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Horrifying moment wheel falls off plane during take-off

<p>Video footage has captured the horrifying moment a wheel fell off a United Airlines Boeing plane just moments after take off on Monday morning. </p> <p>The video captured by RadarBox shows the tire coming loose from the aircraft's undercarriage and plummeting to the ground seconds after take off. </p> <p>The airline confirmed that a wheel fell off the plane as the flight departed Los Angeles International airport en route to Denver, but it safely touched down around three hours later. </p> <p>None of the 174 passengers or seven crew members on board were injured. </p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 573px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7389507936625691920&display_name=tiktok&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40theprojecttv%2Fvideo%2F7389507936625691920%3Fq%3Dboeing%2520wheel%26t%3D1720568253683&image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2FoEEROKIMm2EpV6DrBgf3FeAUB4EjlBg0BMjmzE%3Flk3s%3Db59d6b55%26nonce%3D85756%26refresh_token%3D9848a1a77a4d011f7ceeb76a41229609%26x-expires%3D1720738800%26x-signature%3DKRkuV5%252BXkjrhdVj9cxtL5oLH5ow%253D%26shp%3Db59d6b55%26shcp%3D-&key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p>  </p> <p> </p> <p>A United spokesperson said that the wheel has been found in Los Angeles and they are investigating the cause. </p> <p>“The wheel has been recovered in Los Angeles, and we are investigating what caused this event,” the statement read. </p> <p>It is not known whether it caused any damage on the ground. </p> <p>The incident comes just four months after a Japan-bound Boeing airlines carrying 249 passengers also lost a wheel not long after take off in San Francisco. </p> <p>The flight, that took place in March. was diverted to LAX where it landed safely. The wheel reportedly damaged some vehicles in an airport parking lot. </p> <p><em>Images: CaliPlanes/ Youtube</em></p> <p> </p>

Travel Trouble

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School mourns after beloved teacher falls from roof

<p>A beloved former teacher is being remembered as an educator who “loved a laugh and to have fun” after he suffered critical injuries following a fall. </p> <p>Paul Hogan, 61, was reportedly retrieving balls from the roof of St Margaret Mary’s School in Spotswood, Melbourne when he fell 3m to the concrete ground at around 2:30 pm on Thursday. </p> <p>He suffered critical head injuries and was taken to hospital, where he died on Friday. </p> <p>It is reported that students were still at school and parents were on campus for parent-teacher interviews, when the incident occurred. </p> <p>Hogan worked as a teacher and principal at several schools across the city, with an extensive 36-year career in education. </p> <p>“We extend our sincere condolences to Paul’s family, friends and colleagues, and we hold all of those impacted in our hearts and prayers," Melbourne Archdiocese Catholic Schools executive director Dr Edward Simons said. </p> <p>“Paul was a friend and mentor to many in our MACS community and he will be dearly missed.”</p> <p>Hogan had his first classroom teaching role in 1988. </p> <p>He retired in 2022, but continued to work as a part-time and casual relief teacher at  St Anne’s Sunbury, St Mary’s Ascot Vale, and St Margaret Mary’s Spotswood. </p> <p>Ascot Vale Panthers Junior Football Club said Hogan served as a “confidant, mentor and friend” to all who attended St Mary’s.</p> <p>“His infectious personality, energy and passion saw him loved by parents and students alike,” the club said.</p> <p>“Hoges was a tremendous supporter of the Ascot Vale Panthers Junior Football Club and the wider Ascot Vale community.”</p> <p>WorkSafe is investigating the incident. </p> <p><em>Images: 7NEWS</em></p>

Caring

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Internet icon falls asleep during interview with Karl

<p>An interview on the <em>Today</em> show has gone pear-shaped after the famous guest seemed to fall asleep live on air. </p> <p>Hosts Karl Stefanovic and Sarah Abo were joined by Jack Karlson: the man behind the infamous “Democracy Manifest” news segment from 1991, which later became a much-loved online meme.</p> <p>Karlson, who appears in the vintage news clip being arrested outside a Brisbane restaurant after enjoying what he referred to as a “succulent Chinese meal”, was joined by one of his arresting officers on the morning show to discuss the incident. </p> <p>The interview kicked off and quickly went downhill, as the elderly gentlemen seemed to be having audio problems and couldn't hear Karl and Sarah's line of questioning.</p> <p>Then, as the former police officer began answering questions, Karlson closed his eyes for over a minute, seemingly having a nap live on air. </p> <p>Stefanovic noticed Karlson's impromptu kip, asking, “I just got a little worried there, Jack might’ve nodded off like <em>Weekend at Bernies</em>. You still with us, Jackie boy?”</p> <p>Karlson opened his eyes and rejoined the conversation to discuss the upcoming documentary <em>The Man Who Ate A Succulent Chinese Meal</em>, based on Karlson’s life.</p> <p>Directed by Heath Davis and co-produced by Tim Randall and Mark Dapin, author of <em>Carnage: A Succulent Chinese Meal</em> based on the now-viral event, the film is currently set for release in March 2025.</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PeihcfYft9w?si=QX2m9akJwHEwwBev" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>The video of Karlson’s arrest became an meme when it was finally uploaded to the internet in 2009. </p> <p>In the video, Karlson declared while resisting arrest by police: “This is democracy manifest!”, “Get your hand off my penis!” and “What is the charge? Eating a meal? A succulent Chinese meal?” </p> <p><em>Image credits: Today </em></p>

TV

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Teen actress' parents share update after five-storey fall

<p>Mamie Laverock's parents have shared a promising update with fans, after she was left fighting for her life following a five-storey <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/teen-actress-on-life-support-after-devastating-mishap" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fall</a>. </p> <p>Her parents Nicole and Rob updated their GoFundMe page for the 19-year-old and said that she was “out of her big surgeries," and confirmed that doctors say she's “doing well.”</p> <p>"Mamie is out of her extensive surgeries and the doctors say she is doing well," they wrote.</p> <p>“It’s impossible for us to be happier,” her parents continued.</p> <p>“Thank you all for your support.”</p> <p>On May 11, Laverock experienced a “medical emergency” and was hospitalised in Winnipeg, Canada before being transferred to another hospital in Vancouver. </p> <p>At the time her parents said her recovery was “unclear", but she was “showing signs of improvement.” </p> <p>More than two weeks later, they shared a harrowing update on their daughter's condition informing fans that she was now on life support after she fell five stories from a balcony walkway while being escorted out of a secure unit in the hospital. </p> <p>Many of her <em>When Calls the Heart </em>co-stars took to social media to promote the crowd-funding page and express their heartbreak. </p> <p>“I love this family, my heart is broken. A devastating time for all who care for Mamie. Please help if you can. They need all the support they can get to make it through this,"  Laverock’s on-screen mother Molly Sullivan wrote on X. </p> <p>"I just donated. If you have the means to do so, I hope you will too. Link in bio,” wrote the show's leading actress Erin Krakow.  </p> <p>The fundraiser has now exceeded the $30,000 CAD target, raising almost $33,000 CAD. </p> <p><em>Image: GoFundMe</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Another man dies after fall from world's biggest cruise ship

<p>A passenger has died after he fell from the world's largest cruise ship on the first night of a week-long voyage. </p> <p>The unidentified man allegedly jumped from Royal Caribbean’s new 366 metre-long Icon of the Seas, just hours after it left a port in Miami, Florida on its way to Honduras, according to the US Coast Guard.</p> <p>“The cruise ship deployed one of their rescue boats, located the man and brought him back aboard,” the Coast Guard told the <em><a href="https://nypost.com/2024/05/28/us-news/passenger-dead-after-jumping-off-worlds-largest-cruise-ship/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">New York Post</a></em>.</p> <p>“He was pronounced deceased. Beyond assisting in the search, the US Coast Guard did not have much involvement in this incident,” the agency added.</p> <p>Royal Caribbean told the publication, “The ship’s crew immediately notified the US Coast Guard and launched a search and rescue operation”. </p> <p>“Our care team is actively providing support and assistance to the guest’s loved ones during this difficult time.”</p> <p>At the time of the incident, the cruise ship had only travelled 500km from Florida, and stopped for two hours to help the search and rescue Coast Guard team to locate the passenger. </p> <p>The man was brought back on-board in critical condition before he succumbed to his injuries and died on the ship. </p> <p>The Icon of the Seas, the world’s largest cruise ship, took its maiden voyage in January this year.</p> <p>The Royal Caribbean ship has 20 decks and is nearly the size of four city blocks, holding 7,600 passengers and 2,350 crew members.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Royal Caribbean </em></p>

Travel Trouble

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5 ways to avoid going overboard on a cruise

<p>Falling overboard is the stuff of cruising nightmares (and it happens surprisingly more frequently than you might think. Just this year we’ve brought you two stories about passengers falling overboard, but this fishy fate is by no means unavoidable.</p> <p>Here are five ways to ensure you keep your feet dry.</p> <p><strong>1. Limit your alcohol intake</strong></p> <p>If the prices weren’t enough of a reason to go easy on the sauce on your cruise, perhaps the risk of tipping over the balcony will persuade you. Think of it this way – the effect of alcohol on a cruise is the same as the effect of alcohol on dry land, but when you’re on a cruise you’re travelling through sometimes heavy seas at about 20 knots.</p> <p><strong>2. Stay in your room during inclement weather</strong></p> <p>If your ship is sailing into dicey conditions, you’re better off keeping to your quarters. You never know how a cruise liner is going to stand up to the ocean’s wrath, and even if you want a good view of Mother Nature’s nasty side, you’re safer below deck. </p> <p><strong>3. Keep clear of dark corners</strong></p> <p>It’s not a very pleasant thing to think about, but when there are 4,000 passengers on a cruise they’re not all going to be good eggs. Be aware of your surroundings, just as you would be on land, and be sure to report any suspicious activity to a crew member.</p> <p><strong>4. Pay attention during the practice drills</strong></p> <p>Even if you’ve been on 20 cruises it’s a good idea to pay attention during the practice drills. This will reinforce what you need to do in an event of an emergency, and might just save your life (or someone else’s by knowing where to find the safety gear).</p> <p><strong>5. Don’t re-enact the <em>Titanic</em> scene</strong></p> <p>Because going overboard will make you look like anything but, “The king of the world.”</p> <p>Have you ever been on a cruise? Did you ever feel unsafe at any point? Let us know in the comments below, we’d love to hear from you.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Cruising

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Why millions of Aussies are falling behind on superannuation savings

<p>Millions of Aussies are falling behind on their superannuation savings, with nearly one in two Australians on track for a grim retirement. </p> <p>According to research from superannuation and investments company Vanguard, this huge number of Australians have no idea how much they are playing in fees to their super funds, which can greatly impact how much you have in savings when your retirement day comes. </p> <p>“We are coming up against a stubborn statistic in our retirement research again this year — almost one in two Australians still don’t know what they pay in super fees,” Vanguard Investments Australia managing director Daniel Shrimski said.</p> <p>Also adding to the confusion of how much is needed for comfortable gold year is different companies sharing conflicting numbers on what figures to strive for in your superannuation.</p> <p>Superannuation consultancy company Australian Retirement Trust’s latest research shows the average superannuation balance for someone age 35 to 44 is $92,700, however this should be closer to $156,000 to be on track for a “comfortable retirement”.</p> <p>The average worker aged 55 to 64 has $285,900 in super but a 60-year-old needs close to $453,000 in retirement savings, ART said.</p> <p>“In the past 12 months, only one in five of us has checked our super balance,” Australian Retirement Trust executive general manager Anne Fuchs said, adding 70 per cent of Australians feel they don’t have enough money to retire on.</p> <p>“We talk to members all the time who have reached the end of their working life full of regret, wishing they had done something earlier. Australia has a monster problem whereby not enough of us are engaging with our super."</p> <p>“The earlier you start paying attention and understanding how your money is invested ... then you’ll really be able to finish work and put your feet up.”</p> <p>Financial consultancy Link Wealth director and financial adviser Joshua Lee told <a href="https://7news.com.au/news/new-research-shows-aussie-superannuation-savings-falling-short-of-retirement-needs--c-14507773" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>7News</em></a> that one of the most important tips for Australians is to take notice and understand their superannuation payments and what they pay in fees.</p> <p>“Take notice of what your account is doing,” he said.</p> <p>“Look at your statement when it comes in every year so you can understand what fees are being deducted from your account because that will have an impact on how much money you have come retirement.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Retirement Life

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How to fall asleep without sleeping pills: 7 natural sleep aids that actually work

<p>It’s 3am and you’re suddenly wide awake. Try these seven science-backed strategies to fall back to sleep fast.</p> <p><strong>Give meditation a try </strong></p> <p>As a mindfulness coach, I’m very aware of the day-to-day anxieties and worries that can interfere with a good night’s sleep. One of the most effective natural sleep aids is a quick meditation session to ease yourself out of those stresses. If you’ve never meditated before, you’ll likely find the meditation interrupted by thoughts flashing through your mind.</p> <p>It’s important for you to know that this isn’t a failure on your part, and that you aren’t doing anything wrong. Thinking is just what the brain does, as naturally as lungs take in air. The point is to be non-judgmental yet aware of your thoughts, bodily experiences and breath, moment by moment.</p> <p><em>Sleep better, feel better! <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/rollers-resistance/27-72435-gaiam-strengthen-stretch-kit?affiliate=GAIAM6O" target="_blank" rel="noopener">This Blackout Sleep Mask from Gaiam</a> will help you feel well rested and renewed. </em></p> <p><strong>Stop wanting to fall asleep</strong></p> <p>It’s counterintuitive, isn’t it? Sometimes trying too hard to do something is the very thing that prevents us from achieving it – and that’s never more true than when it comes to falling asleep. Desperately wanting to sleep will only stoke anxieties that will further stress your brain, essentially feeding it the message that it’s not safe to sleep.</p> <p>Throw in those worries about your to-do list at work the following day, and the whole thing can snowball into a panic attack. Try letting go of that feeling that you absolutely must sleep now, and observe your own anxieties for what they are without judgment. When you stop looking at sleep as a goal, you’ll find it easier to fall asleep.</p> <p><em>Before you climb into bed, set aside 10-15 minutes to help relax your body and mind, with <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/restore-massage/27-73353-gaiam-wellness-acupressure-neck-back-pillow?affiliate=GAIAM60" target="_blank" rel="noopener">this wellness acupressure neck and back pillow from Gaiam</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>Start a journal </strong></p> <p>If you find yourself struggling to fall asleep, pick up a pen and paper (not your phone!), and start writing: simply scribble down an account of what’s going on inside your head. Although there’s no “right” way to journal, you might start by listing the events of your day, and from there, how those events and encounters made you feel.</p> <p>Building this structured picture of your thoughts may help you see that the problem that’s keeping you up at night, and is likely less overwhelming than you thought. Why my insistence on a pen and paper? First off, studies show the simple motor action that’s involved in the act of handwriting has a calming effect. Secondly, the light emitted by laptops and phones isn’t conducive to falling asleep.</p> <p><strong>Find yourself a "3am friend"</strong></p> <p>Some of us are lucky to have a ‘3am friend’, that close confidant you can call up in the wee hours knowing that they won’t hold it against you in the morning. Although it’s great to have someone to talk to when you want to fall asleep, it’s important that the conversation doesn’t just rehash the anxieties that are preventing you from catching shut-eye in the first place.</p> <p>Rather than using the call to seek solutions for those issues, talk about things that calm your nerves, or even have them assist you in deep breathing. It may sound silly, but doing a series of deep, relaxing breaths can help you let go of the troubles that are keeping you wide awake.</p> <p><strong>Take a warm shower</strong></p> <p>Taking a warm shower not only relaxes your muscles and soothes minor aches and pains, but it also raises your core body temperature. As soon as you step out of the shower, your body starts working at lowering that temperature, which is something that normally happens when you’re falling asleep naturally.</p> <p>(That’s why we always feel the need for a blanket when we sleep, no matter how warm it is!) By kick-starting that temperature-lowering process, you’re tricking your body into falling asleep fast.</p> <p><strong>Stretch yourself to sleep </strong></p> <p>Anxiety keeping you up? Research suggests mild stretching can help take the edge off and relax muscles that have become stiff and sore after a long day. We’re not talking intricate yoga poses or acrobatics here, either: Simple stretches like an overhead arm stretch and bending over to touch your toes should do the trick. Ramp up the relaxation potential with a soundtrack of ambient noise at a volume that’s just barely audible.</p> <p>There are plenty of white noise apps that are free to download, but soft music can work as well (so long as there are no lyrics). Just remember, if you’re using an electronic device to play these sleep-promoting sounds, make sure it’s placed screen-down so you’re not distracted by the light it emits.</p> <p><em>Stretching is healing, and this <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/rollers-resistance/27-72435-gaiam-strengthen-stretch-kit?affiliate=GAIAM60" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Strengthen and Stretch Kit from Gaiam</a> is a great way to start. An on-line workout is also included to get you started.</em></p> <p><strong>Read (or listen!) to something new</strong></p> <p>When you’re struggling with insomnia, it might be tempting to pull an old favourite off the bookshelf. In reality, it’s better to read or listen to an audio book that covers a topic on which you know absolutely nothing. New information, while taking attention away from the stressors that are keeping you up at night, gives your brain enough of a workout to make it tire more quickly than when it’s engaged with familiar subjects and concepts.</p> <p>Again, if it’s an audio book or podcast you’re listening to, make sure the light-emitting side of the device is face down to keep the room as dark as possible. Darkness and warmth play an essential part in the production and maintenance of melatonin, the hormone that plays the central role falling asleep.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article by </em><em>Deepak Kashyap </em><em style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/sleep/how-to-fall-asleep-without-sleeping-pills-7-natural-sleep-aids-that-actually-work" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Body

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Awful new details emerge after man's fatal fall from hot air balloon

<p><strong>Warning: Disturbing details</strong></p> <p>New details have emerged of the moments before a man tragically fell to his death from a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/man-dies-after-falling-from-hot-air-balloon-over-melbourne" target="_blank" rel="noopener">hot air balloon</a>. </p> <p>The man was one of ten people onboard the hot air balloon ride, which took off at around 7am on Monday. </p> <p>A video obtained by 7News, shows the man, dressed in a brown jumper, taking in the view over the city alongside other guests. </p> <p>Witnesses have also reported that the man looked fine and was even chatting with the ride operator about politics as the balloon launched into the air. </p> <p>As the ride reached around 450metres, just ten minutes later, with no warning whatsoever he shockingly exited the basket in what was reported to be an act of self-harm and plunged to his death. </p> <p>The pilot immediately made a distressed may day call as horrified passengers and motorists witnessed him fall through the air. </p> <p>Passengers onboard another hot air balloon, which was launched at the same time, recalled hearing the distress calls over the radio approximately 15 minutes into their ride. </p> <p>Not long after emergency services arrived at the horrifying scene in Albert Street, Preston in the city's north-east, where his body was found in a front yard.</p> <p>One witness recalled the incident and told the <em>Today </em>show: "My brother heard like a loud bang, almost like something like a large item falling in your house. And it wasn’t until we heard all the sirens that we came out."</p> <p>Passengers onboard the hot air balloon have been offered counselling by the operator, with officers currently preparing a report for the coroner. </p> <p><em>Images: 7News/ Daily Mail</em></p>

Legal

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“Unbelievably legitimate”: Deb Knight falls victim to popular scam

<p>Deb Knight has shared how she fell victim to a popular scam, losing $1,200 while trying to get Taylor Swift tickets for her daughter's birthday. </p> <p>Like many people around Australia, the veteran journalist was eager to get her hands on tickets to the highly anticipated Eras Tour as a once in a lifetime surprise for her eight-year-old daughter's birthday present.</p> <p>After missing out on tickets through all official channels, Deb thought hope was lost, until a friend reached out to her. </p> <p>“A really good friend, who I’ve known all my life, contacted me and said, ‘do you still want Taylor Swift tickets?’” Knight told <em>A Current Affair</em>.</p> <p>“It was my daughter’s eighth birthday and getting my hands on these tickets would be the best present ever."</p> <p>“My friend put me in contact with her friend who had the tickets – or so I thought.”</p> <p>Knight had received a phone call from her close friend who said her cousin was selling tickets, but unbeknownst to everyone involved, the friend’s Facebook account had been hacked. </p> <p>Deb promised to pay half the cost of the tickets as a bond, then pay the rest after she had seen the tickets, which she said looked “unbelievably legitimate". </p> <p>Tech expert Trevor Long joined Deb on <em>ACA</em>, and noticed one major error about the fake tickets. </p> <p>“The difference is a genuine Taylor Swift ticket in an Apple Wallet right now does not have that barcode.”</p> <p>Alarm bells started ringing for the veteran journalist when the so-called seller said the payment had not come through, but by then it was too late.</p> <p>Deb contacted her bank but it was too late to get her $1,200 back, and her hunt to find Taylor Swift tickets continued. </p> <p>“I realised I’d been scammed. I felt sick to the stomach, absolutely humiliated. I also felt embarrassed and ashamed,” she said.</p> <p>“I was reluctant to speak publicly about this but I think we’ve got to. We have to normalise it so people feel there’s less of a stigma about it."</p> <p>“It happens to everyone, even Deb Knight – it’s disgusting, what’s happening, so something needs to be done.”</p> <p>Police have warned Swifties who missed out on tickets to the singer’s upcoming tour not to fall prey to ticketing scams, and only to purchase tickets through official channels such as Ticketek marketplace. </p> <p>Since tickets for the Eras tour went on sale last June, and subsequently sold out in record timing, Victoria Police said there had been more than 250 reports of ticketing scams for Taylor Swift shows alone.</p> <p><em>Image credits: A Current Affair</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Kyle Sandilands abandons radio show after nasty accident

<p dir="ltr">Kyle Sandilands was forced to abandon his daily radio show on Wednesday morning, after a nasty accident prevented him from heading into the studio. </p> <p dir="ltr">KIISFM was forced to play a pre-recorded episode of the <em>Kyle and Jackie O Show</em>, as just moments before he was set to go on air, Sandilands took a tumble down the stairs. </p> <p dir="ltr">Kyle took Thursday off the show as well to recover from his accident, but called in to speak to his co-host Jackie O to share what happened. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I fell from the top of my internal staircase and rolled, rattled and bumped all the way to the bottom, and I was left splayed out like a Christmas dinner,” Sandilands said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s a big marble staircase, very wide and very long, and in some design flaw, the light [switch] is at the bottom, not at the top, it was pitch black and my foot went,” he added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sandilands said he was home alone at the time, with his wife Tegan Kynaston and their one-year-old son Otto spending the night away.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So the normal routine wasn’t happening, the nanny wasn’t there because the baby wasn’t there, and the lighting situation wasn’t sorted out,” Sandilands said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I carry everything in [my] hat, my wallet, keys, cigarettes … That all went everywhere, and I was left at the bottom of the floor.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was so injured I thought, ‘That’s it for me. This is the beginning of the end.’”</p> <p dir="ltr">While he said he was left “rattled” by the accident, Sandilands went on to confirm he was doing “fine” now, and was hoping to be back on the air for Friday morning’s show. </p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><em>Image credits: KIISFM</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-e52ac76e-7fff-4c97-37d8-2bedfb88f925"></span></p>

Caring

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"I thought I was gone": Grandfather reunited with rescuers after pier fall

<p>John Mirabelli, 88, has been reunited with the three men who saved his life after he accidentally fell into the ocean. </p> <p>The great-grandfather was fishing off Portsea Pier in Victoria last month, when he lost his footing and fell off the pier and into the bay. </p> <p>"I thought I was gone, because when I fell in, I went straight down," Mirabelli told<em> 9News</em>. </p> <p>Dressed in just a raincoat and a pair of gumboots, the 88-year-old was drenched and holding on to a slippery pylon for almost an hour, and just when he thought all hope was lost,  local surfer Ben Buxton luckily walked by.</p> <p>"I looked over and I saw John holding onto a little wire and the look on his face, it was kinda terrifying, because he appeared to only have a few moments left until he had to let go of the wire," he said. </p> <p>"I just thought if I can get a board to where John is then he's possibly got a chance."</p> <p>As he paddled over to Mirabelli, police officers Oliver Waters and Adam Gardner arrived, after a call to triple zero. </p> <p>Between them Buxton and Waters took turns reassuring the great-grandfather and convinced him to hold on to the board, as they floated him around the pier for almost 20 minutes to get him back on dry land. </p> <p>"In that time, we were talking to John to try and get him relaxed," Buxton said.</p> <p>"And he kept talking about the calamari that he'd had to let go when he'd fallen into the pier."</p> <p>After a stint in hospital, Mirabelli was reunited with his rescuers. </p> <p>"It's special for us, we really appreciate the chance to catch up with John again," Waters said. </p> <p>"He's a lovely man."</p> <p>Mirabelli embraced the three men and expressed his gratitude: "If it was not for you, I would not be alive."</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">The 88-year-old has </span>fished at the same spot for decades and said that he won't be scared away anytime soon. </p> <p>He even joked about how he will search for the calamari that got away. </p> <p>"Next time I'll fix him up - if it's the same one," he said. </p> <p><em>Images: Nine</em></p>

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Sydney woman who died at Robbie Williams concert identified

<p>The woman who tragically died after falling down six rows of seats at Robbie Williams' Sydney concert has been identified. </p> <p>Robyn Hall, who was in her 70s, passed away at St Vincent's Hospital after spending a week in an induced coma after the fall. </p> <p>Her son Michael paid tribute to his mum on Facebook, saying he had lost his "best friend". </p> <p>“I haven’t got the words to say what my mum meant to me,” he said.</p> <p>“Taken from under me and my best friend is no longer with me … I love you forever.”</p> <p>A family friend said Hall loved the British singer and had “thoroughly” enjoyed the evening before tragedy struck.</p> <p>“She was one of those ones who looked 50 but was 70. She took care of herself and didn’t need carers,” he said.</p> <p>“Robyn was the most beautiful human I have ever met. Through all adversity, she smiled, hugged and laughed her way through,” he said.</p> <p>“Broken hearts amongst all her family and friends, she will be missed by all who knew her.”</p> <p>Robyn had remained in an induced coma since Thursday November 16th, when she was rushed from Sydney's Allianz Stadium where Williams was performing on his Australian tour. </p> <p>It is understood that Robyn was climbing over chairs when she slipped and fell down six rows of seating. </p> <p>Paramedics were called to the stadium around 10:15pm, after Robyn suffered serious head and face injuries. </p> <p>She was treated at the scene before being rushed to hospital.</p> <p>The sold-out show kicked off just after 7pm and had wrapped by about 10pm when the 40,000 fans began making their way to the exit.</p> <p>It was around this time the woman began climbing over the seats and fell.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Facebook</em></p>

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Falling for New Zealand

<p>Aotearoa, named by the Māori and believed to mean the land of the long white cloud, is such a spiritual-like calling – who could resist?</p> <p>The ethereal beauty of New Zealand stirs the soul, with its two main islands and 15,000km of coastline boasting many spectacular landscapes. And the most inspirational and fulfilling way to experience Aotearoa’s beauty is on a cruise, which is by far the most accommodating and best value-for-money option.</p> <p>Instead of bumping around winding roads over mountains and crossing verdant valleys, you relax onboard a Princess® ship, which has all the luxuries for you to enjoy while cruising happily to your next port of call, all the time being one with the surrounding splendid seas as you go – with cocktail in hand for your pleasure.<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>From the mountains to the sea </strong></p> <p>With soaring peaks in dramatic mountain ranges to braided rivers, patchwork valleys, volcanoes, stark gorges, resplendent fiords, geothermal springs, idyllic beaches and vine-tangled fields, New Zealand has one of the most diverse topographies on the planet. It is surprising how beautiful it is and you become part of it moment after moment.</p> <p>One of the highlights of your cruise is witnessing the achingly beautiful scenery of Fiordland National Park. This ancient landscape in the southwest corner of New Zealand has 14 fiords that have been carved over 100,000 years, including the legendary Milford Sound / Piopiotahi that <em>Conde Nast</em> named as one of the “7 Cruise Wonders of the World”.</p> <p>Cruising on this idyllic, tranquil sound fringed by imposing cliffs will leave you in awe. With tendrils of mist, ancient rainforest and waterfalls giving it an other-worldly aura, Milford Sound will leave an imprint on your heart and make you really feel alive and transformed. New Zealand will become a favourite.</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-69462" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/10/NZ_MAORI_VILLAGE_13143_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><strong>Māori culture </strong></p> <p>To get to know any country it is key to learn about the history of the place, and its people. The Māori have been the ‘tangata whenua’, the indigenous people of Aotearoa for millenia, and on your Princess cruise, you’ll learn about the enriching Māori culture both on – and off – the ship, gaining a deeper understanding of this ancient culture.</p> <p>One of the most important Māori experiences is visiting the Waitangi Treaty Grounds in the Bay of Islands, along with Whakarewarewa, a living Māori village in Rotorua. You will connect with locals and become part of their <em>whanau</em> (family). They will share enriching stories from their heritage with you while enjoying your company as much as you will theirs.</p> <p><strong>A veritable feast of wining and dining </strong></p> <p>Any wine connoisseur will wax lyrical about New Zealand’s wines, from its pinot noir to its sauvignon blancs and other varietals. New Zealand has an embarrassment of riches with its food and wine producers able to take advantage of the fertile soils and perfect terroir to grow and cultivate some of the best food and wine worldwide.</p> <p>You’ll tantalise your tastebuds and raise a glass to your new-found friends with fine wines from such renowned regions as Marlborough, Central Otago, the Wairarapa, Hawkes Bay, Nelson and Waiheke. And oyster lovers will be deliriously happy dining on Bluff Oysters, with crayfish, mouthwatering king salmon and tasty, green-lipped mussels being other local favourites. Add to this, it wouldn’t be a New Zealand cruise without a pavlova or two.</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-69460" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/10/MP_MilfordSound_MCrawford_1929-1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><strong>Across the Ditch</strong></p> <p>When cruising with Princess in New Zealand, the exclusive Across the Ditch program offers authentic Māori experiences, culture and local flavours onboard and ashore to showcase what makes New Zealand so unique. You can take advantage of special regional experiences to elevate your cruise and ensure personal growth such as traditional folkloric performances. You can learn the art of Poi dancing or the Haka Māori War Dance and view a pop-up display from the Auckland War Memorial Museum in the Atrium.</p> <p><strong>Family fun </strong></p> <p>New Zealand too, will instill a love of travel and cruising in your children or grandchildren on a family or intergenerational cruise with Princess. New Zealand is a perfect destination with no long flight home and a plethora or exciting activities for kids to enjoy.</p> <p>Onboard, kids will be engaged in new experiences and wonder-filled Kids & Teen Centres. Imagine the joy on the kids’ faces when they visit Hobbiton, the magical recreated and quirky Hobbit village made famous in the <em>Lord of the Rings</em> and <em>The Hobbit</em> trilogies.</p> <p>Then there is the array of activities from rafting to soaking in thermal springs, being mesmerised by bubbling geysers or watching seals frolic, albatross flying or white-flippered blue penguins.</p> <p>Families will have life-long memories from the experiences on their New Zealand Princess cruise, and it will perhaps even help transform and inspire young minds to see the world, learn new things and be educated about Indigenous cultures.</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-69459" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2023/10/DSC9247_RGB-TB_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><strong>Accessible cruising </strong></p> <p>Princess also welcomes those with limited mobility offering a selection of staterooms that provide full wheelchair-turning space. In addition, these staterooms include a roll-in shower equipped with grab bars and a fold-down bench seat, an easy access closet and accessible writing desk. There are also many accessible shore excursions around New Zealand, ensuring meaningful and inspirational time ashore.</p> <p>New Zealand is a destination for all. You’ll return delighted, with an excited family, a group of new friends and a plan to cruise its magnificence again before long.</p> <p><em>Ka kite wawe koe</em> – see you soon!</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="https://www.princess.com/">princess.com</a>.</p> <p><em>Images: Supplied / Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em> </em><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with Princess Cruises.</em></p>

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The rise and fall of antibiotics. What would a post-antibiotic world look like?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/allen-cheng-94997">Allen Cheng</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p> </p> <p>These days, we don’t think much about being able to access a course of antibiotics to head off an infection. But that wasn’t always the case – antibiotics have been available for less than a century.</p> <p>Before that, patients would die of relatively trivial infections that became more serious. Some serious infections, such as those involving the heart valves, were <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20173297/">inevitably</a> fatal.</p> <p>Other serious infections, such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070694/">tuberculosis</a>, weren’t always fatal. Up to a <a href="https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/729426v1.full.pdf">half</a> of people died within a year with the most severe forms, but some people recovered without treatment and the remainder had ongoing chronic infection that slowly ate away at the body over many years.</p> <p>Once we had antibiotics, the outcomes for these infections were much better.</p> <h2>Life (and death) before antibiotics</h2> <p>You’ve probably heard of Alexander Fleming’s accidental <a href="https://www.acs.org/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/flemingpenicillin.html">discovery of penicillin</a>, when fungal spores landed on a plate with bacteria left over a long weekend in 1928.</p> <p>But the <a href="https://www.ox.ac.uk/news/science-blog/penicillin-oxford-story">first patient</a> to receive penicillin was an instructive example of the impact of treatment. In 1941, Constable Albert Alexander had an infected scratch on his face that had become infected.</p> <p>He was hospitalised but despite various treatments, the infection progressed to involve his head. This required removing one of his eyes.</p> <p>Howard Florey, the Australian pharmacologist then working in Oxford, was concerned penicillin could be toxic in humans. Therefore, he felt it was only ethical to give this new drug to a patient in a desperate condition.</p> <p>Constable Alexander was given the available dose of penicillin. Within the first day, his condition had started to improve.</p> <p>But back then, penicillin was difficult to produce. One way of extending the limited supply was to “recycle” penicillin that was excreted in the patient’s urine. Despite this, supplies ran out by the fifth day of Alexander’s treatment.</p> <p>Without further treatment, the infection again took hold. Constable Alexander eventually died a month later.</p> <p>We now face a world where we are potentially running out of antibiotics – not because of difficulties manufacturing them, but because they’re losing their effectiveness.</p> <h2>What do we use antibiotics for?</h2> <p>We currently use antibiotics in humans and animals for a variety of reasons. Antibiotics reduce the duration of illness and the chance of death from infection. They also prevent infections in people who are at high risk, such as patients undergoing surgery and those with weakened immune systems.</p> <p>But antibiotics aren’t always used appropriately. <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(20)30084-0/fulltext">Studies</a> consistently show a dose or two will adequately prevent infections after surgery, but antibiotics are <a href="https://irp.cdn-website.com/d820f98f/files/uploaded/surgical-prophylaxis-prescribing-in-australian-hospitals-results-of-the-2020-surgical-national-antimicrobial-prescribing-survey.pdf">often</a> continued for several days unnecessarily. And sometimes we use the wrong type of antibiotic.</p> <p><a href="https://irp.cdn-website.com/d820f98f/files/uploaded/antimicrobial-prescribing-practice-in-australian-hospitals-results-of-the-2020-hospital-national-antimicrobial-prescribing-survey.pdf">Surveys</a> have found 22% of antimicrobial use in hospitals is inappropriate.</p> <p>In some situations, this is understandable. Infections in different body sites are usually due to different types of bacteria. When the diagnosis isn’t certain, we often <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/resp.13334">err</a> on the side of caution by giving broad spectrum antibiotics to make sure we have active treatments for all possible infections, until further information becomes available.</p> <p>In other situations, there is a degree of inertia. If the patient is improving, doctors tend to simply continue the same treatment, rather than change to more appropriate choice.</p> <p>In general practice, the issue of diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic inertia are often magnified. Patients who recover after starting antibiotics don’t usually require tests or come back for review, so there is no easy way of knowing if the antibiotic was actually required.</p> <p>Antibiotic prescribing can be more complex again if <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2014/201/2/antibiotic-prescribing-practice-residential-aged-care-facilities-health-care">patients</a> are expecting “a pill for every ill”. While doctors are generally good at educating patients when antibiotics are not likely to work (for example, for viral infections), without confirmatory tests there can always be a lingering doubt in the minds of both doctors and patients. Or sometimes the patient goes elsewhere to find a prescription.</p> <p>For other infections, resistance can develop if treatments aren’t given for long enough. This is particularly the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11971765/">case</a> for tuberculosis, caused by a slow growing bacterium that requires a particularly long course of antibiotics to cure.</p> <p>As in humans, antibiotics are also used to prevent and treat infections in animals. However, a proportion of antibiotics are used for growth promotion. In Australia, an <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2019/211/4/antibiotic-use-animals-and-humans-australia">estimated</a> 60% of antibiotics were used in animals between 2005-2010, despite growth-promotion being phased out.</p> <h2>Why is overuse a problem?</h2> <p>Bacteria become resistant to the effect of antibiotics through natural selection – those that survive exposure to antibiotics are the strains that have a mechanism to evade their effects.</p> <p>For example, antibiotics are sometimes given to <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(18)30279-2/fulltext">prevent</a> recurrent urinary tract infections, but a consequence, any infection that does <a href="https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/73/3/e782/6141409">develop</a> tends to be with resistant bacteria.</p> <p>When resistance to the commonly used first-line antibiotics occurs, we often need to reach deeper into the bag to find other effective treatments.</p> <p>Some of these last-line antibiotics are those that had been <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202707/">superseded</a> because they had serious side effects or couldn’t be given conveniently as tablets.</p> <p>New drugs for some bacteria have been developed, but many are much more <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7955006/">expensive</a> than older ones.</p> <h2>Treating antibiotics as a valuable resource</h2> <p>The concept of antibiotics as a valuable resource has led to the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8856755/">concept</a> of “antimicrobial stewardship”, with programs to promote the responsible use of antibiotics. It’s a similar concept to environmental stewardship to prevent climate change and environmental degradation.</p> <p>Antibiotics are a rare class of medication where treatment of one patient can potentially affect the outcome of other patients, through the transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Therefore, like efforts to combat climate change, antibiotic stewardship relies on changing individual actions to benefit the broader community.</p> <p>Like climate change, antibiotic resistance is a complex problem when seen in a broader context. Studies have linked resistance to the values and priorities <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanplh/article/PIIS2542-5196(18)30186-4/fulltext">of governments</a> such as corruption and infrastructure, including the availability of electricity and public services. This highlights that there are broader “causes of the causes”, such as public spending on sanitation and health care.</p> <p>Other <a href="https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/74/9/2803/5512029?login=true">studies</a> have suggested individuals need to be considered within the broader social and institutional influences on prescribing behaviour. Like all human behaviour, antibiotic prescribing is complicated, and factors like what doctors feel is “normal” prescribing, whether junior staff feel they can challenge senior doctors, and even their <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/07/upshot/your-surgeon-is-probably-a-republican-your-psychiatrist-probably-a-democrat.html">political views</a> may be important.</p> <p>There are also issues with the <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/international-journal-of-technology-assessment-in-health-care/article/value-assessment-of-antimicrobials-and-the-implications-for-development-access-and-funding-of-effective-treatments-australian-stakeholder-perspective/D45758CFB95520DA4FF06E46135E0628">economic model</a> for developing new antibiotics. When a new antibiotic is first approved for use, the first reaction for prescribers is not to use it, whether to ensure it retains its effectiveness or because it is often very expensive.</p> <p>However, this doesn’t really <a href="https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/50/8/1081/449089?login=true">encourage</a> the development of new antibiotics, particularly when pharma research and development budgets can easily be diverted to developing drugs for conditions patients take for years, rather than a few days.</p> <h2>The slow moving pandemic of resistance</h2> <blockquote> <p>If we fail to act, we are looking at an almost unthinkable scenario where antibiotics no longer work and we are cast back into the dark ages of medicine – <a href="https://amr-review.org/">David Cameron</a>, former UK Prime Minister</p> </blockquote> <p>Antibiotic resistance is already a problem. Almost all infectious diseases physicians have had the dreaded call about patients with infections that were essentially untreatable, or where they had to scramble to find supplies of long-forgotten last-line antibiotics.</p> <p>There are already hospitals in some parts of the world that have had to carefully <a href="https://www.reactgroup.org/news-and-views/news-and-opinions/year-2022/the-impact-of-antibiotic-resistance-on-cancer-treatment-especially-in-low-and-middle-income-countries-and-the-way-forward/">consider</a> whether it’s still viable to treat cancers, because of the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276316/">high risk</a> of infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.</p> <p>A global <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(21)02724-0/fulltext">study</a> estimated that in 2019, almost 5 million deaths occurred with an infection involving antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Some 1.3 million would not have occurred if the bacteria were not resistant.</p> <p>The UK’s 2014 <a href="https://amr-review.org/sites/default/files/AMR%20Review%20Paper%20-%20Tackling%20a%20crisis%20for%20the%20health%20and%20wealth%20of%20nations_1.pdf">O'Neill report</a> predicted deaths from antimicrobial resistance could rise to 10 million deaths each year, and cost 2-3.5% of global GDP, by 2050 based on trends at that time.</p> <h2>What can we do about it?</h2> <p>There is a lot we can do to prevent antibiotic resistance. We can:</p> <ul> <li> <p><a href="https://www.marketingmag.com.au/news/film-picking-gonorrhoea-wins-tropfest-prize/">raise</a> <a href="https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-019-7258-3">awareness</a> that many infections will get better by themselves, and don’t necessarily need antibiotics</p> </li> <li> <p>use the antibiotics we have more appropriately and for as short a time as possible, supported by co-ordinated clinical and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3437704/">public policy</a>, and <a href="https://www.amr.gov.au/">national</a> <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(22)00796-4/fulltext">oversight</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/our-work/antimicrobial-resistance/antimicrobial-use-and-resistance-australia-surveillance-system/about-aura-surveillance-system">monitor</a> for infections due to resistant bacterial to inform control policies</p> </li> <li> <p>reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics in animals, such as <a href="https://nam.edu/antibiotic-resistance-in-humans-and-animals/">growth promotion</a></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11971765/">reduce</a> cross-transmission of resistant organisms in hospitals and in the community</p> </li> <li> <p>prevent infections by other means, such as clean water, <a href="https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/204948/WHO_FWC_WSH_14.7_eng.pdf">sanitation</a>, hygiene and <a href="https://www.who.int/teams/immunization-vaccines-and-biologicals/product-and-delivery-research/anti-microbial-resistance">vaccines</a></p> </li> <li> <p>continue developing new antibiotics and alternatives to antibiotics and ensure the right <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanepe/article/PIIS2666-7762(23)00124-2/fulltext#:%7E:text=We%20consider%20four%20incentive%20options,exclusivity%20extensions%2C%20and%20milestone%20payments.">incentives</a> are in place to encourage a continuous pipeline of new drugs.</p> </li> </ul> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/allen-cheng-94997"><em>Allen Cheng</em></a><em>, Professor in Infectious Diseases Epidemiology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-rise-and-fall-of-antibiotics-what-would-a-post-antibiotic-world-look-like-213450">original article</a>.</em></p>

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1 in 6 older adults fall victim to impersonation scams

<p>More older adults are likely to fall victim to scams than are currently recognised according to new US research. The problems are global. </p> <div class="copy"> <p>A research team from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, US, says older Americans who aren’t cognitively impeded, are also at risk.  </p> <p>In their study <a href="https://10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.35319" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">published</a> today in <em>JAMA Network Open</em>, the group reports on a behavioural experiment where they targeted 644 adults aged 64-104 in Rush’s Memory and Aging Project – a local scheme that draws on participants from metropolitan Chicago to participate in research – with a pitch mimicking a real-world impersonation scam. </p> <p>The study’s fictitious ‘US Retirement Protection Task Force’ pitched itself to participants as a government social security initiative.  </p> <p>This USRPTF told participants via either post, email or a telephone call there’d been irregular activity on their Medicare or social security file and the inquiry was a routine account security check. As part of this, the fake agency asked participants to call a telephone hotline or login to a provided website to provide their details.  </p> <p>Over two-thirds of the study failed to respond to any attempts to obtain information by the phoney scheme.  </p> <p>The remainder were evenly split by either responding to requests for contact, but expressing scepticism at the authenticity of the USRPTF, or by responding and engaging with the request for information.  </p> <p>Those who were engaged with the request for information, but expressed doubts, were also those with the highest cognitive performance, and lowest proportion of dementia. They were also the most financially literate participants, while those who provided their details had the lowest literacy. </p> <p>Those who provided details were also found to have the lowest scam awareness of all participants.  </p> <p>Among this group, 1 in 10 willingly provided personal information and 1 in 5 provided details of their social security number.  </p> <p>“If extrapolated to a population level, these numbers are astounding and suggest that a very large number of older adults are at risk of victimisation,” the authors say. </p> <p>They also note that, given the use of a fictitious US government organisation name, the number of people vulnerable to well-organised scams is likely much higher.  </p> <p>Last year, the US National Council on Aging reported 92,371 older Americans were defrauded of a total of US$1.7 billion. Most were victims of government department impersonation, sweepstakes and robocall scams. Often such scams will simply demand payment while ‘spoofing’ the phone number of a government agency to add the veil of legitimacy. </p> <p>It’s a similar story around the world. This year, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission found Australians lost a record $3.1 billion last year, mostly via phone scams. Australians over 65 years of age accounted for a quarter of losses and reports.  </p> <p>The UK’s Action Fraud initiative found Britons lost about ₤2.35 billion in the 2020/21 financial year, with those aged 50-69 most susceptible to falling victim.  </p> <div> <p align="center"><noscript data-spai="1">&amp;lt;img decoding="async" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-198773" src="https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/spai/q_lossy+ret_img+to_auto/cosmosmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/09/Issue-100-embed.jpg" data-spai-egr="1" alt="Subscribe to our quarterly print magazine" width="600" height="154" title="1 in 6 older adults fall victim to impersonation scams 2"&amp;gt;</noscript></p> </div> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/society/1-in-6-older-adults-fall-victim-to-impersonation-scams/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="null">Cosmos</a>. </em></p> </div>

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Positive news for injured WA police officer in Croatia

<p>A fundraiser set up for a WA police officer who was injured in an<a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/police-officer-in-critical-condition-after-terrifying-cliff-fall" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> unfortunate cliff fall </a>reached its $500,000 target. </p> <p>Ella Cutler was left fighting for her life after falling off a cliff top while on vacation in Croatia, and her loved ones set up a GoFundMe to help pay for her medical bills and bring her home via air ambulance. </p> <p>Now, Ella is out of the ICU with horrific injuries to her body, including her head and spine.</p> <p>Her friends and family members have been overwhelmed with the outpouring of love and support from strangers who donated, and said that Ella still has a "long road" to recovery, with many surgeries to go. </p> <p>"There's been people that have donated, which is just so heartwarming to see Ella's story has really touched them," friend and fellow police officer Constable Dani Morrison said. </p> <p>"They've never met her and they still donated."</p> <p>Ella will undergo another surgery next week before she can fly home to Perth. </p> <p>Ella, and a 34-year-old Australian man were both injured after they fell 10 metres from a cliff near Fort Lovrijenac, in the Dubrovnik suburb of Piles on August 26.</p> <p>Her family have asked for donations after revealing that Ella's travel insurance denied her claim. </p> <p>As of today, the <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/please-help-us-bring-ella-home#xd_co_f=NDIzY2U3YjUtNTQ2Yi00MjhjLWEwNTMtNGNhZTMyZmNiMzc0~" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe</a> has raised $517,125. </p> <p><em>Image: WA Police</em></p>

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Home and Away star shares shocking injury

<p>Beloved <em>Home and Away</em> star Lynne McGranger has documented a shocking injury she sustained while she was walking her daughter's dog. </p> <p>The 70-year-old shared that she "face planted the road" after taking a tumble and not looking where she was going. </p> <p>She shared a before and after photo of the accident, sharing how quickly her morning had changed.</p> <p>“One minute walking your daughter and son-in-law’s dog with your MOG (mother of the groom). Nek minit (sic) you’ve face planted the road 😳😱😢🤦‍♀️,” she captioned the post.</p> <p>Addressing her caption she later added, “I must’ve been shaken up. I made punctuation mistakes 🤣😱🤦‍♀️”.</p> <p>The close-up of the injuries showed the actress with a bloodied lip and bruising on her chin, right cheek and nose.</p> <p>Friends and followers shared their best wishes for a speedy recovery after the painful accident. </p> <p>“Oh gosh Lynnie!!!! Sending love - I was hoping that was on-set makeup 😮 xx,” former <em>Home and Away</em> actress Sarah Roberts said.</p> <p>“Aww Lynny ❤️❤️❤️ hope you’re all good!” Johnny Ruffo’s partner Tahnee Sims wrote.</p> <p>“Damn, that looks pretty badass! Hope you’re all good though Lynne ❤️,” Home and Away’s Ethan Browne said.</p> <figure><picture>Diehard fans of the show also shared their messages of support, with one person writing, "<source srcset="https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=100&impolicy=sevennews_v2 100w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=150&impolicy=sevennews_v2 150w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=250&impolicy=sevennews_v2 250w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=320&impolicy=sevennews_v2 320w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=414&impolicy=sevennews_v2 414w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=500&impolicy=sevennews_v2 500w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=640&impolicy=sevennews_v2 640w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=828&impolicy=sevennews_v2 828w,https://images.7news.com.au/publication/C-11885705/0db0b6f348379d14736b4992660d3fa675b2b0fd.jpg?imwidth=1024&impolicy=sevennews_v2 1024w" media="(min-width: 0px)" sizes="(max-width: 767px) 95vw,(min-width: 768px) and (max-width: 1020px) 50vw,650px" data-ratio="1080:1350" />Ouch, now how to write that into the script.”</picture> <p>“Oh Lynne. I hope you are ok. That’s a mess. On the plus side, it could make a great story for Irene. Hope you heal quickly, love you lots xxx,” another agreed.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p> </figure>

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