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Still fab after 60 years: how The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night made pop cinema history

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267">Alison Blair</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p>I first saw A Hard Day’s Night at a film festival over 20 years ago, at the insistence of my mum. By then, it was already decades old, but I remember being enthralled by its high-spirited energy.</p> <p>A Beatles fan, mum had introduced me to the band’s records in my childhood. At home, we listened to Please Please Me, the band’s 1963 single, and the Rubber Soul album from 1965, which I loved.</p> <p>Television regularly showed old black-and-white scenes of Beatlemania that, to a ten-year-old in the neon-lit 1980s, seemed like ancient history. But then, I’d never seen a full-length Beatles film. I had no idea what I was in for.</p> <p>When the lights went down at Dunedin’s Regent Theatre, the opening chord of the film’s title song announced its intentions: an explosion of youthful vitality, rhythmic visuals, comical high jinks and the electrifying thrill of Beatlemania in 1964.</p> <p>This time, it didn’t seem ancient at all.</p> <p>Since that first viewing, I’ve returned to A Hard Day’s Night again and again. I now show it to my students as a historically significant example of pop music film making – visually inventive cinema, emblematic of a fresh era in youth culture, popular music and fandom.</p> <h2>Beatlemania on celluloid</h2> <p>A musical comedy depicting a chaotic 36 hours in the life of the Beatles, A Hard Day’s Night has now reached its 60th anniversary.</p> <p>Directed by <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0504513/">Richard Lester</a>, the film premiered in London on July 6 1964, with its first public screening a day later (incidentally, also Ringo Starr’s birthday), and the <a href="https://www.discogs.com/master/24003-The-Beatles-A-Hard-Days-Night">album of the same name</a> released on July 10.</p> <p>The band’s popularity was by then reaching dizzying heights of hysteria, all reflected in the film. The Beatles are chased by hordes of fans, take a train trip, appear on TV, run from the police in a Keystone Cops-style sequence, and play a televised concert in front of screaming real-life Beatles fans.</p> <p>Side one of the album provides the soundtrack, and the film inspired pop music film and video from then on, from the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060010/">Monkees TV series</a> (1966–68) to the Spice Girls’ <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120185/">Spice World</a> (1997) and music videos as we know them today.</p> <h2>The original music video</h2> <p>Postwar teen culture and consumerism had been on the rise since the 1950s. In 1960s Britain, youth music TV programmes, notably <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196287/">Ready Steady Go!</a> (1963–66), meant pop music now had a developing visual culture.</p> <p>The youthful zest and vitality of ‘60s London was reflected in the pop-cultural sensibility, modern satirical humour and crisp visual impact of A Hard Day’s Night.</p> <p>Influenced by <a href="https://nofilmschool.com/french-new-wave-cinema">French New Wave</a> film making, and particularly the early 1960s work of <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000419/">Jean-Luc Godard</a>, A Hard Day’s Night employs <em><a href="https://indiefilmhustle.com/cinema-verite/">cinéma vérité</a></em>-style hand-held cinematography, brisk jump cuts, unusual framing and dynamic angles, high-spirited action, and a self-referential nonchalance.</p> <p>The film also breaks the “fourth wall”, with characters directly addressing the audience in closeup, and reveals the apparatus of the visual performance of music: cameras and TV monitors are all part of the frame.</p> <p>Cutting the shots to the beat of the music – as in the Can’t Buy Me Love sequence – lends a visual rhythm that would later become the norm in music video editing. Lester developed this technique further in the second Beatles film, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059260/">Help!</a> (1965).</p> <p>The closing sequence of A Hard Day’s Night is possibly the film’s most dynamic: photographic images of the band edited to the beat in the style of stop-motion animation. Sixty years on, it still feels fresh, especially as so much contemporary film making remains hidebound by formulaic Hollywood rules.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A Hard Day's Night movie poster" /><figcaption><span class="caption">A new pop aesthetic: original film poster for A Hard Day’s Night.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Getty Images</span></span></figcaption></figure> <h2>Slapstick and class awareness</h2> <p>As with much popular culture from the past, the humour in A Hard Day’s Night doesn’t always doesn’t land the way it would have in 1964. And yet, there are moments that seem surprisingly modern in their razor-sharp irony.</p> <p>In particular, the band’s Liverpudlian working-class-lad jibes and chaotic energy contrast brilliantly with the film’s upper-class characters. Actor Victor Spinetti’s comically over-anxious TV director, constantly hand-wringing over the boys’ rebelliousness, underscores the era-defining change the Beatles represented.</p> <p>Corporate pop-culture consumerism is also satirised. John Lennon “snorts” from a Coca-Cola bottle, a moment so knowingly silly it registers as more contemporary than it really is. George Harrison deflects a journalist’s banal questions with scathingly witty answers, and cuts a fashion company down to size by describing their shirt designs as “grotesque”.</p> <p>And there is Paul McCartney’s running joke that his grandfather – played by Wilfred Brambell from groundbreaking sitcom <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057785/">Steptoe and Son</a> (1962–74) – is “very clean”.</p> <p>Even the film’s old-fashioned visual slapstick still holds up in 2024. Showing the film to this year’s students, I didn’t expect quite as much laughter when Ringo’s attempts to be chivalrous result in a fall-down-a-hole mishap.</p> <p>In 2022, the <a href="https://www.criterion.com/">Criterion Collection</a> released a high-resolution restoration of the film, so today A Hard Day’s Night can be seen in all its fresh, black-and-white, youthful vigour.</p> <p>Happy 60th, A Hard Day’s Night. And happy 84th, Ringo. Both still as lively and energetic as ever.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/228598/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267"><em>Alison Blair</em></a><em>, Teaching Fellow in Music, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p><em>Image </em><em>credits: THA/Shutterstock Editorial </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/still-fab-after-60-years-how-the-beatles-a-hard-days-night-made-pop-cinema-history-228598">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Russell Hill's daughter shares her outrage over Greg Lynn's sentence

<p>Russell Hill's daughter has expressed her anger over the jury's verdict of former pilot Greg Lynn, who was found not guilty for Hill's murder. </p> <p>Greg Lynn faced a lengthy trial over the deaths of campers Russell Hill and Carol Clay, but after a week of jury deliberations, was only <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/shocking-verdict-in-trial-of-murdered-campers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">found guilty</a> for the murder of Carol and was cleared of charges relating to Russell's death. </p> <p>Following the shock verdict, Hill's daughter Debbi, said she was “angry” at the jury and that she felt her father didn’t get the justice he deserved. </p> <p>“It’s new, we’ve only just found out, but the more I think about it, the more angry I get at the fact that it didn’t have to be this way,” Ms Hill told <em>60 Minutes</em> on Sunday. </p> <p>“My dad was not a violent person in any way. He wouldn’t have provoked anything.”</p> <p>Ms Hill went on to say that she thinks about what happened to her father every day. </p> <p>“I’m just really angry that he went camping that day, that time, that he is the person he is and he happened to be right there with my dad and Carol, and this is what happened,” she said. </p> <p>“I think it was just really bad luck for Dad and Carol that they were there at the time, but it wouldn’t have happened if he [Lynn] wasn’t such an awful person.”</p> <p>After the trial concluded, more information has come to light about Lynn's past after non-publication orders were lifted.</p> <p>His first wife Lisa Lynn, 34, was found dead in the front yard of her home in 1999, with a coroner’s report indicating a blood-alcohol level of 0.21 and high levels of anti-depression medication present in her system at the time of her death. </p> <p>No suicide note was ever found and Lynn was never charged over her death, however detectives are now looking to have the Victorian coroner conduct a full inquest into the 1999 death.</p> <p>Ms Hill said it was quite concerning to learn about Lynn’s history, saying, “I hope he doesn’t get away with this, but I’ve lost a bit of faith in the whole system.”</p> <p>“I’m not trusting of it now. We’ll have to wait and see. He’s just such a terrible person.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook / Victoria Police </em></p>

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‘Screaming, chanting, struggling teenagers’: the enduring legacy of the Beatles tour of Australia, 60 years on

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michelle-arrow-45">Michelle Arrow</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></em></p> <p>The Beatles began their first and only tour of Australia 60 years ago this week. It remains a landmark event in our social and cultural history.</p> <p>The Beatles spent almost three weeks in Australia and New Zealand. Touching down in a wet and cold Sydney on Thursday June 11 1964, they played 32 concerts in eight cities: first Adelaide (where drummer Ringo Starr, suffering from tonsillitis and pharyngitis, was replaced by Jimmie Nicol), then Melbourne (with Starr again), Sydney, Wellington, Auckland, Dunedin, Christchurch and two final shows in Brisbane on June 29 and 30.</p> <p>Charming and irreverent as they were, The Beatles themselves were only part of the reason the tour was so memorable.</p> <p>It was the hordes of screaming fans who followed their every move that astonished onlookers.</p> <h2>The rise of Beatlemania</h2> <p>By 1964, Australian teenagers had access to a global youth culture. As the feminist author Anne Summers, then an Adelaide teenager, recalled in her memoir Ducks on the Pond: "It was rare for world-famous pop stars to come to Adelaide and unheard of for a group at the height of their celebrity."</p> <p>That Australian teenagers had the opportunity to see The Beatles in person in 1964 was due to a stroke of luck for tour promoter <a href="https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/brodziak-kenneth-leo-kenn-32165">Kenn Brodziak</a>. In late 1963, Brodziak secured the then up-and-coming Beatles for a three-week tour of Australia at a bargain rate.</p> <p>By the time the tour took place, the Beatles were the biggest band in the world.</p> <p>Their popularity had skyrocketed throughout 1964. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jenWdylTtzs">I Want To Hold Your Hand</a> went to number one on the Australian charts in mid-January and the top six singles that year were <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_top_25_singles_for_1964_in_Australia">all by The Beatles</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iUCl9FWLzgM?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>So when the band arrived here, Beatlemania was the predictable result: crowds of surging, screaming young people, who turned out in massive numbers wherever the Beatles appeared.</p> <p>While the earliest rock ‘n’ roll fans (and even performers) in the late 1950s were often labelled <a href="https://eprints.qut.edu.au/633/1/moore_keith.pdf">juvenile delinquents</a>, there were too many teenagers swept up in Beatlemania for them to be dismissed in the same way. The crowds became a spectacle in themselves.</p> <h2>‘A chanting mass of humanity’</h2> <p>Beatlemaniacs were loud and unruly. The Daily Telegraph reported: "50,000 screaming, chanting, struggling teenagers crowded outside Melbourne’s Southern Cross Hotel this afternoon to give the Beatles the wildest reception of their careers."</p> <p>It was a similar story in Adelaide. The Advertiser described: "police, their arms locked together and forming a tight circle around the car carrying the Beatles, had to force a path through the surging, screaming crowd […] Police said they had never seen anything like it."</p> <p>The crowds overwhelmed observers with their sheer size – a “solid, swaying, chanting mass of humanity”, according to The Age – and noise. The Daily Telegraph consulted an acoustics expert to conclude “Beatles fans scream like [a] jet in flight”.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2MOFBmxPUCs?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Beatlemania was visible (and noisy) evidence of a growing teenage consumer market and the assimilation of rock music, dancing and youth culture into the leisure practices of middle-class youth. It was proof (if anyone still needed it) the youth market was highly developed and extremely lucrative.</p> <p>The speed with which companies found a ready audience for Beatles merchandise (wigs, souvenirs, magazines) demonstrated the relative affluence of the youthful consumer in mid-1960s Australia. This market would continue to grow throughout the decade.</p> <h2>A new idea of youth</h2> <p>Perhaps the most remarkable characteristic of Beatlemania was its femaleness. While not all Beatles fans were girls, it was the crying, screaming girls who attracted the most media comment.</p> <p>The Daily Telegraph described them this way: "It was the girls, the nymphets of 1964 in their uniform of black slacks and duffle coats and purple sweaters – who showed the orgiastic devotion due to the young men from the damp and foggy dead end of England […] the girls wept, screamed, grimaced, fainted, fell over, threw things, stamped, jumped and shouted […] [The Beatles] were the high priests of pop culture, taking due homage from a captive, hypnotised hysterical congregation."</p> <p>The references to “nymphets” with their “orgiastic devotion” tells us many Australians thought these young women were transgressing the norms expected for their era. Young women in the early 1960s were still expected to be demure and responsible. Beatles fans were breaking these rules, and helping to rewrite the meanings of youth and gender in 1960s Australia.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wyrs5uR-nwc?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Beatlemania was an expression of female desire. The Beatles were powerful objects of fantasy for many fans in a world where sexual mores were slowly changing but where women were still expected to police male desire, stopping young men from “going too far”. A fantasy relationship with a Beatle became a way for young women to dream about their ideal relationship.</p> <p>Screaming, chasing a Beatle down the street: these were acts of rebellion and joy that prefigured the rise of women’s liberation, with its embrace of rebellious femininity.</p> <p>Beatlemania reminds us that, even if women were not always behind the microphone or playing the guitar, they have been important to the history of rock ‘n’ roll music as fans and audience members.</p> <p>Beatlemania marked the ascendancy of a new idea of youth: these young people weren’t mere replicas of their parents, but they were not juvenile delinquents, either. The Beatles tour drew young Australians more closely into a transnational youth culture, fostering the development of a distinctively Australian variant here.</p> <p>Beatlemania also demonstrated the massed power of youth. By the end of the 1960s, many Australian teenagers were gathering on the streets to protest, rather than celebrate, and to make political demands, rather than to scream.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/227680/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michelle-arrow-45"><em>Michelle Arrow</em></a><em>, Professor of History, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Granger/Shutterstock Editorial</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/screaming-chanting-struggling-teenagers-the-enduring-legacy-of-the-beatles-tour-of-australia-60-years-on-227680">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Australians lose $5,200 a minute to scammers. There’s a simple thing the government could do to reduce this. Why won’t they?

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-martin-682709">Peter Martin</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/crawford-school-of-public-policy-australian-national-university-3292">Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University</a></em></p> <p>What if the government was doing everything it could to stop thieves making off with our money, except the one thing that could really work?</p> <p>That’s how it looks when it comes to <a href="https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/types-of-scams">scams</a>, which are attempts to trick us out of our funds, usually by getting us to hand over our identities or bank details or transfer funds.</p> <p>Last year we lost an astonishing <a href="https://www.accc.gov.au/media-release/scam-losses-decline-but-more-work-to-do-as-australians-lose-27-billion">A$2.74 billion</a> to scammers. That’s more than $5,200 per minute – and that’s only the scams we know about from the 601,000 Australians who made reports. Many more would have kept quiet.</p> <p>If the theft of $5,200 per minute seems over the odds for a country Australia’s size, a comparison with the United Kingdom suggests you are right. In 2022, people in the UK lost <a href="https://www.ukfinance.org.uk/system/files/2023-05/Annual%20Fraud%20Report%202023_0.pdf">£2,300</a> per minute, which is about A$4,400. The UK has two and a half times Australia’s population.</p> <p>It’s as if international scammers, using SMS, phone calls, fake invoices and fake web addresses are targeting Australia, because in other places it’s harder.</p> <p>If we want to cut Australians’ losses, it’s time to look at rules about to come into force in the UK.</p> <h2>Scams up 320% since 2020</h2> <p>The current federal government is doing a lot – <em>almost</em> everything it could. Within a year of taking office, it set up the <a href="https://www.accc.gov.au/national-anti-scam-centre">National Anti-Scam Centre</a>, which coordinates intelligence. Just this week, the centre reported that figure of $2.74 billion, which is down 13% on 2022, but up 50% on 2021 and 320% on 2020.</p> <p>It’s planning “<a href="https://treasury.gov.au/consultation/c2023-464732">mandatory industry codes</a>” for banks, telecommunication providers and digital platforms.</p> <p>But the code it is proposing for banks, set out in a <a href="https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2023-11/c2023-464732-cp.pdf">consultation paper</a> late last year, is weak when compared to overseas.</p> <h2>Banks are the gatekeepers</h2> <p>Banks matter, because they are nearly always the means by which the money is transferred. Cryptocurrency is now much less used after the banks agreed to limit payments to high risk exchanges.</p> <p>Here’s an example of the role played by banks. A woman the Consumer Action Law Centre is calling <a href="https://consumeraction.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/Joint-submission-CALC-CHOICE-ACCAN-31012024-Scams-Mandatory-code-treasury-consultA.pdf">Amelia</a> tried to sell a breast pump on Gumtree.</p> <p>The buyer asked for her bank card number and a one-time PIN and used the code to whisk out $9,100, which was sent overseas. The bank wouldn’t help because she had provided the one-time PIN.</p> <p>Here’s another. A woman the Competition and Consumer Commission is calling <a href="https://www.accc.gov.au/system/files/Targeting%20scams%202022.pdf">Niamh</a> was contacted by someone using the National Australia Bank’s SMS ID. Niamh was told her account was compromised and talked through how to transfer $300,000 to a “secure” account.</p> <p>After she had done it, the scammer told her it was a scam, laughed and said “we are in Brisbane, come find me”.</p> <h2>How bank rules protect scammers</h2> <p>And one more example. Former University of Melbourne academic <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/377766055_Scams_Blaming_the_Victims">Kim Sawyer</a> (that’s his real name, he is prepared to go public) clicked on an ad for “St George Capital” displaying the dragon logo of St. George Bank.</p> <p>He was called back by a man using the name of a real St. George employee, who persuaded him to transfer funds from accounts at the AMP, Citibank and Macquarie to accounts he was told would be in his and his wife’s name at Westpac, ANZ, the Commonwealth and Bendigo Banks.</p> <p>They lost <a href="https://www.afr.com/wealth/personal-finance/i-lost-2-5m-of-my-super-to-scammers-20240423-p5flzp">$2.5 million</a>. Sawyer says none of the banks – those that sent the funds or those that received them – would help him. Some cited “<a href="https://www.choice.com.au/money/financial-planning-and-investing/stock-market-investing/articles/st-george-capital-investment-scam">privacy</a>” reasons.</p> <p>The Consumer Action Law Centre says the banks that transfer the scammed funds routinely tell their customers “it’s nothing to do with us, you transferred the money, we can’t help you”. The banks receiving the funds routinely say “you’re not our customer, we can’t help you”.</p> <p>That’s here. Not in the UK.</p> <h2>UK bank customers get a better deal</h2> <p>In Australia in 2022, only <a href="https://download.asic.gov.au/media/mbhoz0pc/rep761-published-20-april-2023.pdf">13%</a> of attempted scam payments were stopped by banks before they took place. Once scammed, only 2% to 5% of losses (depending on the bank) were reimbursed or compensated.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.psr.org.uk/information-for-consumers/app-fraud-performance-data/">the UK</a>, the top four banks pay out 49% to 73%.</p> <p>And they are about to pay out much more. From October 2024, reimbursement will be compulsory. Where authorised fast payments are made “because of deception by fraudsters”, the banks will have to reimburse <a href="https://www.thomsonreuters.com/en-us/posts/investigation-fraud-and-risk/app-fraud-uk">the lot</a>.</p> <p>Normally the bills will be split <a href="https://www.psr.org.uk/news-and-updates/latest-news/news/psr-confirms-new-requirements-for-app-fraud-reimbursement/">50:50</a> between the bank transferring the funds and the bank receiving them. Unless there’s a need for further investigations, the payments must be made within five days.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.psr.org.uk/media/as3a0xan/sr1-consumer-standard-of-caution-guidance-dec-2023.pdf">only exceptions</a> are where the consumer seeking reimbursement has acted fraudulently or with gross negligence.</p> <p>The idea behind the change – pushed through by the Conservative government now led by UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak – is that if scams are the banks’ problem, if they are costing them millions at a time, they’ll stop them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thepost.co.nz/business/350197309/banks-given-fraud-ultimatum">New Zealand</a> is looking at doing the same thing, <a href="https://www.biocatch.com/blog/mas-shared-responsibility-fraud-losses">as is Singapore</a>.</p> <p>But here, the treasury’s discussion paper on its mandatory codes mentions reimbursement <a href="https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2023-11/c2023-464732-cp.pdf">only once</a>. That’s when it talks about what’s happening in the UK. Neither treasury nor the relevant federal minister is proposing it here.</p> <h2>Australia’s approach is softer</h2> <p>Assistant Treasurer Stephen Jones is in charge of Australia’s rules.</p> <p>Asked why he wasn’t pushing for compulsory reimbursement here, Jones said on Monday <a href="https://ministers.treasury.gov.au/ministers/stephen-jones-2022/transcripts/interview-mark-gibson-abc-perth">prevention was better</a>.</p> <blockquote> <p>I think a simplistic approach of just saying, ‘Oh, well, if any loss, if anyone incurs a loss, then the bank always pay’, won’t work. It’ll just make Australia a honeypot for these international crime gangs, because they’ll say, well, ‘Let’s, you know, focus all of our activity on Australia because it’s a victimless crime if banks always pay’.</p> </blockquote> <p>Telling banks to pay would certainly focus the minds of the banks, in the way they are about to be focused in the UK.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.ausbanking.org.au/submissions/">Australian Banking Association</a> hasn’t published its submission to the treasury review, but the <a href="https://consumeraction.org.au/scams-mandatory-industry-codes-consultation-paper/">Consumer Action Law Centre</a> has.</p> <p>It says if banks had to reimburse money lost, they’d have more of a reason to keep it safe.</p> <p>In the UK, they are about to find out. If Jones is right, it might be about to become a honeypot for scammers. If he is wrong, his government will leave Australia even further behind when it comes to scams – leaving us thousands more dollars behind per day.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/228867/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/peter-martin-682709">Peter Martin</a>, Visiting Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/crawford-school-of-public-policy-australian-national-university-3292">Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/australians-lose-5-200-a-minute-to-scammers-theres-a-simple-thing-the-government-could-do-to-reduce-this-why-wont-they-228867">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Money & Banking

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"Completely in shock": Beloved actor dies suddenly at age 60

<p>Adrian Schiller has passed away suddenly at the age of 60, with his family and friends sharing their devastation over the unexpected loss. </p> <p>The British actor's agency Scott Marshall Partners confirmed he had died unexpectedly earlier this week in a statement to multiple outlets.</p> <div> <div id="adspot-mobile-mobile-3-above"></div> </div> <p>"It is with the heaviest and saddest hearts that we announce the death of our beloved client, Adrian Schiller, on Wednesday 3rd April," the representatives told <em><a title="People" href="https://people.com/adrian-schiller-dead-60-8624756" target="" rel="">People</a></em>.</p> <p>"He has died far too soon, and we, his family and close friends are devastated by the loss," the statement continued.</p> <p>"His death was sudden and unexpected and no further details around its cause are yet available," they concluded."</p> <p>Schiller's career spanned four decades and saw him make waves in TV, film and theatre roles around the world.</p> <p>The actor made his screen debut in the 1992 film <em>Prime Suspect</em>, and later became known for his role as Aethelhelm in the historical drama series <em>The Last Kingdom</em>.</p> <p>The statement provided by Schiller's agency also shared that he had been in Australia just before his death, reprising his role in <em>The Lehman Trilogy</em> play. </p> <p>"A prodigiously talented actor, he had just returned from Sydney, where he had been appearing in The Lehman Trilogy and was looking forward to continuing the international tour in San Francisco," the statement confirmed.</p> <p>Across his career, Schiller also appeared in <em>Victoria</em>, <em>Death In Paradise</em>, a 2014 film adaption of <em>The Crucible</em>, <em>Beauty and the Beast,</em> <em>Doctor Who</em> and <em>The Danish Girl</em>.</p> <p>Schiller's <em>Victoria</em> co-star Tilly Steele remembered the late actor as being "remarkable."</p> <p>"I cannot believe that Adrian Schiller has died. He was a remarkable actor and person. I'm completely in shock and I'm thinking of everyone who knew him and was close to him," she wrote on social media. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Caring

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Why Mary Poppins has received a new rating 60 years on

<p dir="ltr">Almost 60 years after <em>Mary Poppins</em> was first released, the classic film has been given a new rating by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC). </p> <p dir="ltr">The BBFC, which regulates films and video content in the country, changed the rating of the 1964 Disney musical last week from U (Universal) to PG (Parental Guidance) because it features a racial slur once used by white Europeans to refer to the native peoples of southern Africa.</p> <p dir="ltr">"<em>Mary Poppins</em> (1964) includes two uses of the discriminatory term 'hottentots'," a BBFC spokesperson said in a statement to CNN.</p> <p dir="ltr">"While <em>Mary Poppins</em> has a historical context, the use of discriminatory language is not condemned, and ultimately exceeds our guidelines for acceptable language at U."</p> <p dir="ltr">The approaching 60th anniversary of the film is what prompted the BBFC to reexamine the film, as it is set to return to UK cinemas in celebration of the milestone. </p> <p dir="ltr">Even as <em>Mary Poppins</em> remains a treasured part of UK culture, the film has long been criticised for the use of blackface. It's partly in this context that the discriminatory language referenced by BBFC appears in the film.</p> <p dir="ltr">In one scene, the eccentric Admiral Boom asks one of the Banks children if he is going on an adventure to "defeat hottentots." </p> <p dir="ltr">Later in the film, as Admiral Boom sees chimney sweeps with soot-blackened faces dancing in the distance, he shouts, "We're being attacked by hottentots!" and orders a cannon to be fired in their direction.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Hottentot" is a derogatory term used by European settlers to refer to Khoikhoi peoples of South Africa and Namibia, according to the Oxford Dictionary reference.</p> <p dir="ltr">Per the new film rating, children of any age can still watch without an adult present, but parents should consider whether the content might upset younger or more sensitive children, a BBFC spokesperson said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Disney</em></p>

Movies

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“Meant to be”: Twins give birth just 22 minutes apart

<p dir="ltr">Just days after sharing their 33rd birthday, twin sisters Nicole and Renee Baillie have given birth on the same day. </p> <p dir="ltr">The women, from Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, were shocked when they fell pregnant around the same time, with their due dates just two weeks apart. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We magically fell pregnant at the same time, which was crazy,” Nicole told <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/news/sunshine-coast-twins-give-birth-just-22-minutes-apart--c-13517897">7News</a></em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">Nicole was already at the hospital ready to give birth to her baby when Renee went into labour early. </p> <p dir="ltr">Renee rushed to the hospital just in time to give birth in the hospital foyer,  welcoming a baby girl named Ruby.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was just about to have a bath when I heard someone had a baby in the corridor,” Nicole said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I couldn’t believe it,” Renee said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“When I got here, into this room after we had (the baby), I wasn’t sure how far along Nicole was. I didn’t want her (Nicole) to know I’d already had my baby, just in case it, like, threw her off.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Renee soon found out Nicole had given birth to a baby boy, named Zavian, only 22 minutes earlier.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I thought I had a few days left, but they decided they wanted to be born on the same day,” Renee said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was just meant to be, and I think everyone has just manifested this happening,” Nicole said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: 7News</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Demi Moore flaunts stunning bikini body at 60

<p>Fans have been wowed by Demi Moore's latest Instagram post, after the 60-year-old actress flaunted her bikini body in a series of photos documenting her recent “nature immersion” trip.</p> <p>“Sharing a few precious moments from my recent adventure with @tilliewaltonofficial and @nash2o on #TilliesRiverTrip,”  she captioned the post. </p> <p>"Back in September, I had the opportunity to journey through the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River alongside so many beautiful souls. </p> <p>"We laughed, cried and formed lifelong bonds that I will hold close to my heart forever. I will never truly be able to describe the many ways that this recent nature immersion has impacted me," she added. </p> <p>The star shared a photo of her in a black bikini standing under a waterfall, with her arms in the air. </p> <p>"Standing on the banks of the Colorado River as we all took in its magnificence and beauty, I was reminded of the urgent need to preserve and protect this vital lifeline," she wrote before urging her followers to “be the change we want to see.”</p> <p>She added a few other photos and a video of her with some fellow travellers while on their nature immersion trip. </p> <p>Fans praised the  <em>G.I. Jane</em> star for raising awareness and her timeless beauty. </p> <p>“And this Ladies and Gentlemen’s is what 60 year old looks like. Insane," wrote one fan. </p> <p>“You get better with age,” agreed another. </p> <p>“Demi looks amazing! If I look that good at her age I’ll be happy," commented a third. </p> <p>“Yes … had the honour to join @tilliewaltonofficial on a Grand Canyon trip and it’s LIFE CHANGING,” journalist Frank Elaridi wrote, adding, “Thank you for raising awareness to protect rivers ️.”</p> <p>"So much gratitude for dropping deep into nature with you. Your radiant wisdom and effervescence rocks my world!" added one of the travellers she went with. </p> <p>"Incredible Demi what's your secret to staying so young and beautiful 😍" commented another. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Body

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How 22 minutes of exercise a day could reduce the health risks from sitting too long

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/matthew-ahmadi-1241767">Matthew Ahmadi</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emmanuel-stamatakis-161783">Emmanuel Stamatakis</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p>People in developed countries spend an average of <a href="https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2022-106568">nine to ten hours</a> a day sitting. Whether it’s spending time in front of a computer, stuck in traffic, or unwinding in front of the TV, our lives have become increasingly sedentary.</p> <p>This is concerning because prolonged time spent sitting is <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/24/1451?s=09&amp;int_source=trendmd&amp;int_medium=cpc&amp;int_campaign=usage-042019">linked to a number of health issues</a> including obesity, heart disease, and certain types of cancers. These health issues can contribute to earlier death.</p> <p>But a <a href="https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2022-106568">new study</a> suggests that for people over 50, getting just 22 minutes of exercise a day can lower the increased risk of premature death from a highly sedentary lifestyle.</p> <h2>What the researchers did</h2> <p>The team combined data from two studies from Norway, one from Sweden and one from the United States. The studies included about 12,000 people aged 50 or older who wore wearable devices to track how active and sedentary they were during their daily routines.</p> <p>Participants were followed up for at least two years (the median was 5.2 years) during the study period, which spanned 2003-2020.</p> <p>Analyses took several lifestyle and health factors into account, such as education, alcohol intake, smoking status, and previous history of heart disease, cancer and diabetes. All this data was linked to national death registries.</p> <h2>A 22 minute threshold</h2> <p>A total of 805 participants died during follow up. The researchers found people who were sedentary for more than 12 hours a day had the highest risk of death (a 38% higher risk than people who were sedentary for eight hours).</p> <p>However, this was only observed in those who did less than 22 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily. So for people who did more than 22 minutes of exercise, there was no longer a significantly heightened risk – that is, the risk became generally similar to those who were sedentary for eight hours.</p> <p>Higher daily duration of physical activity was consistently associated with lower risk of death, regardless of total sedentary time. For example, the team reported an additional ten minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity each day could lower mortality risk by up to 15% for people who were sedentary less than 10.5 hours a day. For those considered highly sedentary (10.5 hours a day or more), an additional ten minutes lowered mortality risk by up to 35%.</p> <h2>The study had some limitations</h2> <p>The team couldn’t assess how changes in physical activity or sedentary time over several months or years may affect risk of death. And the study included only participants aged 50 and above, making results less applicable to younger age groups.</p> <p>Further, cultural and lifestyle differences between countries may have influenced how data between studies was measured and analysed.</p> <p>Ultimately, because this study was observational, we can’t draw conclusions on cause and effect with certainty. But the results of this research align with a growing body of evidence exploring the relationship between physical activity, sedentary time, and death.</p> <h2>It’s positive news</h2> <p>Research has previously suggested <a href="https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/24/1499">physical activity may offset</a> health risks associated with <a href="https://www.jacc.org/doi/abs/10.1016/j.jacc.2019.02.031">high sedentary time</a>.</p> <p>The good news is, even short bouts of exercise can have these positive effects. In this study, the 22 minutes wasn’t necessarily done all at once. It was a total of the physical activity someone did in a day, and would have included incidental exercise (activity that’s part of a daily routine, such as climbing the stairs).</p> <p>Several studies using wearable devices have found short bursts of high-intensity everyday activities such as stair climbing or energetic outdoor home maintenance activities such as mowing the lawn or cleaning the windows can lower <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-022-02100-x">mortality</a>, <a href="https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/43/46/4801/6771381">heart disease</a> and <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/fullarticle/2807734">cancer</a> risk.</p> <p>A recent study using wearable devices found moderate to vigorous bouts of activity <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpub/article/PIIS2468-2667(23)00183-4/fulltext">lasting three to five minutes</a> provide similar benefits to bouts longer than ten minutes when it comes to stroke and heart attack risk.</p> <p>Several other studies have found <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2596007">being active just on the weekend</a> provides similar health benefits as <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2794038">being active throughout the week</a>.</p> <p>Research has also shown the benefits of <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2795819">physical activity</a> and <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2809418">reducing sedentary time</a> extend to cognitive health.</p> <p>Routines such as desk jobs can foster a sedentary lifestyle that may be difficult to shift. But mixing short bursts of activity into our day can make a significant difference towards improving our health and longevity.</p> <p>Whether it’s a brisk walk during lunch, taking the stairs, or even a short at-home workout, this study is yet another to suggest that every minute counts.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/216259/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/matthew-ahmadi-1241767">Matthew Ahmadi</a>, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Faculty of Medicine and Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emmanuel-stamatakis-161783">Emmanuel Stamatakis</a>, Professor of Physical Activity, Lifestyle, and Population Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-22-minutes-of-exercise-a-day-could-reduce-the-health-risks-from-sitting-too-long-216259">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

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93-year-old widower with dementia to get kicked out of his home of 60 years

<p>A widower with dementia has been told to pack up his belongings and leave his Brisbane home of 60 years to make way for a school drop-off zone. </p> <p>Trevor Connolly, 93, had no plans on leaving his Coorparoo home in Brisbane's south-east, until a notification of resumption, also known as a compulsory acquisition letter, arrived in his mailbox in October with notice he needs to leave before Christmas.</p> <p>The letter notified Connolly of the Department of Education's plans to forcibly acquire their home and build a new school. </p> <p>The movement of the school is a knock-on effect of Brisbane's expansion plans to accommodate the hosting the 2032 Olympics. </p> <p>The expansion is resulting in the demolition of the heritage-listed East Brisbane State School, which is being rebuilt on the site of the Coorparoo Secondary College.</p> <p>Mr Connolly's home is the last domino to fall in the construction plans, having been designated to be demolished and turned into a drop-off zone for the new school.</p> <p>The 93-year-old widower described the state's decision to acquire his home as "lunacy" and "madness", saying there are numerous other properties they could have chosen.</p> <p>"You feel so useless, what can you do about it?" Connolly told <em>7News</em>.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CynVcsMpiiW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CynVcsMpiiW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by 7NEWS Queensland (@7newsqueensland)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"There's no need to knock the house down, there's plenty of room next door."</p> <p>He said the idea of moving out of the house he has called home for over half-a-century as "a heck of a change to even think about". </p> <p>His daughter, Anne, didn't mince words when speaking about the state's Department of Education's plans, describing them as "quite brutal really, and insensitive".</p> <p>Mr Connolly and the department are yet to enter negotiations into compensation for the widower's property, while a spokesperson for the Queensland Department of Education said, "Decisions to acquire land are not taken lightly."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Seven</em></p>

Legal

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Dawn French tells all in candid interview

<p>Dawn French spills all in her latest interview with<em> 60 minutes</em>. </p> <p>The beloved British comedian revealed that being imperfect is perfect for her, in a world where unrealistic beauty standards are starting to dominate social  media. </p> <p>"I can't believe that we, especially women, have come this far to hand our daughters a life where they have to do selfies and be filtered to try to look perfect," she told 60 minutes reporter Tara Brown. </p> <p>"I don't know how to connect to all those perfect people. I'm in the anti-perfection league frankly."</p> <p>The comedian revealed that the secret to her happiness is finding joy in the simple things in life, an outlook that she gained following the devastating loss of her father when she was 18.  </p> <p>"I find joy in lots of tiny things. I'm the sort of person who doesn't need to be swimming with dolphins, I find happiness in the simple things," she added. </p> <p>French said that losing her father to suicide at such a young age shaped who she was, and that she was grateful for the love he showed and the lessons he taught her. </p> <p>"Now that I look back on it as an adult, I think he needed to give me some armour, he told me that I should value myself and that I deserved the very best," she said. </p> <p>"As a little chubby girl I could have grown up with all kinds of insecurities, but because of him I have never doubted that I'm not worth something."</p> <p>Her father's struggle with mental health gave her a deeper understanding of the complexity of depression and a greater appreciation for her own emotional stability.</p> <p>"He kept his depression very well hidden, so most of the time dad was very cheerful but he also had these black dog moments where he just couldn't cope," she said.</p> <p>"Then he would get stronger and he would be back on the horse again."</p> <p>"I've had sadness, but I haven't sunk to depths like that. I have worried that it's inherited, but I don't seem to have that, I've got too much to live for I think," she added. </p> <p>The French and Saunders actress is currently enjoying her life in a quaint village in the English countryside with her husband, therapist Mark Bignell.</p> <p>"I've got a love for life, and I love and am loved back by a lot of people, so I can't ask for more than that," she said.</p> <p>You can find the full episode <a href="https://www.9now.com.au/60-minutes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. </p> <p><em>Image: 60 minutes</em></p>

TV

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7 simple wealth creation ideas for over 60s

<p>In today's world of rising costs and economic uncertainties, building wealth after the age of 60 might seem like a daunting task. However, it's essential to remember that it's never too late to take control of your financial future and explore innovative ways to boost your income and savings.</p> <p>The latest Retirement Standard from the super industry body ASFA reveals that singles aged 65-84 need an annual income of approximately $50,207 for a 'comfortable lifestyle' in retirement, while couples require a combined income of $70,806 per year. With the full age pension often falling short of these numbers, many seniors are seeking alternative ways to supplement their income during retirement.</p> <p>Let’s delve into some practical and achievable wealth creation ideas tailored to older Australians who are looking to secure their financial well-being in their golden years.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Intentional Spending</strong></li> </ol> <p>Cutting down on non-essential spending is a powerful way to save money. Review your discretionary expenses and identify areas where you can make reductions. For instance, consider cooking at home instead of dining out, exploring free or low-cost local activities for entertainment, and delaying the purchase of luxury items. Prioritise experiences that provide value without straining your budget.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Pressure Test Your Retirement Strategy</strong></li> </ol> <p>It's essential to regularly review your retirement plan, taking into account the evolving financial landscape, legislative changes, and opportunities to minimise costs. By doing so, you can maximise the funds under your control and make informed decisions that align with your retirement goals. Keep in mind that the financial world is dynamic, and staying proactive in managing your retirement assets can lead to a more secure and comfortable retirement.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Get rid of things you don't need by selling online</strong></li> </ol> <p>Embrace the digital age and leverage online marketplaces to turn your unneeded possessions into cash. If you're not tech-savvy, don't hesitate to enlist the help of your grandchildren or any trusted youngster who can guide you through the process. Selling items online not only declutters your living space but also opens up opportunities to supplement your retirement income. Embracing technology can be empowering and profitable at any age!</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Part-Time Job Opportunities in the Gig Economy</strong></li> </ol> <p>Embrace the gig economy by exploring part-time job opportunities. Various platforms offer flexible work arrangements suitable for seniors, such as rideshare driving or food delivery services. These roles allow you to set your own hours and supplement your retirement income.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Freelancing or Consulting</strong></li> </ol> <p>Your years of experience and expertise are valuable assets. Consider venturing into part-time freelancing or consulting opportunities within your field. Many businesses are eager to hire experienced professionals for specific projects or advisory roles, providing an opportunity to boost your income without a full-time commitment.</p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong>Renting Out a Spare Room</strong></li> </ol> <p>If you have extra space in your home, consider renting out a spare room to short-term guests. Websites like Airbnb make it easy to find renters, providing a consistent source of income and helping to cover housing costs.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong>Compare and Save</strong></li> </ol> <p>Once you've reviewed your spending habits, identify areas where you can potentially save money by shopping around and obtaining comparison quotes. Renegotiating bills and subscriptions can also yield significant savings. Don't forget to review your insurance policies, adjusting the coverage and excess to potentially reduce premiums.</p> <p>Creating wealth in your golden years may seem challenging, but with the right approach and determination, it's entirely achievable. By exploring these simple and practical ideas, older Australians can take steps toward securing their financial future and enjoying a comfortable retirement. Remember that every financial decision should align with your individual circumstances and objectives. </p> <p>However, it's crucial to note that earning extra income during retirement can impact age pension payments. It can be worth seeking financial advice about the best way to increase income during retirement without compromising any other entitlements, so consider seeking professional guidance to make informed choices on your path to financial security, ensuring a comfortable and worry-free retirement.</p> <p><em><strong>Amanda Thompson, author of Financially Fit Women, is a sought-after speaker and qualified financial adviser.  As the founder of Endurance Financial, Amanda is driven to renew personal and confidence by providing the financial knowledge and guidance to have a great relationship with money allowing you to become your own CFO (Confident, Focussed &amp; On top of your Finances). For more information visit <a href="http://www.endurancefinancial.com.au">www.endurancefinancial.com.au</a></strong></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><span style="color: #0b4cb4;"> </span></p>

Retirement Income

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Man who died for seven minutes reveals his encounter with the afterlife

<p>A British actor has shared what happened during his brief, yet profound experience in the afterlife, after he was pronounced dead for seven minutes. </p> <p>Shiv Grewal, 60, was having lunch with his wife when he suddenly went into cardiac arrest. </p> <p>His wife frantically called an ambulance, but Shiv's heart had already stopped beating. </p> <p>“I knew, somehow, that I was dead,” Grewal said, according to <a href="https://nypost.com/2023/08/24/i-died-for-7-minutes-before-being-brought-back-to-life-heres-what-i-saw/?utm_source=instagram&amp;utm_medium=social&amp;utm_campaign=nypost&amp;utm_content=curalate_like2buy_7Rd1H9jc__bf5c46e3-ff70-4690-9b19-4f40d83c952f&amp;utm_term=curalate_like2buy&amp;crl8_id=bf5c46e3-ff70-4690-9b19-4f40d83c952f" target="_blank" rel="noopener" data-link-type="article-inline"><em>The New York Post</em>.</a></p> <p>“I felt things completely separate from my body. It was like I was in a void but I could feel emotions and sensations.”</p> <p>Shiv went on to say the experience felt similar to "swimming through water" with a sense of weightlessness and disconnection from the physical world.</p> <p>“At one point, I was travelling over the moon, and I could see meteorites and all of space,” he said.</p> <p>Grewal remembers feeling like he definitely didn't want to die and would do whatever it took to return to his physical body, despite the endless possibilities of the afterlife. </p> <p>“There was a whole set of possibilities, various lives and reincarnations that were being offered to me,” he said.</p> <p>“I didn’t want them. I made it very clear that I wanted to return to my body, to my time, to my wife and to go on living.”</p> <p>Grewal was rushed to hospital were he underwent a surgery to have a stent put into his main artery, which had clogged. </p> <p>He was then put in an induced coma for a month. </p> <p>While the traumatic experience happened almost ten years ago, Shiv explained that he hasn't fully recovered from the emotional impact. </p> <p>He said his life has been completely transformed, and is still trying to work through the profound emotions of that day. </p> <p>“I remembered everything that happened when my heart stopped and have tried to translate it into art,” he said.</p> <p>Before the accident, Grewal was more cynical about the idea of an afterlife, but now has completely changed his mind. </p> <p>“I’m less fearful of death because of it, but at the same time, I’m also more fearful, because I’ve realised how precious everything I have in life is,” he said.</p> <p>“I’m grateful just to be here.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Major fuel savings for seniors

<p>Major fuel savings are now on offer for over 1.6 million seniors over the age of 60 across New South Wales, as the government adds fuel discounts to the list of benefits for NSW Seniors Card and Senior Savers Card holders. </p> <p>Senior card holders will be eligible for the new United Discount Fuel Card, which offers savings of 4c per litre at participating service stations, which can be used once daily for single transactions up to 150 litres. </p> <p>Anyone over 60 can become cardholders of the Seniors Card and Senior Savers Card, which allows them to save on fuel, energy, insurance, cybersecurity, pet adoption and vet services, and groceries.</p> <p>United Petrol head of loyalty Judith Russell said that after they've signed up for the card, “members then need to show and scan this United fuel discount card at the time of purchase at participating United service stations to save the four cents per litre.”</p> <p>The Minister for Seniors Jodie Harrison shared their excitement to launch this discount. </p> <p>"We’re excited to launch the program’s first fuel discount with United Petroleum, an Australian-owned business offering discounts to members at the bowser.”</p> <p>“This brand-new discount has been added to the wealth of Seniors Card savings to help keep more money in seniors’ pockets and ease price pressure at the pump.”</p> <p>For those who want to apply for the fuel card, they can <a href="https://www.unitedpetroleum.com.au/fuel-discount-cards/our-partners/nsw-seniors-card/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">sign up here </a>for a digital or plastic card, and find out the participating service stations here. </p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Lisa Rinna’s totally nude update at 60

<p dir="ltr">Lisa Rinna wasn't afraid to flaunt her birthday suit in her latest Instagram update.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 60-year-old<em> Days of Our Lives</em> star bared it all in an homage to Catherine O'Hara’s iconic character Moira Rose on <em>Schitt’s Creek</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Moira Rose says you should take as many naked pics of yourself while you still can and celebrate it,” Rinna captioned the photo posted on her Instagram stories.</p> <p dir="ltr">“OK Moira,” she added with a selfie of herself posing proudly in her birthday suit with brown hearts barely censoring her private parts.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also added a “happy Sunday” GIF in the bottom corner of her photo.</p> <p dir="ltr">She continues to make waves as she shared a more recent update of her posing in a latex outfit as part of her new Rinna Beauty campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">“A little Latex hand modelling ,” she captioned the video as she confidently posed for the cameras.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvJIbAAxqK3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvJIbAAxqK3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by L I S A R I N N A (@lisarinna)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Fans took to the comments to praise the Melrose Place actress, with many of them commenting multiple fire emojis.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Glamorous!!! ♥️♦️” wrote one fan.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Iconic,” commented another.</p> <p dir="ltr">“How is it you look the same as you did on Days and Melrose Place?! You are still stunning and fabulous 🔥💜” commented a third.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p>

Beauty & Style

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How to declutter your home in 15 minutes flat

<p>While most of us would love to live in a mess-free home, it’s hard to find enough time to dedicate to decluttering the entire house. A better way might be to break the big job into small 15-minute-or-less decluttering tasks like the ones below.</p> <p><strong>Kitchen</strong></p> <p>Use bins and baskets to organise similar items. Label them so the system is clear to everyone. If you’re living in with other people, buy a pantry bin for each member of the home. This will not only keep the space looking neat and tidy but will also reduce the risk of people “mistaking” your food for their own.</p> <p><strong>Home office</strong></p> <p>Make your home office user-friendly by reorganising the space in a way that makes sense to you and your family. For example, store homework equipment in an area where your children can easily access them and things that are used less can be kept up high.</p> <p>Julie Stuart, founder of online craft store and blog Clever Poppy<span style="text-decoration: underline;">,</span> adopted this approach when she moved her home office into her open plan living and dining room.</p> <p>“All of my stationery is stored in a basket on my desk. For those things you don’t need on a day to day basis, store them out of sight in a cupboard or wardrobe.”</p> <p>Keep track of your mail and other paperwork that clogs up your desk by stacking it into three categories: bills, personal mail (e.g. wedding invitations) and then one for everything else. If you’re feeling particularly motivated, take the time to pay your bills now or just keep the piles stored neatly in a tray on your desk so it’s easier to tackle later on.</p> <p><strong>Living room</strong></p> <p>Keep on top of clutter throughout the week by identifying the biggest clutter culprit in the living room (e.g. kid’s toys, mail). Dedicate a few minutes every day, or every couple of days if you’re particularly time pressed, to dealing with that.</p> <p><strong>Bathroom</strong></p> <p>Pull all of your toiletries from the cabinet shelves and throw out anything that’s expired or unnecessary (do you really need four lipsticks in the same shade?) Follow this by giving the shelves a quick wipe-down and replace all of the remaining products, putting the items you use the most in easily accessible spots.</p> <p><strong>Bedroom</strong></p> <p>Take some time on a Sunday evening to pick out the clothes you plan on wearing for the rest of the week and hang them at the front of your wardrobe. This will minimise stress in the mornings and will stop you from tearing your closet apart (and making even more of a mess) to find a pair of piece of clothing.</p> <p>Another way to ease the morning rush is to organise your clothing by grouping like with like (e.g. all business shirts together) and adding garment tags to keep them together.</p> <p><strong>Linen closet</strong></p> <p>A simple way to quickly get you linen closet in order – and to stop sheet sets getting lost in the pile – is by tucking a complete sheet set inside one of its pillowcases. If you have a little extra time, stack the sets according to size (single, queen, king).</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>Written by Natalia Didovich. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz.</span></strong></a></em></p>

Home Hints & Tips

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Leo DiCaprio's new film gets 9-minute standing ovation

<p>If a 9-minute standing ovation is anything to go by, then claims that Martin Scorsese’s new project <em>Killers of the Flower Moon</em> is the “film of the year” may just be on to something. </p> <p>The movie - which stars the likes of Hollywood legends Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert De Niro, and Lily Gladstone - received exactly that: 9 whole minutes of applause after its world premiere at the 2023 Cannes Film Festival.</p> <p>Its stars were all in attendance, from Leo who was last present with <em>Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood</em>, to 80-year-old Scorsese, who was returning to the festival for the first time since 1985, when he was there for <em>After Hours</em>.</p> <p>The near-three-and-a-half-hour film - which shares its name with the David Grann book it was adapted from - takes place in 1920s Oklahoma, and shares the story of a dark period in American history, depicting the serial murders of members of the Osage Nation.</p> <p>Prior to its screening, the film had already been dubbed by some as the festival’s “most anticipated film” - it even saw Apple CEO Tim Cook swing by, as the company is one of the film’s distributors.</p> <p>And as soon as it concluded, the applause broke out - with some suspecting that it may have continued on beyond the 9-minute mark, had Scorsese not been asked to address the crowd. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Leonardo DiCaprio and Lily Gladstone land a 9-minute standing ovation for ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ — the biggest and loudest of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Cannes2023?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Cannes2023</a> so far. <a href="https://t.co/1Gxp4cED1T">pic.twitter.com/1Gxp4cED1T</a></p> <p>— Ramin Setoodeh (@RaminSetoodeh) <a href="https://twitter.com/RaminSetoodeh/status/1660019896393113602?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 20, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>“Thank you to the Osages,” Scorsese said upon reaching the mic. “Everyone connected with the picture. My old pals Bob and Leo, and Jesse and Lily. We shot this a couple of years ago in Oklahoma. </p> <p>“It’s taken it’s time to come around but Apple did so great by us. There was lots of grass. I’m a New Yorker. I was very surprised. This was an amazing experience. </p> <p>“We lived in that world with the Osage, we really did, and we really miss it.”</p> <p>As former Osage tribal leader Jim Gray said of the experience, “the dignity and care for the Osage perspective was genuine and honest throughout the process and the Osage responded with the kind of passion and enthusiasm that met this historic moment.</p> <p>“For those of us who were watching from the sidelines while our best and brightest among us auditioned, sewed, catered, painted, acted and advised the filmmakers, it’s going to be hard not to feel our presence in helping to tell.”</p> <p>Lily Gladstone - who plays an Osage woman betrayed by her husband in the movie - had more to add, telling<em> Variety</em> that “the work is better when you let the world inform the work. That was very refreshing how involved the production got with the [Osage Nation] community. As the community warmed up to our presence, the more the community got involved with the film. </p> <p>“It’s a different movie than the one [Scorsese] walked in to make almost entirely because of what the community had to say about how it was being made and what was being portrayed.”</p> <p>And alongside praise for the film came praise for the performances within it, with many convinced Gladstone is set for attention during awards season for her work, and one reviewer even going so far as to call this “Leonardo DiCaprio’s best performance yet”.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty </em></p>

Movies

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Maccas aren’t lovin’ the over 60s

<p dir="ltr">A McDonald’s in Auckland Central has landed itself in hot water after posting a job ad that wanted nothing to do with the over 60 workforce. </p> <p dir="ltr">The post, shared to the establishment’s Facebook page and since removed, sought new staff to cover the 10pm to 6am ‘graveyard’ shift. The usual benefits and various position criteria were listed, but it was one line at the bottom that caught the attention - and ire - of the masses.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Any age from 16 to 60,” the listing read.</p> <p dir="ltr">Feedback came fast and furious, with many outraged by the blatant ageism the fast food giant was peddling. And while McDonald’s tried to pass it off as the fault of a franchisee, the store’s manager instead said that their head office was at fault.</p> <p dir="ltr">Social media users were vocal about what they thought of the ad, and it wasn’t long before legal experts and union representatives got involved in the ongoing uproar - and even the big wigs over at McDonald’s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We’ve been made aware that a job ad by one of our franchisees has created some debate on social media like Reddit, as it references an age range of 16-60,” company spokesperson Simon Kenny said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The reference in the copy was intended to illustrate that people of all ages are welcome. We’ve asked the franchisee to update the copy to avoid any potential confusion.”</p> <p dir="ltr">As Joe Carolan from New Zealand’s Unite Union told the <em>New Zealand Herald</em>, “contrary to the myth that most McDonald’s jobs are [ideal for] part-time students, improvements made by the union throughout the years have seen many workers stay in these jobs into their 50s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Older workers bring experience, stability and maturity to a workplace and we call on McDonald's to end this discriminatory ageism.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Employment law expert Max Whitehead added that the pay - $22.80 per hour - combined with the age restrictions, were a “blatant” breach of the Human Rights Act. </p> <p dir="ltr">And for those who thought the line had just been an ill-advised marketing move, Whitehead noted “if it really is to get a catchy cliche going, it’s a stupid thing to do.” </p> <p dir="ltr">Whitehead’s fellow expert, Professor Bill Hodge, had more to say on the matter of ageism too, noting that The Human Rights Act actually bans discrimination against people over the age of 60, though he saw no issue with the teenage half of the equation. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We discriminate against people 14 or 15 all the time and it’s justifiable to say ‘no, you can’t drive a car, you can’t leave school’,” he said. “On the face of it I see no obvious requirement that would exclude people over 60.”</p> <p dir="ltr">As a spokesperson for the Humans Right Campaign informed the <em>New Zealand Herald</em>, The Human Rights Act 1993 had rendered it unlawful for people to be treated differently for their age during the employment process. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It is unlawful to discriminate against employees, job applicants, voluntary workers, people seeking work through an employment agency and contract workers because of age,” the spokesperson explained. “The only exception is where, for reasons of authenticity, being of a particular age is a genuine occupational qualification for the position or employment.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Shutterstock, Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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60-plus women are ditching the hair dye

<p><em><strong>Susan Krauss Whitbourne is a professor of Psychology and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She writes the Fulfilment at Any Age blog for Psychology Today.</strong></em></p> <p>If you’re tired of those monthly visits to the salon, or even your own sessions over the sink, you’re not alone. <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/23/fashion/shes-done-with-washing-it-away.html?_r=0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Leah Rozen</a></span></strong>, writing in the <em>New York Times</em>, announced to the world that she’s grey, 57, and loving it, proudly announcing that “Blondes may have more fun, but we grey gals have it made in our shade.”</p> <p>How about you? Are you battling those tell-tale roots, or revelling in the glory of your own grey locks? If so, perhaps you share Rozen’s feeling of liberation. If not, you might ask yourself whether looking young is really worth all that expense and effort.</p> <p>There are plenty of reasons to cover up our signs of a maturing scalp. In fact, as Rozen herself acknowledges, she’s definitely got the “old lady” look going for her. In our youth-oriented society, showing your age may preclude you from certain opportunities. Despite legislation, ageism still exists and can take many forms, ranging from biases against the abilities of older workers to stereotyped beliefs about their personalities and work attitudes. As their self-image and abilities change, older workers can begin to doubt their self-efficacy. A self-fulfilling prophecy can develop, resulting in their further losing the ability to perform up to par. To prevent this outcome, many older women and men take the preventative action of keeping up their youthful personas.</p> <p>Ageism may take many forms outside the workplace. One way is for younger adults just to avoid you altogether. They may not be openly hostile but instead make older adults “invisible” — that is, not worthy of any attention at all. Perhaps they’re afraid of being tainted by the aging vibes you give off.</p> <p>Risking the wrath, visible or not, of ageism can make going grey a dangerous proposition. However, thinking about how and why you’re trying to maintain your youthful image for as long as possible can give you important insights into understanding yourself and your feelings about life changes.</p> <p>You might ask yourself to what lengths you go, and are willing to go, to remain young-looking. Of course it would be ludicrous to suggest that women, and men should give up all attempts to look good. But looking good doesn’t have to mean looking young. You can get out of the youth trap and still feel great about the persona you present to the world, if not your own inner sense of self.</p> <p>Take an honest look at yourself right now. What is working and what isn’t? Which aspects of your hair, makeup and clothing reflect how you really feel about yourself, and which reflect your desire to blend in with the young crowd? If you don’t trust yourself to give the right answer, you might want to consult someone who’s objective to get a second opinion (NOT your children). It’s hard to find someone whose opinion you can trust, because virtually anyone working in clothing, makeup counters or hair salons benefits from selling you their youth-oriented products. (Just think about how much those skin creams are costing you.) If you feel that these people aren’t being honest, you might consider talking to a friend, co-worker or family member (again, not the children) who pulls off an age-appropriate look.</p> <p>Thinking about the image you try to present to the world can give you great insight into your own identity and feelings about how you are changing -and improving- over time. As we cross each aging threshold, including the changes in our hair, skin and bodily functions and appearance, there’s an opportunity to reflect on the deeper meaning of these changes to our sense of who we are. Many people try to put off the inevitable as long as possible, but eventually bounce back as they incorporate this new view of themselves into their identities. Whether grey or not, by bringing your outer image in line with your inner self, you’ll be better prepared to negotiate whatever changes come your way in the years ahead.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Secret to couple’s 60-year marriage

<p>Geoff Yeend's aim was to marry a girl whose family had a television set. He wanted to watch the Queen's coronation but says he "slipped up". His now wife Maureen's parents never had a TV.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Maureen has four brothers and has always said Geoff married her for her brothers because he was an only child.</p> <p>Geoff lived one side of the railway tracks while Maureen lived on the "good side". The couple grew up within five kilometres of each other on the outskirts of London but didn't meet until at a dance when Geoff was 20 and Maureen 16.</p> <p>Maureen turned up to the dance with one of her brothers. Maureen says the next morning she and her brother were talking, calling between bedrooms. "He said Geoff had said 'bring your sister next week'. I said 'well, who's Geoff?' and he said 'oh, the little fella'.</p> <p>The Matamata couple met in 1953 and were married on October 22, 1955.</p> <p>While the early days were challenging, raising two children and emigrating to New Zealand in 1973 and then to North Hollywood in 1978, the couple have had many happy years together.</p> <p><img width="238" height="286" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/16761/geoff-and-maureen-yeend-body.jpg" alt="Geoff And Maureen Yeend Body"/></p> <p>They've been on a sheep farm, Geoff has worked as a newspaper printer and the pair were in the movie advertising industry in America in the 70s and 80s.</p> <p>They returned to New Zealand in 1989 and bought the Daltons farm in Matamata. They sold this in 2009 before buying a section in town.</p> <p>Geoff and Maureen celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a week spent on Norfolk Island. "We're still stopped together," Maureen says.</p> <p>The couple have a passion for travelling and have visited a number of exotic places around the world, although Maureen isn't able to travel much these days. Geoff still gets out and about including a recent trip to South Africa, Botswana and Zambia.</p> <p>And do the couple have any advice for a long and happy marriage? "I always say give and take. I give and Maureen takes," Geoff jokes.</p> <p>But in all honesty, they say a married couple needs to live within their means, be realistic and learn to do things together.</p> <p><em>Written by Teresa Hattan. First appeared on </em><a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span><span style="text-decoration: underline;">.</span></strong></em></a> </p> <p>Looking for love – or perhaps you just want to meet some new people? <strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/301420739;128433504;u%20" target="_blank">Why not sign up at RSVP today by clicking here… You never know who is just around the corner.</a></span></em></strong></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2016/01/how-to-make-love-last/">The secret to make love last</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2016/01/science-behind-couples-who-die-together/">There’s a science behind couple that die close together</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2015/12/soulpancake-what-is-love-video/">People aged 0 to 100 define what is love</a></strong></em></span></p>

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