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If I’m diagnosed with one cancer, am I likely to get another?

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sarah-diepstraten-1495268">Sarah Diepstraten</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/walter-and-eliza-hall-institute-822">Walter and Eliza Hall Institute</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/terry-boyle-1521638">Terry Boyle</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p>Receiving a cancer diagnosis is life-changing and can cause a range of concerns about ongoing health.</p> <p>Fear of cancer returning is one of the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9321869/">top health concerns</a>. And <a href="https://www.cancercouncil.com.au/cancer-information/living-well/after-cancer-treatment/fear-of-the-cancer-returning/managing-fear-of-recurrence/">managing this fear</a> is an important part of cancer treatment.</p> <p>But how likely is it to get cancer for a second time?</p> <h2>Why can cancer return?</h2> <p>While initial cancer treatment may seem successful, sometimes a few cancer cells remain dormant. Over time, these cancer cells can grow again and may start to cause symptoms.</p> <p>This is known as cancer recurrence: when a cancer returns after a period of remission. This period could be days, months or even years. The new cancer is the same type as the original cancer, but can sometimes grow in a new location through a process called <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-does-cancer-spread-to-other-parts-of-the-body-219616">metastasis</a>.</p> <p>Actor Hugh Jackman has gone public about his <a href="https://www.skincancer.org/blog/is-basal-cell-carcinoma-serious/">multiple diagnoses</a> of basal cell carcinoma (a type of skin cancer) over the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-65158945">past decade</a>.</p> <p>The exact reason why cancer returns differs depending on the cancer type and the treatment received. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8486871/">Research</a> is <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cam4.3408">ongoing</a> to identify genes associated with cancers returning. This may eventually allow doctors to tailor treatments for high-risk people.</p> <h2>What are the chances of cancer returning?</h2> <p>The risk of cancer returning differs between cancers, and between <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8019423/">sub-types</a> of the same cancer.</p> <p>New screening and treatment options have seen reductions in recurrence rates for many types of cancer. For example, between 2004 and 2019, the risk of colon cancer recurring dropped by <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/fullarticle/2812113">31-68%</a>. It is important to remember that only someone’s treatment team can assess an individual’s personal risk of cancer returning.</p> <p>For most types of cancer, the highest risk of cancer returning is within the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31231898/">first three years</a> after entering remission. This is because any leftover cancer cells not killed by treatment are likely to start growing again sooner rather than later. Three years after entering remission, recurrence rates for most cancers decrease, meaning that every day that passes lowers the risk of the cancer returning.</p> <p>Every day that passes also increases the numbers of new discoveries, and cancer drugs being developed.</p> <h2>What about second, unrelated cancers?</h2> <p>Earlier this year, we learned Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, had been diagnosed with malignant melanoma (a type of skin cancer) <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-68047608">shortly after</a> being treated for breast cancer.</p> <p>Although details have not been confirmed, this is likely a new cancer that isn’t a recurrence or metastasis of the first one.</p> <p>Australian research from <a href="https://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2407-11-83">Queensland</a> and <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cncr.31247">Tasmania</a> shows adults who have had cancer have around a 6-36% higher risk of developing a second primary cancer compared to the risk of cancer in the general population.</p> <h2>Who’s at risk of another, unrelated cancer?</h2> <p>With improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, people diagnosed with cancer are living longer than ever. This means they need to consider their long-term health, including their risk of developing another unrelated cancer.</p> <p>Reasons for such cancers <a href="https://www.cancer.net/survivorship/what-second-cancer">include</a> different types of cancers sharing the same kind of lifestyle, environmental and genetic risk factors.</p> <p>The increased risk is also likely partly due to the effects that some cancer treatments and imaging procedures have on the body. However, this increased risk is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435077/">relatively small</a> when compared with the (sometimes lifesaving) benefits of these treatment and procedures.</p> <p>While a 6-36% greater chance of getting a second, unrelated cancer may seem large, only around 10-12% of participants developed a second cancer in the Australian studies we mentioned. Both had a median follow-up time of around five years.</p> <p>Similarly, in a <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cncr.30164">large US study</a> only about one in 12 adult cancer patients developed a second type of cancer in the follow-up period (an average of seven years).</p> <p>The kind of first cancer you had also affects your risk of a second, unrelated cancer, as well as the type of second cancer you are at risk of. For example, in the two Australian studies we mentioned, the risk of a second cancer was greater for people with an initial diagnosis of head and neck cancer, or a haematological (blood) cancer.</p> <p>People diagnosed with cancer as a <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2020/212/3/second-primary-cancers-people-who-had-cancer-children-australian-childhood">child</a>, <a href="https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jayao.2022.0074">adolescent or young adult</a> also have a greater risk of a second, unrelated cancer.</p> <h2>What can I do to lower my risk?</h2> <p>Regular follow-up examinations can give peace of mind, and ensure any subsequent cancer is caught early, when there’s the best chance of successful treatment.</p> <p><a href="https://www.lymphoma.org.au/lymphoma/treatments/maintenance-therapy/">Maintenance therapy</a> may be used to reduce the risk of some types of cancer returning. However, despite ongoing <a href="https://febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/febs.15626">research</a>, there are no <em>specific</em> treatments against cancer recurrence or developing a second, unrelated cancer.</p> <p>But there are things you can do to help lower your general risk of cancer – not smoking, being physically active, eating well, maintaining a healthy body weight, limiting alcohol intake and being sun safe. These all reduce the chance of <a href="https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.3322/caac.21719">cancer returning</a> and <a href="https://www.cancer.net/survivorship/what-second-cancer">getting a second cancer</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/226386/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sarah-diepstraten-1495268">Sarah Diepstraten</a>, Senior Research Officer, Blood Cells and Blood Cancer Division, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/walter-and-eliza-hall-institute-822">Walter and Eliza Hall Institute</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/terry-boyle-1521638">Terry Boyle</a>, Senior Lecturer in Cancer Epidemiology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/if-im-diagnosed-with-one-cancer-am-i-likely-to-get-another-226386">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Incredible treasure trove of unseen royal images

<p>In a mesmerising blend of history and artistry, Buckingham Palace's newly christened King's Gallery has unveiled a captivating journey through time and royalty with the debut of "Royal Portraits: A Century of Photography".</p> <p>Opening its on May 17, this groundbreaking exhibition delves into the illustrious lineage of the Royal Family through more than 150 carefully curated portraits – some never before seen by the public eye.</p> <p>A highlight among these treasures is a poignant snapshot capturing a rare familial moment: Queen Elizabeth II, Princess Margaret, Princess Alexandra, and The Duchess of Kent cradling their newborns. Lord Snowdon, Princess Margaret's husband, immortalised this touching scene as a token of gratitude to Sir John Peel, the esteemed royal obstetrician responsible for delivering all four babies within a mere two-month span.</p> <p>In this heartfelt image, Queen Elizabeth II tenderly holds Prince Edward, her youngest offspring, while Princess Margaret, Princess Alexandra and The Duchess of Kent embrace their own bundles of joy. Accompanying this snapshot is a handwritten letter penned by Princess Margaret to her sister, affectionately addressed as "Darling Lilibet", requesting a signature on a print destined as a cherished memento for the esteemed doctor.</p> <p>The exhibition transcends mere family portraits, delving deep into the evolution of royal portraiture over the past century. Visitors are treated to a visual feast of iconic images captured by renowned photographers, including Dorothy Wilding, Annie Leibovitz, David Bailey and Rankin. Notably, the legendary Cecil Beaton's immortalisation of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation remains a cornerstone of the collection, offering a timeless glimpse into history.</p> <p>The exhibition also pays homage to the enduring allure of Princess Anne through her striking appearances on <em>Vogue</em> covers and a celebrated coming-of-age portrait by Norman Parkinson, commemorating her 21st birthday. From the timeless elegance of Princess Anne to the radiant charm of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the spirited grace of Zara Tindall, the exhibition showcases a diverse tapestry of royal personalities spanning generations.</p> <p>Yet, it is not merely the portraits themselves that captivate visitors, but the untold stories and intimate moments woven into each frame. Delving into the depths of royal history, the exhibition reveals unseen wartime images by Cecil Beaton, illustrating King George VI and Queen Elizabeth's unwavering resolve amidst the chaos of conflict.</p> <p>As visitors explore the gallery, they are guided by a free multimedia experience narrated by Dame Joanna Lumley, offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the artistry and craftsmanship behind these timeless portraits. From Hugo Burnand's vivid recollections of photographing the royal coronation to the candid insights of royal photographers such as Rankin and John Swannell, the multimedia guide adds depth and dimension to the exhibition, inviting visitors to immerse themselves fully in the rich tapestry of royal history.</p> <p>"Royal Portraits: A Century of Photography" is not merely an exhibition; it is a testament to the enduring legacy of the British monarchy, captured through the lens of some of the most esteemed photographers of our time. From the grandeur of coronations to the tender embrace of a mother cradling her newborn, each portrait tells a story – a story of tradition, resilience and the timeless allure of royalty.</p> <p><em>Images: Royal Collection Trust / © His Majesty King Charles III 2024.</em></p>

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Insider spills on Robert Irwin's plans for I'm a Celeb

<p>Robert Irwin received rave reviews for his co-hosting skills alongside Julia Morris on this year's<em> I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here</em>, but an insider has claimed that he won't be returning for another season.  </p> <p>"His easygoing and faultless live TV skills have won over the nation. But his career at Ten will only be short-lived, and he is heading back to Seven," a source told <em>Woman's Day</em>. </p> <p>The negotiation is believed to have been orchestrated by the ultimate "mumager" Terri Irwin. </p> <p>"The Irwins are very smart when it comes to negotiations," the insider added. </p> <p>The source also claimed that Robert's decision to join<em> I'm a Celebrity</em> was seen as a one-off opportunity to elevate his television profile - which he has achieved after bringing fresh energy into the show. </p> <p>Channel Seven is reportedly keen to welcome Robert back with a massive deal, according to the source. </p> <p>"Seven want Robert back and have thrown a king's ransom at him," they said.</p> <p>If the deal goes through, Julia Morris will have to find a new partner to head to the jungle with. </p> <p>Many fans have praised Robert for bringing some fun into the jungle. </p> <p>"I have not ever been keen on watching this show but Robert you have brought some class and good honest fun to the jungle. Thank you," one fan wrote under a clip of the show's grand finale that Robert posted on his Instagram. </p> <p>"How awesome was Robert? This gig was like it was made for him. What a natural," another added. </p> <p>"Best year of I'm a Celebrity, and it was because you added something to the show as Co-Host. Brilliant job for somebody with no experience but with a lot to give," commented a third. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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"I'm shocked": Queen of the jungle crowned in I'm a Celeb finale

<p>The 2024 season of <em>I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here!</em> has concluded with the coronation of a new monarch. No, it’s not some royal lineage we’re talking about; it’s the queen of reality TV herself, Skye Wheatley.</p> <p>After weeks of enduring the culinary horrors of the jungle and the occasional emotional breakdown, Australia has spoken and Skye is officially their jungle royalty. Her reign over the camp was nothing short of spectacular, featuring riveting moments such as her triumph over creepy crawlies, her dramatic monologues about missing Wi-Fi, and of course, her unforgettable friendship with that one tree that seemed oddly supportive.</p> <p>In an “incredibly close” result that had us all on the edge of our seats (or couches, let’s be real), Skye managed to outshine her fellow campmates and secure the coveted title of Jungle Queen. But it wasn’t just about the glory; it was about the charity, too. Skye walked away with $100,000 for Bully Zero, proving once and for all that you can battle both bullies and bugs and emerge victorious.</p> <p>In her post-victory interview, Skye expressed her shock at the win, saying, “I’m shocked.” Truly, her eloquence knows no bounds. “I feel absolutely blessed to have had this opportunity, and to go through the things I went through with these boys.”</p> <p>But behind those eloquent words lies the heart of a true champion, one who faced her fears head-on and emerged triumphant, all while looking fabulous in a khaki jumpsuit.</p> <p>Before her jungle adventure, Skye confessed that she thought the public expected her to “fall flat on my face”. Well, Skye, the joke’s on them because you soared like a majestic eagle, or at least like a slightly disoriented possum.</p> <p>And let’s not forget the emotional rollercoaster that was the finale. Tears flowed like the Brisbane River as the top three reunited with their loved ones. It was a moment of pure emotion, a stark contrast to the usual scenes of celebrities eating bugs for our entertainment.</p> <p>As we bid farewell to another season of jungle shenanigans, we can’t help but reflect on the memories created, the friendships forged, and the questionable food choices made. Here’s to Skye Wheatley, the queen of our hearts and the jungle alike. Long may she reign, or at least until the next season starts.</p> <p>And to all the celebrities who braved the jungle, whether voluntarily or not, we salute you. May your next adventure be slightly less bug-infested and involve significantly more room service.</p> <p>New host Robert Irwin had the last word to longtime host Julia Morris: “From the bottom of my heart, I have loved this so much," he said. "It’s been so much fun.” </p> <p><em>Images: Network Ten</em></p>

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The extraordinary amount the I'm A Celebrity contestants are paid

<p>Each year, an array of reality stars, sporting legends and international names head into the South African jungle, fighting for the chance to emerge victorious. </p> <p>At the end of each season of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here</em> when the winner is crowned, their prize is revealed as a huge cash donation to a charity of their choice.</p> <p>Despite the celebs not taking anything home for winning, that doesn't mean they walk away from the jungle empty handed, as each of the celebrities are paid a hefty salary for their appearance on the show. </p> <p>As season 10 of the show premiered on Monday, season two winner Brendan ‘Fev’ Fevola spoke candidly about the salaries and explained that you get more money the longer you stay in the jungle.</p> <p>“In 2015 I got paid $250,000 upfront, and then $5,000 every show after the [first] two weeks,” he said on <em>The Fox’s Fifi, Fev & Nick</em> on Monday.</p> <p>“So you’d lay there on a Sunday and you’d think, ‘There’s another 7 days, there’s $35,000, boom. Hopefully, they don’t have an eviction during the week’.”</p> <p>According to <em><a href="https://www.pedestrian.tv/entertainment/how-much-im-a-celebrity-pay-australia/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener" data-i13n="cpos:6;pos:1" data-ylk="slk:Pedestrian;cpos:6;pos:1;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" data-rapid_p="13" data-v9y="1">Pedestrian</a></em>, one of this year’s male celebrities is being paid $90,000 for a minimum of two weeks in the jungle and will receive an extra $5,500 every day following that they don't get evicted.</p> <p>The publication also asked a handful of 2024 contestants directly about their pay cheques, with reality star Callum Hole revealing that he was paid “good money” and “a lot more than <em>Love Island</em>”.</p> <p>Despite Hole's claims, influencer and former <em>Big Brother</em> star Skye Wheatley said money wasn’t her motivation for going on the show and she would actually be earning more if she stayed home.</p> <p>“I’d do it for free,” she said. “It’s for charity, babes, who gives a f**k about the money. I love that it can be for charity and I love the opportunity. So I’m very grateful.”</p> <p>Former <em>MasterChef</em> contestant Khanh Ong revealed that he had been asked to head into the jungle several times, and this year he was offered “a considerable amount more” than the first time he was asked.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Network 10</em></p>

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Full cast for I'm A Celeb revealed

<p>The much-anticipated premiere of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here!</em> hit screens with a bang, revealing a star-studded lineup of personalities ready to face the challenges of the South African jungle. Channel 10 unveiled the roster on Sunday's premiere episode, promising viewers an exciting season ahead.</p> <p>Leading the charge was none other than Hollywood child star Frankie Muniz, known for his iconic role in <em>Malcolm in the Middle</em>. Muniz, who surprised both fans and fellow contestants with his presence, was joined by an array of intriguing personalities, each bringing their own flair to the jungle.</p> <p>Retired Australian iron-woman Candice Warner, wife of cricketer David Warner, made a notable entrance, expressing her surprise at Muniz's participation. Alongside Warner, the lineup boasted a diverse mix of talents, including retired Paralympian Ellie Cole, British comedian Stephen K. Amos, influencer Skye Wheatley, and former Studio 10 host Tristan MacManus.</p> <p>The premiere episode kicked off with Muniz leading the pack, setting the stage for a series of nerve-wracking challenges. Hosted by the dynamic duo of Julia Morris and Robert Irwin, the celebrities faced their first trial: Warner locked in a glass room teeming with cockroaches, while her campmates braved a mystery box challenge to secure her release.</p> <p>However, the drama didn't stop there. Wheatley's fear of snakes led to a tearful breakdown during her challenge, highlighting the intense nature of the jungle environment. Yet, despite the obstacles, the contestants displayed resilience and determination, setting the tone for an adrenaline-fuelled season.</p> <p>As the episode unfolded, additional celebrities were unveiled, including AFL legend Peter Daicos, radio host Brittany Hockley, fitness guru Michelle Bridges, <em>Love Island </em>star Callum Hole, and <em>MasterChef</em> contestant Khanh Ong.</p> <p>Among the standout contestants is Michelle Bridges, renowned for her role on <em>The Biggest Loser</em> and her thriving fitness empire. Similarly, Khanh Ong, known for his culinary prowess on <em>MasterChef Australia</em>, brings a unique skill set to the jungle environment. With such a diverse cast, the dynamics within the camp are sure to be electric.</p> <p>The premiere also offered glimpses into the personal lives of the contestants, from Cole's inspiring journey as a Paralympic swimmer to Warner's resilience showcased on <em>SAS Australia</em>. </p> <p>As the season progresses, viewers can expect more surprises, twists, and edge-of-your-seat moments. With an intruder poised to shake things up and a cast described as a "national treasure", the stage is set for an unforgettable season. </p> <p><em>Images: Network Ten</em></p>

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“I’ve got to change this”: The one big fix Robert Irwin is bringing to the jungle

<p>Robert Irwin has shared the one big change he insisted on after he joined the cast of <em>I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em></p> <p>The wildlife warrior spoke to Kyle and Jackie O about how he demanded for the show to ditch the eating of native animals for challenges. </p> <p>In past seasons, the show has used body parts of native African animals in challenges for contestants to eat in exchange for prizes and advantages. </p> <p>After agreeing to host the show alongside Julia Morris, the 20-year-old insisted the rule was changed. </p> <p>“The one thing that I was like, ‘Mmm, I’ve got to change this’, was eating the African wildlife…I’m a conservationist at heart,” he said on Tuesday morning when dropping by <em>The Kyle &amp; Jackie O Show</em>.</p> <p>“They have changed it so we’re just doing the cow, and the chicken, and the fish, and the cockroach,” he revealed of the change of challenge menu.</p> <p>Morris said she supported her new co-host’s efforts to stop any consumption of African wildlife on the show.</p> <p>“I think what Robert’s been doing is making people think, ‘Do you need it or not?’ Like if you need it, tell me why you need the wildlife in a place like that?” Morris explained.</p> <p>“And if it doesn’t matter and it was just something that was nice in Africa from Series 1, then we don’t need it – just get a cow!”</p> <p>Irwin added, “Africa’s got such amazing wildlife, and it’s about celebrating it”.</p> <p>Elsewhere in the interview, the young conservationist reflected on the time he first visited the South African set of <em>I’m A Celeb</em> when he was just 10 years old alongside his mum Terri and sister Bindi. </p> <p>“I just kind of got dropped in there with my family and spent the day in there and it was awesome. Since then, it’s been on my radar, I’ve been a fan of the show and I just thought it’s such an amazing thing I was awe-struck, I just loved it. Coming back as a host, is the craziest thing,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: KIISFM</em></p>

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“I’m excited to be back”: Fergie joins list of luminaries Down Under

<p>Sarah Ferguson has returned to Australia for the first time in years to help battle a major problem facing our nation, while sharing her love for the country.</p> <p>The Duchess of York is visiting Melbourne to take part in the <a title="www.globalcitizen.org" href="https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/now/melbourne/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Global Citizen NOW</a> summit from March 4th, which is seeking to drive urgent action to end extreme poverty and address the climate crisis in the Asia-Pacific region.</p> <p>In an exclusive interview with <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/news-life/why-sarah-fergie-ferguson-duchess-of-york-is-back-in-australia/news-story/0a99dbcd4c518d12dcd56b11e89186ba" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, Fergie shared her love of Australia, describing the country as a "haven" and sharing her excitement to be back Down Under. </p> <p>“Australia feels like a home away from home to me,” the 64-year-old royal said.</p> <p>“My sister Jane has lived here for decades, so I have visited many times over the years. I have so many memories of wonderful moments."</p> <p>“I remember the excitement of going to the Melbourne Cup with my mother, for example. I’m excited to be back again to make new memories." </p> <p>“I love the Aussie outlook on life and of course I adore your incredible landscapes and wildlife, which are like nothing you see in Europe." </p> <p>“Australia has often been a haven for me. One thing I particularly like is that there is no culture of building people up in order to knock them down again later, which you see elsewhere.”</p> <p>Fergie will be joined at the summit by hundreds of other leading voices, famous personalities and political figures, including actor Hugh Jackman, musicians Crowded House and former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard. </p> <p>The Duchess said that she has taken a special interest in the issue of preserving the planet for future generations, worrying about what the state of the world looks like in the years to come for her grandchildren. </p> <p>“Becoming a grandmother has really changed my outlook on life,” she revealed.</p> <p>“I have always loved nature and the great outdoors, but now I find myself reflecting on what sort of world we are going to leave to our grandchildren’s generation."</p> <p>“Let’s be honest, it doesn’t look great, does it? So far, my generation has failed to take the big decisions necessary to safeguard the future of the planet, to the point that scientists are telling us the changes we are seeing to our climate and biodiversity are becoming irreversible."</p> <p>“I really hope we can take global, concerted action to change things. We have a responsibility to do so."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

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Line-up clues revealed for 2024 I'm A Celeb cast

<p>With just a few weeks to go before a group of celebrities are dropped in the jungle, Network Ten have dropped a series of clues alluding to this year's <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em> lineup. </p> <p>Premiering in late March and hosted by veteran Julia Morris and newcomer Robert Irwin, the 10th season of the show will see celebrities thrown into the South African jungle and go head-to-head in daring challenges.</p> <p>At the end of the weeks long challenge, the winner will take home $100,000 in prize money for the charity of their choice.</p> <p>With the full line-up of celebs still unknown, Network Ten have dropped a few hints about some of this year's contestants, with online sleuths dedicated to deciphering the clues. </p> <p>So far, it's been revealed that a "controversial TV star" will be heading into the jungle, alongside a Gold medallist who is “diverting from Paris” to take part in the competition. </p> <p>Another celeb joining is an "international comedian loved by the royals", with many online believing this clue is alluding to UK comic Michael McIntyre.</p> <p>Fans believe a former contestant of <em>The Bachelor</em> or <em>MAFS</em> could be joining the line-up, with one celeb teased as a “bad boy” who “breaks hearts”.</p> <p>Also joining the 2024 line-up is an AFL legend with a premiership win under their belt, and a stage performer who is “ditching his famous family” to head into the jungle.</p> <p>Lastly, a celebrity cook is joining the cast, with diehard fans already ruling out Miguel Maestre, Colin Fassnidge and Poh Ling Yeow who have competed on the show in previous years. </p> <p>The 2024 season of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em> will premiere on Ten on March 27th.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Ten </em></p>

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Experience the magic of Ireland down under: A Taste of Ireland 2024 Australian Tour

<p>Get ready to immerse yourself in the rich culture, captivating music and mesmerising dance of Ireland as <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>A Taste of Ireland</em></a> returns to enchant audiences across Australia in 2024. </p> <p>Featuring World Champion dancers from <em>Lord of the Dance</em> and <em>Riverdance</em>, prepare to be transported to the rolling green hills and vibrant streets of the Emerald Isle, right in your hometown!  </p> <p><strong>What is <em>A Taste of Ireland</em>?</strong></p> <p><em>A Taste of Ireland</em> is not just a performance; it's an unforgettable journey through the heart and soul of Ireland. Combining traditional and contemporary Irish music and dance, this spectacular show showcases the incredible talent and passion of some of Ireland's finest performers.</p> <p><strong>What to expect</strong></p> <p>From the moment the first note is struck, and the first step is danced, you'll be captivated by the energy and artistry on stage. Feel the rhythm of the bodhrán drum reverberate through your bones, and let the fiddles whisk you away to a land of ancient myths and legends.</p> <p>Prepare to be dazzled by the lightning-fast footwork and intricate choreography of the dancers as they weave tales of love, loss and triumph through their movements. Each step tells a story, each leap a celebration of life itself.</p> <p><strong>Why attend?</strong></p> <p>Whether you're a die-hard fan of Irish culture or simply looking for a night of entertainment unlike any other, <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> offers something for everyone. It's an opportunity to witness the magic of Ireland's rich heritage brought to life before your very eyes.</p> <p>Forget your troubles for an evening and let the music and dance sweep you away on a journey you won't soon forget. Whether you're tapping your feet to the lively jigs and reels or wiping away tears during a poignant ballad, <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> is an experience that will touch your heart and soul.</p> <p><strong>Tour dates and locations</strong></p> <p>The 2024 Australian Tour of <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> will be making stops across Australia for 80 shows from March to July, bringing the magic of Ireland to a venue near you. <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Check the tour schedule</a> to find out when this unforgettable experience will be coming to your area.</p> <p><strong>Get your tickets now!</strong></p> <p>Don't miss your chance to experience the beauty and excitement of <em>A Taste of Ireland</em>. Tickets are selling fast, so book yours today and get ready for a night of music, dance, and memories that will last a lifetime. </p> <p>Witness the show that has received rave reviews across the globe. Don't rely on the luck of the Irish – <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">book now</a>, because tickets are selling out fast!</p> <p><em>Images: Supplied.</em></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with Pace Live.</em></p>

Music

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"I think I'm done": The question that made Woolies CEO leave interview

<p>Woolworths CEO Brad Banducci has cracked under the pressure during a tense interview with ABC's <em>Four Corners</em>. </p> <p>The supermarket boss sat down with reporter Angus Grigg as part of a deep dive into the supermarket industry in Australia amid the ACCC's investigation into allegations of unfair price gouging.</p> <p>The program questioned how supermarkets have been profiting from rising prices amidst the cost of living crisis and spoke with a number of key players, including Banducci and Coles boss Leah Weckert. </p> <p>The supermarkets have long denied the allegations have since become the focus of investigations by both the Senate and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).</p> <p>“Rod Sims, the former head of the ACCC, says that we have one of the most concentrated supermarket [sectors] in the world, is he lying?” Griggs asked Banducci.</p> <p>“It’s not true. [He’s] retired, by the way,” Banducci said.</p> <p>The comment caught Griggs off guard, to which he responded, “I don’t think you would impugn his integrity and his understanding of competition law. He retired 18 months ago.”</p> <p>Banducci then began to appear agitated and asked if his comments could be removed.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">This is what happened when Four Corners asked Woolworths CEO Brad Banducci about the lack of competition in the Australian grocery market. </p> <p>Watch the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/4Corners?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#4Corners</a> documentary tonight: <a href="https://t.co/dDRYGLaw2i">https://t.co/dDRYGLaw2i</a> <a href="https://t.co/bsrJD9IETB">pic.twitter.com/bsrJD9IETB</a></p> <p>— ABC News (@abcnews) <a href="https://twitter.com/abcnews/status/1759391473567490367?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 19, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>“Can we take that out? Is that ok? Angus, are we going to leave it in?” he said.</p> <p>“I shouldn’t have said that about Rod, about him being retired. I mean, he is retired, but I shouldn’t have said that. Are we going to leave that in there?”</p> <p>Upon being told that his comments were “on the record” and would not be taken out, Banducci said, “I think I’m done guys.”</p> <p>“I do this with good intent, and I don’t do this with bad intent,” he said as he walked away.</p> <p>“Really, you’re walking out?” Grigg asked.</p> <p>Banducci then disappeared from view, reportedly to talk with his PR team, before returning a few moments later to complete the interview.</p> <p>Speaking to <em>ABC’s News Breakfast </em>on Monday after the episode aired, Griggs called the move “pretty startling”.</p> <p>“I think it shows you that, there you have the boss of the largest supermarket chain in the country really unwilling to face too many questions,” he said. </p> <p>“It shows how little scrutiny they’ve had over the years and I think that’s a really big problem.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: ABC</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"I'm lowkey dying": Brave young woman with terminal illness shares her final wish

<p>Samantha Bulloch was given three years to live after she was diagnosed with gut-wrenching stage four bowel cancer at the young age of 28. </p> <p>A year later, Bulloch has shared a heartfelt plea on social media in hopes of meeting her idol- pop star Taylor Swift. </p> <p>The Swiftie has scored a ticket to Taylor's final show in Sydney on the 26th of February, but she’s calling on “anyone to hook a sister up” so she can meet-and-greet the singer backstage. </p> <p>“I’m low key dying and honestly this would just make my year,” she said in a video shared to TikTok. </p> <p>“I’m going out on a limb here so I’m just shooting my shot and we’re going to see what happens.</p> <p>“If anyone has any connections... I would love you forever.”</p> <p>Bulloch has been a fan of the megastar since she was 15 years old. </p> <p>“Taylor means so much to me, and I’d love the opportunity to tell her just how much of an impact she’s made on my life,” she told <em>7Life</em>. </p> <p>“I’ve loved her since I was 15, and her music has seen me through so many chapters in my life — including this one.</p> <p>“I love that her music transcends all kinds of walks of life, and so many of us connect with it so personally, despite the differences in our situations.</p> <p>“She has a real talent for making you feel less alone.I recently got a new tattoo of the lyric, ‘For the hope of it all’, from her song called August.</p> <p>“I adopted that lyric during my experience with cancer. I’m choosing to live for the hope of it all.”</p> <p>As she faces terminal cancer, Bulloch said that she is determined to live the rest of her life to the fullest. </p> <p>"I’m hoping and praying for many more years than what I’ve been given. But if not, I intend to try and maximise these few I’ve got left to the best of my ability," she said. </p> <p>“Thankfully I’ve always been quite a positive and hopeful person, and that hasn’t left me during this experience.”</p> <p>Bulloch was diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2023, after experiencing low iron levels, fatigue and blood in her stool. </p> <p>She is currently on a chemotherapy regime and an immunotherapy drug and added that she also hopes to tick off many of her bucket list destinations this year, including visiting UK, Paris, New York and Tasmania. </p> <p>“My doctor has said I can, providing the treatment I’m on now works," the hopeful 29-year-old said. </p> <p>“Thankfully treatment has been working so hopefully in a few months I’ll be able to do that."</p> <p><em>Images: Samantha Bulloch </em></p>

Caring

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Grandma faces deportation after 40 years in Australia

<p>Mary Ellis, 74, has lived in Australia for over 40 years, but now she faces deportation. </p> <p>The grandmother is known as a local hero in northern New South Wales, for her charitable acts including helping feed the homeless in Tweed Heads, raising money for the Salvation Army. </p> <p>She was even nominated for the NSW Volunteer of the Year award last year. </p> <p>Despite her tireless efforts to help out other Australians, the senior might soon have to leave the country she has called home since she was 31-years-old. </p> <p>"(I have a) Driver's License, ID card, Medicare Card, Pension card. Everything Australians have," Ellis told <em>A Current Affair</em>. </p> <p>"I thought well, I'm a permanent resident.</p> <p>"You know, I carry on doing my daily - what I do every day. Nobody said anything."</p> <p>Ellis, who was born in London and moved here with her partner in 1981, was told that her partner had already arranged permanent visas for them.</p> <p>But one day, the Department of Home Affairs suddenly decided she's got to go. </p> <p>"This is my home and I love Australia ... I want to stay here," the grandma tearfully said. </p> <p>"Just let me get Australian citizenship, please let me.. that's what I want."</p> <p>Ellis has a son and two granddaughters in Australia, who are all Australian Citizens. </p> <p>Migration agent Stanley Schneider has been helping Ellis pro-bono since she was asked to leave, said that she was an absorbed person under the Migration Act and should be allowed to stay. </p> <p>"She's always paid her taxes.. she's never even had a speeding ticket," Schneider said.</p> <p>"She's never infringed anything. She's never offended anyone."</p> <p>The Migration Act requires someone to have been in Australia since April 2, 1984 and not have left, but the Department of Home Affairs claims Mary left the country three times under different aliases.</p> <p>Ellis denies the allegations.</p> <p>"I love Australia. (I) didn't want to go anywhere else," she said.</p> <p>She also said that she has documents that prove she was in Australia during the timeframe in question, which includes a job reference from a Tasmanian restaurant that she worked at from 1983 to 1986, and a Medicare enrolment letter signed by then federal Health Minister Neal Blewett.</p> <p>Ellis' migration agent said that the documents would not have been sent to her had she not been in the country. </p> <p>"Mary Ellis is a decent person. A person we should be absolutely thrilled to have in Australia," Schneider said. </p> <p>"And she's an Australian, Let's face it."</p> <p>In a statement shared to <em>A Current Affair</em>, the Department of Home Affairs said that they do not comment on individual cases. </p> <p>"People who do not have the right to remain in Australia are expected to depart," a government spokesperson said.</p> <p>"Individuals who provide incorrect information may be liable to have their visa cancelled under the provisions of the Migration Act."</p> <p><em>Image: Nine/ A Current Affair</em></p>

Legal

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“The system is too soft”: Ally Langdon fires up over stabbing death of Vyleen White

<p>Ally Langdon has called for an overhaul of the youth crime system in the wake of the violent death of Queensland grandmother Vyleen White. </p> <p>The <em>A Current Affair</em> host was discussing the death of the 70-year-old, as she became visibly frustrated while talking about the rising rates of youth crime.</p> <p>Langdon hinted at a nationwide issue, citing the recent stabbing death of young doctor Ash Gordon in Melbourne, who was also allegedly murdered by a teenager less than a month ago.</p> <p>“Whatever we’re doing to deal with youth crime, it’s failing,” she said.</p> <p>“The police do everything they can, but the system is too soft on serious crime, and we have lost faith in it and our politicians.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C29TB0HvWGj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C29TB0HvWGj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by A Current Affair (@acurrentaffair9)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Ms White’s daughter and widowed husband echoed Ally's sentiment thoughts on the program, saying, “Justice has to be done, not for my sake, for the memory of Vyleen.”</p> <p>“People want action and harsher laws for crimes they are committing,” her husband Victor said.</p> <p>“For several years (politicians) have been promising a lot, a lot of rubbish talk to the public out there, and nothing happens."</p> <p>“All you hear is increase of violence, car stealing … This is due to slackness in the law."</p> <p>“The law is weak as water.”</p> <p> Ms White’s daughter, Cindy Micallef said harsher penalties for youth crimes are needed.</p> <p>“Youth crime, I hate to say it, it’s like having a koala, it’s a protected species, there’s no action,” she said.</p> <p>“They do heinous crimes and it’s getting worse, I don’t care what nationality or race.</p> <p>“If we let people get away with this, it’s going to increase.”</p> <p>A 16-year-old boy was <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/update-on-tragic-stabbing-of-queensland-grandmother" target="_blank" rel="noopener">charged</a> with Ms White’s murder on Tuesday morning, and is also facing charges of unlawful use of a motor vehicle and stealing. </p> <p>Vyleen was <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/grandmother-fatally-stabbed-in-front-of-granddaughter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fatally stabbed</a> in the chest in Town Square Redbank Plains Shopping Centre’s underground carpark around 6pm on Saturday, while she was shopping with her granddaughter. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook / A Current Affair</em></p>

Legal

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Heartbroken parents of slain Melbourne doctor break silence

<p>Dr Ash Gordon's heartbroken parents have spoken out about the moment they found out their son had died. </p> <p>The Melbourne GP was allegedly killed after <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/major-update-in-tragic-death-of-young-melbourne-doctor" target="_blank" rel="noopener">confronting two teenage</a> boys who had allegedly broken into his home in Doncaster in the early hours on Saturday, January 13.</p> <p>Dr Gordon’s grieving mother Catherine, recalled the moment she was woken by the phone call no parent wants to receive. </p> <p>“He said that Ashley had gone. And I said gone where? He’s gone. He’s no longer with us,” Mrs Gordon told <em>A Current Affair </em>about the moment her son's housemate delivered the devastating news. </p> <p>“I said, ‘Don’t lie, you’re joking.‘ And I hung up on him."</p> <p>Holding back tears, Mrs Gordon also shared the denial she went through as she received the call from a detective. </p> <p>"Then the detective rang and I told him that I didn’t believe him, and he said 'how can I get you to believe?', I said 'until there is a police person in uniform in front of me, it's not happening'"</p> <p>"Well you don't want to believe do you?" <em>A Current Affair </em>host Ally Langdon replied, and both parents shook their heads. </p> <p>“We saw the police car coming up, and I just prayed to God they’d just keep going. I didn’t want them to turn into the driveway, but unfortunately, it happened.”</p> <p>Ally Langdon who was brought to tears during the interview added: “It’s a cruel contrast isn’t it? That Ash has dedicated his life to saving lives, yet his was taken in this horrible way." </p> <p>The 33-year-old doctor was found by police less than a kilometre from his home, but unfortunately he died at the scene. </p> <p>In the days following the incident, two 16-year-old boys with Dr Gordon’s murder as well as aggravated burglary and theft.</p> <p>Dr Gordon's family have since held a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/i-ll-see-you-again-one-day-sister-of-slain-doctor-s-emotional-tribute" target="_blank" rel="noopener">memorial service</a> for him to honour the slain doctor. </p> <p><em>Image: A Current Affair</em></p>

Family & Pets

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“I’m in trouble here”: Hughesy recalls disastrous surfing accident

<p dir="ltr">Dave Hughes has recalled the details of a horrific surfing accident on New Year’s Eve, that resulted in him being rushed to hospital in excruciating pain. </p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking candidly on his <em>Hughesy, Ed &amp; Erin</em> radio show, the 53-year-old shared what happened on the Surfers Paradise beach as he was ringing in the New Year. </p> <p dir="ltr">He told his co-hosts Erin Molan and Ed Kavalee that he was having surfing lessons when the disaster unfolded. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s New Year’s Eve, I decide to go surfing and I crash on a huge wave,” Hughesy began.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’ve all got out big boards, and the problem is, the boards are too big.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“So, and, I didn’t listen properly when the instructor said, ‘If you’re going to fall off your board, fall off backwards, don’t fall off forwards’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“And I didn’t really realise why, but I found out why.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C2HC0_ILybf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C2HC0_ILybf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Hughesy, Ed &amp; Erin (@hughesyedanderin)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">While still sporting a sling on his arm from the accident, Hughesy explained that he fell forwards off a wave, and the surfboard took the next wave, which was directly behind him.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The board got a really good wave and the board smashed into my back and dislocated my shoulder,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was immediately like, ‘I am in trouble here’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“The instructor saw me and said, ‘are you okay?’ and I said, ‘I don’t think so.’”</p> <p dir="ltr">“He started laughing! And I’m like, ‘no, I’m really, I’m really in pain’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Still trying to keep his sense of humour through the ordeal, Hughesy described the pain as “worse than childbirth”, with the situation only getting worse when he “sat on the beach crying for an hour” waiting for the ambulance to arrive. </p> <p dir="ltr">Hughesy <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/health/caring/hughesy-gives-health-update-after-being-rushed-to-hospital">first shared</a> the news of his accident in the days after he was released from hospital, sharing a series of photos to his Instagram from the fateful day. </p> <p dir="ltr">He shared that he had "morphine and the rest of them" after enduring "two hours of the worst pain of my life", thanking the hospital staff who treated him, as well as the Surfers Paradise Surf Club before admitting he will "be in a sling for a while". </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Instagram / 2DayFM</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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I’m trying to lose weight and eat healthily. Why do I feel so hungry all the time? What can I do about it?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nick-fuller-219993">Nick Fuller</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p>Benjamin Franklin, one of the founding fathers of the United States, famously said nothing is certain except death and taxes. But I think we can include “you’ll feel hungry when you’re trying to lose weight” as another certainty.</p> <p>The reason is basic biology. So how does this work – and what can you do about it?</p> <h2>Hormones control our feelings of hunger</h2> <p>Several hormones play an essential role in regulating our feelings of hunger and fullness. The most important are ghrelin – often called the hunger hormone – and leptin.</p> <p>When we’re hungry, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11739476/">ghrelin</a> is released by our stomach, lighting up a part of our brain called the hypothalamus to tell us to eat.</p> <p>When it’s time to stop eating, hormones, including <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8717038/">leptin</a>, are released from different organs, such as our gut and fat tissue, to signal to the brain that we’re full.</p> <h2>Dieting disrupts the process</h2> <p>But when we change our diet and start losing weight, we disrupt how these <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4766925/">appetite hormones function</a>.</p> <p>This triggers a process that stems from our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Their bodies developed this mechanism as a survival response to adapt to periods of deprivation and protect against starvation.</p> <p>The levels of hormones <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23126426/">managing our hunger increase</a>, making us feel hungrier to tell us to eat more, while the ones responsible for signalling we’re full decrease their levels, intensifying our feelings of hunger.</p> <p>We end up increasing our calorie consumption so we eat more to regain the weight we lost.</p> <p>But worse, even after the kilos creep back on, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22029981/">our appetite hormones don’t restore</a> to their normal levels – they keep telling us to eat more so we put on a little extra fat. This is our body’s way of preparing for the next bout of starvation we will impose through dieting.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are things we can do to manage our appetite, including:</p> <h2>1. Eating a large, healthy breakfast every day</h2> <p>One of the easiest ways to manage our feelings of hunger throughout the day is to eat most of our food earlier in the day and taper our meal sizes so dinner is the smallest meal.</p> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32073608/">Research</a> shows a low-calorie or small breakfast leads to increased feelings of hunger, specifically appetite for sweets, across the course of the day.</p> <p><a href="https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(22)00344-8">Another study</a> found the same effect. Participants went on a calorie-controlled diet for two months, where they ate 45% of their calories for breakfast, 35% at lunch and 20% at dinner for the first month, before switching to eat their largest meal in the evening and their smallest in the morning. Eating the largest meal at breakfast resulted in decreased hunger throughout the day.</p> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32073608/">Research</a> also shows we burn the calories from a meal 2.5-times more efficiently in the morning than the evening. So emphasising breakfast over dinner is good not just for hunger control, but also weight management.</p> <h2>2. Prioritising protein</h2> <p>Protein helps contain feelings of hunger. This is because protein-rich foods such as lean meats, tofu and beans suppress the appetite-stimulating ghrelin and stimulate another hormone called <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413106002713">peptide YY</a> that makes you feel full.</p> <p>And just as eating a breakfast is vital to managing our hunger, what we eat is important too, with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24703415/">research</a> confirming a breakfast containing protein-rich foods, such as eggs, will leave us feeling fuller for longer.</p> <p>But this doesn’t mean just eating foods with protein. Meals need to be balanced and include a source of protein, wholegrain carb and healthy fat to meet our dietary needs. For example, eggs on wholegrain toast with avocado.</p> <h2>3. Filling up with nuts and foods high in good fats and fibre</h2> <p>Nuts often get a bad rap – thanks to the misconception they cause weight gain – but nuts can help us manage our hunger and weight. The filling fibre and good fats found in nuts take longer to digest, meaning our hunger is satisfied for longer.</p> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12791613/">Studies</a> suggest you can include up to 68 grams per day of nuts without affecting your weight.</p> <p>Avocados are also high in fibre and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, making them another excellent food for managing feelings of fullness. This is backed by a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6567160/">study</a> confirming participants who ate a breakfast incorporating avocado felt more satisfied and less hungry than participants who ate a meal containing the same calories but with lower fat and fibre content.</p> <p>Similarly, eating foods that are high in soluble fibre – such as <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24820437/">beans</a> and vegetables – make us feel fuller. This type of fibre attracts water from our gut, forming a gel that slows digestion.</p> <h2>4. Eating mindfully</h2> <p>When we take time to really be aware of and enjoy the food we’re eating, we slow down and eat far less.</p> <p>A <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28718396/">review</a> of 68 studies found eating mindfully helps us better recognise feelings of fullness. Mindful eating provides our brain enough time to recognise and adapt to the signals from our stomach telling us we’re full.</p> <p>Slow down your food consumption by sitting at the dinner table and use smaller utensils to reduce the volume of food you eat with each mouthful.</p> <h2>5. Getting enough sleep</h2> <p>Sleep deprivation disturbs our <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1389945708700133">appetite hormones</a>, increasing our feelings of hunger and <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms3259">triggering cravings</a>. So aim to get at least seven hours of uninterrupted sleep a night.</p> <p>Try switching off your devices <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1477153515584979">two hours before bed</a> to boost your body’s secretion of sleep-inducing hormones like melatonin.</p> <h2>6. Managing stress</h2> <p>Stress increases our <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18568078/">body’s production of cortisol</a> and triggers food cravings.</p> <p>So take time out when you need it and set aside time for stress-relieving activities. This can be as simple as getting outdoors. A <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00722/full">2019 study</a> found sitting or walking outdoors at least three times a week could reduce cortisol levels by 21%.</p> <h2>7. Avoiding depriving ourselves</h2> <p>When we change our diet to lose weight or eat healthier, we typically restrict certain foods or food groups.</p> <p>However, this <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18568078/">heightens activity</a> in our mesocorticolimbic circuit – the reward system part of the brain – often resulting in us craving the foods we’re trying to avoid. Foods that give us pleasure release feel-good chemicals called endorphins and learning chemicals called dopamine, which enable us to remember – and give in to – that feel-good response.</p> <p>When we change our diet, activity in our hypothalamus – the clever part of the brain that regulates emotions and food intake – <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18568078/">also reduces</a>, decreasing our control and judgement. It often triggers a psychological response dubbed the “what-the-hell effect”, when we indulge in something we think we shouldn’t feel guilty about and then go back for even more.</p> <p>Don’t completely cut out your favourite foods when you go on a diet or deprive yourself if you’re hungry. It will take the pleasure out of eating and eventually you’ll give into your cravings.</p> <p><em>At the Boden Group, Charles Perkins Centre, we are studying the science of obesity and running clinical trials for weight loss. You can <a href="https://redcap.sydney.edu.au/surveys/?s=RKTXPPPHKY">register here</a> to express your interest.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. 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More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nick-fuller-219993">Nick Fuller</a>, Charles Perkins Centre Research Program Leader, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/im-trying-to-lose-weight-and-eat-healthily-why-do-i-feel-so-hungry-all-the-time-what-can-i-do-about-it-215808">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Oprah's weight-loss backflip: "I'm done with the shame"

<p>Oprah Winfrey has become one of the first A-list celebrities to openly admit that she has resorted to using weight loss medication after months of speculation, according to <em>Page Six</em>. </p> <p>“I now use it as I feel I need it, as a tool to manage not yo-yoing,” she told <em>People Magazine</em>. </p> <p>“The fact that there’s a medically approved prescription for managing weight and staying healthier, in my lifetime, feels like relief, like redemption, like a gift, and not something to hide behind and once again be ridiculed for.”</p> <p>The 69-year-old added, “I’m absolutely done with the shaming from other people and particularly myself.”</p> <p>This reversal comes after the actress rocked a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/slimmed-down-oprah-addresses-ozempic-rumours" target="_blank" rel="noopener">slimmed down look</a> at the premiere for the reboot of <em>The Color Purple </em>last week. </p> <p>She had previously denied using weight loss drugs in an episode of<em> Oprah Daily’s The Life You Want: The State of Weight, </em>where she said turning to weight loss medication is "the easy way out.”</p> <p>Although she did not disclose exactly which drug she took, or whether it was the celebrity favourite Type II diabetes medication Ozempic, the media mogul revealed the reason why she had a change of heart. </p> <p>She told <em>People Magazine</em> that she became more open to using a pharmaceutical after conducting a panel discussion with medical experts in July.</p> <p>“I had the biggest ‘aha’ along with many people in that audience,” she said. </p> <p>“I realised I’d been blaming myself all these years for being overweight, and I have a predisposition that no amount of willpower is going to control.”</p> <p>She also shared the success she has had with the unnamed medication, claiming that she gained only half a pound “instead of gaining eight pounds like [she] did last year,” after Thanksgiving. </p> <p>Winfrey added that ultimately it wasn't about the number on the scale but “it was a second shot for me to live a more vital and vibrant life.”</p> <p>The O Magazine founder also said that the medication were just a larger part of her health and fitness regimen, which includes hiking. </p> <p>“I know everybody thought I was on it, but I worked so damn hard. I know that if I’m not also working out and vigilant about all the other things, it doesn’t work for me.”</p> <p><em>Images: </em><em>Arturo Holmes/The Hollywood Reporter via Getty Images</em></p> <p> </p>

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