Placeholder Content Image

Hospice nurse explains why we shouldn't be afraid to die

<p>A hospice nurse has shared why we shouldn't be afraid to die, explaining all the ways in which our bodies "shut off" to make for a "peaceful" death. </p> <p>Julie McFadden, a nurse based in Los Angeles, has long been sharing videos and explanations about end of life care in an attempt to destigmatise the conversations and fear around death and dying. </p> <p>In her latest YouTube video, McFadden got candid with her followers as she confessed she isn't afraid to die and why no one else should be either.</p> <p>She went on to explain all the ways in which our bodies are supposed to "shut off" in our final moments, making for a "peaceful" and "natural" death. "</p> <p>"I'm not afraid of death and here's the science behind it, our body biologically helps us die, so here is what I've seen and learned as a hospice nurse over the years - our body is literally built to die," she said.</p> <p>The hospice nurse revealed that bodies began to slowly shut down in the six months leading up to death, explaining that a person nearing the end of their life would start "eating less, drinking less, and sleeping more."</p> <p>"Why is that happening? Because calcium levels in the body are going up and because calcium levels are going up the person is getting sleepier," Julie said.</p> <p>"Our brains have built in mechanisms to make us hungry and thirsty. Biologically, when the body knows it's getting towards the end of life those mechanisms shut off, so the person does not usually feel hungry and does not usually feel thirsty, which is helping the body slowly shut down."</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CJEkzA0gt6s?si=CIzcf3xchddKtf1D" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>She put minds at ease by debunking a common concern, saying that while certain diseases could make death more uncomfortable, dying in itself wasn't painful. </p> <p>"There are times when the disease that the person is experiencing can cause symptoms and it's more difficult because they're dying from a certain disease, but the actual process that the body is going through to help it die is actually helping that person," Julie added.</p> <p>"There have been many times as a hospice nurse that I have watched someone slowly die on hospice and I have not needed to give them any medication because their disease was not causing any symptoms - no pain, no shortness of breath, they were just more tired and weren't eating or drinking." </p> <p>"They still did all of the things any other person on hospice would be doing, like they slowly go unconscious, they slowly stop eating and drinking. I didn't have to give them any medications. They were perfectly comfortable and died a very peaceful death."</p> <p>Julie explained that death was even "comforting" in a way because when you're about to take your last breath, your body released endorphins, making you feel euphoric in your final moments.</p> <p>"The body slowly goes into something called ketosis, which releases endorphins. In that person's body those endorphins dull pain, dull nerves, and they also give that person a euphoric sense, so they feel good," she said.</p> <p>"There are many reasons why I don't fear death. Yes, I have had some pretty crazy spiritual experiences as a hospice nurse that led me to not fear death, but there are also biological, metabolical, and physiological things that happen in the body that truly, truly comforted me."</p> <p>She concluded, "Our bodies are built to die. The less we mess with that, the more peaceful it will be."</p> <p><em>Image credits: YouTube / Instagram </em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

10 million animals die on our roads each year. Here’s what works (and what doesn’t) to cut the toll

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/graeme-coulson-1378778">Graeme Coulson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/helena-bender-98800">Helena Bender</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p>There’s almost no warning. A dark shape appears on the side of the road, then you feel a jolt as something goes under the car. Or worse, the shape rears up, hits the front of your vehicle, then slams into the windscreen. You have just experienced a wildlife-vehicle collision.</p> <p>This gruesome scene plays out <a href="https://www.bbcearth.com/news/australias-road-kill-map">every night across Australia</a>. When these collisions happen, many animals become instant roadkill. An <a href="https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/bitstream/handle/2123/23121/Thesis%20updated%20for%20library%20submission.pdf?sequence=1">estimated 10 million</a> native mammals, reptiles, birds and other species are killed each year.</p> <p>Others are injured and die away from the road. Some survive with <a href="https://theconversation.com/10-million-animals-are-hit-on-our-roads-each-year-heres-how-you-can-help-them-and-steer-clear-of-them-these-holidays-149733">terrible injuries and have to be euthanised</a>. The lucky ones might <a href="https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/who-should-i-contact-about-injured-wildlife/">be rescued</a> by groups such as <a href="https://wildliferescue.net.au/">Wildlife Rescue</a>, <a href="https://www.wildlifevictoria.org.au/">Wildlife Victoria</a> and <a href="https://www.wires.org.au/">WIRES</a>.</p> <p>Wildlife-vehicle collisions also increase the risk to whole populations of some threatened species, such as <a href="https://doi.org/10.1071/WR17143">Lumholtz’s tree-kangaroo</a> on the Atherton Tablelands in Queensland.</p> <p>People are affected, too. Human <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/1742-6723.13361">deaths and injuries</a> from these collisions are rising, with motorcyclists at greatest risk. Vehicle repairs are <a href="https://www.mynrma.com.au/-/media/wildlife-road-safety-report--final.pdf">inconvenient and costly</a>. Added to this is the distress for people when dealing with a dead or dying animal on the roadside.</p> <p>How can we reduce the wildlife toll on our roads? Many measures have been tried and proven largely ineffective. However, other evidence-based approaches can help avoid collisions.</p> <h2>Evidence for what works is limited</h2> <p>Many communities are worried about the growing impacts of wildlife-vehicle collisions and are desperate for solutions. Recent reports from <a href="https://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1822182/FULLTEXT01.pdf">Europe</a> and <a href="https://westerntransportationinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/4w7576_Huijser_etal_WVC_ConnectivityLiteratureReview_PooledFundStudyFinalReport_2021.pdf">North America</a> review the many methods to reduce such collisions.</p> <p>Do these findings apply to Australia’s unique fauna? Unfortunately, we don’t have a detailed analysis of options for our wildlife, but here’s what we know now.</p> <p>Well-designed fences keep wildlife off our highways but also fragment the landscape. Happily, animals will use crossing structures – overpasses and <a href="https://theconversation.com/good-news-highway-underpasses-for-wildlife-actually-work-187434">underpasses</a> – to get to food and mates on the other side of the road. Fences and crossings do work, but are regarded as too costly over Australia’s vast road network.</p> <p>As for standard wildlife warning signs, drivers <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4494358/">ignore most of them</a> after a while, making them ineffective. Signs with graphic images and variable messages get <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/ani3041142">more attention</a>, but we need road trials to assess their effect on drivers and collision rates.</p> <h2>Whistling in the dark</h2> <p>Some drivers install cheap, wind-driven, high-pitched wildlife whistles on their vehicles. Tests in the United States 20 years ago found humans and deer <a href="https://doi.org/10.1121/1.1582071">could not hear any whistling sound</a> above the road noise of the test vehicle. Yet these devices are still sold in Australia as kangaroo deterrents.</p> <p>The Shu-Roo, an Australian invention, is an active wildlife whistle. It is fitted to the bumper bar, producing a high-pitched electronic sound, which is claimed to scare wildlife away from the road. Sadly, <a href="https://rest.neptune-prod.its.unimelb.edu.au/server/api/core/bitstreams/3c3154e0-2f48-5b73-a6cd-a7423c2a75ee/content">our tests</a> show the Shu-Roo signal can’t be heard above road noise 50 metres away and has no effect on captive kangaroo behaviour.</p> <p>We also recruited fleets of trucks, buses, vans, utes and cars to field test the Shu-Roo. Nearly 100 vehicles covered more than 4 million kilometres across Australia over 15,500 days. The drivers reported just over one wildlife-vehicle collision per 100,000km travelled, but <a href="https://doi.org/10.7882/AZ.2021.042">there was no difference in the rate</a> for vehicles fitted with a Shu-Roo versus those without one.</p> <p>The virtual fence is the latest attempt to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. It uses a line of posts spaced along the roadside, each with a unit producing loud sounds and flashing lights aimed away from the road. Vehicle headlights activate the units, which are claimed to alert animals and reduce the risk of collision.</p> <p>Early results from Tasmania were encouraging. A 50% drop in possum and wallaby deaths was reported, but <a href="https://doi.org/10.1071/AM19009">this trial had many design flaws</a>. Recent trials in <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/9/10/752">Tasmania</a>, <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/12/10/1323">New South Wales</a> and <a href="https://www.redland.qld.gov.au/downloads/download/292/virtual_fence_to_reduce_vehicle_collisions_with_wallabies_on_heinemann_rd_-_final_report_2020">Queensland</a> show no effect of virtual fencing on collisions with possums, wallabies or wombats.</p> <p>Our concern is that this system is being <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-02/wildlife-fence-trial-underway-in-queensland-and-phillip-island/12268110">rolled out</a> in <a href="https://www.townsville.qld.gov.au/about-council/news-and-publications/media-releases/2023/june/councils-innovative-trial-helping-keep-local-wildlife-safe">many</a> <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-10-26/nsw-south-coast-council-first-virtual-fence-to-protect-wildlife/101571600">parts</a> of <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/the-stealth-tech-aiming-to-stop-roos-from-becoming-roadkill-20231222-p5etda.html">Australia</a>. It gives the impression of action to reduce collisions with wildlife, but without an evidence base, solid study design or adequate monitoring.</p> <h2>A very messy problem</h2> <p>The problem has many dimensions. We need to consider all of them to achieve safe travel for people and animals on our roads.</p> <p>At a landscape level, collision hotspots occur where wildlife frequently cross roads, which can help us predict the collision risk for species such as <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/aec.13465">koalas</a>. But the risk differs between species. For example, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01530">on Phillip Island</a> most wallaby collisions happen on rural roads, while most involving possums and birds are in urban streets.</p> <p>Traffic volume and speed are key factors for many species, including <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2306">kangaroos</a>.</p> <p>Driver training and experience are also important. In the Royal National Park in New South Wales, <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/6/6/40">half the drivers surveyed</a> had struck animals, including wallabies and deer. Yet most still <a href="https://theconversation.com/10-million-animals-are-hit-on-our-roads-each-year-heres-how-you-can-help-them-and-steer-clear-of-them-these-holidays-149733">weren’t keen</a> to slow down or avoid driving at dawn and dusk.</p> <p>Road design has a major influence on wildlife-vehicle collions too, but the planning process too often <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2022.959918">neglects wildlife studies</a>.</p> <p>Smarter cars are <a href="https://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1822182/FULLTEXT01.pdf">being developed</a>. One day these will use AI to spot animal hazards, apply automatic emergency braking and alert other drivers of real-time risk.</p> <p>To explore potential technological solutions, Transport for NSW is running a <a href="https://www.eianz.org/events/event/symposium-using-technology-to-reduce-wildlife-vehicle-collisions">symposium</a> at the University of Technology Sydney on May 21. The symposium will cover wildlife ecology and the evidence base for options to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions in Australia.</p> <hr /> <p><em>If you see an injured animal on the road, call <a href="https://www.wildliferescue.net.au/">Wildlife Rescue Australia</a> on 1300 596 457. for specific state and territory numbers, go to the <a href="https://kb.rspca.org.au/knowledge-base/who-should-i-contact-about-injured-wildlife/">RSPCA injured wildlife site</a>.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/222367/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/graeme-coulson-1378778"><em>Graeme Coulson</em></a><em>, Honorary Principal Fellow, School of BioSciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/helena-bender-98800">Helena Bender</a>, Senior Lecturer, Environmental Social Sciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/10-million-animals-die-on-our-roads-each-year-heres-what-works-and-what-doesnt-to-cut-the-toll-222367">original article</a>.</em></p>

Domestic Travel

Placeholder Content Image

Five things to do before you die – because planning your eventual demise takes preparation

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hui-yun-chan-715995">Hui Yun Chan</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-huddersfield-1226">University of Huddersfield</a></em></p> <p>Many people who are struck with sudden, progressive or terminal illness are <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-are-patients-in-permanent-comas-routinely-kept-alive-43365">kept alive mechanically</a>, while families and doctors make decisions about treatment. As a researcher in medical law, particularly end-of-life decision-making, I have seen how this can become a minefield of legal and ethical problems.</p> <p>UK law allows people to plan in advance of any debilitating illness, and thus have some control over future treatment. This is known as “<a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/end-of-life-care/advance-decision-to-refuse-treatment/">advance decisions</a>”. While these laws are in place, research shows the <a href="https://rm.coe.int/cdcj-2017-2e-final-rapport-vs-21-06-2018/16808b64ae">majority of people disregard or defer the discussions</a> primarily because they do not know how to raise them, or what to expect.</p> <p>While planning for your eventual demise probably sounds as fun as pulling teeth, it can be empowering. Following from <a href="https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/advance-directives-rethinking-regulation-autonomy-amp-healthcare-">my recent book</a>, here are five tips for how you can use the law to help you plan for what you want in the future – and make your voice heard when you may no longer have one.</p> <h2>1. Gather information from experts</h2> <p>First, you must think, gather information and talk to experts about how life can unfold in the case of progressive illness. This is important whether you are well but thinking about future incapacity, or whether you have actually been <a href="https://www.4pb.com/case-detail/re-ak-medical-treatment-consent/">diagnosed with illness</a>.</p> <p>A solicitor with expertise in advance directives can help you understand important laws, such as those that dictate when a person has <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2005/9/contents">sufficient “mental capacity”</a> to make lawful decisions. Lawyers can help you draft your will, and advise on how to protect or pass on your estate – including <a href="https://www.gov.uk/inheritance-tax">hidden costs</a>. They can also help you <a href="https://www.gov.uk/power-of-attorney">nominate someone</a> to make medical decisions for you when you become incapacitated, and decide the limits of their power. Do not just assume that your family members automatically have the power to decide for you legally.</p> <p>If you are ill, ask a doctor to inform you how your condition will progress so you can decide how you will deal with future events. For example, with dementia and other progressive illnesses, you must consider what quality of life you would tolerate. Similarly, in the case of pain, what treatment you would accept or refuse?</p> <p>Think big picture about your future life. Would you trade quantity of life for quality, opting for less time but with better quality of life?</p> <h2>2. Setting your decisions in stone</h2> <p>Now you have made some important decisions, the next step is about making these decisions clear in the right way, to the right people, and at the right time.</p> <p>I have <a href="https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030009755#aboutBook">documented many cases</a> across England and Wales where advance directives are disputed because they are invalid or inapplicable and there is a dispute about whether they are still legally able to make decisions. Considering your health, you may want to get a <a href="https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employment/ethics/mental-capacity/assessing-mental-capacity">formal assessment</a> of your mental state and ability to make decisions. You should record any conversations you have in writing. Documents that show you have been supported (by friends, family or professionals) in your decision-making boost the validity of your choices, <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/ejhl/25/1/article-p24_24.xml?lang=en">making them more binding</a> for healthcare professionals.</p> <p>Legally, just revealing your treatment preferences to your doctor or friends <a href="https://swarb.co.uk/w-healthcare-nhs-trust-v-kh-ca-17-sep-2004/">is not enough</a>. Writing things down is important, though never easy. Ask family or friends to support you in this process. If a loved one is aware of the choices you have made they are less likely to object to your medical decisions because they have been part of the decision process.</p> <h2>3. Update when your situation changes</h2> <p>Many people are caught out when their <a href="https://compassionindying.org.uk/making-decisions-and-planning-your-care/planning-ahead/advance-decision-living-will/review-update/">personal situation changes</a>, but they have failed to update their advance directives to reflect this – such as changing romantic relationships. Family conflict by your bedside is the last thing you want. Even if your circumstances are the same, regularly update to avoid “what was I thinking?” moments when it’s too late.</p> <h2>4. Make sure it gets found</h2> <p>Inform your family, doctors and lawyers what your advance directives are <em>and</em> where to find them. If the right people don’t have access to your directives, they are useless. In a recent example, the family of a Warwickshire woman was granted a £45,000 payout after she was <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-42240148">kept alive for 22 months against her will</a> – as the relevant documents had been misplaced.</p> <h2>5. Don’t forget your online life</h2> <p>Discussions on social media about how you wish to spend your twilight days may help as <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/ejhl/25/1/article-p24_24.xml?lang=en">supporting information</a> to ensure the wishes in your advance directives are strengthened. You should also think about who you want to be granted (or denied) access to your online accounts and social media after your death. Streamlining this process, you can now <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/04/google-death-a-tool-to-take-care-of-your-gmail-when-youre-gone/274934/">create a social media will</a> online.</p> <p>Drafting an advance directive is an exercise in liberty. It allows our beliefs and preferences to be made clear even when we are physically or mentally unable to express them ourselves. An advance directive is our voice when we no longer have one. Use your voice wisely.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/122296/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hui-yun-chan-715995">Hui Yun Chan</a>, Senior Lecturer in Law, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-huddersfield-1226">University of Huddersfield</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-things-to-do-before-you-die-because-planning-your-eventual-demise-takes-preparation-122296">original article</a>.</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

"I will die sorry": Phillip Schofield breaks his silence on his career-ending affair

<p>Former <em>This Morning </em>host Phillip Schofield has broken his silence over his affair with a colleague 30 years his junior in an interview with <em>The Sun</em>. </p> <p>And while the disgraced British television star shared that he had been left feeling “utterly broken and ashamed” over the whole ordeal, he stressed that any rumours of grooming were not true. </p> <p>“I did not,” he told the publication, after a week of the social media rumour mill running riot. “I did not [groom him].”</p> <p>“I know the photos of us circulating on Twitter look shocking, but I’m not a groomer,” Phillip insisted.</p> <p>He noted that “there are accusations of all sorts of things”, but claimed that had never been an abuse of power, as “we’d become mates … but of course I understand that there will be a massive judgement, but bearing in mind, I have never exercised that anywhere else.”</p> <p>According to Phillip, the two remain friends. And although the ex-show runner had been 30 years younger than him at the time of their affair, he added that the relationship had only begun after the man was 20 years old, when “something just happened between us that changed everything.” </p> <p>“I assume somebody, somewhere, assumed something was going on, correctly” he shared, “and didn't say anything. </p> <p>“At the time I did not think about it possibly ruining my career. I really probably only thought about it when I saw the rumour mill, and saw it growing.</p> <p>“Then I saw the link with the drama school photo [from] all those years before, and thought, ‘this looks shocking’.”</p> <p>However, as Phillip said, he hadn’t lied in order to protect his own career, but instead because the other man in the affair hadn’t wanted “his name in public. He wanted his own life.” </p> <p>Phillip explained that “the lies grew bigger and bigger and bigger”, and that it was starting to have a deep effect on both of them. </p> <p>“It got to the stage where it was out of control,” he said, “and for whatever cost, it had to stop.</p> <p>“I have massive guilt, and regret. I’ve made a mistake, I’ve had an affair at work.”</p> <p> “I think my greatest apology must go to him,” Phillip revealed. “It has brought the greatest misery into his totally innocent life, his totally innocent family, his totally innocent friends.</p> <p>“It has brought the greatest grief to them.”</p> <p>He added that the pair hadn’t spoken since the story broke - and that he also no longer speaks to his former friend and co-host Holly Willoughby - but that when things began to spiral out of control, he’d “paid for his lawyers to independently work on his behalf. </p> <p>“I am deeply sorry and I apologise to him because I should have known better. I should have acted the way I have always acted. I should not have done it.</p> <p>“I’m sorry. And I will forever be sorry. I will die sorry. I am so deeply mortified.”</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

Pizza chain's delightfully devilish scheme lets you pay when you die

<p>A delightfully devilish pizza chain is taking the 'buy now, pay later' scheme to the next level, giving customers the chance to pay for their pizza when they die. </p> <p>HELL Pizza is inviting pizza fans to apply for the trial scheme, which involves amending their wills to have their total cost included. </p> <p>The chain has one store in Brisbane, with the rest of its stores located around New Zealand, with customers from both countries able to apply for the scheme, which involves no late fees or penalties.</p> <p>The restaurant will select 666 applicants from each country, who will be invited to sign a real amendment to their wills allowing the cost of their pizza to be collected upon death.</p> <p>According to HELL Pizza CEO Ben Cumming, pizza is one of the simple joys of life, and AfterLife Pay means diners can get their fix without having to dip into the bank account immediately.</p> <p>The scheme emerged after the business was approached by popular 'buy now, pay later' providers who wanted HELL Pizza to offer the service to its customers. </p> <p>The pizza chain's unique AfterLife Pay came as a direct response to this proposal, as a statement against “schemes trapping a growing number of Aussies in spirals of debt”, Cumming said.</p> <p>“We’re seeing a growing number of people using the schemes to buy essential items like food, and we think it’s taking it a step too far when you’ve got quick service restaurants like ours being asked to offer BNPL for what is considered a treat,” he said.</p> <p>“Especially when you consider people are falling behind in their payments and 10.5 percent of loans are in arrears."</p> <p>“AfterLife Pay is a light-hearted campaign that reinforces HELL’s stance on BNPL schemes - you can have your pizza and eat it too without any pesky late fees or penalties.”</p> <p>Applicants can apply for the scheme <a href="https://afterlife.hellpizza.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">online</a>, with the chain's restaurant assuring that you will you won't pay anything for your order until "you're resting six feet under". </p> <p><em>Image credits: HELL Pizza</em></p>

Food & Wine

Placeholder Content Image

Hospice nurse shares the specific things people see before they die

<p>A hospice nurse has revealed the very specific things people often see before they die. </p> <p>Julie McFadden, a 39-year-old end of care nurse from Los Angeles, shared a now-viral TikTok about what people see in the moments before they pass away. </p> <p>Julie cares for terminally-ill patients near their end-of-life, keeping them comfortable in the months leading up to their death.</p> <p>In the final weeks of someone's life, people are often visited by lost loved ones and pets that give them the encouragement to cross over. </p> <p>The 39-year-old said most of her patients report apparitions of relatives who offer them comforting words such as, "We're coming to get you soon," or, "Don't worry, we'll help you".</p> <p>After working in hospice care for over five years, McFadden has learnt a lot about death and dying, and how people handle the last days of their life. </p> <p>She revealed that dying patients see family, friends and pets who have passed away so often it is noted in educational packets given to the patient and their relatives, "so they understand what's going on".</p> <p>McFadden also added that medical professionals don't know why these apparitions happen, and don't know how to explain it in a logical sense.</p> <p>These apparitions usually appear a month before the patient dies, she claims, and can either present in dreams or the person being able to physically see them.</p> <p>The nurse said patients will often ask, "Do you see what I'm seeing?"</p> <p>Rather than being scared of what they're seeing, Ms McFadden claims patients often find the visits "comforting".</p> <p>Julie went on to say that she doesn't believe these "visits" are hallucinations, as she says the patients are normally "pretty alert and oriented, they're usually lucid".</p> <p>"It's not like they're saying a bunch of crazy things that don't make any sense," Ms McFadden added. </p> <p>"They're usually functional and logical and questioning me, 'Why am I seeing my dead mom, do you see her?'"</p> <p>Ms McFadden ended her video by saying that for many people in their final days, these visits from loved ones can help a person feel a sense of calm and contentment around dying, rather than a sense of fear of the unknown. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock / Instagram</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

“She wasn’t ready to die”: Son speaks after mum on life support dies during power outage

<p dir="ltr">A grieving son is calling for energy companies to do better after his mum, Gloria Shae, 80, who was on life support, died during a power outage in Dubbo.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gloria was found collapsed on the floor after her oxygen machine switched off during an unexpected blackout at around 5am on May 8.</p> <p dir="ltr">The great-grandmother was woken up out of a deep sleep and was later on found trying to reach for her bottled oxygen.</p> <p dir="ltr">Now, her son Brian Shae, has spoken up about the tragic incident and is calling for energy companies to do better.</p> <p dir="ltr">"She wasn't ready to die," Brian said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"She was full of life and energy, she had planned what she was doing the next day.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said that his mother was a registered life support customer with Origin Energy and Essential Energy.</p> <p dir="ltr">Neither Brian, who lives in the same property, nor Gloria were notified about the outage by their energy providers.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If there was some sort of automated system that sent out a text message, I could have been there in 30 seconds, in under a minute,” the grieving son said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We could have assisted her, we could have got her oxygen bottles to her.</p> <p dir="ltr">"She does have oxygen bottles in the home but at night you rely on the oxygen generator."</p> <p dir="ltr">Although emergency services arrived about 15 minutes after Gloria was found, and they managed to restart her heart, Brian said that by then she was already brain dead.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gloria’s oxygen machine was rented and didn't come fitted with a back-up battery.</p> <p dir="ltr">Providers currently only need to give customers using life support four days' notice if there is a planned power outage, but in the case of a blackout there is nothing in place to contact their customers or the next of kin.</p> <p dir="ltr">Instead, they urge vulnerable customers to have a back-up battery or generator, to call triple-zero in an emergency, and to “have contingency plans in place”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But how could an 80-year-old lady who has woken up out of a deep sleep (and) short of breath manage to go out (and) start a generator?” Brian asked.</p> <p dir="ltr">Health Minister Ryan Park described the death as a “terrible tragedy” and said that he has spoken with NSW Health. The Health Minister also encouraged energy companies to find better ways to support vulnerable customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If there’s anything that we could have done differently, we will look at that,” he added.</p> <p dir="ltr">An Essential Energy spokesperson has also commented and said that the team had personally contacted the family to extend their "deepest condolences".</p> <p><em>Images: 9News</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Schumacher’s family suing German magazine over fake interview

<p dir="ltr">Michael Schumacher’s family is preparing to take legal action against German tabloid magazine <em>Die Aktuelle</em>, for publishing an AI-generated “interview” with the star.</p> <p dir="ltr">The publication has been slammed for using Michael’s face on their April 15 front cover, promoting the piece as “the first interview” since the star’s skiing accident in December 2013.</p> <p dir="ltr">“No meagre, nebulous half-sentences from friends. But answers from him! By Michael Schumacher, 54!” read the text in the magazine.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It sounded deceptively real,” they added in the strapline, which was the only indicator that the piece was fake.</p> <p dir="ltr">The “interview” included quotes that insensitively described Schumacher’s recovery, following the accident where he suffered a serious brain injury.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was so badly injured that I lay for months in a kind of artificial coma, because otherwise my body couldn’t have dealt with it all,” the quote read.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve had a tough time but the hospital team has managed to bring me back to my family,” they added.</p> <p dir="ltr">It was only at the end of the article that the publication revealed that they used Character.ai, an AI chatbot, to create the interview.</p> <p dir="ltr">A spokesperson for Schumachers confirmed their intention to take legal action against <em>Die Aktuelle</em> to <em>Reuters</em> and <em>ESPN</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">This isn’t the first time Schumacher’s family have taken action against <em>Die Aktuelle</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">In 2015, Michael’s wife, Corinna Schumacher filed a lawsuit against the magazine after they used Corinna’s picture with the headline: “Corinna Schumacher – a new love makes her happy.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The story was actually about their daughter, Gina, but the lawsuit was dismissed.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Couple die in hot air balloon tragedy

<p>A hot air balloon disaster above Mexico City has claimed the lives of one couple, and put their seriously injured daughter in hospital, after the basket they were travelling in caught fire.</p> <p>According to <em>The Daily Mail</em>, 50-year-old Jose Nolasco and his 38-year-old wife Viridiana Becerril - who called the nearby city of Cuajimalpa de Morelos home - were confirmed by Mexican authorities as the fatalities of the accident. </p> <p>The tragic incident was caught on camera by people who had been nearby, and clips have since surfaced online of the moments the basket burst into flame, and the plunge of desperate passengers falling - or trying to escape - from the balloon. </p> <p>It is believed that the couple’s daughter - Regina Itzani - was one of such occupants, and she is expected to survive despite suffering a broken arm and second-degree burns. </p> <p>Authorities have been unable to confirm whether or not a pilot was also onboard at the time of the tragedy - though some believe them to have been a second figure plummeting from the balloon - which occurred while the craft was flying over the pre-Hispanic site of Teotihuacan, north of the city. The location is considered to be a popular one for tourists and hot air balloon rides.</p> <p>The footage also shows the balloon deflating as the flames threaten to overtake everything, with one onlooker declaring in Spanish that people are falling, while the craft itself appears to still be tethered to the ground. Authorities have not yet confirmed that it was - and if so, why.</p> <p>As for why the family were taking the trip, social media posts have suggested that Regina and Jose had actually organised the whole experience for Viridiana’s birthday. </p> <p>“It was the birthday of my daughter Viridiana, Regina’s mum,” Regina’s mother, Reyna Gloria Sarmiento, explained to local reporters, “and they had prepared this ride as a surprise for her.”</p> <p>She also noted that her granddaughter was in a stable condition in hospital, and that she was conscious, before sharing that Regina had been able to share one final hug with her parents before making her escape from the balloon’s basket. </p> <p>Authorities are investigating the fatal incident, and although initial reports suggest the fire could be connected to a fault with the fuel storage system on the balloon, nothing has been confirmed. </p> <p>Meanwhile, officials in the family’s hometown, have shared their condolences for the loss, releasing a statement that reads “we send our condolences to the family, friends and acquaintances of Jose Nolasco and Viridiana Becerril who died in the hot air balloon tragedy in Teotihuacan,' they shared Sunday.</p> <p>“Our solidarity and prayers are with Regina and we wish her a speedy recovery.”</p> <p><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

Placeholder Content Image

"Don't die!": Chezzi Denyer takes on snake while Grant hides inside

<p>Grant Denyer has shared a video to instagram of his incredibly brave wife – Chezzi – defending the family home (and her own pet dog) from an advancing brown snake that had been lurking in the garden.</p> <p>As the slithering brown snake made its way towards the house, Grant remained<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> sheltered inside along with their daughters Sunday, Scout and Sailor, while Chezzi stood firm and attempted to shoo the invader away with a pair of barbecue tongs and a broom.</span></p> <p>After posting the video of the scary encounter, Grant wrote “Go Chez!" before going on to reveal why it was Chezzi who was taking on the snake rather than himself:</p> <p>“When Mr Brown comes to visit, trust the chick who had snakes as a kid to take care of it.</p> <p>“Mumma bear protecting the dog and family while TV Dad filmed it all from safely behind double glazed glass.</p> <p>“Didn’t think I ever saw Steve Irwin use BBQ tongs tho. Was she scaring it away or cooking it?”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CnJd0Ctjf8Z/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CnJd0Ctjf8Z/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Grant Denyer (@grantdenyer)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Grant can also be heard shouting in the video, “You see it, Chez? It’s coming for the stairs.”</p> <p>As the snake gets closer to the back stairs, Grant yells again: “CHEZ?”, sounding truly worried.</p> <p>The camera then pans to Chezzi trying to shoo the snake away.</p> <p>“That’s the washerwoman Chez,” Grant can be heard saying in the background.</p> <p>One of the girls then shouts out, “I love you Mum!” and Grant adds, “Don’t die!”</p> <p>“Aw, this is really scary,” Sailor can be heard saying.</p> <p>“Mummy’s very brave.”</p> <p>After the encounter was over and the video had been posted, Chezzi herself took to the comments section, writing: “Just a Mum trying to cook dinner on time when the kids spot a big snake coming for the dog.”</p> <p>“Safely relocated the big brown to the bottom side of the paddock away from the kids ... and finished dinner on time.”</p> <p>Adding eye-roll emojis, she said: “And the eye rolls were for Grant and his helpful commentary from inside.”</p> <p>Of course Grant and Chezzi's Instagram followers did not remain neutral when it came to assessing who was the hero in the incident. </p> <p>The Morning Show co-host Larry Emdur even chimed in, joking: <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">“Bro, firstly I love it how you scream for Chezzi (what a brave husband and protective father you are ). </span>secondly grab a snake survival kit from my mates at @survivalfirstaid immediately.<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">"</span></p> <p>“Mum is so brave…I love you mum!” added TV personality Lisa Wilkinson, while podcaster Abbie Chatfield simply wrote: “Hell yeah!”</p> <p>“Chezzi Denyer you are a legend,” one fan wrote.</p> <p>“The girls’ commentary is the best!” noted another.</p> <p>“Not all heroes wear capes, some hold barbecue tongs,” observed a third.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

Two journalists die in Qatar while covering FIFA World Cup

<p>Two journalists have died within days of each other while covering the FIFA World Cup in Qatar. </p> <p><em>The Gulf Times</em> reported Qatari photojournalist Khalid al-Misslam passed away “suddenly” on the weekend.</p> <p>The Qatar news outlet wrote, “Al-Misslam, a Qatari, died suddenly while covering the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022. We believe in Allah’s mercy and forgiveness for him, and send our deepest condolences to his family.”</p> <p>Al-Misslam had been covering the World Cup since it began in Doha at the end of November. </p> <p>The circumstances around his death are unclear.</p> <p>Al-Misslam's death comes just days after influential American soccer journalist Grant Wahl died at the age of 48 while also covering the games in Qatar.</p> <p>While covering Argentina’s quarter-final win over the Netherlands, Wahl collapsed at the Lusail Iconic Stadium and was rushed to a nearby hospital before his death.</p> <p>It’s unclear whether he died at the hospital or in transport.</p> <p>While there is yet to be a clear cause of death determined, Grant's brother Eric believes foul play from the Qatari government may have been involved.</p> <p>Prior to the American team’s game against Wales, Wahl was initially not allowed into Ahmad bin Ali Stadium and detained for 30 minutes for wearing a shirt depicting a soccer ball surrounded by a rainbow.</p> <p>He was eventually let into the stadium, despite the Qatari government's crackdown on pro-LGBTQ demonstrations at the tournament.</p> <p>Wahl had been struggling with minor health issues while covering the games and had been to a medical centre in Qatar twice.</p> <p>Grant's brother Eric said he is in "complete shock" over the sudden death of his brother and is pleading for answers. </p> <p>“My name is Eric Wahl. I live in Seattle, Washington. I am Grant Wahl’s brother. I’m gay,” he said in a video posted to his Instagram account.</p> <p>“I’m the reason he wore the rainbow shirt to the World Cup. My brother was healthy. He told me he received death threats. I do not believe my brother just died. I believe he was killed. And I just beg for any help."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

Iconic Top Gun and Die Hard actor dies at age 66

<p>Clarence Gilyard, best known for his roll as computer hacker Theo in Die Hard and naval flight officer Marcus “Sundown” Williams in Top Gun, has died at 66 years of age.</p> <p>His death was announced on Monday November 29 in a statement from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he had been working as an associate professor at the College of Fine Arts.</p> <p>"It is with profound sadness that I share this news," Dean Nancy Uscher said in the statement shared on instagram.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/ClhujkALoIh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/ClhujkALoIh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by UNLV College Of Fine Arts (@unlvfinearts)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"His students were deeply inspired by him, as were all who knew him. He had many extraordinary talents and was extremely well-known in the university through his dedication to teaching and his professional accomplishments.”</p> <p>Heather Addison, UNLV film chair remembered Gilyard as a "beacon of light and strength for everyone around him at UNLV".</p> <p>She added: "Whenever we asked him how he was, he would cheerfully declare that he was 'Blessed!' But we are truly the ones who were blessed to be his colleagues and students for so many years. We love you and will miss you dearly, Professor G!”</p> <p>He landed his first role on the TV show Diff'rent Strokes in 1981 and in 1986, Gilyard made his film debut in Top Gun, in which he played Sundown, one of the elite fighter pilots.</p> <p>Two years later, he was cast as Theo, the computer expert who helps Hans Gruber's terrorist group, in the movie Die Hard.</p> <p>He got his big primetime TV break in 1989, when he landed the role of Conrad McMasters on the NBC legal drama Matlock, starring opposite Andy Griffith. He then portrayed Chuck Norris' crime-fighting partner Jimmy Trivette on Walker, Texas Ranger.</p> <p>Despite having a thriving on-screen career, Gilyard stepped away from acting in 2006 to start teaching at UNLV and directing productions at the university's Nevada Conservatory Theatre.</p> <p>No further details surrounding his death have been made public.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

"If I die young": Mum's heartbreaking note to her children before shock death

<p dir="ltr">A mother has tragically passed away on her 36th birthday from a mystery illness while on a family camping trip.</p> <p dir="ltr">Hayley Thompson, from Manchester in the UK, had not long opened her birthday presents when she became unwell on the trip in Devon. </p> <p dir="ltr">The mother then went to the bathroom, where she suddenly fell to the floor and suffered three seizures. </p> <p dir="ltr">Paramedics were called, and Hayley was pronounced dead at the scene. </p> <p dir="ltr">As her family grieves their loss, they have revealed Hayley posted a TikTok telling her daughter Ciana exactly what to do if she “died young” just months before her death.</p> <p dir="ltr">The note reads “If I die young… Give my jewellery to my baby.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Know that I was happy. Everyone is to wear yellow to the funeral.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“No suits or ties, I want FULL yellow suits or dresses. I want a DJ at the after-party. If anyone calls it a wake you’re barred.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Remind Kiana and Adam everyday how special they made my existence. I love my family, never forget.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Wherever you see sunflowers I will be there.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While Hayley’s family knew she had been unwell in the recent years before her death, none of her loved ones had any idea who serious her condition was. </p> <p dir="ltr">In 2016, Hayley was admitted to hospital where doctors discovered she had scarring on her liver, but could not find the cause. </p> <p dir="ltr">After several more visits, Hayley was placed on the waiting list for a liver transplant. </p> <p dir="ltr">What her family didn’t know was that without a transplant, her mysterious condition was fatal.</p> <p dir="ltr">Hayley was called to hospital for a potential liver match twice, but sadly neither of them were the right size for her. </p> <p dir="ltr">Due to being let down several times, her family say she just wanted to “enjoy her life to the max”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her sister, Liah Thompson said, “We all knew she was poorly and knew she needed a transplant but we didn’t think it was needed as soon as it was. I think she downplayed it a lot; I think she wanted to live her life because she had been called for transplants before and was disappointed.” </p> <p dir="ltr">“She just wanted to enjoy herself and I think that’s what sits well with me, that she was happy.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Liah and her family are now <a href="https://gofund.me/3bba8afd">trying to raise funds</a> so they can pay a funeral director to bring Hayley home to Manchester.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: TikTok / Facebook</em></p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

“People are going to die”: Over 1000 uncared for after council aged care services end

<p dir="ltr">More than 1000 elderly residents on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula have been left without care after the local council stopped providing care services and made more than 110 staff redundant.</p> <p dir="ltr">In July, private aged care service providers took over the care of more than 3500 residents who had previously been cared for by the council, with 2063 people transferred to Mecwacare and 1554 to Bolton Clarke, per <em><a href="https://www.watoday.com.au/national/victoria/nobody-s-checked-i-m-alive-more-than-1000-stranded-as-council-retreats-from-aged-care-20220808-p5b81l.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">WA Today</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Aimee Bonfield, a spokeswoman for Bolton Clarke, said “essential services” were being provided for 300 residents, with services starting or scheduled for another 200.</p> <p dir="ltr">“All remaining clients have been contacted and we remain in touch on a regular basis to update on progress and to address any immediate needs,” she said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Bolton Clarke has a strong track record of understanding local needs and supporting wellbeing and independence for older people on the Mornington Peninsula.”</p> <p dir="ltr">But, at least 1000 residents have been left without care, including Barbara Rimington, who has a fused back from spinal surgery and has undergone surgery for lung cancer and was receiving assistance with cleaning from the council.</p> <p dir="ltr">Since Bolton Clarke took over on July 1, the 77-year-old said she hasn’t received any care and is “one of the luckier ones” because she is still relatively independent.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The council said they are monitoring,” she said. “Pig’s arse they are. Nobody has contacted me to see if I am still alive.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Rimington said she was worried for others who needed help with shopping, since there are limited delivery options available on the peninsula.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Are any of these people eating?” she said. “People are going to die. Some people are totally isolated. It’s an indictment on the whole of society.”</p> <p dir="ltr">89-year-old Michael Nolan said he and his wife, 85, were left in the lurch by Mecawacare and haven’t received care for more than a month.</p> <p dir="ltr">The council used to provide assistance to Nolan once a fortnight, helping with cleaning and tasks around the home, such as checking smoke alarms, changing light bulbs, and changing bed sheets.</p> <p dir="ltr">“[Mecwacare] has been on the job since July 1 and nothing is happening,” he said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We have to try and do the cleaning ourselves and we tackle it a little bit at a time, but it takes us days and days to do because I can’t bend down, otherwise I fall over.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Mecwacare has had months and months to prepare for this. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It is typical of the former federal government, they want to give everything over to private enterprise.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Anthony Marsh, the mayor of Mornington Peninsula, said the council decided to “transition” away from using its own staff to prepare for the federal government’s open-market system, and that the council had no say in the providers that would replace them.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The peninsula had no provider other than council delivering these services and we needed to ensure our residents had choice and the advantage of a competitive market environment,” he said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We did not get a say in the appointment of new providers; that was done by the federal government.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Marsh said the council was assured by both providers and the government that essential services would continue from July 1, and that an offer to keep some staff on “to help with the transition” was turned down.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The welfare of our older residents is a major priority for council, and we will continue to advocate to the federal government to make sure older people receive the support they need to remain independent and involved in the community,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">A government spokesman said the government was “continually reviewing” the transition and selection process for councils that chose to exit the Commonwealth home support program and was aware of the situation on Mornington Peninsula.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-e0887fa8-7fff-732a-46d4-1c85b94eac52"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“The department is aware of the transition of clients from Mornington Peninsula Shire council to Mecwacare and Bolton Clarke and is actively working with My Aged Care and the providers on outstanding transition issues,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Women get healthier after their husbands die

<p>It’s a long held belief that a successful and happy relationship can be key to long-term good health. Research has shown that marriage has a protective effect on health, lowering the risk of heart attack and depression, and increasing the chance of surviving from cancer. A new study, however, by the University of Padova, Italy, which followed 733 Italian men and 1154 women for four and a half years found that while men suffer negative consequences when their wives die – because they rely more heavily on their spouses – women often appear to get healthier.</p> <p>Dr Caterina Trevisan, the lead researcher on the study, thought that the results were due to women taking on more responsibilities in terms of household management and healthcare and thus more likely to feel stressed while married. There was also the generally accepted fact that, as women generally have a longer lifespan than men, they may also suffer from the effects of the care-giver burden, since they often devote themselves to caring for their husband in later life. Dr Trevisan said these factors may be behind the lower risk of depression in unmarried women.</p> <p>The research also confirmed the long held belief that widows cope better than widowers after the death of a partner. Incidences of depression are found more commonly in men following the death of their partner while women appear less vulnerable to mental health issues then men, possibly due to greater coping resources and ability to express emotions.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><a href="/lifestyle/relationships/2016/05/crucial-quality-in-a-life-partner-you-might-be-forgetting-about/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>The crucial quality to look for in a life partner</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/lifestyle/relationships/2016/05/why-you-shouldnt-be-friends-with-an-ex-on-social-media/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>The one person you shouldn’t be friends with on Facebook</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/lifestyle/relationships/2016/05/study-reveals-broken-heart-is-deadly/"><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>A broken heart can be deadly</strong></span></em></a></p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

You’re less likely to die if you’re treated in your own language

<div> <p>Hospital patients who speak the same language as their physicians end up healthier, according to new research.</p> <p>The study, which was <a href="https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.212155" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">published</a> in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found that hospital patients had shorter stays and were less likely to die, fall, or catch infections during their treatment if they had a physician speaking their language.</p> <p>The researchers examined medical records for home-care care recipients in Ontario, Canada, between 2010 and 2018. In total, they looked at 189,690 records.</p> <p>A third of Ontario’s population doesn’t speak English as a first language. Among these home-care recipients, 84% were English speakers (Anglophones), 13% spoke French (Francophones) and 2.7% spoke other languages (Allophones).</p> <p>The researchers examined whether these patients were treated by a physician who spoke their first language (language concordant) or didn’t (language discordant).</p> <p>“We found that patients who received language-discordant care had more adverse events (such as falls and infections), longer hospital stays and were more likely die in hospital,” the researchers told Cosmos over email.</p> <p>Francophones treated by a French speaker were 24% less likely to die, while Allophones’ chances of death dropped by 54% when they had language-concordant care.</p> <p>The authors float a few reasons for this disparity. Previous studies have shown that better patient-physician communication leads to faster and more accurate diagnoses, and more patient cooperation – both of which have better health outcomes on average. Language discordance, on the other hand, correlates to cultural differences between patients and healthcare workers, which is typically bad for patients.</p> <p>“These are staggering findings that make a strong case for providing care in the same language for linguistic minorities in hospitals,” says co-author Dr Peter Tanuseputro, a physician scientist in the Department of Medicine of The Ottawa Hospital, Institut du Savoir Montfort and Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario.</p> <p>“It’s clearly easier to convey important information about your health in your primary language. Regardless, the more than doubling in odds of serious harms, including death, for patients receiving care in a different language is eye-opening.”</p> <p>Just 44% of Francophones and under 2% of Allophones received care from physicians who spoke their language. For comparison, 58% of physicians in the study spoke English exclusively.</p> <p>“We expect these disparities to be more pronounced in linguistically diverse populations for the following reason: the odds of receiving care from a physician who speaks your primary language decreases if there are more linguistic groups in the population,” the researchers told Cosmos.</p> <p>“We believe that the results of our study highlight the importance of identifying patients who live in minority language communities so that appropriate strategies can be implemented to increase the provision of language-concordant care to these patients.”</p> <p>This means hospitals should ask patients what languages they speak, establish directories of their staff’s language proficiencies, refer patients to doctors who share their languages, and use professional interpreters.</p> <p>“Furthermore, a healthcare system’s ability to provide language-concordant care depends on the languages spoken by physicians, which should match that of the general population,” say the researchers.</p> <p>“This could be optimised by recruiting physicians with specific language proficiencies, and by dedicating resources to increase opportunities for medical education among minority language communities.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> </div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/language-hospitals-care/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com </a>and was written by Ellen Phiddian. </em></p> </div>

Mind

Placeholder Content Image

What happens if you die without a will?

<p>Actor Chadwick Boseman, star of Marvel’s Black Panther, died in 2020 aged 43 from colon cancer. It came to light last month his estate would be <a href="https://radaronline.com/p/chadwick-boseman-widow-parents-estate-3-million-split-black-panther/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">split evenly</a> between his widow and his parents, following a legal process.</p> <p>Although he knew for some time that he was dying, he did not make a will. This is why his estate (all his money and assets) passed by what’s legally called “intestacy” – the rules governing someone’s estate if they don’t have a will.</p> <p>Boseman was one of <a href="https://www.caring.com/caregivers/estate-planning/wills-survey" target="_blank" rel="noopener">around 66% of Americans</a> who didn’t make a will before he died.</p> <p>Australians are different. They have one of the highest rates of will-making in the world. For example, in Queensland in 2012, <a href="https://oxford.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198747123.001.0001/acprof-9780198747123-chapter-15" target="_blank" rel="noopener">79% of people over 35 had made a will</a> and 54.5% of those over 18 had made one.</p> <p>It’s possible this is a function of Australia’s high level of home ownership comparative to other countries, and that people often make their first will when they buy their first house.</p> <p>But here’s what happens if you die without a will in Australia – and why you should make one if you haven’t already.</p> <p><strong>The law of intestacy</strong></p> <p>If you don’t leave a will, then the law of intestacy will apply.</p> <p>Each state and territory in Australia has rules for intestacy. These set out who is to inherit, and in what shares, when the deceased hasn’t made a will. The rules are based on Western ideas of kinship, derived from English law. They focus on the nuclear family as it descends over time.</p> <p>Although rules differ in each state, there’s a pattern that puts the spouse first (married, registered partner, de facto, same sex, heterosexual). The spouse gets a significant part – sometimes all – of the estate.</p> <p>If there’s anything left after the spouse takes their share, then the children, and grandchildren, and so on share the remainder. If there’s no spouse and no children or grandchildren, then the estate may go to parents, then aunts, uncles and cousins. Some states extend this a little, but if none of these relatives survives, the estate goes to the government.</p> <p>If you make a will, you can decide not only who will take particular parts of your estate, but also who is your “executor” – the person tasked with carrying out your wishes.</p> <p>You can explain your wishes and trust they will carry them out after they have been granted “probate”. Probate gives them the right to deal with your body and property.</p> <p>If you die intestate you get no choices – a court will decide who should administer your estate, and appoint someone (the administrator) to do that. This might be the Public Trustee or anyone the court thinks suitable.</p> <p>The executor or administrator is supposed to pay debts, gather assets, do the last tax return for the deceased and manage the property until it’s clear who will benefit, and then distribute to the beneficiaries.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/473279/original/file-20220711-45278-wlj7k3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="People making a will" /><figcaption><span class="caption">Making a will gives you choices and control over what happens to your money and assets when you die.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Who’s in the family?</strong></p> <p>In intestacy it’s assumed you think about your family in the same way the legal system does.</p> <p>Intestacy may work very well where property held isn’t very complex, and for people whose idea of family matches the law’s view of family.</p> <p>But many people in Australia do not, including some immigrants whose ideas of family may be more extended, and many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people whose ideas of family connections may be very different.</p> <p>Where kinship ideas don’t match, intestacy can be problematic. For example, in many Aboriginal groups, children regard their aunt or uncle as “mother” or “father”. Aunts and uncles often have obligations to help take care of their siblings’ children, who they think of as their own children, according to <a href="https://www.tag.nsw.gov.au/sites/default/files/2021-08/Aboriginal-Wills-Booklet-3rd-Edition-2020_Web%20version.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">my research</a> into culturally appropriate will making.</p> <p>But the intestacy scheme will ignore this. This can create ill-feeling and confusion.</p> <p>This is why in the Northern Territory, New South Wales and Tasmania it’s possible to use <a href="https://www.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/cases/nsw/NSWSC/2017/1.html?context=1;query=Re%20Wilson" target="_blank" rel="noopener">customary law</a> for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who die without a will.</p> <p><strong>You lose choice without a will</strong></p> <p>For the rare people whose property consists only of a house held in joint tenancy, a joint bank account and superannuation, you may not need a will because property will pass to the other owner by the mere fact of living longer.</p> <p>But anyone with more complex property than this needs a will.</p> <p>Intestacy has no room for individual differences. For example, without a will you cannot set up a special trust for a child who has an intellectual disability, or donate to a charity, or pick out the particular people you wish to get particular things.</p> <p>Death creates grief and sometimes grief overwhelms good sense and creates greed leading to disputes. Intestacy is a safety net, but where there has been no planning in the form of a will there may be greater grief and confusion because people do not know what to do.</p> <p>The advantages of a will include that it can smooth the changeover of property from one person to another, and allows the individual to have their own wishes respected.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/186384/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/prue-vines-12823" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Prue Vines</a>, Professor, Law Faculty, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/unsw-sydney-1414" target="_blank" rel="noopener">UNSW Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-happens-if-you-die-without-a-will-186384" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Investigations continue after 21 teens die in tavern

<p dir="ltr">South African police continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding the mysterious deaths of 21 people in a local tavern, as survivors describe trying to escape the jam-packed premises.</p> <p dir="ltr">Officials have ruled out a stampede as the cause of the deaths at Enyobeni Tavern in the town of East London, a provincial safety official told AFP news agency, as there were “no visible wounds”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Seventeen people died inside the bar, with another four later dying in hospital. </p> <p dir="ltr">Police minister Bheki Cele has said the youngest victim was just 13 years old, with the remaining victims ranging in age from 13-17 - though a detailed list of the victims hasn’t been produced yet, per the <em><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-61941170" target="_blank" rel="noopener">BBC</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Unathi Binqose, a government official on safety, told the AAP that it is suspected that the cause of their deaths may have been in something they ate, drank, or inhaled while in the tavern.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It has never happened that our country loses children in this manner,” Elleck Nchabeleng, the chair of the parliamentary committee on education and technology, sports, arts and culture, said.</p> <p dir="ltr">It has been reported that those who went to the tavern were celebrating the end of school exams.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sinovuyo Monyane, one of the survivors who was hired to promote an alcohol brand, said she was still “confused” about what happened but felt lucky to be alive.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We tried moving through the crowd, shouting, ‘Please let us through,’ and others were shouting, ‘We are dying, guys,’ and ‘We are suffocating’ and ‘There are people who can’t breathe’,” she told AFP.</p> <p dir="ltr"> She later regained consciousness after water was sprayed on her.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I could have died,” the 19-year-old said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I saw two people, they died.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Luhlemela Ulana, a resident DJ who was also celebrating his birthday that night, said a rush of revellers forced their way into the already-packed venue.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though he turned off the music to discourage the revellers, it was to no avail.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-4629c71b-7fff-9d91-6fef-ef4446b21e56"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">South African President Cyril Ramaphosa expressed his “deepest condolences” to the victims’ families.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">My deepest condolences go to the families of the 22 teenagers who lost their lives at a tavern in Scenery Park, East London, in the early hours of this morning.</p> <p>— Cyril Ramaphosa 🇿🇦 (@CyrilRamaphosa) <a href="https://twitter.com/CyrilRamaphosa/status/1541018709594185733?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 26, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“This tragedy is made even more grave by its occurrence during Youth Month - a time during which we celebrate young people, advocate and advance opportunities for improved socio-economic conditions for the youth of our nation,” he wrote on Twitter.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-d54a7cee-7fff-d28b-51bd-583726f5a3dc"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

Placeholder Content Image

"Only the good die young": Tragic twist in honeymoon death

<p dir="ltr">The newlywed bride who died in a tragic golf buggy incident on Hamilton Island was due to get married last year but instead it was delayed because of Covid. </p> <p dir="ltr">Marina Hanna, 29, and husband Robbie Morgan were due to get married on July 24, 2021 but because of lockdown and density limits they decided to delay their ceremony. </p> <p dir="ltr">But it wasn't until June 11, 2022, that the loved-up pair were finally able to say their vows in a lavish ceremony at Sydney’s Doltone House.</p> <p dir="ltr">The newlyweds then finally made their way to Queensland’s Hamilton Island for their honeymoon. </p> <p dir="ltr">The pair were travelling on a golf buggy - the main form of transportation on the island on June 20 when Morgan did a U-turn, causing the buggy to tip over.</p> <p dir="ltr">A doctor, off-duty dentist and off-duty firefighter rushed to the scene and desperately performed CPR for 35 minutes on Marina, who unfortunately could not be revived.</p> <p dir="ltr">“(This) is proof that the good die young,” Robbie’s brother Matty said of Marina’s passing.</p> <p dir="ltr">Queensland Police Inspector Anthony Cowan announced in a press conference that Marina was not wearing a seatbelt while in the buggy.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was just a tragic accident with a golf buggy,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There may have been some inexperience driving those type of vehicles while turning it has rolled on its side and the woman has fallen out and sustained life-threatening injuries.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“It just appears inexperience in driving that type of vehicle, turned too quick and rolled on its side and unfortunately, it has ended up with this result.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It appears there was no seatbelt worn at this point in time; we come back to the Fatal Five but now is not the time to dwell on what they should have done.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Inspector Cowan confirmed that no drugs, alcohol or dangerous driving caused the accident.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

Our Partners