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"Devastated": Chris Pratt mourns sudden death of longtime friend and stunt double

<p>Superstar of big and small screen Chris Pratt is grieving the death of his longtime friend and former stunt double, Tony McFarr, who was found dead at his home near Orlando, Florida, on Monday. McFarr was 47, and the cause of his death remains undetermined.</p> <p>Pratt and McFarr began their professional relationship on the set of <em>Jurassic World</em> in 2015. Their collaboration continued on <em>Passengers</em>, <em>Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2</em>, and <em>Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom</em>. Over the years, they developed a strong bond that clearly extended beyond their work on screen.</p> <p>In an emotional Instagram tribute on Friday, Pratt expressed his heartbreak over the loss of McFarr. "We did several movies together," Pratt wrote. "We golfed, drank whiskey, smoked cigars, and spent endless hours on set. I'll never forget his toughness."</p> <p>Pratt then recalled a particularly intense moment during the filming of <em>Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2</em> when McFarr suffered a severe head injury but quickly returned to work. "He was an absolute stud. He was always a gentleman and professional. He'll be missed."</p> <p>Pratt concluded his tribute by offering prayers to McFarr's friends and family, especially his daughter. He shared a series of photos showcasing their time together on set, displaying their striking resemblance, particularly when dressed in matching costumes.</p> <p><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2024/05/ChrisPratt_Insta02.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="970" /></p> <p>In addition to doubling for Pratt in several films, McFarr's impressive career included work on other major Marvel productions like <em>Captain America: Civil War</em> and <em>Ant-Man and the Wasp</em>. He also served as Jon Hamm's stunt double in the 2018 action comedy <em>Tag</em>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.tmz.com/2024/05/16/chris-pratt-stunt-double-tony-mcfarr-dead-dies-guardians-of-the-galaxy/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">According to TMZ</a>, McFarr's mother, Donna, reported that "he passed away Monday at his home just outside Orlando -- and while we're told the family doesn't know the exact circumstances of his death just yet ... Donna does say his passing is unexpected and shocking."</p> <p>"She says Tony was active and healthy ... and we're told the medical examiner's office is running toxicology tests now. The Orange County Medical Examiner confirms to us they have the case ... and that an official cause is still pending."</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Hope: A double-edged sword in the human experience

<p>Hope has long been cherished as a source of strength in times of adversity. Yet, as explored in this edited extract from his new book <em>The Human Condition</em> by author Tony Grey, this fundamental emotion is not without its complexities and potential pitfalls.</p> <p>---</p> <p>As in the host of challenges explored in <em>The Human Condition</em>, the feeling of expectation and desire for something beneficial to happen, which we call hope, is as fundamental to the human condition as the will to survive; they’re linked within the evolutionary imperative. As Cicero pointed out, “dum spiro spero” (while I breathe I hope). Hope is a rolling prayer to life as time moves on, a whisper to the soul that things will turn out all right. </p> <p>The sentiment is generally unchallenged. Why should it be? In times of trouble, we need the balm of hope. Samuel Johnson said, “Hope is a species of pleasure, and perhaps, the chief pleasure this world affords.”</p> <p>While usually positive about hope, Greek philosophers were sometimes ambivalent about it, citing its propensity, through wishful thinking, to encourage indolence or actually cause harm. In Sophocles’ play Antigone, the Chorus sings, “Hope whose wanderings are so wide is to many men a comfort, but to many a false lure of giddy desires.” Plato observes that hope breeds a confidence which can exacerbate a precondition of arrogance in the powerful, leading to serious wrongdoing. “It is among these men that we find the ones who do the greatest evils.” </p> <p>Napoleon and Hitler are examples. And so is the Japanese government responsible for the Pearl Harbour attack.  At the World War Two surrender on the deck of the USS Missouri, a Japanese general was heard to say when he looked at the sky blackened by Allied aircraft flying past and the sea bursting with warships, “How did we ever hope we could win?”</p> <p>On the other hand, Plato stressed the motivational properties of hope when directed towards a good aim. And Aristotle links hope with the virtue of megalopsychia (high-mindedness) resulting from its inspirational role.</p> <p>I have an experience of this in my family. My nephew was born to my sister with intellectual disability, and other difficulties. His condition seemed hopeless. Nevertheless, from the first, hope was my sister’s support; it gave her the energy to carry on. Through the gloom it afforded a glimpse into the future where progress beckoned. And all along she demonstrated that hope is ineluctably linked to love.</p> <p>Aided by her husband, the father, she worked day and night teaching and inspiring the boy. When old enough he went to a special needs school and gradually progressed, indefatigably supported at home. Over time his condition improved so that eventually he could take and keep a simple job, cook food, and have friends (similarly disabled), a state absolutely unforeseeable at his early stage of life. Throughout all the difficulties, frustrations and threats of despair, hope sustained my sister and guided her to the wonderful achievement of saving a human life.</p> <p>In most instances, hope is personal in the sense that something specific to the individual or those who are close is wanted. However, it can range far beyond that into areas involving others such as team sports, politics, economic activity, justice, national and tribal identity, international relations – notably war, and pandemics like Covid. Within these fields, hope calls out for the survival and well-being of humanity and its prospects for moral and material progress. Such hope embraces faith in something bigger than the individual. If human beings have a purpose, its linked to that, and its fulfillment is somehow bound up in hope.</p> <p>This approach cries out for exploring a whole array of other challenges inherent in the human condition.</p> <p><strong>ABOUT THE AUTHOR</strong></p> <p>Tony Grey is an accomplished author residing in Sydney. His latest book, <em>The Human Condition</em>, ambitiously explores the hurly burly of human existence, and is available now for purchase through Halstead Press Publishers. Tony is the founder of Pancontinental Mining, a former director of Opera Australia and the Conservatorium of Music, and a former trustee of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Other books by Tony Grey include <em>Jabiluka</em>, <em>East Wind</em> and <em>Seven Gateways</em>. His writings have featured in the <em>Australian</em> <em>Financial Review</em>, <em>Quadrant</em> and the <em>Australian</em>. </p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Mind

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Why "Grey Divorce" is on the rise in Australia

<p>It seems that the older generation is taking a page out of the millennial playbook and saying, "Thanks, but no thanks" to marriage.</p> <p>According to a recent report by <a href="https://www.seniors.com.au/documents/australian-seniors-series-love-after-50-report-whitepaper.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Seniors</a>, the trend of "Grey Divorce" has become so prevalent that one in three couples in Australia decide to call it quits after hitting the big 5-0.</p> <p>It turns out that once the kids have flown the nest, some couples find themselves facing a conundrum. And no, it's not a midlife crisis involving sports cars and questionable hair dye choices. It's the dreaded "empty nest syndrome" – t<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">he sadness and upheaval that parents experience when their adult children finally leave the family home. </span></p> <p>The report clearly highlights that almost half of these later-in-life divorces are triggered by the empty nest syndrome, followed closely by increased financial pressures (35 per cent) and retirement adjustments (34 per cent).</p> <p>But the report also reveals a silver lining. Many singles over 50 are discovering greater happiness and fulfilment in their solo acts. It's like they've found the secret formula for joy, and it doesn't involve a partner – just personal space, independence, financial control, peace and quiet, and less stress. Who needs a spouse when you can have tranquillity and control over the TV remote?</p> <p>In fact, more than half of single people over 50 reported being content without a committed partner, and almost one-third claimed that their relationship status was a positive influence on their happiness. Move over, relationship goals; it's time for solo satisfaction to take centre stage.</p> <p>And for those still treading the murky waters of late-life love, there's hope yet. The report offers some sage advice from those who've managed to keep the spark alive, including open and honest communication about changing needs, supporting personal growth, and maintaining independence.</p> <p>While the report concludes that overall divorce rates in Australia have actually hit an all-time low in recent years, the over-50 crowd appear to be shaking things up and going their own way. So, whether you're contemplating marriage or dealing with an unexpected guest cancellation at your wedding, just remember – there's a 50/50 chance you'll be navigating the exciting world of "Grey Divorce" someday.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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The life-saving item no Grey Nomad should travel without

<p>When General Practitioner Paul Kelly hung up his stethoscope after nearly 40 years of dedicated service, he had a retirement dream shared by many Australians – hitting the open road and exploring the world with his wife, Robyn.</p> <p>However, with a history of heart problems, he was understandably hesitant about venturing far from medical facilities. His concerns were put to rest when a groundbreaking device, <a href="https://cellaed.io/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the CellAED personal defibrillator</a>, became available. Compact enough to fit in the glove box, this innovative device has opened up a world of possibilities for adventurers like Paul and Robyn.</p> <p>In Australia, a staggering 20,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrests outside of hospitals each year. Sadly, only 10% of them survive. The introduction of CellAED, a handheld defibrillator, is changing these grim statistics by providing a lifeline to those in remote areas.</p> <p>Paul and Robyn are enthusiastic members of this country's growing community of grey nomads. According to ABS data, nearly 16 million caravan and camping trips were made last year, with the majority taken by individuals in the age group most at risk of cardiac arrest. Therefore, it's not surprising that an increasing number of travellers, like Paul, are arming themselves with a CellAED as they embark on adventures across the country.</p> <p>Paul attributes the device to giving him the peace of mind and confidence to travel far and wide. In the past year alone, he has spent over four months caravanning along the picturesque Murray River, explored the coastlines of New South Wales and Victoria, and even managed a European holiday to France. With no intention of slowing down, Paul's trusted travel companion, the handheld defibrillator, has granted him the freedom to explore the heart of Australia without constant worry.</p> <p>"Hopefully, we'll never have reason to use it," Paul says, "but it sure takes the stress out of wondering what we'd do in an emergency."</p> <p>The CellAED defibrillator was developed by the Australian startup, Rapid Response Revival. This groundbreaking device is a game-changer because it's more affordable, portable and easier to use than conventional Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs).</p> <p>Luke Starr, a spokesman for CellAED, emphasised the importance of addressing the issue of cardiac arrests in remote areas. He noted, "A key reason why so few survive sudden cardiac arrest is because help is too far away or too slow. CellAED was created to tackle that problem.</p> <p>"Travelling with a CellAED personal defibrillator isn't just about looking after yourself. It's about giving your traveling companions and the people you meet along the way a fighting chance if the unthinkable happens. Sudden cardiac arrest is survivable if it's witnessed by someone who knows what to do," Starr added.</p> <p>Starr further advised, "One of the best gifts you can give your travelling companions is learning how to recognise cardiac arrest and what to do if it happens. If someone has collapsed, is unresponsive, and isn't breathing normally, call emergency services, start CPR, and get a defibrillator onto their bare chest. If you can do this within the first couple of minutes of an arrest, you'll be giving the patient their best chances of survival."</p> <p>The CellAED invention aims to offer more people the opportunity to survive cardiac arrest without relying on sheer luck. With CPR training and a CellAED handy, individuals are prepared to save lives from cardiac arrest wherever they go.</p> <p>The groundbreaking invention comes after new research pointed towards alarming statistics about heart conditions in Australia, revealing that people living in regional, rural, or remote areas are 90% more likely to die from heart conditions caused by high blood pressure than their urban counterparts. The Heart of Inequality report from the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research (MMIHR) at ACU underscores the stark disparities in heart disease outcomes across Australia, particularly affecting regional and Indigenous communities.</p> <p>Key findings from the report include the continuous increase in the burden of chronic heart disease, with hundreds of thousands of hospital admissions for heart-related conditions among Australians aged 35 and over. Moreover, Indigenous Australians living in remote areas develop heart failure on average 20 years earlier than the general population.</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">So, as Australians continue to explore this vast and varied country, lifesaving innovations like the CellAED defibrillator are playing an increasingly crucial role in ensuring the safety and well-being of adventurers, particularly those in remote areas. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Images: CellAED</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Tony Bennett: the timeless visionary who, with a nod to America’s musical heritage, embraced the future

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jose-valentino-ruiz-1293457">Jose Valentino Ruiz</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-florida-1392">University of Florida</a></em></p> <p>In the history of American popular music, there have been few luminaries as enduring and innovative as Tony Bennett.</p> <p>With a career that spanned almost 80 years, Bennett’s smooth tones, unique phrasing and visionary musical collaborations left an indelible mark on vocal jazz and the recording industry as a whole.</p> <p>That his <a href="https://apnews.com/article/tony-bennett-dies-c3b3a7e2360449fb936a38794c7c3266">death at the age of 96</a> on July 21, 2023, was mourned by artists as varied as <a href="https://twitter.com/KeithUrban/status/1682395658395824133">Keith Urban</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/OzzyOsbourne/status/1682411338340126720">Ozzy Osbourne</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/HarryConnickJR?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1682411086656557056%7Ctwgr%5E04a78435a793b5246d7bc19e09529f2b2f0bcfab%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&amp;ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fvariety.com%2F2023%2Fmusic%2Fnews%2Ftony-bennett-elton-john-reaction-tribute-1235676405%2F">Harry Connick Jr.</a> should come as no surprise. Yes, Bennett was a jazz crooner. But if his voice was always a constant – even late into his 80s, way past an age when most other singers have seen their vocal abilities diminish – then his embrace of the contemporary was every bit a facet of Bennett’s appeal.</p> <h2>Vocal innovator</h2> <p>Bennett’s journey is a testament to the power of daring innovation.</p> <p>From the early days of his career in the 1950s to his final recordings in the early 2020s, he fearlessly explored new musical territories, revolutionizing vocal jazz and captivating audiences across generations.</p> <p>His vocal style and phrasing were distinctive and set him apart from other artists of his time. He utilized a delayed or “laid-back” approach to falling on the note, a technique known as “<a href="https://www.musictheoryacademy.com/how-to-read-sheet-music/rubato/">rubato</a>.” This created a sense of anticipation in his phrasing, adding an element of surprise to his performances. Through Bennett’s skilled use of rubato, he was able to play with the tempo and rhythm of a song, bending and stretching musical phrases to evoke a range of emotions. This subtle manipulation of timing gave his songs a natural and conversational quality, making listeners feel as though he was intimately sharing his stories with them.</p> <p>Armed with this silky, playful voice, Bennett found fame fairly early on in his career, delivering jazz standards alongside the likes of Mel Tormé and Nat King Cole. By the mid-1960s, he was being touted by Frank Sinatra as “the best singer in the business.”</p> <p>But his musical style fell out of fashion in the 1970s – a lean period during which Bennett <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2023/07/21/tony-bennett-son-life-career-drugs/">almost succumbed to a drug overdose</a>. Then, in the 1990s, Bennett found a new audience and set off a series of collaborations with contemporary musical stars that would become the standard for his later career.</p> <p>No genre of artistry was deemed off-limits for Bennett. “<a href="https://www.tonybennett.com/music-detail.php?id=11">Duets: An American Classic</a>,” released to coincide with his 80th birthday in 2006, saw collaborations with country stars such as k.d. lang and the Dixie Chicks – now known as the Chicks – and soul legend Stevie Wonder, alongside kindred jazz spirits such as Diana Krall. “Duets II,” a 2011 follow-up, saw further explorations with the likes of Aretha Franklin, Queen Latifah, Willie Nelson and Amy Winehouse, in what would become the <a href="https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/amy-winehouse-final-recording-session/">British singer’s last recording</a>.</p> <p>But his cross-generational, cross-genre and cross-cultural appeal is perhaps best exemplified by his <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/07/21/arts/music/tony-bennett-lady-gaga.html">collaborations with Lady Gaga</a>, first on the 2014 Grammy-winning album “Cheek to Cheek.” The recording brought together two artists from different generations, genres and backgrounds, uniting them in a harmonious celebration of jazz classics. The collaboration not only showcased each one’s vocal prowess, but also sent a powerful message about the unifying nature of music.</p> <p>Lady Gaga, a pop artist with avant-garde leanings, might have seemed an unlikely partner for Bennett, the quintessential jazz crooner. Yet their musical chemistry and mutual admiration resulted in an album that mesmerized audiences worldwide. “Cheek to Cheek” effortlessly transcended musical boundaries, while the duo’s magnetic stage presence and undeniable talent enchanted listeners.</p> <p>The successful fusion of jazz and pop encouraged artists to experiment beyond traditional boundaries, leading to more cross-genre projects across the industry – proving that such projects could go beyond one-off novelties, and be profitable at that.</p> <h2>Timeless artistry</h2> <p>Bennett’s embrace of contemporary artists did not mean that he abandoned his own musical self. By blending traditional jazz with contemporary elements, he managed to captivate audiences across generations, appealing to both longtime fans and new listeners.</p> <p>One key aspect of Bennett’s success was his ability to embody the sentiment of old America, reminiscent of artists like Sinatra, Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong, while infusing contemporary nuances that resonated with the human condition of a more modern era. His approach to music captured both the essence and struggle of America, giving his songs a timeless and universal appeal. Moreover, his voice conveyed familiarity and comfort, akin to listening to a beloved uncle.</p> <p>Bennett’s albums stood out not only for his soulful voice and impeccable delivery but also for the way he drew others from varied musical backgrounds into his world of jazz sensibilities. As a producer, he recognized the importance of nurturing creativity and bringing out the best in artists.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Bennett’s approach to evolving his own sound while preserving its essence sets him apart as an artist. Fearless in his pursuit of innovation, he delved into contemporary musical elements and collaborated with producers to infuse new sonic dimensions into his later albums. The result drew listeners into an <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kNpdLZwetU">intimate and immersive, concert-like acoustic journey</a>.</p> <h2>Depth of emotion</h2> <p>The greats in music have an ability to speak to the human experience. And either in collaboration with others or on his own, Bennett was able to achieve this time and time again.</p> <p>His albums were successful not only due to their technical brilliance and musicality but also because Bennett’s voice conveyed a depth of emotion that transcended barriers of time and culture, touching the hearts of listeners from various backgrounds. There was a universality in his music that made him a beloved and revered artist across the globe.</p> <p>Bennett’s life spanned decades of societal upheavals in the United States. But in his music, listeners could always find beauty in challenging times. And as the 20th- and 21st-century American music industry went through its own revolutions, Bennett’s artistic evolution mirrored the changes, cementing his place as a music icon who defies the boundaries of time and trends.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/210244/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><iframe style="border-radius: 12px;" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/playlist/2UxxnhUE5YLchYgutxKEbJ?utm_source=generator" width="100%" height="380" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" loading="lazy"></iframe></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jose-valentino-ruiz-1293457">Jose Valentino Ruiz</a>, Program Director of Music Business &amp; Entrepreneurship, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-florida-1392">University of Florida</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/tony-bennett-the-timeless-visionary-who-with-a-nod-to-americas-musical-heritage-embraced-the-future-210244">original article</a>.</em></p>

Music

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Embrace grey hair with our simple healthy hair tips

<p>While in the past going grey may have been seen as a negative of the ageing process, today women are embracing this as a stamp of wisdom. And why not? It’s en vogue and can look really attractive too. Thank goodness the days of “having” to hide your natural colour are gone! But just because you’re going natural, doesn’t mean there’s no effort involved. Knowing how to care for and style your grey locks is key and can make all the difference between “stylish and sixty-plus” and “stuffy and sixty-plus”. Read on for our top tips and tricks for healthy, happy hair.</p> <p><strong>Focus on your cut</strong> – A great cut is essential for any hair colour but especially for grey hair. Chances are good that you may have been dyeing your hair in the months/years leading up to embracing grey… so a decent chop may increase the health and vitality of your locks. Speak to your hairdresser about a style that suits both your face shape and lifestyle.</p> <p><strong>Swap your shampoo</strong> – Grey hair is far more prone to breakage and can also become quite dry and coarse. Ensuring that you’re using a moisturising shampoo at every wash can help keep strands in good condition.</p> <p><strong>Condition well</strong> – If you’ve been wary of conditioner in the past due to your hair being on the oily side, now is the time to become friendly again. Conditioning with a moisturising formula is essential after every shampoo. If you’re still nervous about hair becoming oily, you can try a shampoo for “normal” hair, which will nourish without weighing hair down.</p> <p><strong>Treat yourself to an at-home treatment</strong> – Once a fortnight, treat your hair with a shampoo specifically formulated for grey hair. After washing and conditioning, apply a clear colour glaze or gloss which is designed to coat the cuticle, boosting shine and general vitality.</p> <p><strong>Take care when styling</strong> – As it’s prone to dryness and breakage, applying a thermal protectant to your hair before heat styling is a great way to prevent damage from occurring. Simply comb through hair and style as normal. It’s also a good idea to try and have a day or two off a week from using your hairdryer/hot implements to give hair a good break.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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10 best tips for gracefully growing out grey hair

<h2>Pro tips that make going grey so much better</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">There’s no avoiding it. At some point, you will have to deal with grey hair. Of course, how you deal with it is up to you. Some women start growing out grey hair as soon as it begins to appear. Others begin their journey by pulling out greys and then spend years dyeing it before deciding it’s too much of a hassle to do the constant cover-up. Even if you’ve found the <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/beauty/how-to-find-the-best-hair-colour-for-your-skin-tone" target="_blank" rel="noopener">best hair colour for your skin tone</a>, having to touch up your roots every four to six weeks can get old. No matter what your path is, going grey isn’t for the faint of heart.</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">“Many women find it challenging to grow out grey hair,” says hairstylist Krysta Biancone. “This is because it usually occurs gradually, so the transition from natural hair colour to grey hair is not easy.”</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">But it’s not all doom and gloom when it comes to going grey. In fact, it can be incredibly empowering, liberating and downright gorgeous when you make it to the finish line, and it can even make you look younger. But first, there are a few things you need to know. We asked top hairstylists around the country to divulge their best tips for making this transition as easy as possible.</p> <h2>Add highlights</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">It might sound counterintuitive, but adding subtle colour can make the transition to grey more seamless. “When you first decide you’re nearly ready to go natural, a step in the right direction would be to start going lighter. That way, the roots grow in a little more gracefully,” says hair stylist and colourist, Kali Ferrara. “This can be done easily by a skilled colourist, with a lighter base colour in conjunction with highlights.”</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">One word of warning: steer clear of warmer colours like reds and strawberry blondes when growing out grey hair. Ferrara says these hues could backfire and show even more contrast with your roots.</p> <h2>Go a little darker</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">On the flip side, you could choose lowlights. But instead of adding a shade that’s slightly darker (which is normally what you’d do with lowlights), try to match your non-grey hair colour. This will help blend without adding a brand-new shade to the mix. “Lowlights create some contrast and will give hair a more salt-and-pepper look that can be very becoming,” says celebrity hairstylist Gina Rivera. Just be sure not to go darker than your hair colour, says Rivera. Doing so can create too much contrast and bring more attention to the fact that you are transitioning to grey, which won’t look good in photos or in real life.</p> <h2>Chop it off</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Ready for a big change? Ferrara recommends growing your roots as long as you possibly can and then getting a super-short haircut to get rid of all the leftover colour. How short you go is totally up to you. A pixie cut can be chic and low-maintenance, but if you’ve never had short hair, that could be too big of a change. A short bob looks good on just about anyone, so that may be your best bet, though a stylist will be able to help you determine just how short will be flattering for your face shape. In general, slimmer faces tend to look great with hair that hits just under the jawbone, while fuller faces may want to go slightly longer (think a few centimetres below the jaw).</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">“While this can be a dramatic change, it can also be just the new look you may be looking for!” Ferrara says. “Think of your natural hair colour as a new adventure – a new, liberated you.”</p> <h2>Cover roots as they grow in</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">If you’re growing out grey hair but your roots are driving you nuts, there are a few ways you can hide them. One easy solution is to cover them with a headband, hat or chic scarf. Another option is root spray or powder. “These products can mask the roots very effectively,” says master stylist Lorrene Conino. “Just spray the exposed areas after you style your hair.”</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Just shake the bottle well, hold it about 15 centimetres from your roots and spritz it on. These products offer instant coverage on grey hair without an expensive trip to the salon.</p> <h2>Don’t slack on trims</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">If you can’t bring yourself to do a big cut, regular haircuts (even little ones!) can help make the process go faster too. Aim for a trim every six to eight weeks. This will help you get rid of split ends and maintain healthy hair during your growing-out period, says hairstylist Nia Jones. After all, she explains, you may as well keep your hair looking as good as possible as you go through this tricky transition. Another bonus? Even if you aren’t getting a drastic cut, snipping a bit each time will get rid of old colour.</p> <h2>Prevent brassiness</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">As more and more grey starts growing in, make sure those strands look as good as possible. Although grey hair is less vibrant than hair of other colours, it still can become dull and uneven if not properly cared for. Sun exposure, washing hair with water that has a high mineral content, and improper hair care are just a few reasons grey locks can turn brassy. Luckily, there’s a quick fix: using shampoo and conditioner designed specifically for silver or white hair can help tone down brassiness by balancing out the warm undertones, says Biancone.</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">You can also include purple toning products into your maintenance routine. Why purple? To understand how a purple product works, you need to know a bit about colour theory. Essentially, on the colour wheel, purple is opposite of yellow. This means that purple shampoo or toner helps to neutralise unwanted yellow or brassy tones that can come along with greys. Try adding toning drops to your shampoo or conditioner once a week to keep your hair the colour you want it. Taking this small precaution when caring for grey hair can help create luscious-looking locks with longevity.</p> <h2>Go big on moisture</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">The texture of grey hair is quite different from the hair of your youth. George Papanikolas, a celebrity hairstylist, explains that it’s typically more coarse, frizzy and dehydrated. To combat this, he recommends arming your strands with moisturising products that will keep it silky and shiny.</p> <h2>Don’t try to remove hair dye on your own</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Let’s say you’ve been dying your hair to cover up those greys but wish you hadn’t. Well, even if you’ve just been using root touch-up kits as new greys grow in, you should never try to lift or remove hair dye on your own. “Chemicals are typically used to remove colour, and you need to know what you are doing,” warns Rivera. “If you don’t, you could end up really damaging your hair.” If this is a route you’re intent on exploring instead of waiting for the colour to grow out, book an appointment with a professional. Just be aware that removing hair dye is tricky and often takes multiple appointments.</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">For an easier, much gentler option, try using a clarifying shampoo to lighten the dye on your strands, says Jones. These shampoos are formulated to remove excess buildup and give you a deep clean, but they may also help wash away some colour. Just don’t use them more than once a week. These products give hair a deep clean, and using them too often can strip your strands of natural oils that add hydration.</p> <h2>Experiment with new styles</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Whether you’re trying to cover up the grey or want to embrace it, Jones suggests playing with different styles outside of the boundaries of your everyday look – ie, a ponytail, a different part that flatters your face shape or a brushed-back style that ‘hides’ roots. Changing things up allows you to play with your style, and it also makes growing out grey hair look cool and intentional. Who says blondes have all the fun?!</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;"><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/beauty/10-best-tips-for-gracefully-growing-out-grey-hair" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>.</em></p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Unlocking the Silver Revolution: The Truth About Grey Hair and the Empowering Journey to Embrace the Grey

<p>In a recent poll by midlife connection organisation, Connected Women reveals that two-thirds of women over the age of 50 haven’t embraced their grey hair (67%). With hair starting to go grey in our 30s and 40s, that’s a long time to hide those pesky greys!</p> <p><strong>What causes grey hair? </strong></p> <p>According to Harvard Health, hair doesn’t ‘turn’ grey. Once a strand of hair is a particular colour, it will stay that way unless it is dyed. After the age of 35, hair follicles produce less colour, so when that strand of hair falls out it will be more likely to grow back grey.</p> <p><strong>Can stress cause grey hair? </strong></p> <p>There is very little evidence to indicate that this is true, however, research shows that in mice, in response to a fight or flight situation, hair follicles are impacted and the pigmentation-producing stem cells can be lost. Without stem cells available to produce pigment cells, the hair will go grey.</p> <p>So, can we now legitimately blame our grey hairs on our kids, or our husbands.</p> <p><strong>What happens when you pluck your grey hairs out? </strong></p> <p>Don’t do it! Not only will it simply grow back grey, but according to Trey Gillen, hairstylist and creative director of education at SACHAJUAN, doing so can also traumatise the follicles which could mean NO hair grows back.</p> <p><strong>When is the right time to go grey?</strong></p> <p>This is something that only you can decide. If your hair is dark brown or black, your greys will be more noticeable, so you’ll need to have regular (two to four weekly) trips to the hairdresser to cover them up. At some point you will most likely grow weary of trying to stem the tide and it will be time to just embrace the grey. You will know when you’ve had enough!</p> <p>If you have lighter hair, then your greys will be much less noticeable. Lighter hair gives you a much longer window between coloring appointments in the initial stages of going grey, and later you can use the greys as ‘herringbone highlights’ as per Sarah Jessica Parker’s beautiful mane, which is wonderful way to gracefully embrace going grey.</p> <p><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/05/Phoebe-headshot-EDITED.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;"><span style="box-sizing: border-box; caret-color: #212529;"><em style="box-sizing: border-box;">Phoebe Adams is the founder of Connected Women, an organisation providing a community for women over 50 to connect with each other and build meaningful friendships. With a rapidly growing community in Perth, Sydney, Wollongong, and Melbourne, Connected Women provides a safe and welcoming space for women to come together and share experiences. To learn more about the organisation and how you can get involved, visit <a style="box-sizing: border-box; color: #258440; text-decoration-line: none; background-color: transparent; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out 0s;" href="https://www.connectedwomen.net/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">connectedwomen.net</a>.</em></span></span></p> <p><em><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;"><span style="box-sizing: border-box; caret-color: #212529;"><span style="box-sizing: border-box;"><span style="color: #000000; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif; font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images</span></span></span></span></em></p>

Beauty & Style

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“It’s not binary”: ABC host weighs in on The Voice

<p> ‘Australia’s boyfriend’ and ABC host Tony Armstrong has weighed in on Australia’s The Voice referendum, as people all across the nation prepare to head for the polls in late 2023. </p> <p>The referendum, in which Australians will be given the opportunity “to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the Constitution through an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice”, has been explained by the National Indigenous Australians Agency as an “independent, representative advisory body for First Nations peoples. </p> <p>“It will provide a permanent means to advise the Australian Parliament and Government on the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on matters that affect them.”</p> <p>Additionally, it is intended to act as part of the government’s commitment to implementing the full scope of the Uluru Statement from the Heart. </p> <p>However, as the time to vote draws closer, opinion has divided in the parliamentary and public eye, with many voicing their take from both sides of the discussion. </p> <p>And now, Tony Armstrong has become the latest to discuss the vote, all while stressing that the situation was more complex than people had assumed, and that he didn’t know which way it was going to go. </p> <p>“I truly don’t know if it will be passed or not,” he confessed to <em>Stellar</em>’s Sarrah Le Marquand. “What I think people need to remember with the Voice is that a vote for ‘yes’ and a vote for ‘no’ can both be good things.</p> <p>“It’s not binary. We aren’t in a world where ‘no’ is ‘bad’ and ‘yes’ is ‘good’. Aboriginal people should be the ones talking the most about this; this is about what’s best for Aboriginal people. I don’t know diddly squat. I’m leaving it to the people who actually know their cr*p to give advice on it. But what I do think is lost in the conversation is the fact it’s not binary.”</p> <p>Armstrong went on to note his understanding that a ‘yes’ vote could potentially hold the nation back, and that a ‘no’ vote could push it forward - “and vice versa. We don’t know.”</p> <p>He then explained that the public discourse had framed it as a binary issue, but that the entire situation is “far more nuanced and complex than that. </p> <p>“I’m going to follow in the path of my leaders; it’s just so complex and becomes another red-hot year for blackfellas, even more so where our very identity will be ripped apart and pulled apart and examined. </p> <p>“The irony, regardless of whichever way it goes, will be: it’s not necessarily going to be the blackfellas whose vote makes a difference. I’ve never been able to define irony, but I reckon that’s in the ballpark.”</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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Tony Armstrong announces surprising career ambition

<p>Tony Armstrong has shared his surprising career ambitions, candidly revealing he is eager to explore acting opportunities. </p> <p>The ABC presenter, formerly a player for the Sydney Swans, said that his Logie win in 2022 paved the way for him to explore new opportunities within media, and he is keen to try is hand at unexplored areas of entertainment. </p> <p>Speaking candidly in the first episode of the ABC’s new series <em>Great Australian Stuff</em>, he wanted to get into acting, and that the Logie had put him on the map for a shift, but for now, he remains on the desk on weekday mornings at ABC News Breakfast.</p> <p>Armstrong won the Graham Kennedy Award for Most Popular New Talent in 2022, reflecting on how his on-air charisma brought a new energy to ABC's otherwise reserved news coverage. </p> <p>“(A Logie) puts you in the mind of people who put shows together, for sure,” he told the <em><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/culture/tv-and-radio/it-wasn-t-on-the-bingo-card-is-acting-tony-armstrong-s-next-move-20230404-p5cy2l.html" target="_self">Sydney Morning Herald</a>. </em></p> <p>“I still can’t believe I’ve got one. It wasn’t on the bingo card."</p> <p>“It’s still weird to me, but I’m very humbled, and that was very much a vote for (ABC) News Breakfast, so my success is only as a result of the people who I’ve been lucky enough to work with.”</p> <p>During his time on ABC, Armstrong has been no stranger to a slew of racist online trolls, regularly using his platform to bring awareness to the ongoing issue of racism in Australia. </p> <p>In November last year, police were called over racist abuse sent to the TV personality, with Armstrong, a proud Barranbinya man, sharing a message sent to his work email address.</p> <p>The national broadcaster issued a statement at the time from ABC News Director Justin Stevens, who has said the network is exploring all options to “ensure the wellbeing of our people”.</p> <p>“This racist harassment is sickening. The ABC is taking a range of actions to support Tony Armstrong, including referring the matter to police,” Stevens said.</p> <p>“Our journalists should not be attacked or subjected to abuse for doing their jobs.”</p> <p>Armstrong also spoke out on Twitter about the vile message, saying, “This s*** has gotta stop".</p> <p>“One thing is for certain though, this isn’t guna stop us speaking up or stepping up."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

TV

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Jamie Lee Curtis on ageing in Hollywood

<p class="p1"><span class="s1">Hollywood star Jamie Lee Curtis has taken a swipe at society’s emphasis on youth, no more apparent than in her own industry.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The 59-year-old, visiting Sydney to promote new movie Halloween, the sequel to the 1978 horror classic of the same name, spoke of her dislike of the term “anti-ageing”.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“The term anti-ageing makes me crazy, the amount of marketing towards anti-ageing and making it a pejorative,” Curtis told <em><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/entertainment/sydney-confidential/actor-jamie-lee-curtis-on-why-the-term-antiageing-makes-her-angry/news-story/eec877ecef45fbb08670b1d872d2f8d5">The Daily Telegraph</a></em>.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“(Ageing) cannot be the pejorative because it happens to everybody. It is like everything else, it is an evolution,” said the actor.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">Curtis’ comments come at an apt time in her career. She has reprised her iconic role as Laurie Strode, who took on serial killer Michael Myers 40 years ago on Halloween. Decades on, her character, now a grandmother, is still deeply affected by their battle but is as strong as ever and more than ready for the next round.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The actress too, seems at the top of her game. The sequel is raking it in at the US box office, and not only is she a formidable performer in the film, but it was really Curtis doing many of the fight scenes too.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“I am sitting here in my very nice red suit but this movie was obviously not a glamorous job and I am grateful that I get that opportunity,” she admitted to the publication. “Every fight is me.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“I am fit but I am not a gym rat. It is just what we do. It is the nature of the beast — it is physical and it is painful. I cracked a rib, that is what happens.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">But Curtis, the daughter of Janet Leigh – who memorably starred in another iconic horror Psycho – and matinee idol Tony Curtis, has previously acknowledged her “struggle with my own self-esteem” when it comes to her body. She says she’s found a way to deal with it.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“So I have a big secret: I don’t look in the mirror,” Curtis told <em><a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/entertainment/a22993869/jamie-lee-curtis-confidence-secrets/">Good Housekeeping</a></em> in a recent interview.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“I’m a 60-year-old woman. I am not going to look the same as I used to, and I don’t want to be confronted by that every day! When I get out of the shower, I have a choice: I can dry myself off looking in the mirror, or I can dry myself off with my back to it. I turn my back to the mirror and I feel great!”</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">The actress, who also counts children’s author, entrepreneur and budding screenwriter on her resume, has an inspiring message about chasing and realising creative passions saying she has “no time to waste”.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">“On the very clear passage of 50s to 60s, I have no time to waste,” said Curtis. “None. If you have creative ideas and you don’t bring them out into the world in some way before you go, that is a tragedy.”</span></p> <p class="p1"><em><span class="s1">Images: Getty</span></em></p>

Movies

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Toni Collette and husband David Galafassi split

<p dir="ltr">Toni Collette has confirmed that she has split from her husband of almost 20 years after he was photographed kissing another woman at a Sydney beach.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Aussie actress, 50, took to Instagram to confirm that she and husband David Galafassi, 44, have broken up after photos emerged of him making out with another woman.</p> <p dir="ltr">The <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-11510663/Toni-Collette-splits-husband-Dave-Galafassi-pictures-kissing-woman-Sydney-beach.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Daily Mail</a> published photos of Galafassi passionately kissing a young woman at Manly beach.</p> <p dir="ltr">Other photos show the musician hugging and kissing the young bikini-clad woman, with one witness telling the publication that they were “all over each other”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair reportedly arrived at the beach about 7.30 am and jumped in the water for about 15 minutes before heading out for a coffee.</p> <p dir="ltr">Daily Mail reached out to Collette’s management and within hours she had released the statement confirming the break-up.</p> <p dir="ltr">“After a substantial period of separation, it is with grace and gratitude that we announce we are divorcing," her statement read.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’re united in our decision and part with continuing respect and care for each other.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl3-GTgBYtF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl3-GTgBYtF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by TONI COLLETTE (@toni_collette_official)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“Our kids are of paramount importance to us and we will continue to thrive as a family, albeit a different shape.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’re thankful for the space and love you grant us as we evolve and move through this transition peacefully.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Big thanks.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Collette and Galafassi share two children together, aged 14 and 11, and split their time between Australia and the United States.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair first met back in 2002 at the launch of Galafassi’s band Gelbison's debut album Metal Detector in Sydney.</p> <p dir="ltr">They ran into each other again a few days later and Collette said “he was the first person I saw when I walked in the door”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He kissed me on the cheek and I just kind of melted. I planned to stay for ten minutes… I was there for 12 hours. It was a good day,” she said at the time.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>EDITOR'S NOTE:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Since this article has been published, Toni Collette has changed her statement to explain that she and David Galafassi have been separated for a "substantial period of time".</p> <p dir="ltr">This has now been <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/toni-collette-forced-to-edit-statement-announcing-divorce" target="_blank" rel="noopener">changed and reflected</a> in the article.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Relationships

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Toni Collette forced to edit statement announcing divorce

<p dir="ltr">Toni Collette has edited her statement announcing her divorce from husband David Galafassi after explosive images of him kissing another woman surfaced.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Aussie actress, 50, took to Instagram to confirm that she and husband Galafassi, 44, have broken up after photos emerged of him making out with another woman.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, just a few days later, Collette was forced to edit her statement to explain that she and Galafassi had been separated for a “substantial period”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her new statement reads: “After a substantial period of separation, it is with grace and gratitude that we announce we are divorcing.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’re united in our decision and part with continuing respect and care for each other.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Our kids are of paramount importance to us and we will continue to thrive as a family, albeit a different shape.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl3-GTgBYtF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl3-GTgBYtF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by TONI COLLETTE (@toni_collette_official)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“We’re thankful for the space and love you grant us as we evolve and move through this transition peacefully.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Big thanks.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Collette’s shock statement came less than 24 hours after the paparazzi images were published in the Daily Mail.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair share two children together, aged 14 and 11, and split their time between Australia and the United States.</p> <p dir="ltr">They first met back in 2002 at the launch of Galafassi’s band Gelbison's debut album Metal Detector in Sydney.</p> <p dir="ltr">They ran into each other again a few days later and Collette said “he was the first person I saw when I walked in the door”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He kissed me on the cheek and I just kind of melted. I planned to stay for ten minutes… I was there for 12 hours. It was a good day,” she said at the time.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Relationships

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Explainer: Why does hair turn grey?

<p>For many people, grey hair is a fact of life. It’s a sign that we are getting older and that our bodies are going through change. </p> <p>To understand why hair turns grey, we first need to understand why it has colour in the first place. The answer is a special type of cell known as a melanocyte. These produce melanin, the pigment that gives your skin, hair and eyes their distinctive colours.</p> <p>Melanin comes in two forms, eumelanin (black or brown) and pheomelanin (reddish-yellow). Combinations of these two create the spectrum of eye, hair and skin colours found among humans.</p> <p>One way to understand how melanocytes determine hair colour is to think of these cells as tiny printers, applying their ink to paper. The paper in this case is our hair strands, formed of keratin, the same protein that makes up our fingernails.</p> <p>Just as a printer sprays ink onto a sheet of paper to produce an image, melanocytes produce pigments that are embedded into the growing hair strand, providing them with colour. The melanocytes live within the hair follicle, so each hair strand has its own colour-producing printer.</p> <p>While some people’s melanocytes print a lighter ink combination, such as blonde or red, others have darker colour palletes and so have black or brown colourations.</p> <p>Now that we understand how hair gets its colour, we can understand why it goes grey.</p> <p>In hair, grey is not a colouration like any other shade: it is the lack of colouring. The keratin of people with grey hair lacks pigment because their melanocytes have died, revealing the natural grey-white colour of the keratin protein.</p> <p>Because each hair strand has its own melanocytes, some go grey before others. Exactly what decides which strands go grey first is still unknown. However, age, exposure to chemicals and even the climate can influence how early the melanocytes die.</p> <p>The strongest influence, however, is written in our genes. The genetic influence on hair colour is so strong that if your parents have grey hair, yours is likely to grey at around the same time as theirs did.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=19408&amp;title=Explainer%3A+Why+does+hair+turn+grey%3F" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></em></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/science/biology/explainer-why-does-hair-turn-grey/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Jake Port. </em></p> </div>

Beauty & Style

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Carrie’s shocking revelation as she roasts cohosts

<p dir="ltr">Carrie Bickmore has slammed her male co-hosts after they joked about a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/tv/veteran-newsreader-reportedly-fired-for-going-grey" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Canadian news reporter for being fired</a> just because she had grey hair. </p> <p dir="ltr">Lisa LaFlamme, 58, announced she would be leaving the CTV National News presenter and said she was “blindsided” and left “shocked and saddened” by the allegedly sudden decision to end her contract.</p> <p dir="ltr">The company rejected claims that LaFlamme was let go from her job because of her grey hair and that she would instead be replaced by a younger male. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Project co-host, who is only 35, was speaking about the issue to the rest of the panel before revealing that she is in fact “fully grey” under her blonde locks. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, comedian Peter Helliar went a step too far saying that he hoped burger chain Wendy would remove any grey hairs found in their food after changing their red-headed girl in their logo to grey. </p> <p dir="ltr">A shocked Carrie snapped saying this isn’t a problem for males who are able to continue their day-to-day jobs without worrying about ageing.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Is that what you’ve taken out of this story? You guys don’t have to worry about this, do you?” she asked. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her co-host Waleed Aly then teased asking if there was something Carrie wanted to say to which she responded: “I’m fully grey under here”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Aly pointed out that grey hair appeared to be less acceptable in the US and Canada but the UK, where Carrie had a three month stint at, was more open about it.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Yes, I did notice that in the UK. I’ll move there and do it!” she said.  </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Ten</em></p>

TV

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Veteran newsreader reportedly fired for "going grey"

<p>A veteran newsreader has reportedly been fired from one of Canada’s most-watched television news programs after "going grey". </p> <p>Lisa LaFlamme announced she would be leaving the CTV National News presenter said she was “blindsided” and left “shocked and saddened” by the allegedly sudden decision to end her contract.</p> <p>“At 58, I still thought I’d have a lot more time to tell more of the stories that impact our daily lives,” she said in the Twitter video.</p> <p>“It is crushing to be leaving CTV National News in a manner that is not my choice.”</p> <p>The news anchor said she was asked to keep the details of her termination confidential, as the company released a statement saying the decision had nothing to do with LaFlamme’s hair colour or age and was simply “a business decision”.</p> <p>LaFlamme, like many people around the world, stopped dying her previously brown hair throughout the pandemic, a decision she told viewers she wished she had made sooner.</p> <p>“I finally said, ‘Why bother? I’m going grey.’ Honestly, if I had known the lockdown could be so liberating on that front I would have done it a lot sooner,” she said during the network’s year-in-review special.</p> <p>LaFlamme has been in the anchor job since 2011 but has been with the news outlet for 35 years, and still had two years left on her contract at the time of the “blindside”.</p> <p>Bell Media, which owns CTV National News, said it knew many viewers would be disappointed LaFlamme “would be leaving her position”, and regretted the way the news had been revealed.</p> <p>It added it would launch an independent investigation into newsroom practices.</p> <p>“CTV regrets that the way in which the news of her departure has been communicated may have left viewers with the wrong impression about how CTV regards Lisa and her remarkable career,” Bell Media tweeted in a statement.</p> <p>“We have always taken matters regarding any discrimination very seriously and are committed to a safe, inclusive and respectful work environment for all our employees, devoid of any toxic behaviour."</p> <p>“Consistent with our policies, we are taking steps to initiate an independent third-party internal workplace review of our newsroom, which will take place over the following weeks.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: CTV News</em></p>

TV

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Do you know where your last cup of tea came from?

<p>With winter well and truly upon us, there’s no better way to beat the cold than with a cuppa while you cozy up in front of the TV. But how much better could that be if you knew you were also supporting a tea that’s 100 percent locally grown? </p> <p>Coming in as the second most consumed beverage in the world, it’s easy to see why a whopping 69% of our population have purchased tea over the last six months – with more than half of all tea lovers consuming the delicious beverage daily. However, would it surprise you to learn that only 1 in 10 cups of tea consumed in Australia are actually grown here? </p> <p>The Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland is home to a vast single-origin tea estate that is responsible for 85% of the tea grown in Australia. Proudly owned and run by Nerada Tea, it is the ideal climate to grow and produce tea of such outstanding quality. It’s amazing to think that right here in our very own backyard we have been cultivating some of the finest quality black, green and oolong tea in the world, amongst other variants.</p> <p>The estate itself is nestled between Queensland’s highest mountain ranges in the rich volcanic soils at an altitude of around 750 metres. This pristine environment and unique aspects all serve a significant purpose in giving Nerada Tea the distinctive flavour profile that Aussies have come to know and love. </p> <p>Not only is it proudly Australian grown, but Nerada Tea is 100% pesticide free – which further enhances the quality and authentic taste, compared to its international counterparts where pests and other insects remain a persistent issue in the industry.</p> <p>Additionally, Nerada is Rainforest Alliance certified – and at a time where sustainability matters now more than ever, this stamp of approval ensures the tea you’re consuming was produced with our environment firmly top of mind.</p> <p>By making the choice to purchase locally grown produce, you are not only supporting local businesses, you’re helping to ensure a bright future for both the Aussie tea industry and our economy. This keeps rural job opportunities plentiful – so what better time could there be to make the switch to an all Aussie brew! </p> <p>In 2021, Nerada proudly celebrated 50 years of the Nerada brand  – it’s a huge achievement and Nerada are excited to be shining a spotlight on locally grown tea. The inaugural “Aussie Tea Month” took place in May and will be an annual celebration of the quality and diversity of Australian Tea.</p> <p>David Lyons, Founding Director of the Australian Tea Cultural Society, said, "It is brilliant to see tea in Australia continuing to grow and evolve. International Tea Day, and now Aussie Tea Month, are great ways of celebrating the ingenuity of the tea industry."  </p> <p><img style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/06/55-Nerada-044A1878_O60.jpg" alt="Nerada Tea" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p>“There is such a wonderful tea culture here in Australia. We fe<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">el honoured to have played a significant part of Australia’s tea history,” adds Nerada Tea Plantation Director Tony Poyner. “It’s testament to the perseverance of many of the pioneers in Queensland, such as the Taylor and Russell families who were determined to grow world-class tea on Australian soil. We’ll continue to refine our craft and bring tea lovers a quality range of black tea and infusions”.</span></p> <p>Nerada was recently awarded the 2022 Canstar Blue Award for Most Satisfied Customers for black tea – another endorsement for the quality of this locally grown brew.</p> <p>So next time you do your weekly shop, take a moment to consider where your beloved cuppa actually comes from – and think local before you pour yourself that beloved Aussie Brew.</p> <p>To find out more about the history of Nerada Tea as a great Australian tradition, <a href="https://neradatea.com.au/blogs/history/australian-tea?utm_source=Over+60s&utm_medium=Native&utm_campaign=Black+Tea+Aus+Grown" target="_blank" rel="noopener">click here</a>.</p> <p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HcC8wGabosA" width="560" height="314" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with <a href="https://neradatea.com.au?utm_source=Over+60s&utm_medium=Native&utm_campaign=Black+Tea+Aus+Grown" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Nerada Tea</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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For the love of Greys – retiree volunteers and retired ex-racers

<p>It’s an unexpected match made in heaven, but retirees hoping to give their time to a good cause could find one in a four-legged friend looking for a home.</p> <p>With National Volunteer Week (16 – 22 May 2022) soon upon us, it’s timely to recognise all volunteers. But there’s a very special group of retirees who go the extra mile for Greyhounds.</p> <p>Contrary to popular belief, Greyhounds are big goofy sooks and will swamp you with adoration and love. They’ll also adopt a place on your couch or bed as a loyal pet. This is why many volunteers and foster carers not only adopt a grey or two, but also actively want to save them from greyhound racing.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, the RSPCA <a href="https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/what-are-the-animal-welfare-issues-with-greyhound-racing/#what-needs-to-change" target="_blank" rel="noopener">does not support greyhound racing</a> due to the many unresolved animal welfare concerns associated with the so-called sport. These concerns motivate rescue groups, as well as activists.</p> <p>CPG (the Coalition for the Protection of Greyhounds) is a dedicated group of volunteers across Australia who work together to inform the public about the cruelties of dog racing – <a href="http://www.facebook.com/CoalitionForTheProtectionOfGreyhounds" target="_blank" rel="noopener">FB</a>,<a href="http://www.greyhoundcoalition.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> </a><a href="http://www.greyhoundcoalition.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">web</a>,<a href="https://www.instagram.com/coalitionprotectgreyhounds/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> </a><a href="https://www.instagram.com/coalitionprotectgreyhounds/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Insta</a>,<a href="http://www.greyhoundcoalition.com/cpg-in-the-media" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> </a><a href="http://www.greyhoundcoalition.com/cpg-in-the-media" target="_blank" rel="noopener">media coverage</a></p> <p>Retired nurse Annie is one of CPG’s amazingly enthusiastic volunteers. She’s a media spokesperson for the group and is often busy doing radio and newspaper interviews. Her love affair with Greyhounds started long ago.</p> <p>“I saw an ad on Facebook by Gumtree Greys for foster carers, applied and was introduced to Holly. This beautiful black greyhound girl had been an Irish Champion and ‘Bitch of the year’ in 2012. She was bought by an Australian syndicate at two years old and kept to breed from,” said Annie.</p> <p>Holly whelped many litters until she was nine years old and had her last puppies by caesarean. When Annie took Holly to be desexed, the vet said she was a mess inside and had been sewn up with nylon non-dissolving sutures.</p> <p>“Holly taught me all about how gentle, quirky, dorky, loving and unintentionally hilarious greyhounds are, like the way their jaws quiver when they are happy. All of my future foster greyhounds learnt how to become great pets with guidance from gorgeous Holly,” said Annie.</p> <p>“I foster greyhounds because they deserve the chance of a good life as a dog and pet, not just a product or commodity. Greyhounds bring me so much joy. In return, I speak out for them because of what they suffer on Australia’s many racing tracks.”</p> <p>Annie says she’s appalled by the fact that in 2021, there were <a href="https://greyhoundcoalition.com/2021-australian-track-deaths-and-injuries/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">212 greyhound deaths</a> on Australian dog tracks and over 10,000 injuries, according to statistics from official stewards’ reports. Because of this, she volunteers for CPG and other greyhound-related voluntary bodies. She’s also a motorbike enthusiast and uses her motorbike riding to raise money for greyhound welfare.</p> <p>Alicia – one of CPG’s newest volunteers – is semi-retired. She works part-time in journalism and interior design, but adores Greyhounds. Her male black Greyhound, Fluffy, is now nearly seven years old and has been retired from racing for four years.</p> <p>“Fluffy is one of the lucky survivors from the greyhound racing tracks, as he only won one race and is loving his retired life on the couch! He’s a soppy sook despite his size and the name suits him down to the ground as he is not an Anubis or Nero by nature,” said Alicia.</p> <p>“My lovely boy is very nervous due to his past racing days. He’s frightened of loud noises such as cars or motorbikes, as well as thunder and lightning. He absolutely loves children and babies, as he instinctively knows they won’t harm him.”</p> <p>She says greyhounds are ideal companions for retirees as they are lazy couch potatoes, love cuddles, are very affectionate and generally don’t need more than one walk of 20 minutes a day.</p> <p>“I volunteer with CPG by writing content for publication. They really need more people who have at least five years’ experience writing news releases and placing them with media outlets. Greyhounds are innocents with no voice, so we speak up for them,” said Alicia.</p> <p>She said CPG’s <a href="https://greyhoundcoalition.com/5-key-demands/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">five-point plan</a> is aimed at reforming the racing industry. As well as increased penalties for mistreatment, the plan includes tracking each dog from birth to death so they don’t ‘disappear’, reduced breeding, sanctuaries and safer tracks.</p> <p>Fran, previously a lecturer in Environmental Science, is spokesperson and leader of the Tasmanian activist group <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Let-Greyhounds-Run-Free-425546354301519/?ref=page_internal" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Let Greyhounds Run Free</a> (LGRF), which formed as a result of the ABC's Four Corners program on live baiting and the subsequent Parliamentary Inquiry into the Tasmanian Greyhound Industry. LGRF has held several rallies against greyhound racing, and continues to lobby for the end of this cruel, archaic industry. </p> <p>Fran began her greyhound journey back in 2000 when she came across a Greyhound Adoption stall at a local event. She was instantly hooked after meeting a few of these four-legged beauties and adopted the timid and scared Miss Ruby. It was Ruby who introduced Fran to the dark life of a racing greyhound. </p> <p>Ruby was soon joined by regal Jena. Ruby was terrified, and Jena was injured and a severe epileptic - why we may never know, and it was then that Fran vowed she would do whatever she could to end greyhound racing.</p> <p>All these years later, having had the joy of six hounds and several more foster hounds, she now has the privilege of living with Paddy and Jennifer Jane.</p> <p>Paddy became well known in promotions for Let Greyhounds Run Free's rallies. He is also a champion at helping timid and shy foster greyhounds come back to life after their traumas, and adjust to life as it should be, in a safe and loving home. </p> <p>“I have stories about all the beauties who have blessed my life. They are the most gentle, loving, soul-filled, quirky beings and I'm so very grateful I met ‘Miss Ruby Two Shoes’ way back then in 2000” says Fran. </p> <p>Meanwhile, retired lawyer Jeff is also a tireless campaigner, volunteer and lover of greyhounds. He’s been a supporter of the worldwide campaign to end greyhound racing for the last 15 years or so.</p> <p>“When my pet greyhound died in 2015, I promised myself to continue fighting for the cause. That was the year when the live baiting scandal broke in Australia,” he said.</p> <p>“I followed the news reports and the inquiries closely. When an opportunity arose to become an admin at the new Facebook group ‘<a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/1376102522706650/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Ban Greyhound Racing – Australia Wide</a>’, it was an ideal way to support the growing anti-racing campaign.”</p> <p>Jeff said the group’s focus has always been on activism.</p> <p>“There are many other social media outlets where people can share pictures of their rescued greyhounds and discuss their care, behaviour and feeding. On our page, we try to be a resource for current information about the Australian racing industry.”</p> <p>Those interested in adopting or fostering a goofy hound, should contact one of the groups listed <a href="https://greyhoundcoalition.com/links-to-greyhound-rescue-groups/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>, while anyone interested in volunteering with CPG, can find out more <a href="https://greyhoundcoalition.com/volunteering-with-cpg/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. For further information about greyhound welfare issues, see CPG’s hot topics listed <a href="https://greyhoundcoalition.com/media-resource/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p style="margin-bottom: 7.95pt; line-height: 12.6pt;"><em>Images: Supplied</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Five celebrities embracing their grey hair

<p dir="ltr">More celebrities are staying away from the hair dye and embracing their natural colour in a move that is a particularly big deal for famous (and not so famous) women.</p> <p dir="ltr">A sign of ageing adopted by silver foxes like George Clooney and Pierce Brosnan, it hasn’t been one that applies to celebrity women for a long time - until now that is.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In the past, we have seen trends dominate fashion such as the perm era, the highlight decade, balayage, vivid colours and tonal work,” Robert Eaton, the technical director of Wella Professionals, told <em><a href="https://www.glamour.com/gallery/celebrities-gray-hair" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Glamour</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Now there is a move toward natural hair enhancement, and grey blending (a style that uses natural greys as highlights) is the new movement in hair colour.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Here are five celebrities that have proudly embraced their silvery locks to take inspiration from.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-8bdb59a5-7fff-399d-7520-013450721032"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Andie McDowell</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/andie-macdowell.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The <em>Groundhog Day</em> star revealed how she embraced her “true colour” after she wasn’t able to touch up her roots during the coronavirus-induced lockdown.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I went natural and embraced my true colour,” she captioned a behind-the-scenes <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CLuUNV_rwWL/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">photo</a> from a photoshoot. “I want to be proud of where I am in my life! I don’t want to be ashamed of my age.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She even went against the advice of her managers, sharing with <em><a href="https://www.glamour.com/story/why-andie-macdowell-decided-to-go-gray-even-though-her-managers-said-it-wasnt-time" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Glamour</a></em> how they said ‘it’s not time’ for her to go grey.</p> <p dir="ltr">“And I said, ‘I think you’re wrong, and I’m going to be more powerful if I embrace where I am right now’,” she told the publication.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-f96a0185-7fff-64d4-ef1a-823db1f6e947"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Salma Hayek</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/salma-hayek.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Salma Hayek has become known for sharing her makeup-free selfies on social media, and has extended that openness to her hair colour.</p> <p dir="ltr">Notable shots of her greys come from 2020, after she shared a snap of her hair <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBgaLbuD1iU/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">before and after</a> touching her roots. Later that same year, she shared another <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFefv3pHT-J/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">photo</a> of her “white hair of wisdom”, which has reappeared in photos of her on-and-off ever since.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-e9d855ad-7fff-bab1-56b7-0d15ad41eb10"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jane Fonda</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/jane-fonda.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">After debuting a silver look at the <a href="https://www.glamour.com/story/jane-fonda-gray-hair-oscars-2020" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2020 Oscars</a>, Jane Fonda spoke out how she felt “so happy” when she decided to go grey the following year.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Enough already with so much time wasted, so much money spent, so many chemicals - I’m through with that,” she said during <a href="https://www.ellentube.com/video/jane-fonda-on-why-older-women-are-braver.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">an interview</a> with Ellen Degeneres.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 84-year-old revealed she had begun to go grey at 82 and that her Oscars look - which took her stylist seven hours to achieve - was inspired by her salt-and-pepper roots.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-5c00434e-7fff-0093-8840-1aea70965cf0"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sarah Jessica Parker</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/sarah-jessica-parker.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The <em>Sex and the City</em> star made waves by appearing on the cover of <em><a href="https://www.vogue.com/article/sarah-jessica-parker-cover-december-2021" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Vogue</a></em> with grey in her hair and spoke to the publication about the ageism women face in Hollywood.</p> <p dir="ltr">“‘Grey hair, grey hair, grey hair. Does she have grey hair?’ I don’t know what to tell you people,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s almost as if they almost enjoy us being painted by who we are today, whether we choose to age naturally and not look perfect, or whether you do something if that makes you feel better.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-791d9004-7fff-8c03-1b96-b95bdca31d3a"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Dawn French</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/dawn-french.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: @dawnrfrench (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Dawn French first <a href="https://nz.news.yahoo.com/dawn-french-dramatic-hair-makeover-091047038.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">debuted</a> her greys in June 2021 in a dramatic change from her classic <em>Vicar of Dibley</em>-esque brunette bob.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 64-year-old <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CQN5UKKrNu6/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shared</a> that she was changing her hair colour to “happily welcome the grey”, and has continued to update fans on social media with her progress since.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4f045dc0-7fff-c8cf-ad1e-21c50c200b73"></span></p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 0pt;"><em>Images: Getty Images / @salmahayek (Instagram)</em></p>

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