Placeholder Content Image

Kate Ritchie's surprise career announcement

<p>Kate Ritchie has announced she will be returning to Aussie screens to take part in a new reality TV series. </p> <p>The former Home and Away star, who now co-hosts the Nova 96.9FM breakfast show alongside Fitzy and Wippa, will star in the upcoming ABC reality show, <em>The Role Of A Lifetime</em>.</p> <p>Hosted by Amanda Keller, the five-part series will see Ritchie, who is a mother of one, join forces with comedian Nazeem Hussein as they navigate the challenges of parenting.</p> <p>Kate has a nine-year-old daughter, Mae, whom she shares with ex-husband, Stuart Webb.</p> <p>The official synopsis explains, “Beloved actress Kate Ritchie and comedian Nazeem Hussain will be brought together to act out real-life parenting scenarios, propelling them into immersive and unexpected factual explorations to guide us in raising resilient, happy children.” </p> <p>“Parenting author, educator and podcaster, Maggie Dent will provide insightful parental guidance throughout.”</p> <p><em>The Role of A Lifetime</em> is currently in production and is set to air in 2025.</p> <p>Last year, Ritchie went viral for her parenting discussions, after a clip of her breaking down on air attracted thousands of views.</p> <p>The emotional moment came after Dent detailed “the difference between mums and dads”, explaining that due to “biologically wiring”, women often are carrying a significantly heavier mental load.</p> <p>Ritchie was seen nodding along before starting to cry, with Dent emphasising: “This is the ‘mum brain’ - this is the mental load we carry for the people we love.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram / ABC </em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

"They lied": Kerri-Anne Kennerley blasts I’m A Celeb

<p>Kerri-Anne Kennerley has opened up on her dramatic appearance on <em style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here! </em><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> last year, claiming that she was "lied to" ahead of her decision to sign up. </span></p> <p>Speaking to Tammin Sursok on her podcast, <em>The Sh*t Show</em>, Kennerly alleged that Network Ten made promises they couldn't keep. </p> <p>“[Ten] came to me and promised me this, this and this … and I had nothing else to do at the time,” the TV veteran claimed.</p> <p>“I got promised a bunch of stuff and they lied. And so instead of being in there, the three weeks I committed to, I got out in three days. They lied.”</p> <p>Sursok asked her to elaborate on the promises they made, but Kennerley refused. </p> <p>“I don’t want to go into it now. History. And I’m even dumbfounded that I said to myself after I’ve gone, oh my God. I avoided exactly what happened for 10 years.</p> <p>“ … If I had thought about it for one more nanosecond and the things that were said to me were not said to me, I wouldn’t have done it in a heartbeat.”</p> <p>Kennerley tearfully quit <em style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">I'm A Celebrity</em><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> last year after clashing with </span>MAFS star Domenica Calarco, who she claimed called her "the most self-centred b***h” she’d ever met during an eating challenge.</p> <p>The TV veteran added that going on the show was the "dumbest" decision she has ever made. </p> <p>“Comes out as absolutely number one dumb and as backed by several of my friends – especially straight after [I left IAC], them going, ‘You didn’t tell us, we would’ve locked you in a room if you had said you were going’,” she admitted.</p> <p>“But I don’t know … I’ve always thought I was pretty bulletproof, and then you get wounded and move on. But no … dumb, dumb, dumb – and lies. That’s what I put it down to.”</p> <p><em>Images: Ten</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Still fab after 60 years: how The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night made pop cinema history

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267">Alison Blair</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p>I first saw A Hard Day’s Night at a film festival over 20 years ago, at the insistence of my mum. By then, it was already decades old, but I remember being enthralled by its high-spirited energy.</p> <p>A Beatles fan, mum had introduced me to the band’s records in my childhood. At home, we listened to Please Please Me, the band’s 1963 single, and the Rubber Soul album from 1965, which I loved.</p> <p>Television regularly showed old black-and-white scenes of Beatlemania that, to a ten-year-old in the neon-lit 1980s, seemed like ancient history. But then, I’d never seen a full-length Beatles film. I had no idea what I was in for.</p> <p>When the lights went down at Dunedin’s Regent Theatre, the opening chord of the film’s title song announced its intentions: an explosion of youthful vitality, rhythmic visuals, comical high jinks and the electrifying thrill of Beatlemania in 1964.</p> <p>This time, it didn’t seem ancient at all.</p> <p>Since that first viewing, I’ve returned to A Hard Day’s Night again and again. I now show it to my students as a historically significant example of pop music film making – visually inventive cinema, emblematic of a fresh era in youth culture, popular music and fandom.</p> <h2>Beatlemania on celluloid</h2> <p>A musical comedy depicting a chaotic 36 hours in the life of the Beatles, A Hard Day’s Night has now reached its 60th anniversary.</p> <p>Directed by <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0504513/">Richard Lester</a>, the film premiered in London on July 6 1964, with its first public screening a day later (incidentally, also Ringo Starr’s birthday), and the <a href="https://www.discogs.com/master/24003-The-Beatles-A-Hard-Days-Night">album of the same name</a> released on July 10.</p> <p>The band’s popularity was by then reaching dizzying heights of hysteria, all reflected in the film. The Beatles are chased by hordes of fans, take a train trip, appear on TV, run from the police in a Keystone Cops-style sequence, and play a televised concert in front of screaming real-life Beatles fans.</p> <p>Side one of the album provides the soundtrack, and the film inspired pop music film and video from then on, from the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060010/">Monkees TV series</a> (1966–68) to the Spice Girls’ <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120185/">Spice World</a> (1997) and music videos as we know them today.</p> <h2>The original music video</h2> <p>Postwar teen culture and consumerism had been on the rise since the 1950s. In 1960s Britain, youth music TV programmes, notably <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196287/">Ready Steady Go!</a> (1963–66), meant pop music now had a developing visual culture.</p> <p>The youthful zest and vitality of ‘60s London was reflected in the pop-cultural sensibility, modern satirical humour and crisp visual impact of A Hard Day’s Night.</p> <p>Influenced by <a href="https://nofilmschool.com/french-new-wave-cinema">French New Wave</a> film making, and particularly the early 1960s work of <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000419/">Jean-Luc Godard</a>, A Hard Day’s Night employs <em><a href="https://indiefilmhustle.com/cinema-verite/">cinéma vérité</a></em>-style hand-held cinematography, brisk jump cuts, unusual framing and dynamic angles, high-spirited action, and a self-referential nonchalance.</p> <p>The film also breaks the “fourth wall”, with characters directly addressing the audience in closeup, and reveals the apparatus of the visual performance of music: cameras and TV monitors are all part of the frame.</p> <p>Cutting the shots to the beat of the music – as in the Can’t Buy Me Love sequence – lends a visual rhythm that would later become the norm in music video editing. Lester developed this technique further in the second Beatles film, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059260/">Help!</a> (1965).</p> <p>The closing sequence of A Hard Day’s Night is possibly the film’s most dynamic: photographic images of the band edited to the beat in the style of stop-motion animation. Sixty years on, it still feels fresh, especially as so much contemporary film making remains hidebound by formulaic Hollywood rules.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A Hard Day's Night movie poster" /><figcaption><span class="caption">A new pop aesthetic: original film poster for A Hard Day’s Night.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Getty Images</span></span></figcaption></figure> <h2>Slapstick and class awareness</h2> <p>As with much popular culture from the past, the humour in A Hard Day’s Night doesn’t always doesn’t land the way it would have in 1964. And yet, there are moments that seem surprisingly modern in their razor-sharp irony.</p> <p>In particular, the band’s Liverpudlian working-class-lad jibes and chaotic energy contrast brilliantly with the film’s upper-class characters. Actor Victor Spinetti’s comically over-anxious TV director, constantly hand-wringing over the boys’ rebelliousness, underscores the era-defining change the Beatles represented.</p> <p>Corporate pop-culture consumerism is also satirised. John Lennon “snorts” from a Coca-Cola bottle, a moment so knowingly silly it registers as more contemporary than it really is. George Harrison deflects a journalist’s banal questions with scathingly witty answers, and cuts a fashion company down to size by describing their shirt designs as “grotesque”.</p> <p>And there is Paul McCartney’s running joke that his grandfather – played by Wilfred Brambell from groundbreaking sitcom <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057785/">Steptoe and Son</a> (1962–74) – is “very clean”.</p> <p>Even the film’s old-fashioned visual slapstick still holds up in 2024. Showing the film to this year’s students, I didn’t expect quite as much laughter when Ringo’s attempts to be chivalrous result in a fall-down-a-hole mishap.</p> <p>In 2022, the <a href="https://www.criterion.com/">Criterion Collection</a> released a high-resolution restoration of the film, so today A Hard Day’s Night can be seen in all its fresh, black-and-white, youthful vigour.</p> <p>Happy 60th, A Hard Day’s Night. And happy 84th, Ringo. Both still as lively and energetic as ever.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/228598/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267"><em>Alison Blair</em></a><em>, Teaching Fellow in Music, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p><em>Image </em><em>credits: THA/Shutterstock Editorial </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/still-fab-after-60-years-how-the-beatles-a-hard-days-night-made-pop-cinema-history-228598">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Movies

Placeholder Content Image

ABC host quits live on air

<p>After five years hosting <em>ABC News Breakfast</em>, Lisa Millar has announced she will be leaving the show to her audience live on air. </p> <p>The TV presenter and journalist joined the program in 2018 and became the permanent co-host alongside Michael Rowland the following year.</p> <p>Millar told her loyal viewers that her last show would be on Friday August 23rd, but she would be continuing her other work with ABC. </p> <p>The 55-year-old narrates the Logie-nominated reality series <em>Muster Dogs</em>, is a guest presenter on <em>Back Roads</em>, and co-hosts the podcast <em>The Newsreader</em>.</p> <p>“What a blast the past five years has been, whether it was interviewing prime ministers and global thought leaders or getting karaoke encouragement from my childhood idol Gladys Knight,” she said on Wednesday morning. </p> <p>“In 35 years of journalism I’ve never done anything so exciting, unpredictable, and fun. It’s only worked because of the awesome team in front of the cameras and behind the scenes who kept me laughing.”</p> <p>She went on to thank loyal viewers for spending the mornings with her over the years, saying she "loved sharing breakfast" with people around Australia. </p> <p>“I’m excited to hit the road and discover more of the incredible stories that make up the remarkable tapestry of our culture,” she continued. “There are so many adventures ahead, whether it be with <em>Back Roads</em>, <em>Muster Dogs</em>, or new projects we’re cooking up. What a privilege it is to be a part of that future.”</p> <p>Many colleagues and viewers alike shared their well wishes, as fellow ABC presenter Leigh Sales shared a heartfelt post following Lisa's announcement saying that her departure is a “huge loss” for <em>ABC News Breakfast</em>.</p> <p>“But what a win for the ABC to be getting more of her work on <em>Back Roads</em> and <em>Muster Dogs</em>,” she shared. “The one thing I know after 25 years working with this woman is whatever she delivers is done with quality, warmth and integrity.</p> <p>“You get a colleague like Lisa working alongside you once in a lifetime and Michael Rowland and the team have benefited hugely from having her there for five years. I’m proud of the amazing job she’s done and can’t wait for the next chapter!”</p> <p><em>Image credits: ABC</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Long-serving ABC star calls it quits

<p>Paul Barry, the veteran host of <em>Media Watch</em>, who has made a career out of poking the media bear, has announced his departure from the ABC show in December. After an illustrious (and occasionally infamous) tenure that would make a soap opera look like a nap, Barry is hanging up his microphone at the ripe age of 72.</p> <p>“I’ve been in the hot seat for 11 years and it’s time to give someone else a go,” Barry remarked, possibly while the hot seat sighed in relief. Indeed, hosting Media Watch is no small feat – it's a bit like riding a roller coaster while simultaneously refereeing a brawl. But Barry has certainly done it with aplomb, panache and a fair amount of flair.</p> <p>His announcement has left viewers with mixed feelings – a blend of gratitude for his unyielding service and a tinge of sadness, akin to the bittersweet end of a beloved TV series. Barry promised to stay with us until December, giving us ample time to stock up on popcorn and enjoy the remaining episodes. "Lots of fun to be had before then," he teased, hinting at some final rounds of media mischief.</p> <p>For those who might be wondering what Barry plans to do next, well, that's still a mystery. Perhaps he'll take up knitting, but knowing him, it’ll likely be with barbed wire.</p> <p>Barry first commandeered <em>Media Watch</em> in 2000 before returning in 2013, making a grand comeback that rivalled any reality TV show. Over the years, he has ruffled enough feathers to fill a sizeable pillow factory. Commercial media outlets, politicians and even his own network – as <em>Media Watch</em> famously runs independently of the ABC – have all been on the receiving end of his sharp critiques. His fearless approach has made him a hero to many and a headache to some.</p> <p>One of Barry’s most memorable moments came in 2013 during a spat with columnist Andrew Bolt. When Bolt provocatively asked Barry to reveal his salary on air, Barry did just that – $191,259, to be precise. It was a jaw-dropping moment that left viewers stunned and Bolt, presumably, a bit flummoxed.</p> <p>In between his stints at <em>Media Watch</em>, Barry has donned many hats – investigative reporter for the <em>Sydney Morning Herald</em>, correspondent for <em>60 Minutes</em>, and author of several books, including a controversial unauthorised biography of James Packer. His career has been a veritable smorgasbord of journalism, controversy and unflinching honesty.</p> <p>An ABC spokesperson paid tribute to Barry, highlighting his “track record of independent commentary, analysis, and robust discussion about the media industry and its ethics – or lack thereof.” Barry has indeed been the watchdog’s watchdog, never shying away from calling out malpractice, no matter where it reared its head.</p> <p>As the ABC gears up to announce a new host, the shoes left behind are large ones to fill. Barry’s departure marks the end of an era – one filled with wit, grit and an unwavering commitment to holding the media accountable.</p> <p>So, here’s to Paul Barry – the feather-ruffler, the truth-seeker, the man who made us laugh, gasp and, most importantly, think. As he steps down from <em>Media Watch</em>, we wish him the very best in his next adventure, whether that’s taking on new journalistic endeavours or finally perfecting that tricky scarf pattern.</p> <p>Bravo, Mr Barry. You will be missed.</p> <p><em>Image: Media Watch</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Beloved presenter dies aged 48

<p>Former ABC presenter Seini Fale’aka Taumoepeau has passed away aged 48. </p> <p>The Tongan-Australian, known for hosting Pacific Mornings on <em>ABC Radio Australia</em>, died last week, her family confirmed. </p> <p>ABC Pacific led tributes to the beloved presenter, who paved the way  for the representation of Pacific people in Australian media.</p> <p>“Seini will remembered and celebrated as a dedicated artist, orator, song woman and storyteller, who spent over 30 years advocating for Pasifika communities and their representation in the Australian media landscape,” they said on Instagram. </p> <p>“Seini’s first appearance on ABC Radio Australia was as a 13-year-old on programs produced by her mother, going on to become the inaugural host of Pacific Mornings in 2018.</p> <p>“Colleagues recall her last sign off, ‘I hope that ABC Radio Australia will consider replacing me with 2-5-10 more people of Pacific heritage and understanding, and in doing so evolve the Australian lens of the Pacific with the great and valuable resource that is our region, inclusive of its people’.”</p> <p>Taumoepeau also performed under the stage name, SistaNative and was heavily involved in the Pacific Wave Festival - which showcases arts from the Pacific. </p> <p>A GoFundMe page has been set up by her family to help cover the costs for her funeral, with over $14,000 raised so far. </p> <p>On the page her family said that she “moved on from this earthly life very suddenly."</p> <p>“Seini was for many a loving, caring, compassionate, and sincere human. Through her art, culture and her resounding voice Seini helped create the musical soundtrack of our lives.”</p> <p>Friends and followers have also paid tribute to the presenter on social media. </p> <p>“Going to miss you, sis. Still can’t believe it. Sending so much love to your family,” one wrote. </p> <p>“Love you, sis. Give thanks (for) your love, light and eternal energy.”</p> <p>“Going to miss you…Days pass and I still hope that it isn’t true. Keep looking out for all of us Seini. Love you,” another added. </p> <p><em>Image: ABC</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Laura Tingle shares "regret" over racism comments

<p>Laura Tingle has shared her "regret" over her <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/laura-tingle-under-fire-after-declaring-australia-a-racist-country" target="_blank" rel="noopener">comments</a> that Australia is "a racist country", as the ABC Director of News responded to her claims. </p> <p>Tingle caused outrage after she made the claims about Australia being inherently racist during a panel on Sunday as part of the Sydney Writer's Festival. </p> <p>Now, ABC News director Justin Stevens says her comments did not meet the organisation's editorial standards.</p> <p>“Although the remarks were conversational, and not made in her work capacity, the ABC and its employees have unique obligations in the Australian media,’’ he said in a <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/about/media-centre/statements-and-responses/justin-stevens-statement-on-laura-tingle/103909056" target="_blank" rel="noopener">statement</a>. </p> <p>“Today she has explained her remarks in more detail to ensure there is a factual record of the relevant context and detail."</p> <p>“The ABC’s editorial standards serve a vital role. Laura has been reminded of their application at external events as well as in her work and I have counselled her over the remarks."</p> <p>In response to much nation-wide backlash over her comments, Tingle issued a lengthy statement clarifying her remarks and also sharing her "regret". </p> <p>“I did indeed make the observation on Sunday that we are a racist country, in the context of a discussion about the political prospects ahead,’’ Tingle said.</p> <p>“I wasn’t saying every Australian is a racist. But we clearly have an issue with racism. Without even going into the historic record, there is also ample evidence that racism remains a particular problem in our legal and policing systems."</p> <p>“In my commentary at the ABC, and at the Sydney Writers’ Festival, I expressed my concern at the risks involved in Peter Dutton pressing the hot button of housing and linking it to migration for these reasons," she continued. </p> <p>“Political leaders, by their comments, give licence to others to express opinions they may not otherwise express. That does not make them racist, but it has real world implications for many Australians.”</p> <p>She went on to add a statement of "regret", saying, “I regret that when I was making these observations at the Writers’ Festival the nature of the free-flowing panel discussion means they were not surrounded by every quote substantiating them which would have – and had – been included in what I had said earlier on the ABC."</p> <p>“This has created the opportunity for yet another anti-ABC pile-on. This is not helpful to me or to the ABC. Or to the national debate. I am proud of my work as a journalist at the ABC, on all its platforms, and I let that work speak for itself.”</p> <p>ABC News boss Justin Stevens confirmed on Thursday that Tingle had been “counselled over her remarks” and "reminded of their application at external events as well as in her work."</p> <p><em>Image credits: ABC News / DANNY CASEY/EPA-EFE / Shutterstock Editorial </em></p> <p> </p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Incredible treasure trove of unseen royal images

<p>In a mesmerising blend of history and artistry, Buckingham Palace's newly christened King's Gallery has unveiled a captivating journey through time and royalty with the debut of "Royal Portraits: A Century of Photography".</p> <p>Opening its on May 17, this groundbreaking exhibition delves into the illustrious lineage of the Royal Family through more than 150 carefully curated portraits – some never before seen by the public eye.</p> <p>A highlight among these treasures is a poignant snapshot capturing a rare familial moment: Queen Elizabeth II, Princess Margaret, Princess Alexandra, and The Duchess of Kent cradling their newborns. Lord Snowdon, Princess Margaret's husband, immortalised this touching scene as a token of gratitude to Sir John Peel, the esteemed royal obstetrician responsible for delivering all four babies within a mere two-month span.</p> <p>In this heartfelt image, Queen Elizabeth II tenderly holds Prince Edward, her youngest offspring, while Princess Margaret, Princess Alexandra and The Duchess of Kent embrace their own bundles of joy. Accompanying this snapshot is a handwritten letter penned by Princess Margaret to her sister, affectionately addressed as "Darling Lilibet", requesting a signature on a print destined as a cherished memento for the esteemed doctor.</p> <p>The exhibition transcends mere family portraits, delving deep into the evolution of royal portraiture over the past century. Visitors are treated to a visual feast of iconic images captured by renowned photographers, including Dorothy Wilding, Annie Leibovitz, David Bailey and Rankin. Notably, the legendary Cecil Beaton's immortalisation of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation remains a cornerstone of the collection, offering a timeless glimpse into history.</p> <p>The exhibition also pays homage to the enduring allure of Princess Anne through her striking appearances on <em>Vogue</em> covers and a celebrated coming-of-age portrait by Norman Parkinson, commemorating her 21st birthday. From the timeless elegance of Princess Anne to the radiant charm of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and the spirited grace of Zara Tindall, the exhibition showcases a diverse tapestry of royal personalities spanning generations.</p> <p>Yet, it is not merely the portraits themselves that captivate visitors, but the untold stories and intimate moments woven into each frame. Delving into the depths of royal history, the exhibition reveals unseen wartime images by Cecil Beaton, illustrating King George VI and Queen Elizabeth's unwavering resolve amidst the chaos of conflict.</p> <p>As visitors explore the gallery, they are guided by a free multimedia experience narrated by Dame Joanna Lumley, offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the artistry and craftsmanship behind these timeless portraits. From Hugo Burnand's vivid recollections of photographing the royal coronation to the candid insights of royal photographers such as Rankin and John Swannell, the multimedia guide adds depth and dimension to the exhibition, inviting visitors to immerse themselves fully in the rich tapestry of royal history.</p> <p>"Royal Portraits: A Century of Photography" is not merely an exhibition; it is a testament to the enduring legacy of the British monarchy, captured through the lens of some of the most esteemed photographers of our time. From the grandeur of coronations to the tender embrace of a mother cradling her newborn, each portrait tells a story – a story of tradition, resilience and the timeless allure of royalty.</p> <p><em>Images: Royal Collection Trust / © His Majesty King Charles III 2024.</em></p>

Art

Placeholder Content Image

Insider spills on Robert Irwin's plans for I'm a Celeb

<p>Robert Irwin received rave reviews for his co-hosting skills alongside Julia Morris on this year's<em> I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here</em>, but an insider has claimed that he won't be returning for another season.  </p> <p>"His easygoing and faultless live TV skills have won over the nation. But his career at Ten will only be short-lived, and he is heading back to Seven," a source told <em>Woman's Day</em>. </p> <p>The negotiation is believed to have been orchestrated by the ultimate "mumager" Terri Irwin. </p> <p>"The Irwins are very smart when it comes to negotiations," the insider added. </p> <p>The source also claimed that Robert's decision to join<em> I'm a Celebrity</em> was seen as a one-off opportunity to elevate his television profile - which he has achieved after bringing fresh energy into the show. </p> <p>Channel Seven is reportedly keen to welcome Robert back with a massive deal, according to the source. </p> <p>"Seven want Robert back and have thrown a king's ransom at him," they said.</p> <p>If the deal goes through, Julia Morris will have to find a new partner to head to the jungle with. </p> <p>Many fans have praised Robert for bringing some fun into the jungle. </p> <p>"I have not ever been keen on watching this show but Robert you have brought some class and good honest fun to the jungle. Thank you," one fan wrote under a clip of the show's grand finale that Robert posted on his Instagram. </p> <p>"How awesome was Robert? This gig was like it was made for him. What a natural," another added. </p> <p>"Best year of I'm a Celebrity, and it was because you added something to the show as Co-Host. Brilliant job for somebody with no experience but with a lot to give," commented a third. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

"I'm shocked": Queen of the jungle crowned in I'm a Celeb finale

<p>The 2024 season of <em>I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here!</em> has concluded with the coronation of a new monarch. No, it’s not some royal lineage we’re talking about; it’s the queen of reality TV herself, Skye Wheatley.</p> <p>After weeks of enduring the culinary horrors of the jungle and the occasional emotional breakdown, Australia has spoken and Skye is officially their jungle royalty. Her reign over the camp was nothing short of spectacular, featuring riveting moments such as her triumph over creepy crawlies, her dramatic monologues about missing Wi-Fi, and of course, her unforgettable friendship with that one tree that seemed oddly supportive.</p> <p>In an “incredibly close” result that had us all on the edge of our seats (or couches, let’s be real), Skye managed to outshine her fellow campmates and secure the coveted title of Jungle Queen. But it wasn’t just about the glory; it was about the charity, too. Skye walked away with $100,000 for Bully Zero, proving once and for all that you can battle both bullies and bugs and emerge victorious.</p> <p>In her post-victory interview, Skye expressed her shock at the win, saying, “I’m shocked.” Truly, her eloquence knows no bounds. “I feel absolutely blessed to have had this opportunity, and to go through the things I went through with these boys.”</p> <p>But behind those eloquent words lies the heart of a true champion, one who faced her fears head-on and emerged triumphant, all while looking fabulous in a khaki jumpsuit.</p> <p>Before her jungle adventure, Skye confessed that she thought the public expected her to “fall flat on my face”. Well, Skye, the joke’s on them because you soared like a majestic eagle, or at least like a slightly disoriented possum.</p> <p>And let’s not forget the emotional rollercoaster that was the finale. Tears flowed like the Brisbane River as the top three reunited with their loved ones. It was a moment of pure emotion, a stark contrast to the usual scenes of celebrities eating bugs for our entertainment.</p> <p>As we bid farewell to another season of jungle shenanigans, we can’t help but reflect on the memories created, the friendships forged, and the questionable food choices made. Here’s to Skye Wheatley, the queen of our hearts and the jungle alike. Long may she reign, or at least until the next season starts.</p> <p>And to all the celebrities who braved the jungle, whether voluntarily or not, we salute you. May your next adventure be slightly less bug-infested and involve significantly more room service.</p> <p>New host Robert Irwin had the last word to longtime host Julia Morris: “From the bottom of my heart, I have loved this so much," he said. "It’s been so much fun.” </p> <p><em>Images: Network Ten</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

The extraordinary amount the I'm A Celebrity contestants are paid

<p>Each year, an array of reality stars, sporting legends and international names head into the South African jungle, fighting for the chance to emerge victorious. </p> <p>At the end of each season of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here</em> when the winner is crowned, their prize is revealed as a huge cash donation to a charity of their choice.</p> <p>Despite the celebs not taking anything home for winning, that doesn't mean they walk away from the jungle empty handed, as each of the celebrities are paid a hefty salary for their appearance on the show. </p> <p>As season 10 of the show premiered on Monday, season two winner Brendan ‘Fev’ Fevola spoke candidly about the salaries and explained that you get more money the longer you stay in the jungle.</p> <p>“In 2015 I got paid $250,000 upfront, and then $5,000 every show after the [first] two weeks,” he said on <em>The Fox’s Fifi, Fev & Nick</em> on Monday.</p> <p>“So you’d lay there on a Sunday and you’d think, ‘There’s another 7 days, there’s $35,000, boom. Hopefully, they don’t have an eviction during the week’.”</p> <p>According to <em><a href="https://www.pedestrian.tv/entertainment/how-much-im-a-celebrity-pay-australia/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener" data-i13n="cpos:6;pos:1" data-ylk="slk:Pedestrian;cpos:6;pos:1;elm:context_link;itc:0;sec:content-canvas" data-rapid_p="13" data-v9y="1">Pedestrian</a></em>, one of this year’s male celebrities is being paid $90,000 for a minimum of two weeks in the jungle and will receive an extra $5,500 every day following that they don't get evicted.</p> <p>The publication also asked a handful of 2024 contestants directly about their pay cheques, with reality star Callum Hole revealing that he was paid “good money” and “a lot more than <em>Love Island</em>”.</p> <p>Despite Hole's claims, influencer and former <em>Big Brother</em> star Skye Wheatley said money wasn’t her motivation for going on the show and she would actually be earning more if she stayed home.</p> <p>“I’d do it for free,” she said. “It’s for charity, babes, who gives a f**k about the money. I love that it can be for charity and I love the opportunity. So I’m very grateful.”</p> <p>Former <em>MasterChef</em> contestant Khanh Ong revealed that he had been asked to head into the jungle several times, and this year he was offered “a considerable amount more” than the first time he was asked.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Network 10</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Full cast for I'm A Celeb revealed

<p>The much-anticipated premiere of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out Of Here!</em> hit screens with a bang, revealing a star-studded lineup of personalities ready to face the challenges of the South African jungle. Channel 10 unveiled the roster on Sunday's premiere episode, promising viewers an exciting season ahead.</p> <p>Leading the charge was none other than Hollywood child star Frankie Muniz, known for his iconic role in <em>Malcolm in the Middle</em>. Muniz, who surprised both fans and fellow contestants with his presence, was joined by an array of intriguing personalities, each bringing their own flair to the jungle.</p> <p>Retired Australian iron-woman Candice Warner, wife of cricketer David Warner, made a notable entrance, expressing her surprise at Muniz's participation. Alongside Warner, the lineup boasted a diverse mix of talents, including retired Paralympian Ellie Cole, British comedian Stephen K. Amos, influencer Skye Wheatley, and former Studio 10 host Tristan MacManus.</p> <p>The premiere episode kicked off with Muniz leading the pack, setting the stage for a series of nerve-wracking challenges. Hosted by the dynamic duo of Julia Morris and Robert Irwin, the celebrities faced their first trial: Warner locked in a glass room teeming with cockroaches, while her campmates braved a mystery box challenge to secure her release.</p> <p>However, the drama didn't stop there. Wheatley's fear of snakes led to a tearful breakdown during her challenge, highlighting the intense nature of the jungle environment. Yet, despite the obstacles, the contestants displayed resilience and determination, setting the tone for an adrenaline-fuelled season.</p> <p>As the episode unfolded, additional celebrities were unveiled, including AFL legend Peter Daicos, radio host Brittany Hockley, fitness guru Michelle Bridges, <em>Love Island </em>star Callum Hole, and <em>MasterChef</em> contestant Khanh Ong.</p> <p>Among the standout contestants is Michelle Bridges, renowned for her role on <em>The Biggest Loser</em> and her thriving fitness empire. Similarly, Khanh Ong, known for his culinary prowess on <em>MasterChef Australia</em>, brings a unique skill set to the jungle environment. With such a diverse cast, the dynamics within the camp are sure to be electric.</p> <p>The premiere also offered glimpses into the personal lives of the contestants, from Cole's inspiring journey as a Paralympic swimmer to Warner's resilience showcased on <em>SAS Australia</em>. </p> <p>As the season progresses, viewers can expect more surprises, twists, and edge-of-your-seat moments. With an intruder poised to shake things up and a cast described as a "national treasure", the stage is set for an unforgettable season. </p> <p><em>Images: Network Ten</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Beloved ABC presenter reveals cancer diagnosis

<p>ABC radio listeners received some sobering news as James Valentine, the familiar voice behind the Afternoons show, revealed his battle with oesophageal cancer.</p> <p>The announcement, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-03-21/james-valentine-cancer-abc-radio-sydney-surgery-oesophagus/103603786" target="_blank" rel="noopener">made on Thursday, March 21</a>, sent shockwaves through his audience, who have grown accustomed to his wit, humour and insightful commentary over the years.</p> <p>Valentine's journey with cancer began approximately four months ago when he received the diagnosis. Since then, he has been thrust into a whirlwind of medical appointments and treatments. "Immediately it was meetings with oncologists, radiologists and surgeons," he recounted in a statement <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-03-21/james-valentine-cancer-abc-radio-sydney-surgery-oesophagus/103603786" target="_blank" rel="noopener">posted on the ABC website</a>. In January, he embarked on a gruelling regimen of chemotherapy and radiation in preparation for the upcoming surgery.</p> <p>"Everyone's thinking it's an old man reflux kind of condition," Valentine said with his trademark candour. "I have a fun conversation with the anaesthetist about Taylor Swift and the next thing I know my eyes are opening and across the room I can see my wife, my son, my sister-in-law, and the gastro doctor."</p> <p>"The doctor comes over."</p> <p>"It's bad. You've got a 4-centimetre tumour where your oesophagus meets your stomach."</p> <p>The forthcoming surgery looms large for Valentine, as it represents the primary treatment option for his condition. Describing the procedure, he explained, "The surgery will remove my entire oesophagus and then stretch my stomach up and attach it to my throat." It's a daunting prospect, compounded by the expectation of a challenging recovery period. "After that, I'm very likely to feel like absolute crap for quite some time," he candidly admitted.</p> <p>Valentine's dedication to his audience is unwavering, but he recognises the necessity of stepping away from the microphone to focus on his health. His last radio show aired on Thursday, marking the beginning of a hiatus that could last up to three months. "I'm going to make sure I'm fully recovered and my stomach is going to stay attached to my neck before I attempt broadcasting again," he assured his listeners.</p> <p>Despite the optimism about his long-term prognosis, Valentine acknowledges that this experience will change him. The road ahead is uncertain, but his resolve remains steadfast. With more than 27 years of service to the national broadcaster, he is no stranger to challenges. From his early days as a reporter on <em>Sunrise</em> and <em>Good Morning Australia</em> to his recent tenure as host of Afternoons, Valentine has left an indelible mark on Australian radio.</p> <p>Beyond his broadcasting career, Valentine is also known for his musical talents, having toured with bands as a saxophonist. Even in the middle of his health battle, he continues to find solace in music, performing at gigs whenever possible.</p> <p>Valentine's absence from the airwaves will undoubtedly be felt, but his resilience serves as an inspiration to all who admire him. Here's to a speedy recovery for one of Australia's most cherished radio personalities.</p> <p><em>Image: Suddenly Senior</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

“I’ve got to change this”: The one big fix Robert Irwin is bringing to the jungle

<p>Robert Irwin has shared the one big change he insisted on after he joined the cast of <em>I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em></p> <p>The wildlife warrior spoke to Kyle and Jackie O about how he demanded for the show to ditch the eating of native animals for challenges. </p> <p>In past seasons, the show has used body parts of native African animals in challenges for contestants to eat in exchange for prizes and advantages. </p> <p>After agreeing to host the show alongside Julia Morris, the 20-year-old insisted the rule was changed. </p> <p>“The one thing that I was like, ‘Mmm, I’ve got to change this’, was eating the African wildlife…I’m a conservationist at heart,” he said on Tuesday morning when dropping by <em>The Kyle &amp; Jackie O Show</em>.</p> <p>“They have changed it so we’re just doing the cow, and the chicken, and the fish, and the cockroach,” he revealed of the change of challenge menu.</p> <p>Morris said she supported her new co-host’s efforts to stop any consumption of African wildlife on the show.</p> <p>“I think what Robert’s been doing is making people think, ‘Do you need it or not?’ Like if you need it, tell me why you need the wildlife in a place like that?” Morris explained.</p> <p>“And if it doesn’t matter and it was just something that was nice in Africa from Series 1, then we don’t need it – just get a cow!”</p> <p>Irwin added, “Africa’s got such amazing wildlife, and it’s about celebrating it”.</p> <p>Elsewhere in the interview, the young conservationist reflected on the time he first visited the South African set of <em>I’m A Celeb</em> when he was just 10 years old alongside his mum Terri and sister Bindi. </p> <p>“I just kind of got dropped in there with my family and spent the day in there and it was awesome. Since then, it’s been on my radar, I’ve been a fan of the show and I just thought it’s such an amazing thing I was awe-struck, I just loved it. Coming back as a host, is the craziest thing,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: KIISFM</em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Why Ita Buttrose chose to leave the ABC

<p>In her last week as the head of the ABC, Ita Buttrose has broken her silence on why she chose to step down from the role. </p> <p>Speaking with <em>Stellar</em> magazine ahead of International Women's Day, the 82-year-old journalist has clarified that her decision to leave the public broadcaster had “nothing to do with current events.”</p> <p>After serving her five-year term, reports have swirled that her departure is related to the December sacking of presenter Antoinette Lattouf, who was let go after she shared a social media post about the Israel Gaza war, in which she condemned the treatment of Palestinian civilians.</p> <p>Following the controversial sacking, more than 100 of ABC's union staff slammed managing director David Anderson triggering a vote of no confidence. </p> <p>Ms Buttrose supported Mr Anderson through the ordeal, declaring it’s “abhorrent and incorrect” that he showed a lack of support for independent journalists amid Ms Lattouf’s axing.</p> <p>Due to the chaos at the ABC, many speculated that Buttrose's departure was to escape the turmoil, but she has since refuted the claims. </p> <p>“I did notify the government and the minister Michelle Rowland in August last year that I was not going to seek another term,” Ms Buttrose told <em>Stellar</em>.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C366msrI_qc/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C366msrI_qc/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Stellar (@stellarmag)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Five years is quite a long time to serve the ABC. I know some chairs have gone on and done a second term, but I’m conscious that I’m a woman of a certain age. And despite [US president] Joe Biden thinking he should run another term – I don’t think he should – sometimes you need to examine yourself and say, ‘Well, I am a person of a certain age and everything’s fine, and cognitively I’m good’ but still, weigh it up. Another five years. What would it be like?" </p> <p>“You have to know in yourself when you need to step aside. I felt that. It had nothing to do with any current events.”</p> <p>Ms Buttrose went on to defend questions surrounding outside influence on the national broadcaster.</p> <p>“The role of independence of the national broadcaster is paramount to what we do. It’s enshrined in legislation,” she said.</p> <p>“The ABC and I have never been influenced by outside lobbyists, people passionate about their particular cause as politicians, commercial interests, you name it." </p> <p>“The ABC has never caved in. I’ve never caved in. Neither has the managing director nor the board.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Line-up clues revealed for 2024 I'm A Celeb cast

<p>With just a few weeks to go before a group of celebrities are dropped in the jungle, Network Ten have dropped a series of clues alluding to this year's <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em> lineup. </p> <p>Premiering in late March and hosted by veteran Julia Morris and newcomer Robert Irwin, the 10th season of the show will see celebrities thrown into the South African jungle and go head-to-head in daring challenges.</p> <p>At the end of the weeks long challenge, the winner will take home $100,000 in prize money for the charity of their choice.</p> <p>With the full line-up of celebs still unknown, Network Ten have dropped a few hints about some of this year's contestants, with online sleuths dedicated to deciphering the clues. </p> <p>So far, it's been revealed that a "controversial TV star" will be heading into the jungle, alongside a Gold medallist who is “diverting from Paris” to take part in the competition. </p> <p>Another celeb joining is an "international comedian loved by the royals", with many online believing this clue is alluding to UK comic Michael McIntyre.</p> <p>Fans believe a former contestant of <em>The Bachelor</em> or <em>MAFS</em> could be joining the line-up, with one celeb teased as a “bad boy” who “breaks hearts”.</p> <p>Also joining the 2024 line-up is an AFL legend with a premiership win under their belt, and a stage performer who is “ditching his famous family” to head into the jungle.</p> <p>Lastly, a celebrity cook is joining the cast, with diehard fans already ruling out Miguel Maestre, Colin Fassnidge and Poh Ling Yeow who have competed on the show in previous years. </p> <p>The 2024 season of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here!</em> will premiere on Ten on March 27th.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Ten </em></p>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Experience the magic of Ireland down under: A Taste of Ireland 2024 Australian Tour

<p>Get ready to immerse yourself in the rich culture, captivating music and mesmerising dance of Ireland as <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>A Taste of Ireland</em></a> returns to enchant audiences across Australia in 2024. </p> <p>Featuring World Champion dancers from <em>Lord of the Dance</em> and <em>Riverdance</em>, prepare to be transported to the rolling green hills and vibrant streets of the Emerald Isle, right in your hometown!  </p> <p><strong>What is <em>A Taste of Ireland</em>?</strong></p> <p><em>A Taste of Ireland</em> is not just a performance; it's an unforgettable journey through the heart and soul of Ireland. Combining traditional and contemporary Irish music and dance, this spectacular show showcases the incredible talent and passion of some of Ireland's finest performers.</p> <p><strong>What to expect</strong></p> <p>From the moment the first note is struck, and the first step is danced, you'll be captivated by the energy and artistry on stage. Feel the rhythm of the bodhrán drum reverberate through your bones, and let the fiddles whisk you away to a land of ancient myths and legends.</p> <p>Prepare to be dazzled by the lightning-fast footwork and intricate choreography of the dancers as they weave tales of love, loss and triumph through their movements. Each step tells a story, each leap a celebration of life itself.</p> <p><strong>Why attend?</strong></p> <p>Whether you're a die-hard fan of Irish culture or simply looking for a night of entertainment unlike any other, <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> offers something for everyone. It's an opportunity to witness the magic of Ireland's rich heritage brought to life before your very eyes.</p> <p>Forget your troubles for an evening and let the music and dance sweep you away on a journey you won't soon forget. Whether you're tapping your feet to the lively jigs and reels or wiping away tears during a poignant ballad, <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> is an experience that will touch your heart and soul.</p> <p><strong>Tour dates and locations</strong></p> <p>The 2024 Australian Tour of <em>A Taste of Ireland</em> will be making stops across Australia for 80 shows from March to July, bringing the magic of Ireland to a venue near you. <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Check the tour schedule</a> to find out when this unforgettable experience will be coming to your area.</p> <p><strong>Get your tickets now!</strong></p> <p>Don't miss your chance to experience the beauty and excitement of <em>A Taste of Ireland</em>. Tickets are selling fast, so book yours today and get ready for a night of music, dance, and memories that will last a lifetime. </p> <p>Witness the show that has received rave reviews across the globe. Don't rely on the luck of the Irish – <a href="https://www.atasteofirelandshow.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">book now</a>, because tickets are selling out fast!</p> <p><em>Images: Supplied.</em></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with Pace Live.</em></p>

Music

Placeholder Content Image

Grandma faces deportation after 40 years in Australia

<p>Mary Ellis, 74, has lived in Australia for over 40 years, but now she faces deportation. </p> <p>The grandmother is known as a local hero in northern New South Wales, for her charitable acts including helping feed the homeless in Tweed Heads, raising money for the Salvation Army. </p> <p>She was even nominated for the NSW Volunteer of the Year award last year. </p> <p>Despite her tireless efforts to help out other Australians, the senior might soon have to leave the country she has called home since she was 31-years-old. </p> <p>"(I have a) Driver's License, ID card, Medicare Card, Pension card. Everything Australians have," Ellis told <em>A Current Affair</em>. </p> <p>"I thought well, I'm a permanent resident.</p> <p>"You know, I carry on doing my daily - what I do every day. Nobody said anything."</p> <p>Ellis, who was born in London and moved here with her partner in 1981, was told that her partner had already arranged permanent visas for them.</p> <p>But one day, the Department of Home Affairs suddenly decided she's got to go. </p> <p>"This is my home and I love Australia ... I want to stay here," the grandma tearfully said. </p> <p>"Just let me get Australian citizenship, please let me.. that's what I want."</p> <p>Ellis has a son and two granddaughters in Australia, who are all Australian Citizens. </p> <p>Migration agent Stanley Schneider has been helping Ellis pro-bono since she was asked to leave, said that she was an absorbed person under the Migration Act and should be allowed to stay. </p> <p>"She's always paid her taxes.. she's never even had a speeding ticket," Schneider said.</p> <p>"She's never infringed anything. She's never offended anyone."</p> <p>The Migration Act requires someone to have been in Australia since April 2, 1984 and not have left, but the Department of Home Affairs claims Mary left the country three times under different aliases.</p> <p>Ellis denies the allegations.</p> <p>"I love Australia. (I) didn't want to go anywhere else," she said.</p> <p>She also said that she has documents that prove she was in Australia during the timeframe in question, which includes a job reference from a Tasmanian restaurant that she worked at from 1983 to 1986, and a Medicare enrolment letter signed by then federal Health Minister Neal Blewett.</p> <p>Ellis' migration agent said that the documents would not have been sent to her had she not been in the country. </p> <p>"Mary Ellis is a decent person. A person we should be absolutely thrilled to have in Australia," Schneider said. </p> <p>"And she's an Australian, Let's face it."</p> <p>In a statement shared to <em>A Current Affair</em>, the Department of Home Affairs said that they do not comment on individual cases. </p> <p>"People who do not have the right to remain in Australia are expected to depart," a government spokesperson said.</p> <p>"Individuals who provide incorrect information may be liable to have their visa cancelled under the provisions of the Migration Act."</p> <p><em>Image: Nine/ A Current Affair</em></p>

Legal

Our Partners