators calling customers claiming they need money to pay for new internet hardware or postage costs. </p> <p>Scammers have also offered to inspect people's homes for a nbn fibre upgrade and took their bank account details in the process. </p> <p>Other impersonators have called customers saying they would show up a few days later, despite having no prior appointment booked. </p> <p>Scammers have also impersonated staff, and used the presence of actual nbn vehicles on the street as proof of their authenticity. </p> <p>“These impersonators are also asking residents for payment to test their services or secure upgrades and repair works in the future,” nbn Local head Chris Cusack said. </p> <p>“In taking the payment these people are then skimming banking and card details to extract more money afterwards.</p> <p>“We are asking residents to be extra-vigilant against scams, especially while legitimate nbn work is underway.”</p> <p>Nbn has advised that their technicians would always contact people to ensure they were aware of visits before their appointments, and inform them of where they will be doing fibre upgrades. </p> <p>They also send their customers texts to confirm or cancel the appointment, and let them know when they are on their way. </p> <p>Nbn technicians never ask for payment for an appointment, postage costs, hardware costs, or access to any devices. </p> <p>Approved technicians and workers all carry identification cards, and the nbn Local head suggested that customers should always request to see the card before providing access to their residence. </p> <p>“Do not share your bank or personal details with an unsolicited caller or with people who door knock claiming to be from nbn trying to sell you an nbn service or seeking payment for related services,” Cusack said.</p> <p>“If you get contacted like this, please close your door, or hang up the phone and report it to the ACCC’s Scam watch.”</p> <p><em>Images: news.com.au</em></p>

Legal

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Kochie's warning for every Aussie parent

<p>Australian finance expert David Koch has warned parents to think twice before offering financial assistance to their adult children who are thinking of buying their first home. </p> <p>With many young Australians looking to buy property turning to the “Bank of Mum and Dad” for financial help, Kochie has advised parents to approach this with caution, structured agreements, and clear communication, to reduce the risks and protect both parties involved. </p> <p>“The Bank of Mum and Dad provided $2.7 billion to their adult children to buy property over the past year," the finance expert said on his latest column in <em>The Nightly</em></p> <p>He encouraged a structured approach to navigating the common intergenerational finance practice, and added that financial assistance from parents has become a significant player in the housing market. </p> <p>“If it was an actual bank, it would be somewhere between the fifth and ninth biggest mortgage lender," he said, referring to an estimation by the Productivity Commission. </p> <p>He then warned against the casual approach that is often taken, saying: “We all want to help our kids … But the question is what that help looks like.”</p> <p>“Treat the loan as a business transaction and draw up a formal agreement between each party outlining the terms of the deal, including a set repayment schedule,” he emphasised. </p> <p>Kochie also drew attention to the University of Newcastle’s findings on the increased risk of financial elder abuse associated with parental assistance.</p> <p>“Borrowing from the Bank of Mum and Dad encourages ageist attitudes, which leads to kids financially abusing their parents," he quoted the study. </p> <p>He then differentiated the different forms of financial assistance, explaining the difference between gifts, loans, and guarantees. </p> <p>“If your child is married or in a de facto relationship and it ends, gifts will usually be considered part of the family assets and divided up in court,” he warned. </p> <p>He also offered guidance on parental investments in entrepreneurial ventures, advising parents to “think of your role as that of a regular investor."</p> <p><em>Image: news.com.au </em></p>

Money & Banking

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Nick Kyrgios' honest thoughts on Shane Warne's open letter

<p>In 2015, late cricket legend Shane Warne posted an open letter Nick Kyrgios on social media, calling out the then hot-headed tennis player's fiery behaviour off-court. </p> <p>"Dear Nick, we all realise you're only 20 and have a lot to learn buddy, but please don't waste your talent," the letter began. </p> <p>"Everyone in the world, especially us Australians want to respect you. You need to respect the game of tennis and yourself. We all make mistakes.</p> <p>"You're testing our patience mate, show us what you're made of and how hungry you are to be the best in the world. It's time to step up and start winning, no excuses," he added in the scathing letter. </p> <p>"We all make mistakes. It's how we learn from them and the way we conduct ourselves when we lose that shows true character. You're testing our patience mate," he concluded. </p> <p>A then 20-year-old Kyrgios had just beat Spanish champion Rafael Nadal during the 2015 Wimbledon, but also attracted a lot of controversy after insulting Stan Wawrinka at a tournament in Montreal, Canada. </p> <p>This was a particularly difficult time in Kyrgios' career, as he was suspended for 28-days and got a $34,705 fine from the ATP.</p> <p>Since the incident, Kyrgios has managed to get his professional life back on track, and in a recent interview with Piers Morgan on his show <em>Uncensored</em>, the tennis star shared that he never read the letter. </p> <p>"I saw it and didn't read it. I'm never going to be the first one to go out on social media and put someone down," he told the host. </p> <p>He added that he believed that Warne would be proud of how far he's come. </p> <p>"I look back at that letter and at how far I've come and I'd say he would be proud for sure. I’ve had a pretty successful career. I feel I've won a lot more than I've lost." </p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

TV

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"So beautiful": Summer Warne overwhelmed by Coldplay's tribute to Shane

<p>Summer Warne has captured the emotional moment that Coldplay frontman Chris Martin paid tribute to her late father on stage. </p> <p>During their show in Perth on Sunday night, Martin bean singing an original acoustic song that honoured Shane Warne in a unique way. </p> <p>Shane's daughter Summer was in the audience for the performance, and was incredibly touched by the gesture. </p> <p>During the song, Chris Martin sang the lyrics, "Friends come, and friends go, there are just some people you're lucky to know. If I could, I'd do it all again, so thanks for everything Shane."</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cz1Ln4fRVQU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cz1Ln4fRVQU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Summer Warne 🍒 (@summerwarne)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>He even joked at one point, singing "I needed sunglasses just to look at your teeth," and poked fun at the late cricketer's lack of rhythm. </p> <p>Summer posted a clip of the emotional moment to Instagram with the caption, "The most amazing song dedicated to Dad. Thank you Chris, so beautiful <a title="" href="https://www.instagram.com/coldplay/?hl=en" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">@coldplay</a> Love you dad xx."</p> <p>This isn't the first time Martin has honoured the star in song, as Coldplay dedicated an acoustic cover of their hit song <em>Yellow</em> to the sporting legend at Shane's memorial. </p> <p>The performance was done via video, as Chris began saying, "I am sorry I cannot be there today."</p> <p>"We are on tour in Central America and there are a lot of background noises, but I feel like that may be OK with him. I think chaos and Shane were good friends."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

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"I couldn't save her": Husband's heartbreaking warning against weight loss drugs

<p>A grieving father has issued a desperate plea against using weight loss drugs after his wife passed away from possible side effects just months into her treatment. </p> <p>Roy Webster told <em>60 Minutes</em> that his wife Trish simply wanted to lose weight before their daughter's wedding, so she decided to take Ozempic - a drug which was originally designed to treat diabetes, but is now being prescribed as a weight loss drug. </p> <p>The 56-year-old mother lost 16 kilos from taking Ozempic and another weight loss drug, Saxenda, but she was also frequently ill and in January "something went seriously wrong".</p> <p>"I couldn't save her, that's the hard part," Webster said. </p> <p>"If I knew that could happen, she wouldn't have been taking it."</p> <p>The heartbroken Aussie father added that his wife tragically passed away in his arms. </p> <p>"She had a little bit of brown stuff coming out of her mouth and I realised she wasn't breathing, and started doing CPR," he said.</p> <p>"It was just pouring out and I turned her onto the side because she couldn't breathe." </p> <p>Trish's death certificate reveals that her cause of death was an acute gastrointestinal illness, although there isn't a direct link to weight loss drugs, Webster believes that they contributed to his wife's death. </p> <p>"I never thought you could die from it," he warned other Aussies. </p> <p>In the same interview with <em>60 Minutes</em>, Endocrinologist Dr Kathryn William, said that there's "growing evidence the active ingredient in drugs like Ozempic can cause digestive complications."</p> <p>"When we prescribe them, we warn people," she said.</p> <p>"So if I say to someone, 'yes, it might be that you do vomit once or twice, but if you are having recurrent vomiting, you need to let me know and you need to stop the medication'."</p> <p>The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia is investigating local cases and encourages people like Webster to report their concerns. </p> <p>Webster also reportedly wants a coronial inquest to examine his wife's death.</p> <p>"She shouldn't be gone, you know," he said. "It's just not worth it, it's not worth it at all."</p> <p><em>Image: 60 Minutes</em></p>

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Jackson Warne speaks for the first time on the moment he found out about his father's death

<p>Jackson Warne has opened up for the first time about the life-changing moment he found out about his father's untimely death. </p> <p>Jackson was 22-years-old when his father, famous Aussie cricketer Shane Warne, passed away of a heart attack while holidaying in Thailand in March 2022. </p> <p>Now, for the first time, Jackson has recalled the moment he and his family found out abut the devastating news. </p> <p>Speaking with <em>SAS Australia</em> chief instructor Ant Middleton on the show's podcast ahead of the show's anticipated finale, Jackson spoke candidly about receiving the life-changing phone call. </p> <p>Middleton asked Jackson, who was a contestant on <em>SAS</em> three years ago, “Do you remember where you were when you got the news?” </p> <p>Jackson said, “Definitely, I don’t think I’ll ever be able to probably forget where I was or what I was doing. Because all you get is a phone call. And then when you hang up the phone call, your life that you’ve been living, your entire life, everything you ever knew sort of was like this, just gets whooshed, just completely flipped upside down."</p> <p>“You have all these thoughts, and you let the tears out, that you just sort of sit in silence. Like we, I was with my girlfriend, my sister, Brooke, and her partner, and then my mum. And we just got to call. Hung up the phone and we just sat in silence for hours."</p> <p>While going through the shock and devastation of finding out about his father's death, Jackson had a profound dream about his late dad, as he felt he was sending him a message. </p> <p>He began, "I can tell you about a dream that might sound bizarre, but it would have been maybe two weeks, or two-and-a-half weeks after dad passed, and I was driving my car. He was driving his car. And we used to sort not race, we used to just drive next to each other and, you know, race a little bit."</p> <p>“But he was always the better driver in the better car. So (he) always beat me all the time, all the time. And in this dream I had, I was driving my car, he was driving his car, we’re both looking each other left and right and driving and driving.</p> <p>“And then all of a sudden our cars sort of, they sort of merged, and I was in the driver’s seat of his car. And then I looked to my left, and he wasn’t there. And then I sort of woke up and I can really vividly remember that dream."</p> <p>“Everything about it, I can remember. And I sort of looked at that as he was sort of giving me the permission to be in charge. Now he’s like, ‘Jackson, I’m giving you the driver’s seat. You’re the one that’s, you know, going to be making the tough decisions. Now you’re the one that has to step up for the family. I’m not here anymore, you have to be (the one)‘."</p> <p>Jackson also shared the reason he is finally speaking out about his father, saying, “To keep someone’s memory alive, you have to keep talking about them."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

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"I want to make Dad proud": Summer Warne's heart-wrenching revelation

<p>Summer Warne has shared a heart-wrenching revelation after making her TV debut on <em>The Masked Singer</em>. </p> <p>The 21-year-old, who is Shane Warne's youngest child with Simone Callahan, left the panel of judges in tears following an emotional performance of Coldplay’s <em>Yellow</em>. </p> <p>“That was his favourite Coldplay song. It’s such a significant song to me and my family,” she said. </p> <p>“I want to make Dad proud. Singing Yellow was absolutely amazing – that song was his funeral song. Chris Martin sang it at the state memorial.”</p> <p>Summer also took to Instagram to reflect on her TV debut, where she thanked the judging panel, host and fans for their love and support. </p> <p>"I will be forever grateful of this whole experience ❤️" she captioned the photos. </p> <p>She also paid tribute to her dad, and shared what an honour it was to perform for him.</p> <p>"My dad would love nothing more than hearing me sing and perform on stage, if it wasn’t for him I would have never been given an opportunity like this.</p> <p>"So thank you Dad, and I really wish you could have seen this, but I know you were by my side every step of the way ❤️"</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CxpPcGvRRoJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CxpPcGvRRoJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Summer Warne (@summerwarne)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In an interview with <em>Yahoo Lifestyle </em>after her performance, Summer shared a few candid insights into how tough it was to grow up with a famous father. </p> <p>“If I was out at a party, I thought I had to act a certain way, because if I did the wrong thing, or said the wrong thing, people would look at my family and go, ‘Oh, she’s a horrible person’.</p> <p>“I never wanted … I never asked to be in this life. And I think it was just very hard growing up in an environment where your whole life is kind of on screen.</p> <p>“And if Dad made a mistake, it would reflect on me. And, you know, I thought people were looking at me differently.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/like-a-bad-dream-shane-warne-s-family-in-shock" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Shane passed away </a>of a suspected heart attack in Thailand on March 2022, and the news shocked the world. </p> <p>Ever since his passing, Summer said that life hasn't gotten any easier for her family. </p> <p>"I think it has gotten a bit more hectic, because they (paparazzi) can’t follow him around now, and they want to follow us,” she said.</p> <p>"They write stories and the public is like 'we don't want to hear about them or they're not celebrities'. But we're just living our lives, whether that's going out for breakfast, or going out on a Saturday night, you know, it's just gonna get written about.</p> <p>“We’re just trying to live our lives and move on. Unfortunately, it is what it is.”</p> <p>The 21-year-old has been very open about her grief and has recently shared a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/shane-warne-s-daughter-s-candid-admission" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tribute to her dad</a> for what would've been his 54th birthday. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Shane Warne's daughter's candid admission

<p>Shane Warne's daughter, Brooke, has opened up about how her family has coped with the devastating loss, one year after the cricket legend's <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/like-a-bad-dream-shane-warne-s-family-in-shock" target="_blank" rel="noopener">passing</a>.</p> <p>The 24-year-old candidly told <em><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CxRbtJHv_Fx/?img_index=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stellar Magazine</a> </em>that, despite missing him deeply, her family, including her siblings Jackson and Summer, as well as her mother Simone Callinan, have remained close-knit in the wake of the tragedy. </p> <p>"As a family, we've always stuck together. We've always had each other's backs. We're going okay," she told the publication. </p> <p>"Obviously, I miss him and think about him every second – that's never going to change," she continued. </p> <p>"I think we just learn to accept life, that this is our life now, and do the best by him and make him proud... and be positive and enjoy everything. You don't know what's going to happen. </p> <p>"We just had to deal with what comes our way. We do it together, and that's the important thing," she concluded. </p> <p>This comes just days after loved ones took to social media to honour the legendary cricketer on what would've been his 54th birthday.</p> <p>Brooke took to Instagram stories to share a throwback photo of herself and her dad.</p> <p>"Your day King, Happy birthday dad," she captioned the photo posted on Wednesday the 13th with a love heart. </p> <p>Another photo showed her indulging in a few of her dad's favourite snacks  including potato scallops, a donut, lollies and a bag of Musk sticks. </p> <p>"Birthday lunch for dad. All his faves," she captioned. </p> <p>Shane's son, Jackson also took to Instagram to honour his late dad, with a video about how he planned to mark the day. </p> <p>“Today would have been dad’s 54th birthday – happy birthday dad,” he said in the clip.</p> <p>“And I thought instead of being sad or posting a story in black and white with a big caption with things that are quite obvious, I’m going to do what dad would have wanted me to do which is be happy and do things that make me happy."</p> <p>He then listed three things that he used to do with his dad including getting Maccas, watching <em>Two and a Half Men, </em>and playing roulette.</p> <p>“Roulette is on par for me and dad with poker and we just loved cheering on a 23 for a spin. So we’ll go downstairs and see if we can hit a 23. Happy birthday dad," he concluded his video. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CxH4e_BRaca/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CxH4e_BRaca/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Jackson Warne (@jacksonwarne18)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Shane's younger daughter Summer honoured her late dad with another throwback picture posted on Instagram stories with the caption: "Happy Birthday Dad. I love and miss you more than words can describe ❤️" </p> <p>This is the second birthday the family have had to endure without Shane, who passed away while on holiday in Thailand.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Does running water really trigger the urge to pee? Experts explain the brain-bladder connection

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/james-overs-1458017">James Overs</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-homewood-1458022">David Homewood</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/melbourne-health-950">Melbourne Health</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/helen-elizabeth-oconnell-ao-1458226">Helen Elizabeth O'Connell AO</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/simon-robert-knowles-706104">Simon Robert Knowles</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p>We all know that feeling when nature calls – but what’s far less understood is the psychology behind it. Why, for example, do we get the urge to pee just before getting into the shower, or when we’re swimming? What brings on those “nervous wees” right before a date?</p> <p>Research suggests our brain and bladder are in constant communication with each other via a neural network called the <a href="https://www.einj.org/journal/view.php?doi=10.5213/inj.2346036.018">brain-bladder axis</a>.</p> <p>This complex web of circuitry is comprised of sensory neural activity, including the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. These neural connections allow information to be sent <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12123119">back and forth</a> between the brain and bladder.</p> <p>The brain-bladder axis not only facilitates the act of peeing, but is also responsible for telling us we need to go in the first place.</p> <h2>How do we know when we need to go?</h2> <p>As the bladder fills with urine and expands, this activates special receptors detecting stretch in the nerve-rich lining of the bladder wall. This information is then relayed to the “periaqueductal gray” – a part of the brain in the brainstem which <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nrn2401">constantly monitors</a> the bladder’s filling status.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=454&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=454&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=454&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=570&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=570&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/547931/original/file-20230913-19-2kgkhk.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=570&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><span class="caption">The periaqueductal gray is a section of gray matter located in the midbrain section of the brainstem.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brainstem#/media/File:1311_Brain_Stem.jpg">Wikimedia/OpenStax</a>, <a class="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/">CC BY-SA</a></span></figcaption></figure> <p>Once the bladder reaches a certain threshold (roughly 250-300ml of urine), another part of the brain called the “pontine micturition centre” is activated and signals that the bladder needs to be emptied. We, in turn, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16254993/">register this</a> as that all-too-familiar feeling of fullness and pressure down below.</p> <p>Beyond this, however, a range of situations can trigger or exacerbate our need to pee, by increasing the production of urine and/or stimulating reflexes in the bladder.</p> <h2>Peeing in the shower</h2> <p>If you’ve ever felt the need to pee while in the shower (no judgement here) it may be due to the sight and sound of running water.</p> <p>In a 2015 study, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0126798">researchers demonstrated</a> that males with urinary difficulties found it easier to initiate peeing when listening to the sound of running water being played on a smartphone.</p> <p>Symptoms of overactive bladder, including urgency (a sudden need to pee), have also been <a href="https://www.alliedacademies.org/articles/environmental-cues-to-urgency-and-incontinence-episodes-in-chinesepatients-with-overactive-urinary-bladder-syndrome.html">linked to</a> a range of environmental cues involving running water, including washing your hands and taking a shower.</p> <p>This is likely due to both physiology and psychology. Firstly, the sound of running water may have a relaxing <em>physiological</em> effect, increasing activity of the parasympathetic nervous system. This would relax the bladder muscles and prepare the bladder for emptying.</p> <p>At the same time, the sound of running water may also have a conditioned <em>psychological</em> effect. Due to the countless times in our lives where this sound has coincided with the actual act of peeing, it may trigger an instinctive reaction in us to urinate.</p> <p>This would happen in the same way <a href="https://www.simplypsychology.org/pavlov.html">Pavlov’s dog learnt</a>, through repeated pairing, to salivate when a bell was rung.</p> <h2>Cheeky wee in the sea</h2> <p>But it’s not just the sight or sound of running water that makes us want to pee. Immersion in cold water has been shown to cause a “cold shock response”, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19945970">which activates</a> the sympathetic nervous system.</p> <p>This so-called “fight or flight” response drives up our blood pressure which, in turn, causes our kidneys to filter out more fluid from the bloodstream to stabilise our blood pressure, in a process called “<a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00864230">immersion diuresis</a>”. When this happens, our bladder fills up faster than normal, triggering the urge to pee.</p> <p>Interestingly, immersion in very warm water (such as a relaxing bath) may also increase urine production. In this case, however, it’s due to activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s004210050065">One study</a> demonstrated an increase in water temperature from 40℃ to 50℃ reduced the time it took for participants to start urinating.</p> <p>Similar to the effect of hearing running water, the authors of the study suggest being in warm water is calming for the body and activates the parasympathetic nervous system. This activation can result in the relaxation of the bladder and possibly the pelvic floor muscles, bringing on the urge to pee.</p> <h2>The nervous wee</h2> <p>We know stress and anxiety can cause bouts of nausea and butterflies in the tummy, but what about the bladder? Why do we feel a sudden and frequent urge to urinate at times of heightened stress, such as before a date or job interview?</p> <p>When a person becomes stressed or anxious, the body goes into fight-or-flight mode through the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. This triggers a cascade of physiological changes designed to prepare the body to face a perceived threat.</p> <p>As part of this response, the muscles surrounding the bladder may contract, leading to a more urgent and frequent need to pee. Also, as is the case during immersion diuresis, the increase in blood pressure associated with the stress response may <a href="https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI102496">stimulate</a> the kidneys to produce more urine.</p> <h2>Some final thoughts</h2> <p>We all pee (most of us several times a day). Yet <a href="https://doi.org/10.5489/cuaj.1150">research has shown</a> about 75% of adults know little about how this process actually works – and even less about the brain-bladdder axis and its role in urination.</p> <p><a href="https://www.continence.org.au/about-us/our-work/key-statistics-incontinence#:%7E:text=Urinary%20incontinence%20affects%20up%20to,38%25%20of%20Australian%20women1.">Most Australians</a> will experience urinary difficulties at some point in their lives, so if you ever have concerns about your urinary health, it’s extremely important to consult a healthcare professional.</p> <p>And should you ever find yourself unable to pee, perhaps the sight or sound of running water, a relaxing bath or a nice swim will help with getting that stream to flow.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/210808/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/james-overs-1458017"><em>James Overs</em></a><em>, Research Assistant, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-homewood-1458022">David Homewood</a>, Urology Research Registrar, Western Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/melbourne-health-950">Melbourne Health</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/helen-elizabeth-oconnell-ao-1458226">Helen Elizabeth O'Connell AO</a>, Professor, University of Melbourne, Department of Surgery. President Urological Society Australia and New Zealand, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/simon-robert-knowles-706104">Simon Robert Knowles</a>, Associate Professor and Clinical Psychologist, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/does-running-water-really-trigger-the-urge-to-pee-experts-explain-the-brain-bladder-connection-210808">original article</a>.</em></p>

Mind

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Why is a messy house such an anxiety trigger for me and what can I do about it?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/erika-penney-1416241">Erika Penney</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-technology-sydney-936">University of Technology Sydney</a></em></p> <p>Do you ever feel overwhelmed by the sight of clutter and mess in your home? Have you walked in the door only to feel overloaded by scattered papers, unwashed dishes and clothes in disarray? Maybe you’ve even had arguments because it bothers you more than it bothers you partner or housemates.</p> <p>You’re not alone. Many people report a messy house can trigger feelings of <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0146167209352864">stress</a> and <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272494421000062?via%3Dihub">anxiety</a>.</p> <p>So why do clutter and chaos make some of us feel so overwhelmed? Here’s what the research says – and what you can do about it.</p> <h2>Cognitive overload</h2> <p>When we’re surrounded by distractions, our brains essentially become <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21228167/">battlegrounds</a> for attention. Everything competes for our focus.</p> <p>But the brain, as it turns out, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1994-43838-001">prefers</a> order and “<a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2015.00086/full%22%22">singletasking</a>” over multitasking.</p> <p>Order helps reduce the competition for our attention and reduces mental load. While some people might be better than others at <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/full/10.1073/pnas.1523471113">ignoring distractions</a>, distractable environments can overload our cognitive capabilities and memory.</p> <p>Clutter, disorder and mess can affect more than just our cognitive resources. They’re also linked to our <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23907542/">eating</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0360132318307157?via=ihub">productivity</a>, mental health, <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15374424jccp3401_9">parenting</a> decisions and even our willingness to donate <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23907542/">money</a>.</p> <h2>Are women more affected than men?</h2> <p>Research suggests the detrimental effects of mess and clutter may be more pronounced in women than in men.</p> <p>One <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167209352864">study</a> of 60 dual-income couples found women living in cluttered and stressful homes had higher levels of cortisol (a <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19596045/#:%7E:text=After%2520controlling%2520for%2520the%2520individual,and%2520poor%2520self-rated%2520health.">hormone</a> associated with stress) and heightened depression symptoms.</p> <p>These effects remained consistent even when factors like marital satisfaction and personality traits were taken into account. In contrast, the men in this study seemed largely unaffected by the state of their home environments.</p> <p>The researchers theorised that women may feel a greater responsibility for maintaining the home. They also suggested the social aspect of the study (which involved giving home tours) may have induced more fear of judgement among women than men.</p> <p>We will all live with clutter and disorganisation to some degree in our lives. Sometimes, however, significant clutter problems can be linked to underlying mental health conditions such as <a href="https://beyondocd.org/information-for-individuals/symptoms/ocd-related-hoarding#:%7E:text=Examples%20of%20hoarding%20in%20the,are%20not%20needed%20any%20more">obsessive-compulsive disorder</a>, <a href="https://beyondocd.org/information-for-individuals/symptoms/ocd-related-hoarding#:%7E:text=Examples%20of%20hoarding%20in%20the,are%20not%20needed%20any%20more">hoarding disorder</a>, <a href="https://psychcentral.com/depression/messy-room-depression#does-it-exacerbate-symptoms">major depressive disorder</a>, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0005796704000531">attention deficit hyperactivity disorder</a>, and <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0887618510001647">anxiety disorders</a>.</p> <p>This raises a crucial question: which came first? For some, clutter is the source of anxiety and distress; for others, poor mental health is the source of disorganisation and clutter.</p> <h2>Not all mess is a problem</h2> <p>It’s important to remember clutter isn’t all bad, and we shouldn’t aim for perfection. Real homes don’t look like the ones in magazines.</p> <p>In fact, disorganised spaces can result in increased <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23907542/">creativity</a> and elicit fresh insights.</p> <p>Living in constant disorder isn’t productive, but striving for perfectionism in cleanliness can also be counterproductive. Perfectionism itself is associated with feeling overwhelmed, anxiety and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28026869/">poor mental health</a>.</p> <h2>Mess makes me anxious so what can I do about it?</h2> <p>It’s important to remember you have some agency over what matters to you and how you want to prioritise your time.</p> <p>One approach is to try to reduce the clutter. You might, for example, have a dedicated de-cluttering session every week. This may involve hiring a cleaner (if you can afford it) or playing some music or a podcast while tidying up for an hour with your other household members.</p> <p>Establishing this routine can reduce clutter distractions, ease your overall mental load and alleviate worry that clutter will spiral out of control.</p> <p>You can also try micro-tidying. If don’t have time for a complete cleanup, commit just five minutes to clearing one small space.</p> <p>If the clutter is primarily caused by other household members, try to calmly discuss with them how this mess is affecting your mental health. See if your kids, your partner or housemates can negotiate some boundaries as a household over what level of mess is acceptable and how it will be handled if that threshold is exceeded.</p> <p>It can also help to develop a self-compassionate mindset.</p> <p>Mess doesn’t define whether you are a “good” or “bad” person and, at times, it may even stimulate your <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23907542/">creativity</a>. Remind yourself that you deserve success, meaningful relationships and happiness, whether or not your office, home or car is a mess.</p> <p>Take comfort in <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0013916516628178">research</a> suggesting that while disorganised environments can make us susceptible to stress and poor decision-making, your mindset can buffer you against these vulnerabilities.</p> <p>If clutter, perfectionism or anxiety has begun to seem unmanageable, talk with your GP about a referral to a <a href="https://psychology.org.au/psychology/about-psychology/what-is-psychology">psychologist</a>. The right psychologist (and you may need to try a few before you find the right one) can help you cultivate a life driven by values that are important to you.</p> <p>Clutter and mess are more than just visual nuisances. They can have a profound impact on mental wellbeing, productivity and our choices.</p> <p>Understanding why clutter affects you can empower you to take control of your mindset, your living spaces and, in turn, your life.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/211684/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/erika-penney-1416241">Erika Penney</a>, Lecturer in Clinical Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-technology-sydney-936">University of Technology Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-is-a-messy-house-such-an-anxiety-trigger-for-me-and-what-can-i-do-about-it-211684">original article</a>.</em></p>

Mind

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What does financial abuse really look like?

<p>Sally is in her 20s, lives in a dilapidated rental home and works three jobs. Fifty-something Sarah owns a large home, drives a Mercedes and is a corporate executive. Pensioner Scott, in his mid-70s, still lives in the home in which he and his late wife raised their children. Who would you say is more vulnerable to financial abuse?</p> <p>The answer, you may be surprised to learn, is all three. Financial abuse, according to the government’s <a href="https://moneysmart.gov.au/living-in-retirement/financial-abuse">MoneySmart</a>, is a type of family and domestic violence:</p> <p>“It often happens alongside other types of violence, such as physical or emotional abuse. It can leave you feeling vulnerable, isolated, depressed and anxious. It can also take away your independence.”</p> <p>Commonly a spouse or partner is the perpetrator, but it can come from any relative or friend. A <a href="https://www.commbank.com.au/content/dam/caas/newsroom/docs/Cost%2520of%2520financial%2520abuse%2520in%2520Australia.pdf">2022 Commonwealth Bank report</a> suggests over 623,000 Australians experienced financial abuse in 2020 alone – roughly one in 30 women and one in 50 men. Anyone – regardless of age, wealth etc. – can be a victim. </p> <p><strong>Financial abuse has many faces</strong></p> <p>Just as finances are complex, so too is financial abuse, which can be viewed from many angles:</p> <ul> <li>Couples: One partner controls everything money related. I know of one instance where a woman’s partner went so far as counting coffee pods; another checked car mileage to stop his partner driving further than school drop-offs.</li> <li>Exes: Not working specifically to avoid paying child support; withholding information to delay settlement; bullying into a menial settlement.</li> <li>Multi-generations: Children or grandchildren milking elderly relatives; seizing control over their finances and living arrangements.</li> <li>Non-relatives: Such as friends buying property together without properly documenting everything, then fighting come sale time.</li> <li>Business relationships: Duped signatures on trust and business documents; hiding debts; impeding or undervaluing someone’s exit.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Warning signs </strong></p> <p>There are common warning signs that you, or someone you know, is suffering financial abuse:</p> <ul> <li>Pressure to make decisions: to invest your money or superannuation in crazy things that go bust, or to do nothing and not keep up with inflation (let alone grow your wealth), go guarantor on a loan, or sign power of attorney.</li> <li>Draining money: using your money to fund their business or investment on the promise a return is coming that never does (which could be poor management or deliberate deceit). This could continue for years until you’re left homeless and bankrupt.</li> <li>Unfair claims: your partner came into the relationship with nothing and stays just long enough to make a claim on your home.</li> <li>Controlled spending: this may start small (‘Don’t spend so much on clothes!’) but can become extreme. </li> <li>Blackmail: I’ve heard of people denied access to their grandkids unless they gave their son/daughter money or amended their will.</li> <li>Restricted access: you’re denied access to your own or joint finances, from having your own accounts, or are banned from working to earn your own income and superannuation.</li> <li>Tracking: sharing your location by smartphone may sound practical or safe but is open to abuse.</li> <li>Social isolation: cutting you off from friends and family; pressing for an interstate move.</li> <li>Reckless spending: your money is spent haphazardly – you may be kept in the dark or pressured not to ask questions.</li> <li>Tying down: trapping you into a big mortgage to crimp your freedom.</li> <li>Guilting: I have seen wealthy adults guilt their less fortunate parents into paying their bills, and gambling addicts guilt partners into paying their debts (with no intention to address their addiction or plan to pay it back).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Protecting yourself</strong></p> <p>The best prevention of all is to avoid thinking ‘it won’t happen to me’. So many victims of financial abuse once thought exactly the same.</p> <p>Other tips include:</p> <ul> <li>Speak up: Sometimes, starting a conversation can be enough to deliver positive change and even save a relationship (avoiding divorce is cheaper for everyone!)</li> <li>Have an emergency fund – cash only you can access, easily, in a crisis.</li> <li>Keep separate bank accounts – deposit your income here, then transfer money for joint bills into a joint account. </li> <li>Make decisions together – don’t leave money matters to your partner/children. It’s your money too.</li> <li>Get outside perspective: financial advisers are accountable to you as their client and help provide visibility over your assets, liabilities and risks. Ensure they are qualified and currently practicing.</li> </ul> <p>If you think you may be a victim of financial abuse, I beg you – seek help immediately. Suffering in silence and letting the situation snowball is the costliest thing you can do. Both financially and emotionally!</p> <p><a href="http://www.lifeline.org.au/">Lifeline - </a>13 11 14</p> <p><a href="https://www.1800respect.org.au/">1800RESPECT - </a>1800 737 732</p> <p><a href="https://www.familyrelationships.gov.au/talk-someone/advice-line">Family Relationship Advice Line - </a>1800 050 32</p> <p><a href="https://goodshep.org.au/">Good Shepherd Australia Financial Independence Hub  - </a>1300 050 150</p> <p><a href="http://www.ndh.org.au/">National Debt Helpline - </a>1800 007 007</p> <p><strong><em>Helen Baker is a licensed Australian financial adviser and author of the new book, On Your Own Two Feet: The Essential Guide to Financial Independence for all Women (Ventura Press, $32.99). Helen is among the 1% of financial planners who hold a master’s degree in the field. Proceeds from book sales are donated to charities supporting disadvantaged women and children. Find out more at <a href="http://www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au">www.onyourowntwofeet.com.au</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Money & Banking

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Julie Bishop’s warning over the Voice result

<p dir="ltr">Julie Bishop has warned that if the Voice to Parliament results in a “no” vote, it could send a “very negative message” to the rest of the world. </p> <p dir="ltr">The former foreign minister said that the Voice was an opportunity to “get things right” for Indigenous Australians. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We’ve done a great deal of research and analysis on the Uluru Statement from the Heart, the Yes campaign, the referendum, and we believe that this is an opportunity to get things right,” she told a Yes campaign event in Perth on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bishop was then quizzed about what a “no” vote would mean for Australia's international reputation, to which she said she was “most concerned at the message” it would send to our global friends. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s not a front-of-mind issue for most people, but I know that Australia’s international reputation can be affected by a No vote,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have no doubt that it would be sending a very negative message about the openness, and the empathy, and the respect and responsibility that the Australian people have for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The Voice referendum, like any Australian referendum, requires both a national majority and a majority in at least four of the six states in order to pass. </p> <p dir="ltr">Reports have suggested that support for the “Yes” campaign is slipping in Western Australia, hence Bishop’s appearance in Perth which was followed by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s appearance on a local radio station. </p> <p dir="ltr">Albo described the Voice as “just an advisory group so that people can listen to what Indigenous people have to say about programs that affect their lives.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“That is all this is about, so as to get better results,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The constitutional change is really straightforward, recognition, listening through a voice in order to get better results. It won’t change the way that parliament functions, it won’t have a right of veto.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Albanese will announce the date of the referendum at a campaign event in Adelaide on Wednesday, with reports suggesting it will be held on October 14th. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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“Take official warnings seriously”: Aussies warned to not travel to surprising destination

<p dir="ltr">Australian travellers have been urged to exercise caution if they are planning to visit a popular Scandinavian tourist destination. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade have warned Aussies to use “a high degree of caution in Sweden due to the threat of terrorism” in its official travel advisory for the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">The warning comes as Sweden has the country has seen a surge in racial and religious tensions, with violence escalating after anti-Islam activists publicly burned and damaged copies of the Islamic sacred text, the Quran.</p> <p dir="ltr">As a result of the violence, Australia's official <a href="https://www.smartraveller.gov.au/destinations/europe/sweden" target="_blank" rel="noopener">SmartTraveller website</a> has placed the Scandinavian country on a Level Two alert, which means visitors need to be more cautious than normal.</p> <p dir="ltr">The warning does not include urging travellers to reconsider a trip or being told not to go to a destination. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You should maintain a high level of vigilance in public spaces,” the website says.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Since the beginning of 2023, there's been an increase in public burnings of the Quran, which has led to a deterioration in the security situation.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“The Swedish Government has assessed the risk of terrorism as an 'elevated threat', equivalent to a threat level of 3 out of 5.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“This rating means an attack could happen. Take official warnings seriously.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The website offers some further advice to “protect yourself from terrorism”, including avoiding places that could be terrorist targets (such as airports, travel hubs, tourism hotspots and places of worship), avoiding visiting such places at peak times and having “a clear exit plan if there's a security incident”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Travellers are also advised to “consider the level of security around you”, report suspicious items to police, and monitor official advice and media assessments.</p> <p dir="ltr">Australia is not alone in classifying Sweden as a more dangerous country for tourists, as the UK's Home Office has warned terrorist attacks “could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by foreigners”, while the US Department of State says terrorist groups “continue plotting possible attacks in Sweden”.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

International Travel

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"Totally absurd": Ben Fordham rages over Shakespeare content warning

<p>Hold on to your quills, folks, because we've got ourselves a Shakespearean drama fit for the 21st century! It appears that the Bard's timeless works are now under fire at an international university, and our dear radio host, Ben Fordham, is not amused.</p> <p>The talk radio host is taking on an English degree's "content warning" that has been applied to none other than William Shakespeare. That's right: The great bard of yore now comes with a caution label.</p> <p>The University of Wales Trinity Saint David has allowed students studying "Error and Sweet Violence: Shakespeare and Renaissance Comedy and Tragedy" to exit stage left – much like Shakespearean characters fleeing their woes – if the content ever gets too spicy or confrontational.</p> <p>Any student, at any time, is permitted “to leave the class, interrupt their activity or take any measure necessary to take care of their wellbeing without the need for explanation or justification”. </p> <p>And what content in particular are they worried about? The saucy romantic comedy "Twelfth Night", featuring a cross-dressing heroine and more mistaken identities than a masked ball gone wrong. Othello, Measure For Measure, and Coriolanus also make the list of potential "trigger warnings".</p> <p>Fordham couldn't resist taking to the airwaves to voice his disbelief. "So Shakespeare is now the subject of a trigger warning," he proclaimed with a clear mix of humour and disbelief. <span style="color: #343541; font-family: Söhne, ui-sans-serif, system-ui, -apple-system, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Noto Sans', sans-serif, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; white-space-collapse: preserve;">“You can just walk out of class, because university bosses are worried that some snowflakes may find the material too much. </span><span style="color: #343541; font-family: Söhne, ui-sans-serif, system-ui, -apple-system, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Noto Sans', sans-serif, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; white-space-collapse: preserve;">Once upon a time universities challenged students and now they wrap them in cotton wool.”</span></p> <p>In the land of Twelfth Night, Viola dons a disguise to woo the Duke Orsino, but alas, love plays its twisted game, and Olivia falls for the cross-dressing charmer instead. How scandalous! It's like the plot of a Hollywood rom-com but with more ruffles and poetic monologues.</p> <p>“The play features a cross-dressing heroine and in 2023 you would think that wouldn’t raise an eyebrow,” continued Fordham. “But someone wants to protect the students from Shakespeare. Can you believe it?”</p> <p>Also joining the fray was English actress Felicity Kendal, who described the warning as “totally absurd”.</p> <p>“Great art is meant to challenge our senses, our feelings and our prejudices," Kendal said in an interview with the Daily Mail. "We should not be deterring students from engaging with these works."</p> <p><em>Images: Nine Network / Wikimedia Commons</em></p>

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Joh Griggs’ warning following husband’s health scare

<p dir="ltr"><em>Better Homes and Gardens </em>host Johanna Griggs has shared an update after her husband's health scare.</p> <p dir="ltr">Late last year her husband Todd Huggins was diagnosed with a basal cell carcinoma, but the “simple surgery” led to complications which resulted in a bad infection.</p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking to <em>7News</em>, the TV personality provided an update on how her husband is doing and a reminder for all Australians.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He had a skin cancer removed and they didn’t get enough of the margins around it, so when he went back in, he managed to pick up a random infection, which is not uncommon in hospitals,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He absolutely lucked out; it was very hairy stuff for a couple of weeks.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But he’s back, fighting fit, 100 per cent again,” Joh added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Joh looked at the positive side of things despite everything and said that the situation served as a reminder for her to get her skin checked, which she’s now encouraging other Australians to do.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If anything, I think it was an apt time to remind people to go and get their skin checked,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I think that was one of the things during COVID that fell off the radar - people getting breast checks and skin checks, going to the dentist, all the health things that we are usually in the habit of doing regularly.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But during COVID, those health services weren’t as easily available, or people were concerned about going out.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We used to be so vigilant with skin checks because of my background in sport and with health - you didn’t want to miss anything.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But we realised he hadn’t actually gone and had a skin check throughout the duration of COVID,” she revealed the impact of the pandemic on her personal life.</p> <p dir="ltr">Joh spends a lot of her time outdoors, both as part of her job as the host of <em>Better Homes and Gardens</em> and in her everyday life, so the TV personality is taking sun protection more seriously - especially after her husband’s recent health scare.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was a chance to say to people, ‘hey listen, put it back on your agenda and make it a priority’.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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"Possibly carcinogenic to humans": WHO's dire warning over common ingredient

<p dir="ltr">The World Health Organisation (WHO) has called for one of the world’s most popular artificial sweeteners to be declared a possible carcinogen. </p> <p dir="ltr">The push will be led by the WHO’s research team for the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), pitting it against the food industry and regulators.</p> <p dir="ltr">The sweetener, known as Aspartame, is used in products from Coca-Cola diet drinks, such as Diet Coke and Coke Zero, to Mars’ Extra chewing gum and some Snapple drinks.</p> <p dir="ltr">Later this month, the IARC will list Aspartame for the first time as “possibly carcinogenic to humans”</p> <p dir="ltr">The ruling from the IARC has assessed whether the sweetener is hazardous to humans or not, although it does not stipulate how much of the product a person can safely consume. </p> <p dir="ltr">This advice for individual consumers comes from a different organisation, known as JECFA (the Joint WHO and Food and Agriculture Organisation’s Expert Committee on Food Additives), who make consumption guidelines alongside national regulators. </p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the claims from the WHO, since as early as 1981 JECFA has said aspartame is safe to consume within accepted daily limits.</p> <p dir="ltr">An adult weighing 60kg would have to drink between 12 and 36 cans of diet soft drink, depending on the amount of aspartame in the beverage, every day to be at risk.</p> <p dir="ltr">Its view has been widely shared by national regulators, including in the United States and Europe.</p> <p dir="ltr">These conflicting reports have angered some regulators and consumers alike, with Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare official Nozomi Tomita writing to the WHO, “kindly asking both bodies to coordinate their efforts in reviewing aspartame to avoid any confusion or concerns among the public.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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“Turn your phone off”: The simple reason behind Albanese’s warning

<p>Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has issued a clear warning to the public, advising them to "turn their phones off" as a safety measure to avoid potential dangers.</p> <p>Albanese delivered this cautionary message last week while announcing the appointment of Australia's first national cybersecurity coordinator, Air Commander Darren Goldie of the Royal Australian Air Force.</p> <p>Goldie was quick to echo the Prime Minister's sentiments, emphasising the importance of mobilising both the private sector and consumers in the fight against cyber threats.</p> <p>"We all bear responsibility in this matter. Simple actions, such as turning off your phone every night for five minutes, can make a significant difference.</p> <p>"I encourage everyone watching to adopt this practice once every 24 hours, perhaps while engaging in daily routines like brushing your teeth," stated Albanese during the press conference.</p> <p>While rebooting your device on a daily basis may seem like a basic precaution, it can greatly enhance your protection against cybercriminals. Often, various applications and processes continue running in the background of your phone or computer, even when you're not actively using them.</p> <p>If unauthorised individuals gain access to these apps and processes, they can monitor your activities and collect your data, including financial information and identification documents, and even hijack your webcam or phone camera.</p> <p>By rebooting your phone, you force the closure of all background applications and processes, effectively evicting anyone attempting to track your virtual movements.</p> <p>Priyadarsi Nanda, a cybersecurity expert at the University of Technology Sydney, supported Albanese's advice, emphasising the importance of periodically turning off one's phone.</p> <p>"Considering how extensively we use smartphones in our daily lives, there have been cases where individuals haven't turned off their phones for an entire year," Dr. Nanda told <em>The Guardian</em>.</p> <p>"If there is a malicious process running, switching off the phone breaks the chain. While it may only provide protection while the phone is off, it undoubtedly frustrates potential hackers. Although not foolproof, rebooting can make it more challenging for hackers to compromise your device."</p> <p>It is crucial to note that this measure does not safeguard against all forms of cybercrime. If your password has been stolen or you are being repeatedly and strategically targeted, for example, a simple reboot is unlikely to deter the most persistent hackers.</p> <p><em>Image: Wikimedia / Australian Government</em></p>

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