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Roadside cameras set to target more infringements

<p>Millions of Aussie drivers are being warned as authorities expand the number of infringements being targeted by roadside cameras. </p> <p>The technology, initially used to detect mobile phone use, will now target new road rules. </p> <p>"The laws were brought in and this technology was brought in as a preventative measure ... to stop people getting behind the wheel and taking risks that jeopardise the safety of others," NRMA head of media told <em>Yahoo News. </em></p> <p>"The road toll is terrible nationally in Australia ... So we need to do everything we can to reduce risks on our roads."</p> <p>In NSW authorities are expanding the capabilities of their roadside mobile-detection cameras. </p> <p>From July 1 the cameras will be able to catch drivers wearing their seatbelt incorrectly. </p> <p>This comes after Queensland reportedly became the first jurisdiction in the world to roll out seatbelt-spotting detection along with mobile-detection. </p> <p>Last year, Victoria also rolled out dual mobile phone and seatbelt detection cameras last year after a two year trial.</p> <p>No grace period will be granted when they issue the seatbelt fines. </p> <p>"The expansion of mobile phone detection cameras to also apply to seatbelt offences reinforces the NSW Government’s commitment to enforcing the 50-year-old seatbelt law, actively contributing to improving road safety and reducing fatalities on NSW roads," a statement read on their official website. </p> <p>The department told Yahoo that all images captured by roadside cameras are automatically reviewed by software. </p> <p>Those that do not contain evidence of an offence will have their images deleted within an hour. </p> <p>Drivers in the ACT will need to make sure they have proper insurance and registration.</p> <p>From August, the roadside cameras alongside speed cameras and red light cameras will be used to send hefty fines to those driving without proper registration or insurance. </p> <p>Those caught by the cameras will have their paperwork manually checked by transport staff. </p> <p>An infringement for driving an unregistered vehicle in the ACT is $700 while the fine for driving an uninsured car is $973. </p> <p>The mobile detection cameras could also soon be programmed to detect speeding in the ACT. </p> <p>In South Australia, authorities began testing overhead mobile detection cameras at four busy locations in April, fines are currently not being issued, but the grace period is due to finish on June 19. </p> <p>Drivers caught using their phones in Adelaide will be fined $540 and three demerit points. </p> <p><em>Image: </em><em>Stepan Skorobogadko / Shutterstock.com</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Magpie murderer slapped with massive penalty

<p>A Victorian man has copped a $2,349 penalty after inflicting “callous” acts on magpies.</p> <p>His sentence comes after an investigation by Victorian authorities who were tipped off that birds were being shot at a property in the state’s Sunraysia region. After inspecting the property in 2021, investigators discovered four dead magpies as well as two so severely injured they had to be euthanised.</p> <p>The 57-year-old was placed on a good behaviour bond after appearing at the Mildura Magistrates Court. He admitted to 10 offences of wounding and inflicting aggravated cruelty on the native birds.</p> <p>While Victoria does allow wildlife to be killed by property owners, they must apply for a permit before they start shooting.</p> <p>After the sentence was handed down, the state’s Conservation Regulator Glen Smith warned offenders would be prosecuted.</p> <p>“Magpies are an iconic native bird and they are protected in Victoria. There is no excuse for unlawfully killing or injuring them," he said.</p> <p>“The Conservation Regulator takes wildlife crime extremely seriously and this court result should act as a warning that we will pursue penalties for offenders.”</p> <p>These “callous” acts on the native birds come soon after another Australian man was found guilty of <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/man-who-killed-350-kookaburras-ordered-to-pay-fine" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shooting and killing</a> a staggering 350 kookaburras.</p> <p>Anyone with information about wildlife crime can report it anonymously to Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

Legal

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Firing squad demanded for teen in Bali

<p>Prosecutors are calling for a 19-year-old woman to be executed by firing squad after she was arrested for allegedly smuggling drugs into Bali.</p> <p>The Brazilian teenager, Manuela Vitoria de Araujo Farias, has been in custody since her initial arrest in January 2023, after allegedly being sprung with 3kg of cocaine in her luggage.</p> <p>According to global press agency <em>Newsflash</em>, prosecutors demanded the maximum penalty.</p> <p>If she is convicted of trafficking drugs into Indonesia, she could face execution by firing squad or a lifetime prison sentence.</p> <p>Authorities allege she was involved with a drug gang, but according to her lawyer, Davi Lira da Silva, the teen sold lingerie and perfume for a living and was tricked by people she trusted.</p> <p>Mr da Silva claimed the 19-year-old was tricked into cooperating after the gang who hired her told her about temples in Bali where they pray for the ill.</p> <p>Her mother had recently suffered a stroke and her lawyers claimed she was going to seek Buddhist prayers for a cure.</p> <p>They also alleged that the gang had promised to pay for surf lessons for Ms Farias following her arrival to the country.</p> <p>Her arrest made international headlines after the case was confirmed to local media by Bali Police Chief Inspector Gen Putu Jayan Danu Putra in Denpasar on January 27, 2023.</p> <p>The <em>Bali Sun</em> reported that Ms Farias had arrived at Bali Airport around 3 am on January 1 on a Qatar Airways flight, travelling from Brazil to Bali via Qatar.</p> <p>“The drug smuggling attempt was thwarted by the Bali airport customs. We really appreciate what customs have done,” Chief Inspector Putra said at a press conference on January 27, according to the outlet.</p> <p>Ms Farias’ case has been adjourned with the sentences to be announced on a later date in April.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Little-known road rule could cost you BIG money with fines up to $3200

<p dir="ltr">Drivers could be fined up to $3200 for parking in spots designated for electric vehicles as part of the little-known penalties introduced in four states and territories.</p> <p dir="ltr">The fines apply to drivers with petrol or diesel vehicles who park in these designated spaces in an act known as “ICEing”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The ACT, Queensland and NSW introduced the heftiest fines with a maximum of 20 penalty units.</p> <p dir="ltr">Drivers in New South Wales who block public electric vehicle chargers can be fined up to $2200.</p> <p dir="ltr">The law added to the NSW Road Rule states that the “driver of a vehicle that is not an electric-powered vehicle must not stop in a parking area for electric-powered vehicles”.</p> <p dir="ltr">In the ACT it could cost drivers up to $3200 and in Queensland it could cost up to $2875.</p> <p dir="ltr">In Victoria the fine for misusing a space that’s designated for electric vehicles is two penalty units or $369.</p> <p dir="ltr">But the penalties also apply to electric drivers who use these parking spots without charging their vehicles.</p> <p dir="ltr">NSW Metropolitan Roads Minister Natalie Ward said that the government introduced these penalties to "support the transition to electric vehicles on our roads".</p> <p dir="ltr">"To make sure we keep the community moving forward, we want electric vehicle drivers to have access to charging stations when they are on offer," she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the Electric Vehicle council, there are more than 83,000 electric vehicles in Australia with these vehicles contributing to 6.8 per cent of all new car sales in February.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Female artists earn less than men. Coming from a diverse cultural background incurs even more of a penalty – but there is good news, too

<p>Artists all over the world, regardless of their gender, earn <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/handbook/handbook-of-the-economics-of-art-and-culture">considerably less</a> than professionals in occupations requiring similar levels of education and qualifications. </p> <p>But there’s an additional income penalty for artists who are female. </p> <p>In an analysis of gender differences in the incomes of professional artists in Australia that <a href="https://australiacouncil.gov.au/advocacy-and-research/the-gender-pay-gap-among-australian-artists/">we undertook in 2020</a>, we found the creative incomes of women were 30% less than those of men. </p> <p>This is true even after allowing for differences in such things as hours worked, education and training, time spent in childcare and so on. This income penalty on women artists was greater than the gender pay gap of 16% experienced in the overall Australian workforce at the time.</p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/screen-australia-celebrates-its-work-in-gender-equality-but-things-are-far-from-equal-122266">Some sectors</a> of the arts have tried to redress this problem. However, women continue to suffer serious and unexplained gender-based discrimination in the artistic workplace.</p> <p>Cultural differences are <a href="https://www.nber.org/papers/w27725">also known</a> to influence pay gaps in many countries. </p> <p>In new research <a href="https://australiacouncil.gov.au/advocacy-and-research/culture-and-the-gender-pay-gap-for-australian-artists">out today</a>, we considered whether cultural factors might also affect the gender pay gap of artists in Australia. In addition, we analysed the gender pay gap for remote Indigenous artists for the first time.</p> <h2>A larger gap for women from a non-English speaking background</h2> <p>In our <a href="https://australiacouncil.gov.au/advocacy-and-research/making-art-work/">2016 survey of 826 professional artists</a> working in metropolitan, regional and rural Australia, we asked participants if they came from a non-English speaking background. </p> <p>Only a relatively small proportion of artists – 10% – came from a non-English-speaking background, compared to 18% for the Australian labour force as a whole. </p> <p>A non-English-speaking background appears to carry an income penalty only for women artists, not for men. </p> <p>We found the annual creative earnings of female artists from a non-English-speaking background are about 71% of the creative incomes of female artists whose first language is English. But there is little difference between the corresponding incomes of male artists.</p> <p>Within the group of artists from language backgrounds other than English, the annual creative earnings of female artists are about half (53%) those of their male counterparts. </p> <p>By contrast, the ratio of female to male creative earnings among English-speaking background artists is 73%. </p> <p>These results suggest that women artists from a non-English-speaking background suffer a triple earnings penalty – from being an artist (and hence as a group earning less than comparable professionals), from their gender, and from their cultural background.</p> <p>Despite this earnings disadvantage, 63% of artists who identified as having a first language other than English thought their background had a positive impact on their artistic practice. Only 16% thought it had a negative impact.</p> <p>When artists were asked whether being from a non-English speaking background was a restricting factor in their professional artistic development, 17% of women answered “yes”, compared to only 5% of men from a similar background. </p> <p>Nevertheless, like their male colleagues, these women artists continue to celebrate their cultural background in their art. They contribute to the increasingly multicultural content of the arts in Australia, holding up a mirror to trends in Australian society at large.</p> <h2>No gender gap in remote Indigenous communities</h2> <p>For First Nations artists working in remote communities, a different picture emerges. </p> <p>For this research, we used results for remote communities in three regions of northern Australia drawn from our <a href="https://apo.org.au/node/257301">National Survey of Remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Artists</a>.</p> <p>The gender gap is not replicated among remotely practising First Nations artists. </p> <p>There are some minor variations in this finding for subgroups in different regions, depending in part on differences in the mix of visual and performing artists in the population. But whatever other differentials may exist between female and male earnings, they do not appear to be attributable to the sorts of systemic gender-based discrimination that affects the residual gender gap for other Australian artists.</p> <p>A possible reason relates to fundamental differences between the cultural norms, values and inherited traditions that apply in remote and very remote First Nations communities. </p> <p>Gender roles in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities have been <a href="https://anthrosource.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1525/can.1992.7.2.02a00020">described</a> by researchers as distinctively different, rather than superior or inferior. The importance of both women and men as bearers of culture has been clearly articulated. </p> <p>The unique cultural content of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music, dance, visual art and literature is an essential feature of the work of these artists. These characteristics pass through to the marketplace, and there does not appear to be any obvious gender gap in the way the art from these remote communities is received. </p> <p>There is always differentiation between the art produced in different remote regions of Australia which varies depending on the complexities of different inherited cultural traditions. But there is no indication of any gender-based discrimination associated with these regional differences.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/female-artists-earn-less-than-men-coming-from-a-diverse-cultural-background-incurs-even-more-of-a-penalty-but-there-is-good-news-too-195646" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

Art

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This is what a hairstylist first notices about you

<p><strong>Hairstylists see more than just your hair</strong></p> <p>“Hairstylists can tell far more about what is going on with your life than you might expect,” says Alex Keville, an award-winning hairdresser and the owner of Alan Keville for Hair Salons in Ireland. “We can even tell certain things just by the way you walk in, like if you’re someone who likes to stand out in a crowd or if you’re a more laid-back type.”</p> <p>Your stylist isn’t being nosy or presumptuous – all of these observations are important. They can help a professional determine what kind of haircut you need, as well as how best to work with you, what recommendations to make, how to avoid hair mistakes and how to tailor the experience for you.</p> <p>This also helps build a stronger relationship between a hairstylist and their client. “I think the main thing hairstylists have to remember is that people come to us to make them feel better,” says Keville. “That’s a massive part of our job.”</p> <p>Read on to find out more things your hairstylist knows, from what your hair says about your stress level and your health to what your method of booking reveals about you.</p> <p><strong>How your treat "the little people"</strong></p> <p>Just the way a client walks in and greets the front-desk staff can say a lot about their kindness, empathy and politeness, says hairstylist, Kristy, who asked that we not use her last name.</p> <p>“People who are rude right off the bat will be difficult to work with, even if they’re nice to me,” she explains, “because how you treat the little people shows the kind of person you really are.” That extends to how clients treat the stylist’s assistant, cleaner and even other clients. </p> <p><strong>Your personality</strong></p> <p>People who come in five minutes late in flip-flops and fall into the chair are often low-maintenance types who want a hairstyle to match their vibe, says Keville. Similarly, those who show up in a sharply tailored suit generally want a sharply tailored haircut, like a steep bob.</p> <p>This is important to know because your stylist can give you the perfect style in the salon, but if you don’t have the time, supplies or will to replicate it at home, you won’t be happy with it, she adds.</p> <p><strong>If you have "stressed-out" hair</strong></p> <p>Hair pulling (called trichotillomania), tugging, fidgeting or even chewing is a common response to stress – and a tipoff to your hairstylist that you may be dealing with some chronic anxiety, says Keville. Stress can also affect your hair directly, causing it to fall out or even triggering alopecia, an autoimmune disorder that causes hair loss. Your stylist isn’t your therapist, but it is helpful to let them know if you’re under a lot of stress. They can give you a cut to camouflage trouble areas and recommend products to rebuild and strengthen your hair.</p> <p>When Kristy notices a client with this issue, she’ll tweak the normal session a tiny bit. For example, she might provide an extra scalp massage with relaxing essential oils, as well as take a few extra minutes to chat with clients to help them feel more at ease.</p> <p><strong>Who comes in with you</strong></p> <p>Men and women often bring a partner, friend or even a parent with them to the salon for support and advice – which gives your stylist important intel. If your loved one’s opinions are important to you, then they should be important to your stylist as well. “Whether we want to admit it or not,” says Kristy, “a lot of our hair decisions are made based on who will see it and what others think of us – and there’s nothing wrong with taking that into consideration.”</p> <p>That said, sometimes the relationship with your loved one is more revealing than you may think. “I’m a barber, so I primarily work with men, and you’d be amazed at how many guys will come in with their partner, who will then tell me what the client wants,” says Colin S., a barber who asked that we not use his last name. “I also have guys tell me the haircut is fine only to have their wife or – I’m not even kidding – their mum call me later to complain. I think it says a lot about their relationship.”</p> <p><strong>How chatty you are</strong></p> <p>Your conversational style – including how you first greet your stylist, how much you want to talk (or if you want to talk at all) and what you like to talk about – is a big indicator of a client’s personality. More specifically, it shows how extroverted or introverted you are. A professional can use these conversational clues to refine your hairstyle. For instance, extroverted clients often want something eye-catching and head-turning since they like to stand out or create a presence. In that case, the stylist may suggest an ultra-trendy cut or a bold hair colour,  says Keville. On the other hand, a more introverted client might prefer a cut and style that looks beautiful and put-together but doesn’t call attention to them.</p> <p>Plus, your chattiness indicates the type of bond you have (or want to have) with your stylist, and this affects how you work together. “I have clients who want to gossip the entire time to the point where I feel like I might be the only human contact they’ve had that week,” says Kristy. “And I have clients who will say hi and then want to sit in silence. I just try to go with their flow.”</p> <p><strong>How organised you are</strong></p> <p>According to Colin, clients generally fall into two main groups: those who arrive 15 minutes early and those who rush in five minutes late. “Some people see lateness as a sign of disrespect, but in my experience, it is more a sign of how good your organisational and time-management skills are,” he says. “There are some people who desperately want to be on time but are just too scattered to do it.”</p> <p>Your preferred hairstyle often reflects this innate tendency – or should. For instance, people who are chronically late may need a wash-and-go style. They’re the type of people who may have great intentions (like blowing out their hair regularly), but at the last minute, something always seems to get in the way. As a result, they’d do better with a more low-maintenance cut.</p> <p>Still, try to arrive on time since your stylist may have a tight schedule.</p> <p><strong>Your relationship status</strong></p> <p>When a client suddenly shows up after months of missed appointments and wants a fancy cut or totally different style, Colin says it’s a telltale sign that they are in a new relationship and want to look extra good or are hoping to attract a special someone.</p> <p>Similarly, Kristy says that women will often book special appointments – say, to get a blowdry before a big date or a smoothing treatment before a holiday with a new love. These extras often decline once someone is in a long-term relationship because they don’t have to work as hard to impress their partner, she adds.</p> <p><strong>Your physical health</strong></p> <p>From your posture to your skin to the current state of your hair, your appearance can reveal a lot about your health. That’s because your hair health is directly tied to your physical health. Nutrition, sleep, exercise and certain illnesses or conditions can all change your hair. And because hair takes months to grow, it can show changes to your health over time that you might not otherwise notice.</p> <p>“I had a client whose normally thick, shiny hair turned dry and brittle and started falling out,” says hair stylist, Audie. “It turns out she had a thyroid disorder, and that was the first sign.”</p> <p><strong>How trendy your hair colour is </strong></p> <p>Your shoes, clothes and handbags aren’t the only things that show how trendy you are – and what you value. “People have a complicated relationship with their hair colour because it says things about their youth, ethnicity, culture, sexuality and social status,” says Audie. “I have clients who would rather be caught dead than with the hair colour they were born with. They’ll move hell and high water to keep their dye appointments.” She adds that there is a certain ‘balayage blonde’ (that routinely costs more than $1000) that has become a signature among socialites, and simply having the right hair colour can mark you as part of the ‘in’ crowd without you having to say a word.</p> <p>On the other hand, clients who come in with several centimetres of grey roots usually care less about what other people think of them or may be on a budget, trying to stretch out the time between dye appointments. If this is the case, be sure to tell your stylist, as there are types of dye and methods of hair dyeing (like doing highlights and lowlights that blend with your natural colour) that can help you need fewer appointments, Audie says.</p> <p><strong>"Depression hair"</strong></p> <p>Self-care is one of the first things to go when someone is in a deep state of depression, and your stylist can see immediately when you’ve let things go. Here are some common signs, according to Kristy:</p> <p>Unusually long times between appointments</p> <p>Longer-than-normal hair (for that particular client)</p> <p>Slightly matted or tangled hair, particularly in curly-haired clients</p> <p>Breakage from being in a permanent bun</p> <p>Hair that just seems uncared for</p> <p>Your stylist may also notice changes to your posture, the type of clothes you’re wearing and your overall hygiene, all of which could also indicate you’re struggling with depression. Helping someone get their hair back to a healthy and beautiful state can do wonders for a client’s mood and confidence, Kristy adds. “It’s an instant pick-me-up!”</p> <p><strong>If you're pregnant or recently had a baby</strong></p> <p>Big hormone swings, like those that happen during and after pregnancy, can significantly change the texture, thickness and overall appearance of a woman’s hair. “I have a regular client who didn’t even have to tell me she was pregnant,” says Kristy. “I could tell just from how thick and shiny her hair had become!”</p> <p>Expectant or new mothers often want easy-to-manage hairstyles and may prefer to avoid chemical dyes or treatments, she adds. Similarly, after childbirth, many women lose hair, especially along their hairline, and want to cut their hair short or get a fringe to cover the uneven hairline as it grows back in.</p> <p><strong>How you book the appointment</strong></p> <p>“My clients over age 40 almost always call to schedule appointments, cancel or ask questions,” says Audie. “But my younger clients, especially those under 20, are much more comfortable booking appointments online and hate calling for any reason. They’ll text me – or, I swear, they’d even use smoke signals – before they’ll voice call.”</p> <p>While this may not say much about your hairstyle, it certainly impacts your ability to make appointments and your stylist’s ability to accommodate you. Audie adds that this sometimes means her younger clients don’t get what they need because they try to book online at the last minute, miss appointment reminders or don’t get important questions answered. On the other hand, she does appreciate their comfort with technology when it comes to using the electronic payment system – which her older clients sometimes struggle with.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/beauty/hair-and-nails/this-is-what-a-hairstylist-first-notices-about-you?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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9 things house guests notice and 9 things to please stop worrying about

<p><strong>Do it: Mop the kitchen floor</strong></p> <p>Make sure your floors are clean enough that your house guests aren’t scared to walk around without shoes on. “There’s nothing worse than walking into the kitchen and feeling like you’re stepping on crumbs or something sticky,” says Laura Bonucchi, director of interior design for Designed to SELL Homes, LLC.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Wipe down the bathroom</strong></p> <p>“Guests are definitely going to notice bathrooms because they’re going to be using them,” says Maeve Richmond, founder and coach of organising company Maeve’s Method. “It’s a good opportunity to look and see what the bathroom looks like, because that’s an area people take for granted. It’s hard to look at a bathroom with fresh eyes on a day-to-day basis.” Don’t go crazy, but absolutely make sure that the sink and toilet are clean, and that there’s toilet paper.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Offer fresh bathroom towels</strong></p> <p>If you’re having overnight guests, make sure each person has at least one clean bath towel and washcloth. Women might want a separate one for their hair, so give extras, and let guests know where to put their dirty towels, says Bonucchi. Even if your guests aren’t staying the night, having people over can be a reminder to switch out your dirty hand towels, says Richmond. “We need triggers in life,” she says. “Tying the idea of new hand towels to guests is a good way to get a dirty job done that may be overlooked otherwise.”</p> <p><strong>Do it: Open up dresser space</strong></p> <p>While you don’t have to clear out the guest room of every piece of clutter, you should make sure there’s enough space for your visitors to put their belongings. Provide hangers in the wardrobe, and empty out a few drawers. “As long as the room is open enough to get around and not overly cluttered – you just want a basic, comfortable room with a bed and a place to put their things,” says Bonucchi. If you really want to go above and beyond, a fresh flower and a magazine are small, hospitable touches your guests are sure to notice, she says.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Clear off the table</strong></p> <p>“So many people multiuse their table surfaces in life,” says Richmond. “The kitchen table is also used as a home office.” Instead of going through the time to look at every bill and paper – talk about overwhelming! – pick a spot in your home to be the temporary home for those sorts of files. After guests are gone, put the papers back to their original spot so you don’t forget about the unfinished business, says Richmond.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Get rid of odours</strong></p> <p>“Pay attention to the things you’ve gone nose blind to because you’re used to living in the house,” says Bonucchi. Especially if you’ve got pets, you might not notice a distracting odour in your home. Spritz a bit of air freshener, or light a candle in the kitchen and bathroom.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Clean out the fridge</strong></p> <p>You probably don’t think of the state of your fridge often, but visitors will peek in with a set of fresh eyes. To keep it looking fresh, take just five minutes to take out expired condiments and produce that’s past its prime, then quickly wipe down the shelves, says Richmond. “They’re things barely anyone thinks to do on a regular basis,” she says. “It’s a great incentive to clean up the other parts of the shelf.”</p> <p><strong>Do it: Offer a drink</strong></p> <p>Particularly if your guests have been travelling, they might be hungry or thirsty when they arrive, says Bonucchi. Offer them a drink or a snack once they’ve dropped off their belongings in their room.</p> <p><strong>Do it: Change the bed sheets</strong></p> <p>“Houseguests definitely notice sheets,” says Richmond. “How could they not, because they’ll be sleeping on this?” Prepare the guest bed with fresh bed sheets or linens that are free of rips and stains.</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Buying new linens</strong></p> <p>While you should always make sure the bedding is clean, don’t be embarrassed by the frumpy guest sheets your aunt gave you at your wedding. “In general, our stuff in our home tells a story of who we are,” says Richmond. “I enjoy seeing the sheets someone gives me because it gives me a sense of their life and home. It’s a cosy feeling to sleep on sheets you can tell someone has had for a while.”</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Hiding every toy</strong></p> <p>While no one would expect a parent’s home to look like a child has never stepped foot inside, consider designating one area of the house for playtime when you have guests around. “Of course children will continue to play and dump out toys, and there’s no stopping them from doing that because they’re living there too,” says Bonucchi. “Try and reign in the toys so they’re not all over the house.”</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Putting books on the shelf</strong></p> <p>Leaving your current weekend read or your favourite magazines lying around can spark conversation, making a good icebreaker for guests. “Guests, believe it or not, like to step into a home and see things that are real,” says Richmond. “To take away magazines and piles of books, you’re not representing who you are, and detracting from the experience of interacting with guests.”</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Dusting and vacuuming a clean home</strong></p> <p>If Sunday is your normal dusting day, don’t rush to get your chores done on Friday just because you have guests coming. As long as your home is generally clean, your guests probably won’t notice. But if you’re self-conscious about the state of your house, now is the time to put in some extra effort. “If you’re feeling uncertain or uncomfortable because you haven’t vacuumed or dusted in a while, do those because it will make you as a host feel more comfortable in your home when guests arrive,” says Richmond. “But you shouldn’t go crazy. They’re not there for the home – they’re there for you.”</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Making the mirror shine</strong></p> <p>Visitors likely won’t notice if your mirror is sparkling clean, so don’t stress if you don’t have time to wipe it down. That said, a sparkling mirror could give your home a subtle sense of cleanliness that makes a big impact. “If it’s clean, no one will know it’s been cleaned, but they will be gifted with a sense that the house is brighter, lighter and cleaner,” says Richmond.</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Cleaning the master bedroom</strong></p> <p>If you know your guests won’t be setting foot in the master bedroom, don’t bother cleaning it. “It’s better to focus on the parts of the house that they’re going to spend the most time in,” says Bonucchi.</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Completing unfinished projects</strong></p> <p>Being aware of how visitors see your home can make you panic about the things in your home in need of revamping. But don’t worry about painting that wall or fixing that leaky tap just because you’ll have people staying with you. “The idea of having house guests can trigger a lot of things for people,” says Richmond. “It’s great if the idea of having guests is motivating to finishing a project, but it doesn’t make sense in terms of a short-term house guest.” Warn your guests of things like faulty doorknobs so they don’t think they broke something, but don’t stress about doing all those odd jobs before they come.</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Getting details spotless</strong></p> <p>You might be tempted to get your entire house spotless to prepare for visitors, but making sure you have basic amenities like toilet paper and towels should be your priority. No need to bother deep cleaning your skirting boards or windows. “It’s not stressing out about those fine details,” says Bonucchi. “It’s overall paying attention to the common comforts that people expect when they’re staying somewhere.”</p> <p><strong>Skip it: Buying new home goods</strong></p> <p>“Having people over is the number-one panic inducer for people when it comes to their homes,” says Richmond. But that doesn’t mean you need to rush out for a new shower curtain or dish container, she says. As long as the space is clean, it doesn’t need to be stylish.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/9-things-house-guests-notice-and-9-things-to-please-stop-worrying-about?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Home & Garden

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Why Crown Princess Mary was noticeably absent from the Queen's funeral

<p>Royal fans were quick to notice a suspicious absence from Queen Elizabeth's funeral on Monday. </p> <p>Despite being confirmed on the guest list, Crown Princess Mary of Denmark was noticeably missing from the congregation of famous faces. </p> <p>The Aussie-born royal confirmed her plan to attend the state service via a palace statement last week.</p> <p>“HM (Her Majesty) The Queen and The Crown Prince Couple (Prince Frederik and Princess Mary) will be present at the State Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II on 19 September 2022 at Westminster Abbey in London, Great Britain,” the statement read at the time.</p> <p>However, only Prince Frederik and his 82-year-old mother, Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, were photographed inside the church, where they sat in the front row opposite King Charles III.</p> <p>The Danish Royal Family has since edited the initial statement on its official website, which now simply reads, “HM The Queen and the Crown Prince Couple are present at the State Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II on 19 September 2022 at Westminster Abbey in London, Great Britain.”</p> <p>The updated statement made no mention of Crown Princess Mary. </p> <p>Danish tabloids have offered a possible explanation for the embarrassing blunder, saying the invitation may have been "made in error", citing a spokesperson from the Danish Royal House.</p> <p>“There has been a regrettable error in the invitation from the British Foreign Office’s protocol. It is thus only the Queen and the Crown Prince who, from the Danish side, will participate in Queen Elizabeth II’s state funeral on Monday,” a spokesperson reportedly confirmed to local publication BT.</p> <p>There were reportedly only two dignitaries per country permitted to attend.</p> <p>The outlet’s royal correspondent, Jacob Heinel Jensen, said he believed the Danish royals would be embarrassed by the oversight.</p> <p>“It’s really clumsy and unfortunate. It has meant that the Royal House must now say that a mistake had been made, and that is embarrassing,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

News

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Woman cops eye-watering fine for being just 6km/h over speed limit

<p>A Melbourne woman who copped a massive $3,635 fine for going less than 10km/h over the speed limit has taken to social media to share her horror story.</p> <p>Jane Agirtan uploaded a TikTok showing the eye-watering fine she received for speeding 6km/h over the speed limit in a 60km/h zone on the 3rd of March.</p> <p>“A bit excessive, no?” she said in the caption of the video.</p> <p>In the clip, Ms Agirtan can be heard saying: “Six kilometres. Are you kidding me? Six kilometres, are you serious?”</p> <p>The woman appeared to have also been fined a few weeks prior for going 106km/h in a 100km/h zone, resulting in a $3661.20 fine. The TikTok post has since received more than 17,000 likes and hundreds of comments.</p> <p>However, Ms Agirtan, a former local candidate for Chelsea in Melbourne, didn’t receive the response she was expecting, with the majority of commenters being less than sympathetic, pointing out the high penalty is likely because she is driving a company car.</p> <p>Under Victoria’s current road rules, exceeding the speed limit by less than 10km/h in a corporate vehicle will result in a fine of more than $3,000.</p> <p>The fine can then be reduced once the company nominates the employee who was behind the wheel at the time of the infringement.</p> <p>“It’s to stop people abusing corporate cars. If you pay it you won’t lose points. If you nominate, the fine will be like normal,” one person said.</p> <p>Ms Agirtan then responded in the comments confirming her company had followed the process and nominated a driver.</p> <p>Commenters suggested she wouldn’t have to worry about paying a fine if she had simply followed the road rules.</p> <p>“Maybe don’t speed,” one person said. In turn, this prompted Ms Agirtan to say: “106 in 100 zone is prob calibration issue, not speeding”.</p> <p>However, there were some people who agreed with Ms Agirtan that $3,635 was excessive, even for a company car.</p> <p>“That’s absolutely whack. That amount of money is ABSURD even if it is a company car!” one person said.</p> <p>Ms Agirtan responded saying that was the “exact point” she was trying to make.</p> <p>Fines Victoria explained the large fine amount was used to incentivise companies to out the driver behind the wheel.</p> <p>If the company fails to nominate a driver, they are liable for the $3,365 fine – and if the company does this three or more times over a 12-month period they then run the risk of copping a $21,000 penalty.</p> <p><em>Image: TikTok</em></p>

Legal

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North Korean man sentenced to death for distributing Squid Game

<p>A man in North Korea has been handed the death penalty after smuggling in copies of the hit Netflix show <em>Squid Game</em> and illegally distributing them. </p> <p><span>Sources in the North Hamgyong province told Radio Free Asia that the man brought in the copies on USB drives from China and sold them to high school students. </span></p> <p><span>The operation was foiled when authorities caught seven students watching the hit South Korean drama. </span></p> <p><span>The perpetrator has been sentenced to death by firing squad, as North Korea tightens its laws on letting capitalist media into the country. </span></p> <p><span>One student that purchased the show has been sentenced to life in prison, while six others who watched <em>Squid Game</em> have been sentenced to five years hard labour.</span></p> <p><span>The students were punished under North Korea’s new Elimination of Reactionary Thought and Culture law, which keeps a firm grip on outside media. </span></p> <p><span>Penalties were extended to the school too, with reports teachers, the principal and other administrative staff were dismissed.</span></p> <p><span>The nine-part fictional Netflix drama sees 456 bankrupt contestants compete for a multi-million dollar cash prize. </span></p> <p><span>The contestants take part in a series of children's games to win the money, and those who lose the games end up paying with their lives. </span></p> <p><span>After being released in September, <em>Squid Game</em> has quickly become the most popular show in Netflix's history. </span></p> <p><em>Image credits: Netflix</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Shocking notice left at a Christchurch Airbnb

<p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <div> <div class="reply-list-component"> <div class="reply-component"> <div class="reply-body-component"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply-body-wrapper"> <div class="reply-body-inner"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Shock and fear went through a guest’s mind when he noticed signs at an Airbnb property in Christchurch, saying Māori is not to be spoken and not to refer to their country as Aotearoa.</p> <p>Ameen Makani, had been chatting with the owner of the house for at least half an hour last weekend when he noticed three signs printed and pasted on each glass door in the living room.</p> <p>The “Important Notice to Visitors” contained four rules, including ‘No Maori to be spoken on these premises’, and ‘We live in NEW ZEALAND. Please don’t refer to our country as ‘Aotearoa’.’</p> <p>Makani said he was struck by fear because the Pakeha man, aged about 70, was the most unsuspecting individual.</p> <p>“He’s charismatic, he’s well-travelled and he’s kind. You could strike up a conversation with this man and probably chat for hours,” said Makani, saying he found it difficult to stay composed and contain his reaction after seeing the notices.</p> <p>Makani said he was taught when growing up to consider what conversations are worth engaging in and decided not to ask the host about the signs.</p> <p>“What I most certainly have never seen before and never hope to again, is the absolute confidence in which this man has blatantly showcased his instructions for his guests to see.</p> <p>“I made a last-minute booking on the day and he wasn’t home when I checked in. So<br />it makes you wonder how long these signs have really been up and do they ever come down?” the guest said about the incident.</p> <p>Makani also realised a simple Airbnb complaint was not going to cut it, saying the<br />issue was bigger than a house being taken off a website.</p> <p>Derek Nolan, Airbnb’s Head of Public Policy for New Zealand and Australia, said discrimination is unacceptable and has no place in our community. </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div class="new-reply-component"></div> </div>

Travel Trouble

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Scott Cam reveals what he really thinks of cheating penalty

<p dir="ltr">The latest cheating scandal has rocked <em>The Block</em>, and for the first time ever - Scott Cam has handed down a major punishment for the cheating contestants.</p> <p dir="ltr">Scott Cam punished Tanya and Vito and Josh and Luke who had a photo of the production schedule in their possession, by deducting two points from last week’s scores from judges.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We deducted those points, I mean I thought that punishment wasn't harsh enough," Cam told 9Entertainment.</p> <p dir="ltr">"But we couldn't make it so those people had no chance of winning <em>The Block,</em> because that would make the whole thing void, if it was just between three teams."</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843632/scott-cam-tanya-fitzy-wippa-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2bb51176059444159afaeb70aeea13d4" /></p> <p dir="ltr">The TV host said he wanted to make the game even again.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If we gave them a too-harsh punishment, that would hamstring them too much, so we needed to start again and make the game fair, so we could actually have a series and have a show," he explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">While talking to contestants, he told them he was asked if he would give a penalty to the two teams for cheating.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I thought long and hard about this and I've come to a decision. I will be deducting two points from each of your scores tonight, effectively ruling you out of this week's room," he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"This will also give the others a head start on the Domain leader board to choose the auction order at the end of the series."</p> <p dir="ltr">Josh and Luke were prepared for whatever punishment was handed to them, but neither the brothers, nor Tanya and Vito were on track to win half basement week.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I think that the auction order is really important, so deducting those points, it made it almost impossible for them to win the Domain Super Power," Scott explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I think that was pretty fair, that's going to hamstring them at the end of the series."</p> <p dir="ltr">Not everyone agreed that the points were fair.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Yeah look, I think the penalty for stealing the photo and cheating is appropriate," Mitch said.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Ronnie said: "I think it's flat-out bulls---, two points is not enough. All their points should have been stripped and all money should have been given back."</p> <p dir="ltr">Kirsty and Jesse were the only team looking at the end game with the penalty.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Two points doesn't sound like a lot," Kirsty said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"But when it comes to the end of this competition and you've got the Domain Leaderboard, you know, when you look at last year's results and how close most couples come within each other.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I think those two points, they're gonna be all the difference."</p> <p dir="ltr">Kirsty and Jesse ended up taking the win.</p>

TV

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Five maskless men give insane response to police questioning

<div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Five men who had tested positive for COVID-19 in country NSW but then allegedly breached their self isolation orders after they’d been escorted back to south-west Sydney, have been fined $5000 each.</p> <p>The five men were sitting at a footpath table on Monday morning when police went up to them, asking they why they were not wearing masks.</p> <p>The officers spoke to the men, who revealed they had tested positive to COVID-19 in rural NSW and had been ordered to self-isolate for 14 days after being escorted back to Sydney on August 23.</p> <p>Following the police inquiries, all five men – aged 23, 25, 26, 31 and 32 – were issued $5000 Penalty Infringement Notices for not complying with the public health orders.</p> <p><strong>Escorted back to their premises for self-isolation.</strong></p> <p>The men were escorted back to their premises to continue their mandatory isolation.</p> <p>This comes after Premier Gladys Berejiklian has warned that October will be the “worst time” for the state’s intensive care units and health system.</p> <p>NSW reported another record number of new COVID cases on Monday, with four deaths, 1,290 local infections, and western Sydney remaining the main area of transmission.</p> <p>“We anticipate that the worst month, the worst time for our intensive care units will be in October," said Berejiklian. "The number of cases we have in intensive care will depend on our vaccination rate and also on the number of cases, and we all have a hand in determining what that looks like.</p> <p>“Vaccination is the key in terms of our freedom and reducing the spread of the virus,” she added..</p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

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New penalties for animal abusers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>NSW has become the first state in Australia to automatically ban anyone convicted of serious animal abuse to ever own or work with animals ever again.</p> <p>The government bill introduced tougher penalties for animal cruelty and bestiality after two years of intense work by Animal Justice Part MP Emma Hurst.</p> <p>"We have witnessed some chilling cases over the past two years where animal abusers have been allowed to continue to breed animals, work alongside animals and even buy animals after their convictions," she said in a statement.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CP7sKWNJQR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CP7sKWNJQR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Emma Hurst (@emma.hurst)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"There have been far too many cases where the punishments simply do not match the crimes.</p> <p>"Animal cruelty is hard to think and talk about- but it is happening."</p> <p>The NSW legislation is unique in which the ban is for a lifetime and automatically imposed upon conviction and Hurst hopes other states will follow suit.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

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Furious dad slams childcare's "pathetic" penalty after son left in hot bus

<p>A Perth childcare centre has been penalised for inadequate supervision after a four-year-old boy was found locked inside a mini-bus.</p> <p>Mulberry Tree Childcare Centre in Mt Hawthorn has been hit with a $15,000 fine after the incident in October last year.</p> <p>Tom Shipp was picked up from his nearby kindergarten, but when he arrived at the Loftus Recreation Centre, the little boy was left on the bus.</p> <p>The worker did not do a headcount or check the bus was empty before locking the door.</p> <p>The child was left alone on the bus for 11 minutes on a 31C day, with the vehicle parked in direct sunlight.</p> <p>When Tom was found, he was crying and unsettled.</p> <p>Staff went to look for him after his father arrived at the centre asking where he was.</p> <p>Mulberry Tree Childcare has since implemented new bus run procedures with more checks and balances.</p> <p>But Tom's father Anthony Shipp is not satisfied with the $15,000 fine, telling The West Australian his son could have died.</p> <p>“Purely by chance, I went to the centre at 3.30pm. We normally pick him up at 5pm,” he said.</p> <p>“I think it’s just a minor slap on the wrist for an organisation as big as Mulberry Tree - it’s nothing to a company that size.</p> <p>“It’s pathetic.”</p> <p>Shipp said the fine was not a big enough deterrent and he was shocked at how many incidents such as this have occurred at other daycare centres around the country.</p> <p>“Personally, I no longer trust any centre to transport kids in buses.</p> <p>“Clearly these fines have very little impact on this happening again and again.”</p> <p>The WA Regulatory Authority released a statement saying it was important for service providers to review their transportation policies, risk assessments and practices.</p> <p>“Being approved to operate an education and care service in WA carries significant responsibilities and obligations to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children,”<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://dlgc.communities.wa.gov.au/LegislationCompliance/Lists/Enforcement%20Actions%20ECRU/DispForm.aspx?ID=242&amp;Source=https%3A%2F%2Fdlgc%2Ecommunities%2Ewa%2Egov%2Eau%2FLegislationCompliance%2FPages%2FECRU%2DEnforcement%2DActions%2Easpx&amp;ContentTypeId=0x01001680BDFDBEEA1C4ABE0B192F984CBB9E" target="_blank">the department said</a><span> </span>in a statement.</p> <p>“It is important that service providers review their transportation policies, procedures, risk assessments and practices to ensure they are adequate, and that staff - including casual and relief staff- are frequently trained in following these policies and procedures.</p> <p>“The transportation practices put in place must be robust to protect against human error and to ensure thorough vehicle checks are undertaken every time.”</p>

Legal

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The subtle yet sneaky Woolies tactic you didn’t notice at checkout

<p><span>A little-known feature at Woolworths’ self-serve checkouts is being used to stamp out potential theft and helping customers scan groceries faster.</span><br /><br /><span>Sneaky shoppers who may try to cheat the self-serve system by scanning avocados as carrots should beware.</span><br /><br /><span>New technology at the assisted checkouts will now be able to detect the type of loose product a customer is purchasing.</span><br /><br /><span>The upgrade in the self-service checkout machines has been rolled out in 220 of its 1050 stores and allows the scanner to analyse the subtle characteristics of the product being weighed.</span><br /><br /><span>The screen will then give chekoutlists with three fruit and vegetable options to choose from.</span><br /><br /><span>“So if a customer places a loose tomato on the scanner, the system will show a range of tomato varieties rather than the full list of fruit and veg items,” a Woolworths spokesperson told<em> Yahoo News Australia.</em></span><br /><br /><span>“This makes self-serve that little bit faster and improves the accuracy of product selection for customers.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Picklist Assist feature scans fruit and vegetables using imaging technology.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839069/woolies-sself-servce-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f9b1985b850a4be3b5802a52ffa9915f" /><br /><br /><span>It brings up shortlists of items to help shoppers make selection of their product image quicker.</span><br /><br /><span>Woolworths hopes the technology will simplify their shop.</span><br /><br /><span>“We’re always looking for ways to make shopping easier for our customers,” the Woolworths spokesperson said.</span><br /><br /><span>“As we progressively upgrade our assisted checkouts, we have access to new technology, which helps customers find loose fruit and veg items in the system faster.</span><br /><br /><span>“The system uses image recognition technology to filter the list of possible products based on their colour, shape or size.”</span></p>

Food & Wine

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Army puts 13 soldiers on notice over war crimes report

<p>The Australian Army has issued 13 soldiers with administrative notices that could see their service with the military terminated over last week’s IGADF Afghanistan Inquiry.</p> <p>Chief of Army Lieutenant-General Rick Burr revealed that those who received a notice now have 14 days to respond to the claims.</p> <p>"Each matter and individual circumstance will be considered on a case-by-case basis," Lieutenant-General Burr said.</p> <p>"It is essential that privacy be respected and that procedural fairness is followed, and that no further comment be made until the process is complete."</p> <p>Last week the IGADF Afghanistan Inquiry found there was “credible information” that Australian special forces soldiers killed 39 civilians or prisoners in the Afghanistan War</p> <p>The Chief of Army was grilled during a press conference, with questions he declined to answer as reporters demanded to know whether he has plans to resign.</p> <p>“We have seen generals in Japan hanged for war crimes that they had no knowledge of,’’ the reporter asked. “Can you tell me why you shouldn’t resign?”</p> <p>But the Chief of Army chose not to answer the question.</p> <p>“There is a process to be followed here. We’ve received the inquiry one week ago,’’ he replied.</p> <p>“We need to follow a very deliberate, very methodical and very fair process, ensuring that we respect every individual’s privacy and right of reply. This will take time.”</p>

News

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Samantha Armytage slams Sydney Water over price rise notice

<p>Samantha Armytage has slammed Sydney Water after she was informed her rates would be increasing from July amid the COVID-19 downturn.</p> <p>The <em>Sunrise </em>host said she was informed of the price increases on her bill, which she received on Wednesday.</p> <p>“Just got my bill today from Sydney Water where they tell you they’re here to help... and then, oh, a price rise on July 1. What a lovely treat,” she said in a clip posted on her Instagram Stories.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836266/sapost.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cb5f20d7edd048aeb16a9b2bdf5b4071" /></p> <p>A caption on the video read: “We’re all in this together, except Sydney Water.”</p> <p>The clip came after Armytage shared the things she has learned during lockdown in a column for <em><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/stellar/what-samantha-armytage-learnt-in-lockdown/news-story/a664e3f21684e7e722ece5b064e96651">Stellar</a> </em>magazine.</p> <p>“We’ve realised we are not all in this together. There are members of the population who think it’s OK to spit on police officers, who will hoard products, and that there are countries who are so, so, so much worse off than us,” she wrote.</p> <p>“We’ve realised how many large companies were very badly run before COVID. We’ve realised how much we admire doctors and nurses. Ditto teachers. Oh, and beauticians. Waxing is best left to the experts. Enough said.”</p> <p>The 43-year-old also shared the pet peeves she developed during the pandemic.</p> <p>“We’ve realised how annoying it is to see celebrities crying about isolation from their mansions/massage rooms/private gyms. That none of us has much patience for taxpayers bailing out billionaires’ businesses (bag it like Beckham, anyone?) and how many people actually think Ellen DeGeneres is mean,” she wrote.</p> <p>Since public health emergencies were declared by state governments in March, Armytage has spent most of her time isolating at her country estate in Bowral, New South Wales.</p> <p>In April, she returned to <em>Sunrise </em>after taking six weeks off to recover from a respiratory infection.</p>

Money & Banking

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The beautiful detail fans noticed in Fergie’s home office of kids

<p>The Duchess of York, while in self-isolation, has shared multiple looks into her stunning home that she shares with Prince Andrew, Royal Lodge – which is located in Windsor.</p> <p>On Friday, Fergie shared a glimpse into her home office and fans could not help but notice the small detail that includes the royal’s children, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie.</p> <p>The 60-year-old took to Instagram to post a picture of the spacious working area, which included a framed photo of herself with daughters.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836213/sarah-ferguson-office-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f19e2d7fb2104a3f876858b7fbe37d16" /></p> <p>The Duchess is incredibly close to her two girls, who she shares with ex-husband Prince Andrew.</p> <p>During the lockdown, Sarah has been enjoying having Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank stay with her, and recently opened up about the activities they have been all doing together, including baking.</p> <p>Speaking on X Factor winner and good friend Darlton Harris' podcast, City Island Podcast, Sarah said: “During this lockdown period I've really loved spending more time with Eugenie and Jack.</p> <p>“My daughter got married to Jack in, oh goodness, was it last October? No, it was October before, heavens! And so, of course once she's gone to get married they live away.</p> <p>“So, I haven't seen her so much and so now it's been a total joy to spend real quality time with her. And, first time in 30 years I even baked a lemon drizzle cake with her, so the first thing is that it's fantastic.”</p> <p>The Grade II-listed house is in the grounds of Windsor Great Park and the Duke of York has lived in the 30-room property since 2004.</p> <p>Sarah joining him four years later in 2008.</p> <p>The residence was previously the Queen Mother’s Windsor home until her death in 2002 and has undergone significant renovation since Andrew has lived there.</p> <p>Beatrice is currently isolating with her fiancé Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi and his mum in Chipping Norton.</p> <p>Touching on her daughter's cancelled wedding and how she's missing being with both her girls during the lockdown, Sarah said: “It's sad for me that Beatrice, she was going to get married next week, but they postponed the wedding.</p> <p>“Edo and Beatrice have been living with her future mother-in-law who is lovely. Great friend of mine. But I'm missing my other daughter but it's just like everybody else, we are just the same family as everybody else."</p>

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