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Labor Senator dies following health battle

<p>Labor Senator Linda White has passed away following a health battle. </p> <p>Just last month, the ALP Senator for Victoria announced that she would be taking leave from the senate to "deal with some health issues".</p> <p>"For the next while I will be focusing on getting well again so I can return to my full duties representing the people of Victoria," the statement read. </p> <p>However, today Prime Minister Anthony Albanese confirmed her death and led a wave of tributes for the senator. </p> <p>"All of our hearts in the Labor family are broken at the passing of Senator Linda White last evening," Albanese said.</p> <p>"Linda was formidable. A beloved friend, a valued colleague, a dedicated parliamentarian and, through all her efforts in the wider labour movement, a devout supporter of working Australians."</p> <p>"Linda believed in a better, fairer and more compassionate Australia," Albanese added</p> <p>"A belief that was always backed by her energy and action."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="pt">Vale Senator Linda White. <a href="https://t.co/b70CTMWMJU">pic.twitter.com/b70CTMWMJU</a></p> <p>— Anthony Albanese (@AlboMP) <a href="https://twitter.com/AlboMP/status/1763340992403681721?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 29, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>Labor MP Tony Burke also paid tribute to White and praised her achievements. </p> <p>"Linda campaigned for years in the union movement for paid family and domestic violence leave. As a senator she helped make it law so no one would have to choose between safety and pay. RIP," he wrote. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Linda White leaves an extraordinary legacy for working people in Australia. Linda campaigned for years in the union movement for paid family and domestic violence leave. As a Senator she helped make it law so no one would have to choose between safety and pay.<br />RIP</p> <p>— Tony Burke (@Tony_Burke) <a href="https://twitter.com/Tony_Burke/status/1763331902856155521?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 29, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>Fellow senator and Foreign Minister Penny Wong praised White for modelling "integrity, persistence, and skill".</p> <p>"Linda fought the illness that has now claimed her life privately, but with all the tenacity and determination that has marked not just her short time in the Senate, but her decades of commitment to the Labor movement and Australian workers," she said.</p> <p>The leader of the opposition in the Senate, Liberal Simon Birmingham also offered his condolences and praised her work. </p> <p>"The Senate has lost a determined and passionate sitting senator far too soon," Birmingham said in a statement.</p> <p>"A senator who clearly had much more to contribute, but who will be remembered with respect by those who had the privilege to serve with her."</p> <p>White was elected the ALP Senator for Victoria in 2022. </p> <p>Prior to this she had a long career in law as a trade union official.</p> <p>She served as vice president of the Australian Council of Trade Unions for 10 years, and was assistant national secretary of the Australian Services Union (ASU) from 1995 to 2020.</p> <p>The ASU also shared their condolences after the loss of "one of our great warriors".</p> <p>"We wish Linda could have taken up this fight for longer. However, we are so fortunate to have had Linda in our lives for as long as we did, and that she dedicated so much of her life to building up the next generation of activists and change makers," the statement read.</p> <p>"Her strength, smarts, and determination for equality will live on through them."</p> <p><em>Image: X</em></p>

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Eating leafy greens could be better for oral health than using mouthwash

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mia-cousins-burleigh-1201153">Mia Cousins Burleigh</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-the-west-of-scotland-1385">University of the West of Scotland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/siobhan-paula-moran-1506183">Siobhan Paula Moran</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-the-west-of-scotland-1385">University of the West of Scotland</a></em></p> <p>Over half the adult population in the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26052472">UK and US</a> have gum disease. Typical treatments include <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61912-4">mouthwash</a> and in severe cases, <a href="https://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/vetn.2017.8.10.542">antibiotics</a>. These treatments have side effects, such as dry mouth, the development of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30967854/">antimicrobial resistance</a> and increased <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61912-4">blood pressure</a>.</p> <p>But research has indicated that a molecule called <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">nitrate</a>, which is found in leafy green vegetables, has fewer side effects and offers greater benefits for oral health. And it could be used as a natural alternative for treating oral disease.</p> <p>Inadequate brushing and flossing leads to the build up of <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">dental plaque</a>, a sticky layer of bacteria, on the surface of teeth and gums. Plaque causes tooth decay and gum disease. Sugary and acidic foods, dry mouth, and smoking can also contribute to bad breath, tooth decay, and gum infections.</p> <p>The two main types of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. <a href="https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/etm.2019.8381">Gingivitis</a> causes redness, swelling and bleeding of the gums. <a href="https://www.spandidos-publications.com/10.3892/etm.2019.8381">Periodontitis</a> is a more advanced form of gum disease, causing damage to the soft tissues and bones supporting the teeth.</p> <p>Periodontal disease can therefore, lead to tooth loss and, when bacteria from the mouth enter the bloodstream, can also contribute to the development of <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/bdjteam2015163">systemic disorders</a> such as cardiovascular disease, dementia, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.</p> <h2>Leafy greens may be the secret</h2> <p>Leafy greens and root vegetables are bursting with <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2666149723000312">vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants</a> – and it’s no secret that a diet consisting of these vegetables is crucial for maintaining a healthy weight, boosting the immune system, and preventing <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2048004016661435">heart disease, cancer and diabetes.</a> The multiple health benefits of leafy greens are partly because spinach, lettuce and beetroots are brimming with <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">nitrate</a>, which can be reduced to nitric oxide by nitrate-reducing bacteria inside the mouth.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7zrRlMGeBes?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><figcaption><span class="caption">Popeye knew a thing or two about the health benefits of eating leafy greens. Boomerang Official, 2017.</span></figcaption></figure> <p>Nitric oxide is known to <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006295222004191">lower blood pressure</a> and improve <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243755#:%7E:text=Nitrate%2Drich%20beetroot%20juice%20offsets,healthy%20male%20runners%20%7C%20PLOS%20ONE">exercise performance</a>. However, in the mouth, it helps to prevent the overgrowth of bad bacteria and reduces <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243755#:%7E:text=Nitrate%2Drich%20beetroot%20juice%20offsets,healthy%20male%20runners%20%7C%20PLOS%20ONE">oral acidity</a>, both of which can cause gum disease and tooth decay.</p> <p>As part of our research on nitrate and oral health, <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243755#:%7E:text=Nitrate%2Drich%20beetroot%20juice%20offsets,healthy%20male%20runners%20%7C%20PLOS%20ONE">we studied competitive athletes</a>. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9839431/">Athletes are prone to gum disease</a> due to high intake of carbohydrates – which can cause inflammation of the gum tissues – stress, and dry mouth from breathing hard during training.</p> <p>Our study showed that beetroot juice (containing approximately 12 <a href="https://www.nursingtimes.net/students/an-easy-guide-to-mmols-09-02-2012/">millimole</a> of nitrate) protected their teeth from acidic sports drinks and carbohydrate gels during exercise – suggesting that nitrate could be used as a prebiotic by athletes to reduce the risk of tooth decay.</p> <p>Nitrate offers a lot of promise as an oral health <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">prebiotic</a>. Good oral hygiene and a nitrate rich diet could be the key to a healthier body, a vibrant smile and disease-free gums. This is good news for those most at risk of oral health deterioration such as <a href="https://www.news-medical.net/health/Periodontitis-and-Pregnancy.aspx">pregnant women</a>, and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8771712/">the elderly</a>.</p> <p>In the UK, antiseptic mouthwashes containing <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-61912-4">chlorhexidine</a> are commonly used to treat dental plaque and gum disease. Unfortunately, these mouthwashes are a blunderbuss approach to oral health, as they indiscriminately remove both good and bad bacteria and increase oral acidity, which can cause disease.</p> <p>Worryingly, early research also indicates that chlorhexidine may contribute to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30967854/">antimicrobial resistance</a>. Resistance occurs when bacteria and fungi survive the effects of one or more <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4768623/">antimicrobial drugs</a> due to repeated exposure to these treatments. Antimicrobial resistance is a <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(21)02724-0/fulltext">global health concern</a>, predicted to cause 10 million deaths yearly by the year 2050.</p> <p>In contrast, dietary nitrate is more targeted. Nitrate eliminates disease-associated bacteria, reduces oral acidity and creates a balanced <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2944498/">oral microbiome</a>. The oral microbiome refers to all the microorganisms in the mouth. Nitrate offers exciting potential as an <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">oral health prebiotic</a>, which can be used to prevent disease onset or limit disease progression.</p> <h2>How many leafy greens for pearly whites?</h2> <p>So how much should we consume daily? As a rule of thumb, a generous helping of spinach, kale or beetroot at mealtimes contains about 6-10 mmol of nitrate and offers immediate health benefits.</p> <p>Work we have done with our collaborators has shown that treating <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-69931-x">plaque samples</a> from periodontal disease patients with 6.5 mmol of nitrate increased healthy bacteria levels and reduced acidity.</p> <p>For example, consuming <a href="https://aap.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/JPER.20-0778">lettuce juice</a> for two weeks reduced gum inflammation and increased healthy bacteria levels in patients with gum disease.</p> <p>Growing evidence suggests that nitrate is a cornerstone of oral health. Crunching on a portion of vegetables at mealtimes can help to prevent or treat oral disease and keeps the mouth fresh and healthy.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/221181/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mia-cousins-burleigh-1201153"><em>Mia Cousins Burleigh</em></a><em>, Lecturer, School of Health and Life Sciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-the-west-of-scotland-1385">University of the West of Scotland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/siobhan-paula-moran-1506183">Siobhan Paula Moran</a>, PhD candidate, School of Health and Life Sciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-the-west-of-scotland-1385">University of the West of Scotland</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/eating-leafy-greens-could-be-better-for-oral-health-than-using-mouthwash-221181">original article</a>.</em></p>

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"That's cheap": Tim Minchin attacked by former senator over emotional moment

<p>In the wake of tragedy, renowned Australian musician and comedian Tim Minchin faced an unexpected wave of criticism from former government minister Amanda Vanstone.</p> <p>Minchin, who recently <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/tim-minchin-s-tragic-mid-show-announcement" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shared the heartbreaking news</a> of his mother's death during a concert in Sydney, was accused by Vanstone of "cheapening" the experience by making it public. The public response to Vanstone's comments was swift and overwhelmingly negative.</p> <p>During last Friday night's concert, Minchin bared his soul to the audience, disclosing that his beloved mother, Ros, had been battling terminal blood cancer for three years. The emotionally charged performance included anecdotes about his mother's life, interspersed with songs he had composed in her honour. The devastating climax came when Minchin revealed that his mother had passed away just a day before, at the age of 74.</p> <p>In a late-night tweet following the performance, former Senator Amanda Vanstone criticised Minchin for sharing such a personal and private moment with the public. </p> <p>"Losing a parent is hard," Vanstone wrote. "Whatever age and however expected. But to me it’s a private grief. Making it public seems to cheapen it, make it marketable."</p> <p>The comments struck a nerve with many, igniting a firestorm of backlash on social media.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Losing a parent is hard. Whatever age and however expected. But to me it’s a private grief. Making it public seems to cheapen it, make it marketable : Tim Minchin stuns audience with sad announcement <a href="https://t.co/tSK3LhhvlX">https://t.co/tSK3LhhvlX</a> via <a href="https://twitter.com/newscomauHQ?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@newscomauHQ</a></p> <p>— Amanda Vanstone (@amandavanstone) <a href="https://twitter.com/amandavanstone/status/1724032047511916677?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 13, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Readers expressed their indignation at Vanstone's perceived lack of empathy, with many arguing that everyone processes grief differently and that Minchin's decision to share his pain was a personal choice. Some accused Vanstone of disrespecting Minchin's right to grieve in his own way, and others called for her to retract her statement.</span></p> <p>"Shut down your account you heartless crone - but then you've always been that. However, you've never been cheap - with our money," read one angry post. </p> <p>"It brings those who have lost their parent together to share their grief. As someone who lost their mum to cancer at a young age, this sharing is what gets me and many others through. You’re entitled to privacy. He’s entitled to share and not be labeled as opportunistic," read a second comment.</p> <p>"Imagine disrespecting someone’s right to grieve in a way of their choosing. That’s cheap," another said.</p> <p>Among the many voices condemning Vanstone's comments, an overwhelming outpouring of support for Tim Minchin also emerged. Fans commended the artist for his courage in continuing with the show despite the family tragedy. Many emphasised that sharing grief in a public space can be a source of solace and connection for those who have experienced similar losses. The consensus among Minchin's supporters was that his decision to proceed with the concert demonstrated strength and resilience.</p> <p>Minchin, undeterred by the controversy, has continued his nationwide tour, receiving rave reviews for his performances. On Instagram, he shared a glowing tribute from a concertgoer, underscoring the beauty of his show and its impact on the audience. The positive response to his performances served as a powerful rebuttal to those who criticised him for sharing his grief publicly.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram / X</em></p>

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Aussie grandma and former Greens candidate jailed in Japan claims she was scammed

<p>Donna Nelson, a 57-year-old Perth grandmother, has found herself entangled in a nightmarish situation in a Japanese prison, accused of a crime she vehemently denies.</p> <p>Nelson, an Aboriginal health advocate and former Greens candidate, has been incarcerated for nearly a year without a trial date set, facing allegations of attempting to smuggle two kilograms of meth into Japan. However, her plight is not as straightforward as it may seem, and her family and legal team are tirelessly fighting to clear her name.</p> <p>The ordeal began on January 4, when Nelson was arrested at Narita Airport in Tokyo. Authorities claimed to have discovered drugs concealed within a false compartment in her luggage. According to the prosecution, a customs officer suspected her of acting suspiciously. But the narrative has taken a complex turn as Nelson's defence team unveiled a shocking revelation: she alleges she was deceived and manipulated by a Nigerian scammer who had groomed her for two years.</p> <p>Since her arrest, Nelson has been confined to Chibu prison, located an hour outside Tokyo. Her living conditions are appalling; she spends 23 hours a day isolated in her cell, showers are allowed only every three days, and communication with other inmates and visitors is strictly prohibited. This form of treatment is a reflection of Japan's infamous "hostage justice" strategy, aimed at coercing confessions from detainees.</p> <p>The only individuals granted access to Nelson are her lawyers, Australian embassy representatives, and a pastor. Legal representatives have identified a significant issue with translation throughout the case, and it could very well hinge on an inaccurate translation by the customs officer at the time of her arrest.</p> <p>Rie Nishida from Shinjuku International Law Firm, one of Nelson's lawyers, explained, "The main evidence from the prosecution is mainly a customs officer who said she acted suspiciously. There's a lot of mistranslation that's also the difficulty in this case."</p> <p>This mistranslation issue is not trivial; it extends to the messages exchanged between Nelson and the man she believed she had a romantic connection with, who ultimately turned out to be a scammer.</p> <p>Matthew Owens, another member of the legal team and a translator for the case, noted, "Some of them were completely wrongly translated, so we had to re-translate those messages and submit them back to the prosecutor."</p> <p>Nelson remains steadfast in her conviction that she is innocent of the accusations against her. Her lawyer,  Owens, relayed her message, saying, "Donna wants to say that she is going to be able to prove her innocence, she's 100 per cent confident of that, and she wants everyone in Australia and the world to know she is innocent."</p> <p>If found guilty, Nelson could face a harrowing 20-year sentence in a Japanese prison, a terrifying prospect for both her and her family. Her five daughters and grandchildren are distraught, but they are not giving up the fight to prove her innocence. They believe they have evidence to substantiate the claim that she was scammed and unjustly accused.</p> <p><em>Image: Australian Greens</em></p>

Legal

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Why does my hair turn green from the swimming pool?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/magdalena-wajrak-1432339">Magdalena Wajrak</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p>If you are a blonde like me and enjoy laps in a swimming pool, you may have noticed your hair acquires a green tint after frequent swims in chlorinated water.</p> <p>This happens to both bleached and natural blondes. In fact, the green tinge happens to everyone, but it’s less visible on dark hair and those whose hair isn’t damaged by chemical treatments such as bleaching.</p> <p>But what exactly causes this green discoloration, and what can we do about it? Most of us blame the chlorine in the pool water. However, although chlorine does play a part, it is not the main culprit.</p> <h2>Which chemicals in the pool turn the hair green?</h2> <p>The element to blame for the green staining of hair is copper.</p> <p>The main source of copper is copper sulfate (CuSO₄), a compound added to swimming pools to prevent the growth of algae. <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1568988320301803?via%3Dihub">Contact with algae</a> can cause skin irritation and respiratory issues, and ingesting water with algae can lead to serious gastrointestinal problems. Only a small amount (around 0.5mg per litre or 0.5 parts per million) of copper sulfate is needed to prevent algal growth.</p> <p>However, copper can also enter swimming pools through the corrosion of water pipes, so concentrations may be higher in some pools.</p> <p>Copper sulfate crystals are greenish-blue in colour. So, when hair comes into contact with copper ions – a positively charged variant of a copper atom with extra electrons – those ions get absorbed by the hair and cause the greenish hue.</p> <p>Scientists were fascinated by the green “pool hair” phenomenon as far back as the 1970s, so we actually have research data on copper being the cause.</p> <p>One very <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamadermatology/article-abstract/538197">interesting study in 1978</a> performed experiments by immersing hair samples into water containing different concentrations of copper ions, chlorine and various pH values (neutral and basic). Their results showed hair exposed to free copper ions does turn green.</p> <p>Furthermore, when hair is oxidised (meaning electrons are removed from the hair proteins) by chlorine, it actually damages the hair, enhancing the absorption of copper ions. Hair submerged in water with chlorine but without copper ions did not turn green. Meanwhile, hair exposed to water with only copper ions and no chlorine still formed a green colour.</p> <p>Hence, chlorine by itself does not play a role in causing the green hue we see in “pool hair”, but it does exacerbate it.</p> <h2>So, how does copper get into the hair?</h2> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-0943-7_24">Other research teams</a> have conducted <a href="https://doi.org/10.1071/ch9682437">more extensive studies</a>, using sophisticated instruments, such as scanning electron microscopy, to examine how exactly copper ions attach to the hair.</p> <p>Our hair is predominantly composed of protein called keratin. Keratin is classified as a “structural fibrous protein”, meaning it has an elongated, sheet-like structure.</p> <p>The keratin structure is composed of various <a href="https://chem.libretexts.org/Courses/University_of_Kentucky/UK%3A_CHE_103_-_Chemistry_for_Allied_Health_(Soult)/Chapters/Chapter_4%3A_Structure_and_Function/4.4%3A_Functional_Groups">chemical groups</a> (types of atom groupings with similar properties), such as carboxyl groups, amino groups and disulfide groups. Copper ions have the ability to form bonds with these groups, forming a copper-keratin complex. This complex remains in the hair, causing it to appear green.</p> <p>Interestingly, the most recent study <a href="https://doi.org/10.32657/10356/142466">conducted in 2020</a>, showed copper ions mainly bind to the disulfide groups. This study also found other metal ions such as zinc, lead, chromium and mercury also bind to hair in the same way. This is very useful in <a href="https://theconversation.com/forensic-breakthrough-study-suggests-humans-can-be-identified-by-the-proteins-in-their-hair-65051">forensic analysis</a>, for example, because forensic scientists can analyse hair samples to determine if a person has been exposed to a particular metal.</p> <p>Light-coloured hair already has the most visible green discoloration, but research has shown that damaged hair, caused by bleaching, straightening, or exposure to sun, is the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19586601/">most susceptible</a> to the binding of copper ions. This is because in damaged hair the disulfide groups have “broken bonds” (the link that holds the elements within these groups together is broken), making it easier for the copper ions to bind to the hair.</p> <h2>Can I prevent the green colour or get rid of it?</h2> <p>To prevent your hair from turning green in a swimming pool, you have two basic options. The first is a physical barrier – just wear a swim cap.</p> <p>The second option is chemical – you can pre-treat your hair with an alkaline shampoo. <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0891584918310050">Studies have shown</a> under alkaline pH conditions, the copper ions won’t attach to the hair. To treat your hair before going to the pool, you can either use a shampoo with a pH higher than 7, or you can even try mixing some baking soda into your regular shampoo.</p> <p>But what can you do if your hair has already turned greenish? Well, you can try washing your hair with a shampoo designed to achieve this, typically marketed as a “chlorine removal” shampoo. These products contain a chemical called EDTA – it can bind to metal ions (such as copper) and thus will remove copper from the hair.</p> <p>You may have heard tomato sauce or ketchup is a good way to get the green out of your pool hair – potentially because the red pigments are supposed to “cancel out” the green ones. However, I’m not aware of any scientific evidence this would work.</p> <p><em>Correction: This article has been amended to clarify that alkaline shampoos have a pH higher than 7, not lower.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/211736/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/magdalena-wajrak-1432339"><em>Magdalena Wajrak</em></a><em>, Senior lecturer, Chemistry, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image </em><em>credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-does-my-hair-turn-green-from-the-swimming-pool-211736">original article</a>.</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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My Royal Melbourne Seniors Classic Adventure: A day on the greens (and in the bunkers!)

<p dir="ltr">G'day to all past, present, and emerging golf enthusiasts!</p> <p dir="ltr">If you're a senior golfer like me, hunting for inspiration, adventure, and authentic golf yarns — this is for you.</p> <p dir="ltr">Picture this: a crisp August morning, and sixty-two senior golfers gathered on Royal Melbourne's West Course for the Vic Seniors Classic 2023. Here's the story of how it all went down...</p> <p dir="ltr">Before anything else, I mustered the guts to jump in. Ever heard of "imposter syndrome"? Trust me, I was its best mate. But the requirements were clear: age 55+ (I'm a proud 65-year-old), GA Handicap under 24.5 (18.5), and a $225 entry fee. Wait, $225? Given that Royal Melbourne's green fees dance around $1000, caddy fee included, it was a no-brainer.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fueled by the temptation of playing a top-notch course for a quarter of the fee, I submitted my application without hesitation. Before I knew it, my name adorned the list of players.</p> <p dir="ltr">As the day approached, I was geared up to tackle the Royal Melbourne challenge.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 8 am shotgun start meant groups teed off from various holes. I found myself at the 11th tee, flanked by two fierce competitors: Peter (Daily Handicap 1) and Damian (12). Yours truly? A modest 20.</p> <p dir="ltr">Standing over the ball, knees a tad wobbly, I swung that driver. The ball sailed gracefully, landing centre fairway, while their shots had taken a wilder route into the rough. The lesson? 'How near,' not 'how far'.</p> <p dir="ltr">Now, let's talk about those Royal Melbourne greens. Rumour had it, they were "super fast". Super fast? Imagine sliding a ball across your kitchen's polished tiles — yep, that rapid.</p> <p dir="ltr">Around the course, bunkers became my stern mentors — big, deep, and oh-so unforgiving.</p> <p dir="ltr">Post 18 holes, scorecards were in, followed by the triumphant crowning of winners over lunch.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rodney Ware (75 gross) and Kevin Naismith (81 gross) led in men's gross, while Wayne Moon (72 net) and Craig Lonsdale (73 net) dominated the net division. Melinda Crawford (16, scratch stableford) and Louise Yuen (29 handicap points) shone in the women's.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kudos to winners, fellow players, Royal Melbourne and Golf Australia for the unforgettable day.</p> <p dir="ltr">By the way, can you see yourself on those hallowed Royal Melbourne greens? If your inner golfer nods, I'm your cheerleader. Consider joining me for the 2024 Royal Melbourne Seniors Classic.</p> <p dir="ltr">And as I wrap up, let me leave you with the timeless words of the legendary Peter Thomson: "Golf is a game of how near, not how far".</p> <p dir="ltr">Until next time, keep those swings buttery, putts steadfast, and steer clear of those tricky bunkers.</p> <p dir="ltr">PS: My result? T43rd (net) among the 48 male players. Next time I'll be swinging even better.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><em>About the Writer: Mike Searles is a Melbourne retiree who's living the golfing dream.</em></strong></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Lidia Thorpe injured in car accident

<p>Former Greens senator Lidia Thorpe has been involved in a car accident in Melbourne and is expected to be absent from parliament for a week after suffering injuries.</p> <p>The incident occurred late last week, and Thorpe was sitting in her car when it was rear-ended by another vehicle, allegedly causing her to suffer whiplash and bruising.</p> <p>Thorpe was told by her doctor that she could not travel to Canberra for at least a week following the midwinter break.</p> <p>At the time of writing, her media team were yet to make an official statement about the accident but they have confirmed the details of the crash.</p> <p>They revealed that the car was stationary when it was rear-ended and have confirmed that Thorpe is expected to return to parliamentary duties next week.</p> <p>Thorpe has been gaining attention recently due to her outspoken <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/lidia-thorpe-and-pauline-hanson-team-up-for-voice-to-parliament-no-campaign" target="_blank" rel="noopener">opposition to the Voice to Parliament</a>.</p> <p>The incident comes just two weeks after the former Greens senator told <em>The Project</em> about her safety concerns, and that as she is currently under “formal protection” after receiving death threats and abuse.</p> <p>“I’m an outspoken person and I am a target at the same time,” she said.</p> <p>“There are a lot of people out there that don’t want me in that role or in this role … that don’t want me in parliament, that don’t want me alive.</p> <p>“I’ve felt very unsafe over the last few weeks.”</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

News

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"We cannot judge": Nat Barr's frank question on war crimes for Army veteran

<p>Sunrise host Natalie Barr surprised viewers when she confronted a war veteran after he referred senior Australian Defence Force leaders to the International Criminal Court over alleged war crimes committed in Afghanistan.</p> <p>Glenn Kolomeitz, a military lawyer and army veteran, signed the referral alongside Senator Jacqui Lambie.</p> <p>The referral to The Hague had the criminal court examine the country’s high commanders “through the lens of command responsibility”.</p> <p>Kolomeitz and Lambie claimed senior commanders have avoided investigation over alleged war crimes in Afghanistan.</p> <p>“I've got to ask you. This is a question I get asked every time we discuss this general issue,” she said.</p> <p>“We trained these people to kill, and we trained them to operate in a war setting. None of us as civilians have any idea what that's like and we cannot judge them for when they go over there to war. What do you say to that?”</p> <p>Kolomeitz insisted that defence force personnel, regardless of rank, must be investigated if they’ve committed or covered up a criminal act.</p> <p>“I worked with these guys on a couple of rotations, and quite frankly, they are amazing advocates for our country, but if they've done the wrong thing, they must be properly investigated, and they must be vigorously prosecuted. That's the reality,” he said.</p> <p>“You can't ignore the commanders. You vigorously investigate and prosecute those who have done the wrong thing, including those with command responsibility.”</p> <p>The TV presenter then asked if an investigation was necessary for the chief of the defence force, Angus Campbell.</p> <p>Kolomeitz replied, “Every joint task force 633 commanders in that job during the period of the enquiry.”</p> <p>The army veteran drafted the letter that would be sent to the International Criminal Court.</p> <p>“If Australia does nothing about it, the ICC can potentially assume jurisdiction over the higher command and excise the higher command investigation from the ongoing investigation of junior soldiers,” he said.</p> <p>The 2020 Brereton report found “credible” evidence that 25 current or former Australian SAS soldiers unlawfully killed 39 Afghan civilians and prisoners between 2005 and 2016.</p> <p>The report strongly recommended administrative action be taken against ADF personnel where there is credible evidence of misconduct, but not enough for a criminal conviction.</p> <p>It ruled that senior commanders were not criminally to blame for the alleged crimes.</p> <p>Senator Lambie noted leadership had not been held to account for their actions.</p> <p>“The government is no doubt hoping this will all just go away,” she told the Senate.</p> <p>“They're hoping Australians will forget that when alleged war crimes in Afghanistan were investigated, our senior commanders got a free pass while our diggers were thrown under the bus.</p> <p>"Well, we don't forget. I won't forget. Lest we forget.</p> <p>“There is a culture of cover-up at the highest levels of the Australian Defence Force. It is the ultimate boys' club.”</p> <p>Image credit: Instagram/LinkedIn</p>

TV

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"This is absurd": PM mocks bizarre Higgins conspiracy

<p>Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has denied claims Senator Katy Gallagher misled Parliament over what she knew about <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/lisa-wilkinson-denies-turning-to-senior-politicians-over-higgins-rape-allegations" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Brittany Higgins’ rape allegations</a>, dubbing it a “bizarre conspiracy”.</p> <p>Amid the Coalition preparing to target the Finance Minister and Labor during question time, Albanese is backing the Senator completely.</p> <p>He said the real questions were around how the Morrison Government mishandled the issue and not about how Higgins’ boyfriend tipped off Senator Gallagher.</p> <p>“This is absurd,” Albanese declared.</p> <p>“It’s a bizarre conspiracy theory – this concocted issue by what is a desperate Liberal opposition looking for any issue.</p> <p>“Katy Gallagher has been transparent.”</p> <p>The uproar follows the leaking of a six-hour audio tape that hears Higgins’ partner David Sharaz bragging to The Project that he had a connection with Senator Gallagher and in turn, she would drive the story forward in Senate estimates.</p> <p>Network Ten has lodged a police complaint over the leak after a tape of Lisa Wilkinson and Brittany Higgins was seen on a rival channel.</p> <p>Thomson Geer law firm partner Marlia Saunders, who is currently acting for Network Ten in the defamation proceedings, has confirmed she has filed a complaint to Australian Capital Territory Policing.</p> <p>Ten has complained that the material used was obtained via coercive subpoenas for the criminal trial and should have remained under wraps.</p> <p>“Last Wednesday, Ten made a complaint to the AFP requesting they investigate an apparent contempt of court,” Saunders told news.com.au.</p> <p>It relates to material produced under an AFP warrant and a subpoena issued in the ACT Supreme Court which Saunders said “appears to have been disclosed to the media in breach of the implied undertaking.”</p> <p>“The AFP yesterday confirmed the complaint has been received for consideration,” she said.</p> <p>The leaked audio tape first aired on Channel Seven during a televised interview on the Spotlight program, it has since been leaked to <em>The Daily Mail</em>,<em> The Australian</em> and <em>Sky News</em>.</p> <p>The ACT Supreme Court did not release the entire audio at the trial, but parts of it were played to the jury.</p> <p>The audio hears Wilkinson describing former Defence Minister Linda Reynolds as “a nobody” and an “idiot”, and saying “who is this f***king woman”.</p> <p>It also recorded the group war gaming the story and suggested Albanese would “definitely” raise the issue in time. Wilkinson has confirmed she never contacted him to do so.</p> <p>The leaked texts show private discussions with Wilkinson’s husband Peter Fitz-Simons regarding a $325,000 book deal and Sharaz describing then-Prime Minister Scott Morrison as a “c***t”.</p> <p>Higgins’ private text messages were provided to the police and lawyers during the criminal trials, and have since been leaked by sources unknown to media outlets.</p> <p>In the text messages, Sharaz suggested he had forwarded the entire transcript of Higgins’ interview with Lisa Wilkinson to Senator Gallagher before the story aired.</p> <p>Channel 10 were seemingly unaware that Sharaz had forwarded the transcript, which was also a signed statutory declaration, to other parties before the broadcast.</p> <p>In June 2021, Senator Gallagher was in a state of fury when the then-Defence Minister Linda Reynolds proposed she “knew where this started”, adding she had been tipped off by a Labor Senator before the story broke about what the ALP was planning.</p> <p>“No one had any knowledge. How dare you! It’s all about protecting yourself,” Senator Gallagher said at the time.</p> <p>Speaking at an ALP conference in Fremantle, Senator Gallagher was asked if she would stand aside or resign.</p> <p>“Why would I?" she said.</p> <p>“I was responding to an assertion that was being made by the minister Reynolds at the time that we had known about this for weeks and had made a decision to weaponise it,” she continued.</p> <p>“That is not true. It was never true. I explained that to Senator Reynolds that night and she accepted that explanation.”</p> <p>“Mr Sharaz provided me with information, I think we’ve seen that in the paper in the last couple of days,” she said.</p> <p>“I did nothing with that information. And I was clear about that at the time.</p> <p>“There’s absolutely no issue here at all,” she insisted.</p> <p>“I’ve been clear, I’ve been honest. And at all times, I’ve been guided by the bravery and courage of a young woman who chose to speak up about her workplace. And from that we have had massive changes to that workplace because of the problem.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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Mysterious liquid turns popular rock pool green

<p>A mysterious liquid has turned a popular public rock pool at Cronulla beach fluorescent green.</p> <p>The liquid, believed to be a natural fluorescent dye, fluorescein, was seen pouring into the usually clear waters of the pool on Friday.</p> <p>The dye is often used to help experts track the flow of water to identify any leaks and has low toxicity, which means it is harmless despite the daunting colour.</p> <p>“We believe the discolouration is likely to be fluorescein dye, which is commonly used in plumbing/drain testing and dissipates quickly once diluted,” a spokesperson for the New South Wales Environmental Protection Authority said.</p> <p>According to Australian dye manufacturer, Tintex, the dye is also used to “locate leaks in plumbing, tracing pipe locations, detect drain damage and water pathways,” and is odourless and non-toxic to the environment.</p> <p>However, in a safety data sheet, Tintex has also warned about the potential health effects which include eye irritation, skin irritation, irritation of the digestive tract and respiratory tract irritation.</p> <p>Many locals are cautious despite the claim that the dye is mostly harmless.</p> <p>One user wrote on a Facebook page for Cronulla locals that dye was “legal to use in a stormwater drain”.</p> <p>“Doesn’t look good whatever it is,” another responded, while other cautious residents replied that they wouldn’t swim in the area until the dye fully dissipates.</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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“Pattern of bigotry”: Pauline Hanson being sued by senator over tweet

<p>Greens deputy leader Mehreen Faruqi has launched legal action against Pauline Hanson over a tweet telling her to "pack your bags and piss off back to Pakistan”.</p> <p>Documents filed in the Federal Court on May 3 allege the One Nation leader breached section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act with the tweet in 2022.</p> <p>Faruqi is seeking a sum of $150,000 be donated to a not-for-profit or community organisation of her choice.</p> <p>She also wants Hanson to undertake anti-racism training and pay legal fees.</p> <p>Faruqi revealed in a statement that she had “taken on bullies” her whole life and had no choice but to take on Hanson.</p> <p>"I refuse to let Senator Hanson get away with racist bullying and harassment," she said.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson crossed a line when she tweeted those hateful comments and I am hoping the Federal Court puts an end to this pattern of bigotry.</p> <p>"Not just for me, but for the almost 30 per cent of Australians born overseas, and their next generations.</p> <p>"I shouldn't have to take the personal risk and trauma of taking Senator Hanson to court."</p> <p>In 2022, the Greens attempted to reprimand Hanson in the upper house but the motion was amended by the government and opposition to instead condemn all forms of racism.</p> <p>Hanson defended her comments and denied she is racist.</p> <p>Farqui said she decided to launch proceedings following Hanson’s refusal to apologise for her tweet and her rejection of conciliation attempts from the Australian Human Rights Commission.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson has used her decades in the spotlight and immense public platform to spew vicious hate towards people of colour," Faruqi said.</p> <p>"She has caused incalculable harm and gotten away with it for far too long.</p> <p>"It's time that she was held accountable.</p> <p>"Senator Hanson has been contacted for comment on the court action."</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty/Instagram</em></p>

Legal

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“He threw me under the bus”: Lidia Thorpe responds to Dad’s interview

<p>Senator Lidia Thorpe has accused her father of throwing her “under the bus” following his <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/tv/lidia-thorpe-s-dad-calls-her-racist-in-extraordinary-interview" target="_blank" rel="noopener">TV interview</a>, where he claimed she was “very racist against white people”.</p> <p>Speaking to activist Tom Tanuki in an interview on Youtube, Ms Thorpe covered many of her recent controversies.</p> <p>“When I pay attention to the things you say, I am never left in any doubt as to exactly what your politics are. I always get an extremely firm sense of your perspective,” Mr Tanuki told the senator, who left the Greens in February 2023 following disagreements on the proposed Indigenous Voice to Parliament.</p> <p>“Your actions, even protest actions, marry up with your words. More than most politicians, let’s face it. You are ostensibly bulls*** free, in that you mean what you say and you will take actions to show that you mean it.”</p> <p>“And that’s always got me into trouble,” Ms Thorpe explained.</p> <p>“Because I’m a straight shooter, straight talker, I’ve got nothing to hide, and people struggle with that. And they want me to conform to what? What do you want me to be like? Do you want me to be like Pauline Hanson, do you want me to be like Jacinta Price? You know, what’s a good model politician that you want me to be like?</p> <p>“Obviously being myself is hard for people to understand. I’m a good person. I have a beautiful relationship, I have beautiful children. And my dad’s been texting me all morning, telling me he loves me, even though he threw me under the bus on Andrew Bolt.</p> <p>“So, you know, we all have our own lives and our own complications, but I’m a loving person, and I’m genuinely wanting to bring this country together. Working class conservatives and the left, on a journey towards peace and healing.”</p> <p>Roy Illingworth, Ms Thorpe’s father, took aim at her when speaking to <em>Sky News Australia</em> host Andrew Bolt, explaining he was “disappointed” by her abandoning her English and Irish heritage.</p> <p>“The way I see it, the way she is and the way she's changed over the years, she's a very racist person against white people," he said.</p> <p>“She doesn’t acknowledge any of her white side. I’m a bit disappointed in the way she’s been carrying on lately.</p> <p>“Because after all, she does have English background as well as Irish, the convict side.</p> <p>“She’s never, ever mentioned me in her speeches, never mentioned anything about a white father, which disappointed me a little bit.”</p> <p>Mr Illingowrth revealed he had fallen out with his daughter and had no contact with her children, although she did still call him for his birthday and Father’s Day.</p> <p>“She’s said a lot of bad and evil things to me over the years,” he said.</p> <p>“We still love each other and, at the end of the day, she’s still my daughter.”</p> <p>He claimed Ms Thorpe became politicised in her late teens and “turned racist”, though he did acknowledge her as a “strong woman”.</p> <p>Ms Thorpe has been at the front of several controversies, with the most recent being an intense altercation with a group of men outside a Melbourne strip club at 3am.</p> <p>The footage that emerged from the incident captured Ms Thorpe taunting the group of men, one of whom called her a racist dog, and saying another had a “small penis”.’</p> <p>She claimed she did not instigate the exchange and was just responding to harassment.</p> <p>Ms Thorpe gave further insight into the altercation with Mr Tanuki.</p> <p>“When I said that person had a little d**k, it was for the reason that you waited for us to walk out of the door and then, you had all your mates around you, and then you had a go at me,” she said.</p> <p>“I mean, don’t call yourself a man or a bigshot standing outside the door if you can basically wait and plan to have a go at a black senator who was spending money in the club, but also having some really beautiful conversations and yarns.</p> <p>“What has been portrayed is blatantly wrong, and it’s also exemplary of how this country deals with people like me, whether I’m a senator or not. I’m a black woman, and look at how black women are treated in this country.”</p> <p>Mr Tanuki later asked her why she thought the “Australian political media establishment” was “so concerned with policing your rudeness?”</p> <p>“I think different elements of the political spectrum have different reasons,” she responded.</p> <p>“If you look at the right-wing media, they’re scared. They’re becoming the minority, and they’ve not had to deal with truth in the way that’s being put in their face every day.</p> <p>“In terms of the progressives, they’ve all got their hands on their heart and they’re feeling really good about the voice, it appeases their white guilt, makes them feel like they’ve done something for us.</p> <p>“Even though they won’t pay the rent, or force the government to stop deaths in custody, or stop child removal, or give us our rights.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Could the Senate inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and children prevent future deaths?

<p><em>Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised this article contains names of deceased people and mentions domestic violence and murder.</em></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FirstNationswomenchildren/Public_Hearings" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Public hearings</a> have officially commenced into the Senate Committee <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/Missingmurderedwomen" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Inquiry</a> into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Children. The inquiry has <a href="https://www.aapnews.com.au/news/indigenous-legal-service-funds-fall-short" target="_blank" rel="noopener">found</a> “Murder rates for Indigenous women are eight times higher than for their non-Indigenous counterparts”. This came as no surprise to many of us who have worked in this field for a long time.</p> <p>In fact, these numbers are likely to be higher when they include manslaughter rates. The rate at which women are murdered in Australia over time (<a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FirstNationswomenchildren/Public_Hearings" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2005-06 to 2019-20</a>) have been declining. But according to the <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/sites/default/files/2022-03/sr39_homicide_in_australia_2019-20.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Homocide Report Australia 2019 -20</a>, report, this sadly is not the case for Indigenous women.</p> <p>When women are murdered in Australia, there is understandable <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-44491670" target="_blank" rel="noopener">outrage</a>, displays of <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-09/hannah-clarke-children-funeral-service/12024138" target="_blank" rel="noopener">grief</a> and moments of reflection in our parliament.</p> <p>However, there is often silence in the media and in public discussion about the violence Indigenous women experience, as Indigenous studies Professor Bronwyn Carlson has <a href="https://theconversation.com/no-public-outrage-no-vigils-australias-silence-at-violence-against-indigenous-women-158875" target="_blank" rel="noopener">discussed</a>.</p> <p>This inquiry has the potential to provide voice to the Indigenous women and children we have lost and continue to lose to violence, as well as ending the silence that follows.</p> <h2>What is this senate inquiry?</h2> <p>In November 2021, First Nations Greens senators Dorinda Cox and Lidia Thorpe called for a Senate inquiry into the high rates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and children in Australia. Through measures including hearing testimony from survivors of violence and examining police responses, this will be an opportunity to investigate what can be changed to better address violence against Indigenous women and children in Australia.</p> <p>Available data tell us Indigenous women represent up to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-09/linda-burney-wants-senate-inquiry-into-missing-indigenous-women/11773992" target="_blank" rel="noopener">10%</a> of unsolved missing persons cases in Australia, many of whom are presumed dead. Indigenous women are also <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-welfare/indigenous-community-safety" target="_blank" rel="noopener">30 times</a> more likely to be hospitalised for assault-related injuries. As part of its public hearings, the inquiry is examining these damning statistics.</p> <p>However, the inquiry is also delving deeper, <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FirstNationswomenchildren/Public_Hearings" target="_blank" rel="noopener">asking more</a> about the women’s stories, with the intention to go beyond statistics and hear how people are affected by their experiences with family violence.</p> <h2>Police and domestic violence services are not helping</h2> <p>My research has found violence against Indigenous women is significantly <a href="https://www.telethonkids.org.au/globalassets/media/documents/aboriginal-health/working-together-second-edition/wt-part-5-chapt-23-final.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">under-reported</a> and perpetrators regularly go unpunished. This is not to say Indigenous women are not crying out for support: they are and have been. However, they are often confronted with a dilemma of who is safe to turn to, and what the consequences of reporting might be.</p> <p>For First Nations women, there are significant risks to consider when reporting violence to police or seeking assistance from domestic violence services. These risks include their children being <a href="https://theconversation.com/another-stolen-generation-looms-unless-indigenous-women-fleeing-violence-can-find-safe-housing-123526" target="_blank" rel="noopener">taken from them</a> by child protection services, the women themselves being arrested for unrelated criminal matters, and the risk of being misidentified as the perpetrator.</p> <p>Criminology and law researcher <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bjc/advance-article/doi/10.1093/bjc/azab103/6430028" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Emma Buxton-Namisnyk’s</a> study of domestic violence policing of First Nations women in Australia found “there were very few examples of police interventions that did not produce some identifiable harm”. Buxton-Namisnyk found this harm was through police inaction and non-enforcement of domestic violence laws. Some instances involved police action resulting in “eroding victim’s agency” through criminalising victims and increasing police surveillance over their families.</p> <p>In June 2022, Acting Coroner Elisabeth Armitage handed down <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-10/coronial-inquest-roberta-findings-darwin-local-court/101141340" target="_blank" rel="noopener">damning findings</a> against the Northern Territory Police in the death of Roberta, an Aboriginal woman from the Katherine region. Armitage said the police “did nothing to help her”. In fact, the fatal assault was the seventh time Roberta’s partner had abused her in less than two weeks. It was five days after Roberta had been told by police to “<a href="https://justice.nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0012/1113600/D01052019-Roberta-Curry.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">stop calling us</a>”.</p> <p>Armitage summed up this case as one in which police failed to follow any of their procedures concerning domestic violence complaints. She also found their manner towards Roberta was rude and dismissive.</p> <p>These actions and failures were not confined to the actions of police. The triple-zero call operator incorrectly classified Roberta’s calls for help, and the parole officer tasked with supervising Roberta’s partner was oblivious to his breaches of parole conditions. The breakdown in communication across these services and the lack of support available to Roberta created the conditions that led to her death.</p> <p>This case also speaks to a broader issue of bystanders who fail to act on our women’s cries for help. The Northern Territory is a unique jurisdiction in that it is <a href="https://nt.gov.au/law/crime/domestic-family-and-sexual-violence/report-domestic-family-and-sexual-violence" target="_blank" rel="noopener">mandatory</a> for all adults to <a href="https://legislation.nt.gov.au/en/LegislationPortal/~/link.aspx?_id=2AB69753FCA64C5281F9E2ED1FF089E7&amp;_z=z" target="_blank" rel="noopener">report domestic violence</a> “when the life or safety of another person is under serious or imminent threat” or be liable for a fine up to $20,000.</p> <p>Despite this, Armitage explained there were witnesses to the violence Roberta endured, who did not report. To my knowledge, no one has been held accountable for failing to report.</p> <h2>There are stories behind the numbers</h2> <p>During this Senate inquiry, politicians need to consider the stories behind the statistics, such as Roberta’s. It is these stories that demonstrate the need for domestic and family violence death reviews in all of our states and territories. They provide the opportunity to understand the victim’s story and how it is affected by services and systems currently in place.</p> <p>But it’s also critical Indigenous people are included in the process of reviews and the analysis of what keeps going wrong with services that are meant to save lives.<br />In addition to this, there needs to be an extensive review of cases over time to understand trends in missing and murdered Indigenous women and children. We need to find out whether systemic problems or issues in practice are responsible for failing these women.</p> <p>As the United Nations’ violence against Indigenous women and girls <a href="https://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/G22/323/90/PDF/G2232390.pdf?OpenElement" target="_blank" rel="noopener">report</a> states, Indigenous women already have to navigate violence in the form of racial discrimination and system inequities. Our calls for help need to be met with a culturally safe person who can hear our stories and respond with care and respect to help us navigate our way to safety.</p> <p><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/could-the-senate-inquiry-into-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-children-prevent-future-deaths-192020" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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"You want a minute’s silence from me?" Lidia Thorpe speaks out on Queen's passing

<p dir="ltr">Indigenous Greens senator Lidia Thorpe has accused the British Royal Family of genocide in the wake of the Queen’s death.</p> <p dir="ltr">Queen Elizabeth II was under medical supervision due to her deteriorating health before she passed away on September 8.</p> <p dir="ltr">The death of the longest reigning monarch has seen many instances of the traditional "minute of silence" observed in Australia and around the world – at sporting events, in Parliament and in many other settings.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Ms Thorpe said that she refused to give a minute's silence to the late Queen, who she says is part of the family who “declared a war on these shores”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Djab Wurrung, Gunnai and Gunditjmara senator wrote an opinion piece for <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/sep/14/dont-ask-me-to-give-the-queen-a-minutes-silence-ask-me-for-my-truth-about-british-colonialism?fbclid=IwAR3P1sJO7LFcnsDA2D_eOJ3zycCt_fJPUKRElZgwfM7blwh6Wc8XiEqXVPc" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Guardian</a> and shared it to Facebook with the caption: “They buried our kids in the sand and kicked off their heads, and you want me to pay my respects? This isn’t about an individual, it’s about the institution she represents and the genocide that they’re responsible for”.</p> <p dir="ltr">She first revealed that the news of the Queen’s death broke at the same time of her cousin’s funeral who had died in custody.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The institutions that British colonisation brought here, from the education that erases us to the prisons that kill us, are designed to destroy the oldest living culture in the world,” she wrote in the opinion piece.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That’s the legacy of the crown in this country.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The ‘British empire’ declared a war on these shores, against this country’s First Nations peoples. This led to massacres. And you want a minute’s silence from me?</p> <p dir="ltr">“Their war continues and is still felt today – on our children, our men, our land, our water, the air we breathe. Yet we’re meant to kneel to the colonising force with our hands on our hearts?”</p> <p dir="ltr">She went on to call Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s decision to mark September 22 as a “National Day of Mourning for Her Majesty The Queen” as insulting.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Thorpe slammed the announcement saying that First Nations people have called for January 26 to be acknowledged as a Day of Mourning since 1938.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We called for a Day of Mourning so that this country could understand how we’re still affected by colonisation today,” she continued.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We’re not grieving a singular human life, we’re reeling from the violence that is the legacy of the monarchy.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Who gave permission for our flag to be lowered to half-mast? That power has been taken away from us, again.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She went on to say that Australia doesn’t need a king but instead needed a “head of state” elected by the people.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The Queen is dead. I’ve had some days to reflect, and know that people wanted me to come out ranting and raving to confirm their views of me as a crazy Blak woman. In the days since, I’ve seen anger and disbelief from First Nations people at the glorification of our oppressor,’’ she said on Monday night.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This Country has a new King. The parliament and the Prime Minister are subjugated to someone we didn’t elect. We don’t need a new King, we need a head of state chosen by the people.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The process towards being able to pick our own head of state would bring us all together – it would force us to tell the truth about our history and move us towards real action to right the wrongs that started with colonisation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We could use this moment and momentum to empower people to democratically elect our own leader. Someone who represents all of us, uniting a country that has owned up to its past and chosen its own future. That unity would be more powerful than any King.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The comment section of Ms Thorpe’s post showed a lot of support for the Indigenous senator with many praising her stance.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This is a shameful country. Shameful leaders who choose to ignore the atrocities from the past and present. Thank you Senator for your strength in standing up!!” someone wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You are amazing. I'd rather look to you as a queen than that archaic system that traumatised first nations people all over the world,” another commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s so great hearing your voice and indigenous voices loudly in parliament. You’re doing an amazing job. You are making a massive difference. Full respect,” another read.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Facebook</em></p>

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Paul Green farewelled

<p dir="ltr">NRL legend Paul Green has been farewelled in an emotional service in Queensland following his devastating death. </p> <p dir="ltr">The legendary coach and former player was just 49 when he was found dead at his home in Brisbane on August 11. </p> <p dir="ltr">More than 700 people attended the service at Kougari Oval, the Wynnum-Manly Seagulls’ home ground, including rugby league greats Allan Langer, Andrew Gee, Shane Webcke, Ben Ikin and Jason Taumalolo.</p> <p dir="ltr">John Lang, Steve Renouf, Wendell Sailor, Lote Tuqiri, Todd Payten, Neil Henry, Brad Thorn, Kevin Walters, Brad Fittler, Trent Robinson and Bryan Fletcher were also in attendance. </p> <p dir="ltr">Paul Green’s wife Amanda delivered a heartfelt speech speaking of when the pair met and their love for one another. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Paul and I met at the Mad Cow in Townsville, an establishment of many relationships,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The day Paul proposed he said to me you better strapped yourself because it’s going to be one hell of a ride, and that it was.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We had the deepest love and he made me feel deeply loved … we’ve always been a team.</p> <p dir="ltr">“As heartbroken as I am today, I’ve loved every moment with Paul. I loved you yesterday, I love you today and I will love you tomorrow.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Paul Green’s wife Amanda has delivered the most moving tribute to her late husband as family and friends remember the legendary player and coach. </p> <p>Pictures from the service: <a href="https://t.co/bBOWY77XFj">https://t.co/bBOWY77XFj</a> <a href="https://t.co/dTDjE93KJ5">pic.twitter.com/dTDjE93KJ5</a></p> <p>— Courier Mail Sport (@cmail_sport) <a href="https://twitter.com/cmail_sport/status/1564426956770201601?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 30, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Their daughter Emerson then got up and delivered a heart-warming speech saying she will cherish their memories forever.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He always knew what to say and when to say it. He would always tell you it doesn’t matter what people think of you,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He knew how to bust a move and liked to think he had an amazing voice. If there was music on, I could always count on Dad dragging me onto a dancefloor.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He taught me to be the best version of myself. I will cherish our memories forever and will continue to do you proud. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I was always your little angel, but now you are mine.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Jed also said a few words, thanking his dad for being the “best dad ever”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Thanks for being the best dad ever. You were so silly sometimes and that you made the best dad,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I am going to miss you so much.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Paul’s family announced a few weeks after his death that they <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/paul-green-s-brain-donated-to-science" target="_blank" rel="noopener">donated his brain to science</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Australian Sports Brain Bank said Paul’s brain will help aid research into concussion-related condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) - a common injury amongst NRL players due to the nature of the game. </p> <p dir="ltr">"In memory of our beloved Paul, we ask that you support the pioneering work of the Australian Sports Brain Bank,” their post read.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Paul was known for always looking out for others. We are proud that part of his legacy will be looking out for the brain health of all others involved in the game that he loved.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Amanda, Emerson and Jed."</p> <p dir="ltr">Paul had an incredible NRL career, playing 162 first grade matches between 1994-2004 and winning the prestigious Rothmans Medal in 1995 as the game's best and fairest.</p> <p dir="ltr">He played for several different clubs including Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks, North Queensland Cowboys, Sydney Roosters, Parramatta Eels and the Brisbane Broncos.</p> <p dir="ltr">Green eventually swapped his playing boots to coaching ones as he took on the North Queensland Cowboys from 2014-2020.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit lifeline.org.au or beyondblue.org.au.</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

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"It's mad!" Steve Price goes ballistic over Greens rent freeze proposal

<p>Steve Price has clashed with a Greens MP over their party's idea of a rent freeze, calling the proposal "mad".</p> <p>Greens MP Max Chandler-Mather spoke with the <em>The Project</em> on Thursday night to discuss the Greens' proposal, which was met with a frosty reception. </p> <p>Earlier this week, The Greens urged the government to impose a nationwide rent freeze for two years, citing the sharp increases in rent that have outstripped wage rises in recent months.</p> <p>The minor party has also called for future rent increases, beyond the proposed freeze period, to be capped at 2 per cent every two years.</p> <p>When Mr Chandler-Mather explained the proposal to the panel, the questions came flooding in. </p> <p>“Max, this does sound vaguely like socialism, possibly even communism. How would it work in practice?” host Hamish Macdonald asked.</p> <p>“I wouldn’t call it socialism or communism. I’d call it what is being done around the world, and (what has) worked. Victoria froze rents for six months during the pandemic, and what we are saying now is we are in a worse housing crisis even than in the pandemic, and we need an urgent national response," Mr Chandler-Mather replied.</p> <p>“What we’re proposing today is a two-year national rent freeze, because rents are out of control. They’ve increased seven times faster than wages since the pandemic began.”</p> <p>“It is not a crazy proposal ... I think it is a moderate proposal for what is a national crisis," he said. </p> <p>As he went on to cite other global examples of a similar scheme working to protect renters, Steve Price jumped in. </p> <p>“Max, you call it moderate. I call it mad,” he said.</p> <p>“What do you say to landlords who, over the next two years or so, are going to have an increase to their mortgage repayments, council rates are going up, repairs on rental properties are going up, it’s hard to get tradesmen – they are just expected to wear this increase in cost with no rent going up."</p> <p>“They’re going to bail on the market, they’re going to sell their properties, and you’re going to collapse the real estate market. It’s mad, mate!”</p> <p>“Well I don’t think the real estate market collapsed in Victoria when they froze rents for six months,” Mr Chandler-Mather said.</p> <p>“There was a six-month rent freeze in Victoria, but similarly in British Colombia or in New York or Scotland-” said the Greens MP.</p> <p>Price interrupted saying, “We’re not in British Columbia, New York or Scotland, we’re in Australia.”</p> <p>“We’ve got a rental system that works. There are a lot of great landlords. There are even landlords who, during Covid, made the rent cheaper for people because they wanted to look after good tenants. You’re trying to blow up a system that actually works.”</p> <p>“I think you just need to talk to the 2.7 million renters who are in severe rental stress at the moment and ask them if the housing market is working,” countered Mr Chandler-Mather.</p> <p>The pair continued their feisty back and forth before the interview drew to a close, where Macdonald thanked the MP for being “a good sport”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: The Project</em></p>

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Paul Green’s brain donated to science

<p dir="ltr">Paul Green’s brain has been donated to the Australian Sports Brain Bank to help with science. </p> <p dir="ltr">The legendary coach and former player Paul Green was just 49 when he <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/news/news/rugby-league-icon-dead-at-49" target="_blank" rel="noopener">was found dead</a> at his home in Brisbane on August 11. </p> <p dir="ltr">It is confirmed that the father-of-two died from suicide. </p> <p dir="ltr">His family has now confirmed that his brain will be donated to the <a href="https://www.mycause.com.au/page/290298/in-memory-of-paul-green" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Sports Brain Bank</a> to help aid research into concussion-related condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) - a common injury amongst NRL players due to the nature of the game. </p> <p dir="ltr">"In memory of our beloved Paul, we ask that you support the pioneering work of the Australian Sports Brain Bank,” their post read.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Paul was known for always looking out for others. We are proud that part of his legacy will be looking out for the brain health of all others involved in the game that he loved.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Amanda, Emerson and Jed."</p> <p dir="ltr">They are hoping to raise $150,000 to help with the research. </p> <p dir="ltr">Michael Buckland, the director of the Australian Sports Brain Bank, thanked Green’s family for their donation.</p> <p dir="ltr">"This is an incredibly generous donation and will be an invaluable part of our research into the long-term effects of repetitive head impacts in sport and elsewhere," he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We at the Australian Sports Brain Bank are blown away by the fact that in their time of grief, Amanda and the rest of the family thought of how they could help others."</p> <p dir="ltr">Green had an incredible NRL career, playing 162 first grade matches between 1994-2004 and winning the prestigious Rothmans Medal in 1995 as the game's best and fairest.</p> <p dir="ltr">He played for several different clubs including Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks, North Queensland Cowboys, Sydney Roosters, Parramatta Eels and the Brisbane Broncos.</p> <p dir="ltr">Green eventually swapped his playing boots to coaching ones as he took on the North Queensland Cowboys from 2014-2020.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you would like to donate to the research, click <a href="https://www.mycause.com.au/page/290298/in-memory-of-paul-green" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/">lifeline.org.au</a> or <a href="https://www.beyondblue.org.au/">beyondblue.org.au</a>.</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Australian Sports Brain Bank</em></p>

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Meteors seem to be raining down on New Zealand, but why are some bright green?

<h1 class="legacy">Meteors seem to be raining down on New Zealand, but why are some bright green?</h1> <figure><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476788/original/file-20220731-19335-76trxr.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;rect=5%2C304%2C3828%2C1851&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" /><figcaption><span class="attribution"><span class="source">Greg Price</span>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span></figcaption></figure> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jack-baggaley-1366298">Jack Baggaley</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-canterbury-1004">University of Canterbury</a></em></p> <p>New Zealand may seem to be under meteor bombardment at the moment. After a <a href="https://theconversation.com/equivalent-to-1-800-tonnes-of-tnt-what-we-now-know-about-the-meteor-that-lit-up-the-daytime-sky-above-new-zealand-186636">huge meteor exploded</a> above the sea near Wellington on July 7, creating a sonic boom that could be heard across the bottom of the South Island, a smaller fireball was captured two weeks later above Canterbury.</p> <p><a href="https://fireballs.nz/">Fireballs Aotearoa</a>, a collaboration between astronomers and citizen scientists which aims to recover freshly fallen meteorites, has received a lot of questions about these events. One of the most frequent is about the bright green colour, and whether it is the same green produced by auroras.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=399&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=399&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=399&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=502&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=502&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476789/original/file-20220731-20-zrewrz.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=502&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="An image of an aurora australis" /><figcaption><span class="caption">An aurora australis observed from the international space station.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Wikimedia Commons</span>, <a class="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/">CC BY-ND</a></span></figcaption></figure> <p>Green fireballs have been reported and filmed in New Zealand regularly. Bright meteors often signal the arrival of a chunk of asteroid, which can be anywhere between a few centimetres to a metre in diameter when it comes crashing through the atmosphere.</p> <p>Some of these asteroids contain nickel and iron and they hit the atmosphere at speeds of up to 60km per second. This releases an enormous amount of heat very quickly, and the vapourised iron and nickel radiate green light.</p> <p>But is this the same as the bright green of an aurora? For the most recent meteor, the answer is mainly no, but it’s actually not that simple.</p> <h2>The colours of a meteor trail</h2> <p>The green glow of the aurora is caused by oxygen ions in the upper atmosphere, created by collisions between atmospheric oxygen molecules and particles ejected by the sun.</p> <p>These oxygen ions recombine with electrons to produce oxygen atoms, but the electrons can persist in an excited state for several seconds. In an energy transition known as “forbidden” because it does not obey the usual quantum rules, they then radiate the auroral green light at 557nm wavelength.</p> <p>A meteor can also shine by this route, but only if it’s extremely fast. Very fast meteors heat up in the thin atmosphere above 100km where auroras form.</p> <p>If you want to see a green auroral wake from a meteor, watch out for the Perseid meteor shower, which has now started and will peak on August 13 in the southern hemisphere.</p> <p>Also arriving at about 60km per second, the Perseids are extremely fast bits of the <a href="https://www.space.com/33677-comet-swift-tuttle-perseid-meteor-shower-source.html">comet Swift-Tuttle</a>. Some Perseids trail a beautiful, glowing and distinctly green wake behind them, particularly at the start of their path.</p> <p>Once the Canterbury meteor hit on July 22, the capricious winds of the upper atmosphere twisted the gently glowing trail, resulting in a pale yellow glow towards the end (as seen in the GIF below, also recorded by Greg Price for an earlier meteor). This is caused by sodium atoms being continually excited in a catalytic reaction involving ozone.</p> <p><img src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/static_files/files/2231/The_22_July_meteor_-_persistent_train_-_credit_Greg_Price.gif?1659310010" width="100%" /></p> <h2>Are we being bombarded by meteors?</h2> <p>Yes and no. The arrival of big, booming green meteors and the dropping of meteorites isn’t rare in New Zealand, but it is rare to recover the rock. Fireballs Aotearoa is working to improve the recovery rate.</p> <p>In an average year, perhaps four meteorites hit New Zealand. We’re encouraging citizen scientists to build their own meteor camera systems so they can catch these events.</p> <p>By comparing the meteor against the starry background and triangulating images caught by multiple cameras, we can pin down the meteor’s position in the atmosphere to within tens of metres.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=450&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=450&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=450&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=566&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=566&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476790/original/file-20220731-43929-h2dp31.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=566&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="The July 22 meteor as seen by a specialised meteor camera near Ashburton." /><figcaption><span class="caption">The July 22 meteor as seen by a specialised meteor camera near Ashburton.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Campbell Duncan/NASA/CAMS NZ</span>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span></figcaption></figure> <p>Not only does that help us find the rock, but it tells us what the pre-impact orbit of the meteoroid was, which in turn tells us which part of the solar system it came from. This is a rather efficient way of sampling the solar system without ever having to launch a space mission.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=553&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=553&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/476791/original/file-20220731-31484-7i4x0t.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=553&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Map of witness reports and cameras." /><figcaption><span class="caption">Witness reports and high-resolution meteor cameras help to calculate a meteor’s trajectory. This map shows the approximate trajectory of the July 22 meteor at the top of the red shape in the centre.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Fireballs Aotearoa and International Meteor Association</span>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span></figcaption></figure> <p>Fireballs Aotearoa is rapidly populating Otago with meteor cameras and there are half a dozen more in other parts of the South Island. The North Island isn’t well covered yet, and we’re keen for more people (in either island) to build or buy a meteor camera and keep it pointed at the sky.</p> <p>Then next time a bright meteor explodes with a boom above New Zealand, we may be able to pick up the meteorite and do some good science with it.</p> <hr /> <p><em>Many thanks for the input from Jim Rowe of the UK Fireball Alliance, and Greg Price who photographed the July 22 meteor and the persistent train.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/187836/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jack-baggaley-1366298">Jack Baggaley</a>, Professor Emeritus Physics and Astronomy, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-canterbury-1004">University of Canterbury</a></em></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/meteors-seem-to-be-raining-down-on-new-zealand-but-why-are-some-bright-green-187836">original article</a>.</p>

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5 minutes with author John M. Green

<p dir="ltr">In the OverSixty “5 Minutes With” series, we ask book writers about their literary habits and preferences. Next up is John M. Green who is debuting his sixth book, <em>Framed</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">John worked as a director at a leading investment bank for 30 years before deciding to pursue his writing career.</p> <p dir="ltr">Framed is inspired by the infamous robbery that took place at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston in 1990 and looks at the world of art theft and organised crime.</p> <p dir="ltr">With six books already published, John M. Green has started working on his seventh one. </p> <p dir="ltr">Watch this space. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What inspired you to write <em>Framed</em>?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Being confronted by a series of empty frames on the walls inside Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, frames where thieves - in a billion-dollar art heist in 1990 - sliced out and stole three Rembrandts, a Vermeer and five works by Degas, among others, works that have never been recovered. From that day, I’ve been haunted by the question: where are these works today? </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>You’ve written six books, did you do anything differently for <em>Framed</em>? </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">I wrote <em>Framed </em>while convalescing from open heart surgery, so readers might find a greater love of life in it. And due to the COVID lockdowns, I wrote <em>Framed </em>with far fewer distractions … I wasn’t travelling anywhere, for business or pleasure, I didn’t have to attend physical meetings, you know the rest. In many ways, it was my most satisfying writing experience, and I hope it shows in the reading.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>If you could tell your younger writer something, what would it be? </strong></p> <p dir="ltr"> Stop thinking about writing a novel, and actually start writing it. But most importantly, finish it.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What is next on the agenda for you as an author? </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">While Framed is about art - and murder, my seventh novel is about theatre - and murder.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What is one book you recommend everyone should read?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. I was utterly entranced. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Supplied</em></p>

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Why Pauline Hanson stormed out of the Senate

<p>Pauline Hanson has been branded a "racist" after storming out of the Senate during the Welcome to Country acknowledgement. </p> <p>Senate President Sue Lines acknowledged the Ngunnawal and Ngambri peoples as the traditional custodians of the Canberra area and paid respect to elders past and present during the opening of Wednesday’s sitting.</p> <p>But before Senator Lines could complete the acknowledgment, the One Nation leader interrupted. </p> <p>“No, I won’t,” she yelled, adding, “I never will.”</p> <p>Greens Senator Lidia Thorpe, a proud Djab Wurrung Gunnai Gunditjmara woman, quickly condemned the “disrespectful” move and slammed Senator Hanson's actions on Twitter. </p> <p>“Day two of the 47th parliament and racism has reared its ugly head,” she tweeted. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Pauline Hanson, you are ignorant and you are racist.</p> <p>— Senator Lidia Thorpe (@SenatorThorpe) <a href="https://twitter.com/SenatorThorpe/status/1552077364318060544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 26, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>“Pauline Hanson disrespectfully stormed out of the acknowledgement of Country in the Senate, refusing to acknowledge 'those people.' You want to make parliament safe? Get rid of racism.”</p> <p>As is tradition in the Houses of Parliament, the Welcome to Country is given daily after the Lord's Prayer. </p> <p>The acknowledgment was made a permanent feature of daily Parliament proceedings in 2010 after the election of the Gillard government. </p> <p>Senator Hanson has been a member of the upper house since 2016, with colleagues saying she has sat through years of daily acknowledgments without any interjections. </p> <p>In a statement, a spokesman for Senator Hanson said she would “refuse” to acknowledge country in the Senate. </p> <p>“Senator Hanson considers that ‘acknowledgement of country’ perpetuates racial division in Australia,” the spokesman said. </p> <p>“Like many non-indigenous Australians, Senator Hanson considers this country belongs to her as much it does belong to any other Australian, Indigenous or otherwise."</p> <p>“From this point forward, Senator Hanson will refuse to acknowledge country in the Senate.”</p> <p>Senator Hanson's defiance has caused a flood of criticism online, with many calling the One Nation leader a "racist": a title she has been branded with sporadically throughout her political career. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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