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No croutons, no anchovies, no bacon: the 100-year-old Mexican origins of the Caesar salad

<div class="theconversation-article-body"> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/garritt-c-van-dyk-1014186">Garritt C. Van Dyk</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060"><em>University of Newcastle</em></a></em></p> <p>The most seductive culinary myths have murky origins, with a revolutionary discovery created by accident, or out of necessity.</p> <p>For the Caesar salad, these classic ingredients are spiced up with a family food feud and a spontaneous recipe invention on the Fourth of July, across the border in Mexico, during Prohibition.</p> <p>Our story is set during the era when America banned the production and sale of alcohol from <a href="https://www.atf.gov/our-history/timeline/18th-amendment-1919-national-prohibition-act">1919–1933</a>.</p> <p>Two brothers, Caesar (Cesare) and Alex (Alessandro) Cardini, moved to the United States from Italy. Caesar opened a restaurant in California in 1919. <a href="https://historicalmx.org/items/show/195">In the 1920s</a>, he opened another in the Mexican border town of Tijuana, serving food and liquor to Americans looking to circumvent Prohibition.</p> <p>Tijuana’s Main Street, packed with saloons, became a popular destination for southern Californians looking for drink. It claimed to have the “<a href="https://www.google.com/books/edition/Satan_s_Playground/znhxImXG8e0C">world’s longest bar</a>” at the Ballena, 215 feet (66 metres) long with ten bartenders and 30 waitresses.</p> <p>The story of the Caesar salad, allegedly 100 years old, is one of a cross-border national holiday Prohibition-era myth, a brotherly battle for the claim to fame and celebrity chef endorsements.</p> <h2>Necessity is the mother of invention</h2> <p><a href="https://classicsandiego.com/restaurants/caesars-restaurant-tijuana/">On July 4 1924</a>, so the story goes, Caesar Cardini was hard at work in the kitchen of his restaurant, Caesar’s Place, packed with holiday crowds from across the border looking to celebrate with food and drink.</p> <p>He was confronted with a chef’s worst nightmare: running out of ingredients in the middle of service.</p> <p>As supplies for regular menu items dwindled, Caesar decided to improvise with what he had on hand.</p> <p>He took ingredients in the pantry and cool room and combined the smaller leaves from hearts of cos lettuce with a dressing made from coddled (one-minute boiled) eggs, olive oil, black pepper, lemon juice, a little garlic and Parmesan cheese.</p> <p>The novel combination was a huge success with the customers and became a regular menu item: the Caesar salad.</p> <h2>Et tu, Alex?</h2> <p>There is another version of the origin of the famous salad, made by Caesar’s brother, Alex, at his restaurant in Tijuana.</p> <p>Alex claims Caesar’s “inspiration” was actually a menu item at his place, the “<a href="https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20190521-the-surprising-truth-about-caesar-salad">aviator’s salad</a>”, named because he made it as a morning-after pick-me-up for American pilots after a long night drinking.</p> <p>His version had many of the same ingredients, but used lime juice, not lemon, and was served with large croutons covered with mashed anchovies.</p> <p>When Caesar’s menu item later became famous, Alex asserted his claim as the true inventor of the salad, now named for his brother.</p> <h2>Enter the celebrity chefs</h2> <p>To add to the intrigue, two celebrity chefs championed the opposing sides of this feud. <a href="https://www.google.com/books/edition/Appetite_for_Life/sEAfuK8lDjkC">Julia Child</a> backed Caesar, and <a href="https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Essential_Cuisines_of_Mexico/gzsGAwAAQBAJ">Diana Kennedy</a> (not nearly as famous, but known for her authentic Mexican cookbooks) supported Alex’s claim.</p> <p>By entering the fray, each of these culinary heavyweights added credence to different elements of each story and made the variations more popular in the US.</p> <p>While Child reached more viewers in print and on television, Kennedy had local influence, known for promoting regional Mexican cuisine.</p> <p>While they chose different versions, the influence of major media figures contributed to the evolution of the Caesar salad beyond its origins.</p> <p>The original had no croutons and no anchovies. As the recipe was codified into an “official” version, garlic was included in the form of an infused olive oil. Newer versions either mashed anchovies directly into the dressing or added Worcestershire sauce, which has anchovies in the mix.</p> <p>Caesar’s daughter, Rosa, always maintained her father was the original inventor of the salad. She continued to market her father’s <a href="https://classicsandiego.com/restaurants/caesar-cardini-cafe/">trademarked recipe</a> after his death in 1954.</p> <p>Ultimately she won the battle for her father’s claim as the creator of the dish, but elements from Alex’s recipe have become popular inclusions that deviate from the purist version, so his influence is present – even if his contribution is less visible.</p> <h2>No forks required – but a bit of a performance</h2> <p>If this weren’t enough, there is also a tasty morsel that got lost along the way.</p> <p>Caesar salad was originally meant to be eaten as finger food, with your hands, using the baby leaves as scoops for the delicious dressing ingredients.</p> <p>For <a href="https://www.latimes.com/food/story/2024-01-30/original-caesar-salad-tijuana-100-years">presentation</a> in a restaurant, the salad was also created in front of the diners’ table, on a rolling cart, with some recommending a “true” Caesar salad was tossed only seven times, clockwise.</p> <p>This extra level of drama, performance and prescribed ritual was usually limited to alcohol-doused flaming desserts.</p> <p>To have a humble salad, invented in desperation, elevated to this kind of treatment made it a very special dish – even without any bacon.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/233099/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/garritt-c-van-dyk-1014186">Garritt C. Van Dyk</a>, Lecturer in History, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/no-croutons-no-anchovies-no-bacon-the-100-year-old-mexican-origins-of-the-caesar-salad-233099">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Food & Wine

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Why it’s still a scientific mystery how some can live past 100 – and how to crack it

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/richard-faragher-224976">Richard Faragher</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-brighton-942">University of Brighton</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nir-barzilai-1293752">Nir Barzilai</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/albert-einstein-college-of-medicine-3638">Albert Einstein College of Medicine</a></em></p> <p>A 35-year-old man <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18544745/">only has a 1.5% chance of dying in the next ten years</a>. But the same man at 75 has a 45% chance of dying before he reaches 85. Clearly, ageing is bad for our health. On the bright side, we have made unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control ageing and late-life disease.</p> <p>A few tightly linked biological processes, sometimes called the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23746838/">“hallmarks of ageing”</a>, including our supply of stem cells and communication between cells, act to keep us healthy in the early part of our lives – with <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-secret-to-staying-young-scientists-boost-lifespan-of-mice-by-deleting-defective-cells-54068">problems arising as these start to fail</a>. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34699859/">Clinical trials are ongoing</a> to see if targeting some of these hallmarks can improve <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31542391/">diabetic kidney disease</a>, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29997249/">aspects of</a> <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33977284/">immune function</a> and age-related <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30616998/">scarring of the lungs</a> among others. So far, so good.</p> <p>Unfortunately, big, unanswered questions remain in the biology of ageing. To evaluate what these are and how to address them, the <a href="https://www.afar.org/">American Federation For Aging Research</a>, a charity, recently convened a series of <a href="https://www.afar.org/imported/AFAR_GeroFuturesThinkTankReport_November2021.pdf">meetings for leading scientists and doctors</a>. The experts agreed that understanding what is special about the biology of humans who survive more than a century is now a key challenge.</p> <p>These centenarians <a href="https://www.statista.com/chart/18826/number-of-hundred-year-olds-centenarians-worldwide/">comprise less than 0.02% of the UK population</a> but have exceeded the life expectancy of their peers by almost 50 years (babies born in the 1920s typically had a life expectancy of less than 55). How are they doing it?</p> <p>We know that centenarians live so long because they are unusually healthy. They remain in good health for about 30 years longer than most normal people and when they finally fall ill, they are only sick for a very short time. This <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27377170/">“compression of morbidity”</a> is clearly good for them, but also benefits society as a whole. In the US, the medical care costs for a centenarian in their last two years of life <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_198.pdf">are about a third of those of someone who dies in their seventies</a> (a time when most centenarians don’t even need to see a doctor).</p> <p>The children of centenarians are also much healthier than average, indicating they are inheriting something beneficial from their parents. But is this genetic or environmental?</p> <h2>Centenarians aren’t always health conscious</h2> <p>Are centenarians the poster children for a healthy lifestyle? For the general population, watching your weight, not smoking, drinking moderately and eating at least five servings of fruit and vegetables a day can <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27296932/">increase life expectancy by up to 14 years</a> compared with someone who does none of these things. This difference <a href="https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld5801/ldselect/ldsctech/183/18305.htm#_idTextAnchor012">exceeds that seen</a> between the least and most deprived areas in the UK, so intuitively it would be expected to play a role in surviving for a century.</p> <p>But astonishingly, this needn’t be the case. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21812767/">One study</a> found that up to 60% of Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians have smoked heavily most of their lives, half have been obese for the same period of time, less than half do even moderate exercise and under 3% are vegetarians. The children of centenarians appear no more health conscious than the general population either.</p> <p>Compared to peers with the same food consumption, wealth and body weight, however, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29050682/">they have half the prevalence of cardiovascular disease</a>. There is something innately exceptional about these people.</p> <h2>The big secret</h2> <p>Could it be down to rare genetics? If so, then there are two ways in which this could work. Centenarians might carry unusual genetic variants that extend lifespan, or instead they might lack common ones that cause late-life disease and impairment. Several studies, including our own work, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32860726/">have shown</a> that centenarians have just as many bad genetic variants as the general population.</p> <p>Some even carry two copies of the largest known common risk gene for Alzheimer’s disease (APOE4), but still don’t get the illness. So a plausible working hypothesis is that centenarians carry rare, beneficial genetic variations rather than a lack of disadvantageous ones. And the best available data is consistent with this.</p> <p>Over 60% of centenarians have genetic changes that alter the genes which regulate growth in early life. This implies that these remarkable people are human examples of a type of lifespan extension observed in other species. Most people know that <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28803893/">small dogs tend to live longer than big ones</a> but fewer are aware that this is a general phenomenon across the animal kingdom. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26857482/">Ponies can live longer than horses</a> and many strains of laboratory mice with dwarfing mutations <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29653683/">live longer than their full-sized counterparts</a>. One potential cause of this is reduced levels of a growth hormone called IGF-1 – although human centenarians <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28630896/">are not necessarily shorter than the rest of us</a>.</p> <p>Obviously, growth hormone is necessary early on in life, but there is increasing evidence that high levels of IGF-1 in mid to late life <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18316725/">are associated with increased late-life illness</a>. The detailed mechanisms underlying this remain an open question, but even among centenarians, women with the lowest levels of growth hormone <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24618355/">live longer than those with the highest</a>. They also have better cognitive and muscle function.</p> <p>That doesn’t solve the problem, though. Centenarians are also different from the rest of us in other ways. For example, they tend to have good cholesterol levels – hinting there may several reasons for their longevity.</p> <p>Ultimately, centenarians are “natural experiments” who show us that it is possible to live in excellent health even if you have been dealt a risky genetic hand and chose to pay no attention to health messages – but only if you carry rare, poorly understood mutations.</p> <p>Understanding exactly how these work should allow scientists to develop new drugs or other interventions that target biological processes in the right tissues at the right time. If these become a reality perhaps more of us than we think will see the next century in. But, until then, don’t take healthy lifestyle tips from centenarians.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/172020/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/richard-faragher-224976">Richard Faragher</a>, Professor of Biogerontology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-brighton-942">University of Brighton</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nir-barzilai-1293752">Nir Barzilai</a>, Professor of Medicine and Genetics, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/albert-einstein-college-of-medicine-3638">Albert Einstein College of Medicine</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-its-still-a-scientific-mystery-how-some-can-live-past-100-and-how-to-crack-it-172020">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Retirement Life

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The alarmingly accurate predictions made 100 years ago

<p>A university researcher has uncovered predictions made in 1924 about what the world would look like 100 years in the future, with some of the predictions proving to be scarily accurate. </p> <p>The Canadian professor Paul Fairie shared a selection of headlines and articles made by newspapers in the 1920s on his X account, showing in what ways the world has changed and how it has remained the same.</p> <p>While some predictions made in 1924 hit the nail on the head, others couldn't be further from reality. </p> <p><strong>Accurate predictions </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Car speedways</em></span></p> <p>One newspaper clipping claimed that in the future, cars would be travelling on super "speedways" that allowed them to travel faster. </p> <p>While cars first hit the roads in the 1880s, it wasn't until the 1920s that vehicles became more common, with cities quickly trying to build safe roads to accommodate the growth in motor vehicles. </p> <p>“In the city of 2024, this authority predicts there will be three-deck roads; speedways through the heart of town,” the newspaper article predicted.</p> <p>The article also envisaged monorail express services to the suburbs replacing cars and buses and moving sidewalks (similar to airport travelators) that moved people in all directions, “serving all railroad stations and business districts”.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Women getting tattooed and dyeing their hair</em></span></p> <p>In the 1920s, tattoos were exclusively reserved for sailors, criminals and gangland figures until they became more commonplace. </p> <p>But one 1924 article predicted, incredibly accurately, that by 2024 women would be getting tattoos and dyeing their hair “all the colours of the rainbow”.</p> <p>“Debutantes of 1924 are shingle-haired, sleek-looking maidens with delicately rouged cheeks and provocative red lips,” the article stated.</p> <p>“The 1924 debutante successfully conceals her personality under paint and power."</p> <p>“The debutante of 100 years hence may revert to type and frankly copy her ancestors, who dyed their skins with woad; only, with the modern instinct for progress."</p> <p>“She may go still further and dye her complexion and hair all the colours of the rainbow.”</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Women becoming stronger</em></span></p> <p>The newspapers of 1924 also predicted that women of the future would be “physically strong, vital and alert.”</p> <p>One article predicted that women would spend more time in the outdoors, participate in sports, and would be “engaging by choice” in activities that were historically restricted to men.</p> <p>Intellectually, women would be “quick at wit and keen of judgment,” while spiritually, she would “radiate love and good will”.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Remote viewing </em></span></p> <p>One of the most accurate predictions from 1924 was the invention of technology that would allow people to view entertainment "remotely". </p> <p>“Many inconveniences which the touring artist now has to suffer will no doubt be eliminated,” one prediction read.</p> <p>“It will not be necessary to travel great distances. The strain of the concert tour will be dispensed with. Artists may not even have to leave their homes (to perform).”</p> <p><strong>Not so accurate predictions</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Horses becoming extinct </em></span></p> <p>One prediction from a 1924 newspaper believed that as cars took over as the main form of transportation, there would be no more use for horses and they would soon becoming extinct. </p> <p>“If a house would decrease in the same ratio as in the last ten or twenty years, it might be easy to tell when the last horse would give up his stall to an automobile,” the prediction read.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Self-launching beds</em></span></p> <p>Another not-so accurate prediction claimed that beds would soon come with a feature that would override the use for an alarm clock, but would come with a mechanism to launch you out of bed in the morning. </p> <p>Describing this futuristic scenario, the reporter wrote: “My bed turns over automatically and I am deposited on the floor”.</p> <p>“Eight o’clock and the switch operating above the fiendish substitute for an alarm clock is operated from school, so at the moment, I am in the same predicament as the rest of the 450 scholars.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Technology

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Dad cops furious note from "egotistical Karen" for parking in parent's bay

<p>A Perth dad has been left hurt after he was targeted by an "egotistical Karen" for parking in a parent's bay, while his wife was inside a shopping centre changing their seven-month-old baby. </p> <p>"Don't park here again, you selfish prick!" the note read. </p> <p>His wife took to Facebook on behalf of her hurt husband to question why someone would go out of their way to criticise him for parking in a space designated for parents. </p> <p>"My husband was putting a baby gate in the boot while I was in the forum changing our seven-month-old baby," she defended her partner, who parked at the Mandurah Forum. </p> <p>"He came back into the forum looking for me [and] when we returned, someone had put this note on our windscreen.</p> <p>"How about next time you be sure before insulting an innocent husband and father, you hero."</p> <p>The woman said that the note left her husband "hurt and almost feeling guilty" and she argued that he had every right to be there as a parent. </p> <p>Her post attracted over 300 interactions with many agreeing with the mum, and saying that the "Karen" should've gotten their facts straight before taking action. </p> <p>"There is no law for who can park in parents with prams spaces they are just convenience but anyone can park there and use,"  one man wrote. </p> <p>A few others shared the same sentiment and said that "it's not illegal to park in those bays" regardless of whether or not you have a baby. </p> <p>Some parents even shared their own experiences and why it is important to not judge someone based on looks alone. </p> <p>"This has happened to me also. I had a baby and a toddler and my husband took them inside the Mandurah forum while I unloaded our car," the person began. </p> <p>"A couple with a baby parked next to me and the man kept yelling at me that it was only for parents with prams, even though I told him I had young kids and a pram. But he didn't believe me and yelled loudly to move my car."</p> <p>One mum added that she doesn't see the need for parents with prams spaces altogether.</p> <p>"As a mum of just a five-year-old, I personally don’t see the need for parent spaces. They are not any bigger, just more convenient. Kids need exercise and prams have wheels, not hard to walk," she wrote. </p> <p>"I personally think they should be seniors bays instead, they are less mobile and struggle to walk long distances. Give them the spots."</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Legal

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Finding joy at age 100: Talking to centenarians about living their best life at any age

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heather-joyce-nelson-1440914">Heather Joyce Nelson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-regina-3498">University of Regina</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/beverlee-ziefflie-1445320">Beverlee Ziefflie</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paula-mayer-1445321">Paula Mayer</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a></em></p> <p>Aging is seen as a period of loss, and there are unhelpful <a href="https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/10-myths-about-aging">myths about older adults</a>. Myths lead to treatable conditions being considered normal parts of aging, including cognitive decline, dementia, depression and loneliness. Some even consider exercise dangerous in older adults.</p> <p>At the same time, mainstream media promotes the message that <a href="https://doi.org/10.4236/jss.2017.58015">being young is central to a person’s value</a>. These ideas lead to ageism and older adults being seen as lesser.</p> <p>After spending time with six female centenarians in assisted living facilities, our research team — which included four nursing researchers and a documentary filmmaker — learned there is plenty still worth living for.</p> <p>Centenarians are a small but growing segment of the population with <a href="https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/daily-quotidien/220928/dq220928c-eng.pdf?st=LrkfjZE_">13,844 centenarians in Canada</a>, and our findings debunk myths about the experience of aging.</p> <p>We asked the centenarians questions about what brings them joy and how they plan for the future because we wanted to learn how the very elderly plan for and find ways to live their best lives. The results of this study were <a href="https://vimeo.com/showcase/looking-forward-at-100">turned into a 32-minute documentary</a> that captures participants’ long and interesting lives and offers insight into continued meaning experienced by centenarians in their daily lives. Three of the centenarians died shortly after the interviews took place.</p> <h2>Long and interesting lives</h2> <p>The participants were born between the years 1919 and 1922. They were children during the Great Depression and young adults during the Second World War.</p> <p>One of the women helped build bullet casings and worked on the <a href="https://www.britannica.com/technology/Lancaster-airplane">Lancaster bomber</a>. Another woman helped her husband protect the blueprints of the ill-fated <a href="https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/avro-arrow">Avro Arrow aircraft</a> when he brought them home from work. Two women lost their husbands when their children were small and had to go to work to support their families. They all experienced love and adventure.</p> <p>Our team was fascinated by their stories and wanted to further explore what their lives look like today.</p> <p>Betty, 101, saw happiness as a choice. “I don’t know what’s really to complain about. I went through life staying happy,” she said.</p> <h2>Joy and challenges</h2> <p>This study used a research method called <a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/151684840/Braun-Clarke-2006-Using-Thematic-Analysis">thematic analysis</a> to find four themes: Finding Joy, Act your Age, Looking Forward and Putting Challenges into Perspective.</p> <p>The centenarians found joy each day and enjoyed the little things such as activities, visits and treats. Betty enjoyed cheating at solitaire and Jean, 100, played the piano. Clementina, 101, had fun gambling and Joyce, 100, continued to write stories and watch her grandchildren in music concerts.</p> <p>Family was central to their lives and they enjoyed spending time with their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Two of the women stated that raising their children was the biggest accomplishment in their lives.</p> <p>The centenarians also found great joy in reminiscing about their interesting lives. However, one of the challenges was that there was no one left alive who had the same shared experiences.</p> <h2>Limitations</h2> <p>The centenarians were constrained by the limitations of society, their bodies and their self-perceptions. “You have to act your age,” said Clementina. She physically described this phenomenon by clasping her hands together in her lap and sitting still.</p> <p>Some participants found life to be boring at 100 compared to their lives as younger adults. They had limited opportunities to do what they would like. “We had homes,” said Joyce, 100, describing how they had known better lives, which made it hard to accept the constraints of their current existence.</p> <p>In spite of these feelings, many of the participants continued to be busy and live life fully despite limitations. Jean, despite needing a wheelchair for mobility, continues to do people’s taxes for a volunteer organization, plays piano for church services and leads choirs within her facility.</p> <p>“I am constantly rebelling against my situation physically,” she said.</p> <p>The other women in this study also continued to challenge norms of what their age and disabilities meant. Joyce writes and submits short stories for publication, and has a poem in the war archives in Ottawa.</p> <p>Assisted living facilities often prioritize resident safety, but this can come at a cost to personal freedom. Some residents only leave their facility accompanied by a facility employee or a family member. Clementina rebelled against this restriction and at the age of 97, snuck out of her assisted living facility in a cab to go to the casino, pretending that she was going to meet her son.</p> <p>All of the participants put their life challenges into perspective. They all had lost spouses, friends and some had lost their children. “I was broken,” Clementina said about losing her husband.</p> <p>Christine, 102, was asked how she managed after losing her husband when her children were still small. “I am still here,” she said.</p> <h2>The future</h2> <p>Most of the centenarians had few plans for themselves for the future and were more interested in leading their day-to-day lives. Betty jokingly described the inevitability of her death and that she was “looking for the bucket.” Most described being prepared to die except for Jean, who laughed and said she didn’t have time to die. “I have too many plans.”</p> <p>The centenarians looked to the future of their families and the larger community and entrusted the next generation to make good choices.</p> <p>Participants in this study had long and interesting lives and continued to find meaning each day. This study supports the idea that older adults continue to lead engaging lives and that we need to support older adults to live their best lives at any age.</p> <p><em>This article was also co-authored by journalist and filmmaker Kelly-Anne Riess and retired nursing instructor Susan Page.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/206852/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heather-joyce-nelson-1440914"><em>Heather Joyce Nelson</em></a><em>, Assistant Professor of Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-regina-3498">University of Regina</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/beverlee-ziefflie-1445320">Beverlee Ziefflie</a>, Instructor, Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paula-mayer-1445321">Paula Mayer</a>, Associate Research Scientist, Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/finding-joy-at-age-100-talking-to-centenarians-about-living-their-best-life-at-any-age-206852">original article</a>.</em></p>

Caring

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Women forced to do shocking act for $100 rent reduction

<p>Two women in Queensland have claimed that they were forced to use a makeshift  "temporary shower" outdoors, while renovations are being carried out in the property's only bathroom. </p> <p>The pair, who were expecting a porta-loo style shower to use during the four-to-six weeks renovation, were horrified when they found out the makeshift shower was just a blue tarpaulin attached to the side of the house.</p> <p>Electrical cords and plumbing pipes can be spotted hanging down in front of the open cubicle, and has no curtain for privacy or a lock, raising questions for their privacy and safety. </p> <p>To make matters worse, the women revealed on Facebook that they initially tried negotiating for a rental discount of $200 per week during the renovations, but their landlord said "no way" offering only a $50 discount, "then $100 as final offer".</p> <p>Dr Chris Martin, Senior Research Fellow in the University of NSW's City Futures Research Centre, slammed the landlord for "a bunch of possible breaches". </p> <p>"There is a big question about whether the temporary arrangement meets the minimum standards that apply to rented premises in Queensland under the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act," he told <em>Yahoo News</em>. </p> <p>"Those minimum standards include that the bathroom and toilet facilities must provide privacy and that a premise must be weatherproof and structurally sound, and there's a standard about security," he added. </p> <p>He also claimed that "there's a bunch of possible breaches of the minimum standards of this temporary arrangement," as intruders could also potentially get in. </p> <p>The Senior Research Fellow also slammed the $100-a-week reduction in rent, calling it "grossly insufficient".</p> <p>"What a professional landlord who takes a bit of pride in themselves as a reputable housing provider would have done, is hire one of those portable bathrooms that come on a little trailer with a little heater and hook it up, and also do a rent reduction for the hassle of having to trot out to the trailer to shower," he said.</p> <p>"That would be the appropriate response."</p> <p>He encouraged the tenants to speak to Tenants Queensland or a local tenants advice service about what to do, adding that they could say that the current temporary arrangements could be deemed "unlivable or uninhabitable". </p> <p>"I suggest they should also be telling the landlord that this arrangement may place the landlord in a further breach of the agreement and for the liability for an even bigger rent reduction and the prospect of compensation if they don't do this better,"  Dr Martin told the publication. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Thief returns stolen truck with note of apology – and gifts!

<p>In the bustling world of Auckland cafés, where flat whites and smashed avocados reign supreme, one café owner recently found himself entangled in a plot that could rival a sitcom script.</p> <p>Varun Chada, the proud owner of Kati Street, had his beloved 4WD truck snatched right out from under his nose, leaving him in a state of disbelief that could only be rivalled by a magician's audience.</p> <p>Picture this: a sunny afternoon, the aroma of freshly brewed coffee wafting through the air, and Chada minding his own business when, suddenly, his trusty truck disappeared faster than a piece of cake at a weight loss support group meeting. The audacity! The cheek! Someone had the gall to pull off a vehicular heist right outside his beloved eatery.</p> <p>But it gets better.</p> <p>Four days later, as if the universe had decided to play a cosmic prank on poor Varun, the stolen truck made a triumphant return. Parked in the exact same spot, as if it had never embarked on a wild joyride. It was like the vehicular version of Houdini's vanishing act, only with less smoke and mirrors and more caffeinated confusion.</p> <p>To add a sprinkle of absurdity to the mix, the returned truck came with a heartfelt, handwritten letter of apology. Now, we applaud any criminal with the decency to apologise, but it seems this particular ne'er-do-well could use a grammar lesson or two. The apology note featured the word "sorry", albeit with a creative twist on spelling that would make any English teacher cringe.</p> <p>“I couldn’t believe it,” Chada <a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/watch-cafe-owners-stolen-truck-returned-with-sorry-note/VTWKKMRGR5AOTNIQGJNKBP6H7E/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">told The NZ Herald</a>. "The first time I thought I was losing my mind because I’d just walked inside, and the second time I rocked up, and it was parked there."</p> <p>As it turns out, the thief, in an attempt to excuse their vehicular misdeed, claimed to be a bit 'drunk' and in desperate need of a ride home. Because, you know, grand theft auto is a completely acceptable solution to a night out with one too many beers.</p> <p>"It was exactly where I’d parked it," Chada explained, "and I walked up to the window and there was a note inside it saying ‘hey mate sorry but I borrowed your car, was a bit drunk’ and none of us could believe it." </p> <p>But here's the twist that turns this tale into a comedy goldmine – the thief not only returned the truck unscathed but also left some new toys in the back for Chada's young son! It's like they momentarily transformed from a rogue car bandit to the world's most peculiar Santa Claus.</p> <p>Despite the surreal nature of the ordeal, Chada seems to be taking it all in stride. “I’m not condoning what they did is fine, but I mean, they gave it back and they said sorry, so, I don’t know, I’m just stoked to get it back, put it that way.”</p> <p>The saga has become the talk of the town, with Chada's Facebook and community pages buzzing with activity. Social media, the modern-day town square, has played a pivotal role in the unfolding drama, with hundreds of likes, shares and comments turning the café owner into an unintentional social media influencer.</p> <p>As for the truck, it's currently parked at Chada's house, awaiting the forensic scrutiny of the police. The investigation continues, but in the meantime, Aucklanders are left scratching their heads, wondering if their next caffeine fix might come with a side of unexpected vehicular shenanigans.</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Legal

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Debate sparked over list of top 100 cities on the planet

<p>The best 100 cities on the planet have been revealed, with three Aussie cities making the final list. </p> <p>The list was compiled by as part of an annual report by <a href="https://www.worldsbestcities.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Resonance Consultancy</a>, who rated major capital cities on three main factors: liveability, lovability and prosperity, with dozens of factors taken into account.</p> <p>These include educational attainment, GDP per capita, poverty rate, the number of quality restaurants, shops and nightclubs, walkability, the number of mapped bike routes, quality parks and museums, as well as ratings from TripAdvisor and Google. </p> <p>The top ten chart features four cities on the Asian continent, four in Europe and two in the U.S.</p> <p>Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane were all featured in the list, coming in at numbers 31, 35 and 57 respectively.</p> <p>Taking out the number one spot this year is London, dubbed the "capital of capitals" that "reigns over all global cities" as the best metropolis in the world. </p> <p>The study proclaims it as the most liveable and the most lovable mecca, solidified by its winning culture and education attainment.</p> <p>The report concludes, "Despite crippling Covid lockdowns and economic devastation. Despite Brexit. Despite a war in Europe. The city is more indomitable and part of the global discourse than ever. From the Queen's death, to last autumn's chaotic drama at 10 Downing Street that finally calmed down with Rishi Sunak becoming prime minister, only to take heavy local election losses this spring, London is rarely quiet these days."</p> <p>Here's the full list of top 100 cities in the world.</p> <p> 1 - London, England </p> <p>2 - Paris, France</p> <p>3 - New York, USA</p> <p>4 - Tokyo, Japan</p> <p>5 - Singapore</p> <p>6 - Dubai, United Arab Emirates</p> <p>7 - San Francisco, USA</p> <p>8 - Barcelona, Spain</p> <p>9 - Amsterdam, Netherlands</p> <p>10 - Seoul, South Korea</p> <p>11 - Rome, Italy </p> <p>12 - Prague, Czechia </p> <p>13 - Madrid, Spain </p> <p>14 - Berlin, Germany</p> <p>15 - Los Angeles, USA</p> <p>16 - Chicago, USA</p> <p>17 - Washington, D.C., USA</p> <p>18 - Beijing, China </p> <p>19 - Istanbul, Turkey </p> <p>20 - Dublin, Ireland</p> <p>21 - Vienna, Austria </p> <p>22 - Milan, Italy </p> <p>23 - Toronto, Canada</p> <p>24 - Boston, USA</p> <p>25 - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates </p> <p>26 - Budapest, Hungary </p> <p>27 - São Paulo, Brazil</p> <p>28 - Riyadh, Saudi Arabia</p> <p>29 - Stockholm, Sweden </p> <p>30 - Munich, Germany</p> <p>31 - Melbourne, Australia </p> <p>32 - Lisbon, Portugal </p> <p>33 - Zürich, Switzerland</p> <p>34 - Seattle, USA</p> <p>35 - Sydney, Australia </p> <p>36 - Doha, Qatar</p> <p>37 - Brussels, Belgium </p> <p>38 - San Jose, USA</p> <p>39 - Bangkok, Thailand</p> <p>40 - Warsaw, Poland </p> <p>41 - Copenhagen, Denmark </p> <p>42 - Taipei, Taiwan </p> <p>43 - Austin, USA</p> <p>44 - Oslo, Norway </p> <p>45 - Osaka, Japan </p> <p>46 - Hong Kong, China </p> <p>47 - Tel Aviv, Israel </p> <p>48 - Athens, Greece</p> <p>49 - Frankfurt, Germany</p> <p>50 - Vancouver, Canada </p> <p>51 - San Diego, USA</p> <p>52 - Orlando, USA</p> <p>53 - Helsinki, Finland </p> <p>54 - Miami, USA</p> <p>55 - Buenos Aires, Argentina </p> <p>56 - Hamburg, Germany </p> <p>57 - Brisbane, Australia </p> <p>58 - Kuwait, Kuwait</p> <p>59 - Las Vegas, USA</p> <p>60 - Montreal, Canada </p> <p>61 - Glasgow, Scotland</p> <p>62 - Shanghai, China </p> <p>63 - Rio de Janeiro, USA</p> <p>64 - Auckland, New Zealand </p> <p>65 - Atlanta, USA</p> <p>66 - Houston, USA</p> <p>67 - Busan, South Korea</p> <p>68 - Philadelphia, USA</p> <p>69 - Naples, Italy </p> <p>70 - Denver, USA</p> <p>71 - Nashville, USA</p> <p>72 - Manchester, England </p> <p>73 - Dallas, USA</p> <p>74 - Liverpool, England</p> <p>75 - Minneapolis, USA</p> <p>76 - Mexico City, Mexico</p> <p>77 - Minsk, Belarus </p> <p>78 - Lyon, France </p> <p>79 - Portland, USA</p> <p>80 - Rotterdam, Netherlands </p> <p>81 - Bogotá, Colombia</p> <p>82 - Kraków, Poland</p> <p>83 - Valencia, Spain</p> <p>84 - Santiago, Chile </p> <p>85 - Birmingham, England</p> <p>86 - New Orleans, USA</p> <p>87 - Bucharest, Romania</p> <p>88 - Leeds, England</p> <p>89 - Muscat, Oman </p> <p>90 - Ottawa, Canada </p> <p>91 - Cologne, Germany </p> <p>92 - Charlotte, USA</p> <p>93 - Calgary, Canada </p> <p>94 - Nagoya, Japan  </p> <p>95 - Düsseldorf, Germany </p> <p>96 - Hanoi, Vietnam</p> <p>97 - Gothenburg, Sweden </p> <p>98 - Sapporo, Japan</p> <p>99 - Bilbao, Spain </p> <p>100 - Baltimore, USA</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

International Travel

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Cruise ship forced to turn back after 100 passengers injured in storm

<p>The Spirit of Discovery cruise ship was forced to turn back after around 100 passengers were injured during a massive storm. </p> <p>Cruise company Saga have said that most of the injuries were minor, but five people had to be taken to hospital when the ship returned to England on Tuesday local time. </p> <p>One passenger told<em> BBC News</em> that a few passengers  "feared for their lives", when the storm hit the ship in the Bay of Biscay, off the French coast. </p> <p>"People were writing texts to their loved ones in case we capsized," they added. </p> <p>"The tone of voice in our captain... he was physically scared. We had crew crying. We had many passengers in awful states of fear." </p> <p>The passenger also claimed that that injuries included broken bones and cuts, with reports of furniture flying around and  people  being knocked off their feet, as the ship stopped moving and veered dramatically to one side as part of its safety manoeuvre. </p> <p>Another passenger, 75-year-old Jan Bendall, told the BBC that she and her husband were "holding on for dear life", and that it was overall a frightening experience. </p> <p>"It was quite frightening, I'm not somebody who frightens easily," Bendall said.</p> <p>"We were lucky - we're quite able-bodied, but I think some of the older people and people in their own cabins were quite worried," she added.</p> <p>The ship itself holds almost 1000 passengers and holds cruises for people over 50. </p> <p>Saga told the <em>BBC </em>that there had been "very limited" damage and the ship had "remained safe at all times." </p> <p>"While the weather is clearly beyond our control, we want to offer our sincere apologies to all those affected who are now safely on their way home in calmer seas," the spokesperson said.</p> <p><em>Images: Nine News/ Facebook</em></p> <p> </p>

Travel Trouble

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A rose in every cheek: 100 years of Vegemite, the wartime spread that became an Aussie icon

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hannah-viney-1153558">Hannah Viney</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p>There are roughly <a href="https://www.onlymelbourne.com.au/vegemite">22 million jars of Vegemite</a> manufactured in the original Melbourne factory every year. According to the Vegemite website, around 80% of Australian households have a jar in the cupboard.</p> <p>The cultural status of Vegemite is so enduring that, in 2022, the City of Melbourne Council <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/jun/01/smell-of-vegemite-factory-given-special-heritage-recognition-by-melbourne-council">included the smell of the factory</a> at 1 Vegemite Way, Fishermans Bend, in a statement of heritage significance.</p> <p>Vegemite first hit Australian supermarket shelves in 1923, but it took a while to find its feet.</p> <p>Indeed, the now classic spread may have failed into obscurity as “Parwill” if not for a very clever advertising campaign in the second world war.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YNiOZInvLog?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <h2>A product of war</h2> <p>Vegemite has German U-boats to thank for its invention.</p> <p>When the first world war began in 1914, Australians were big fans of <a href="https://www.marmite.co.uk/">Marmite</a>, the British yeast extract spread.</p> <p>As the Germans began sinking ships full of British supplies to Australia, Marmite disappeared from the shelves. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1108/JHRM-06-2015-0019">Due to the conditions of its patent</a>, Marmite could only be manufactured in Britain.</p> <p>As a result, there was a gap in the market for a yeast spread.</p> <p><a href="https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/walker-fred-8953">Fred Walker</a>, who produced canned foods, hired food technologist <a href="https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/callister-cyril-percy-5468">Cyril P. Callister</a> to create a homegrown yeast spread using brewer’s yeast from the Carlton Brewery.</p> <p>Callister’s experiments produced a thicker, stronger spread than the original Marmite. Callister’s inclusion of vegetable extracts to improve the flavour would <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/08949468.1993.9966612">give the spread its name, Vegemite</a>, chosen by Walker’s daughter from competition entries.</p> <p>Australians were wary of Vegemite when it first appeared on grocery shelves, perhaps due to brand loyalty to Marmite.</p> <p>To try and combat this, <a href="https://vegemite.com.au/heritage/">Walker renamed Vegemite “Parwill”</a> in 1928 as a play on Marmite: “if Ma might, Pa will”.</p> <p>This rebrand was short-lived. Australians were not any more interested in Parwill than they were in Vegemite.</p> <h2>A nutritious food replacement</h2> <p>In the 1930s, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1108/JHRM-06-2015-0019">Walker hired American advertiser J. Walter Thompson</a>. Thompson began offering free samples of Vegemite with purchases of other Kraft-Walker products, including the popular Kraft cheese.</p> <p>Kraft-Walker also ran limerick competitions to advertise Vegemite. Entrants would write the final line of a limerick to enter into the draw to win a brand new car.</p> <p>It would take another world war, however, before Vegemite became part of Australian national identity.</p> <p>The second world war also disrupted shipping supply routes. <a href="https://www.oldtreasurybuilding.org.au/work-for-victory/housewives-to-action/food-rationing/">With other foodstuffs hard to come by</a>, Vegemite was marketed as a nutritious replacement for many foods. One 1945 advertisement <a href="http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1106308">read</a>: "If you are one of those who don’t need Vegemite medicinally, the thousands of invalids and babies are asking you to deny yourself of it for the time being."</p> <p>With its long shelf life and high levels of B-vitamins, the Department of Supply also saw the advantages of Vegemite. The department began buying Vegemite in bulk and <a href="https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C1070486">including it in ration kits</a> sent to soldiers on the front lines.</p> <p>Due to this demand, Kraft-Walker foods rationed the Vegemite available to civilians. Yet the <a href="https://doi.org/10.1108/JHRM-06-2015-0019">brand increased advertisements</a>. Consumers were told Vegemite was limited because it was in demand for Australian troops due to its incredible health benefits.</p> <p><a href="http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1106308">One ad told Australians</a>: "In all operational areas where our men and those of our Allies are engaged, and in military hospitals, Vegemite is in great demand, because of its value in fighting Vitamin B deficiency diseases. That’s why the fighting forces have first call on all Vegemite produced. And that is why Vegemite is in short supply for civilian consumption. But it won’t always be that way. When the peace is won and our men come home, ample stocks of this extra tasty yeast extract will be available for everyone."</p> <p>This clever advertising linked Vegemite with Australian nationalism. Though most could not buy the spread during the rationing years, the idea that Vegemite was vital for the armed forces cemented the idea that Vegemite was fundamentally Australian.</p> <p>Buying Vegemite was an act of patriotism and a way to support Australian troops overseas.</p> <h2>Happy little Vegemites</h2> <p>In the postwar baby boom, Vegemite advertisements responded to concerns about the nation’s health and the need to rebuild a healthy population.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vLhk_wE4l2Q?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>This emphasis on <a href="http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article46442748">Vegemite as part of a healthy diet</a> for growing children would remain the key advertising focus of the next 60 years.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/collection/curated/happy-little-vegemites-jingle-1953">The ear-catching jingle was composed</a> in the early 1950s, first for radio and then later used in the 1959 television ad.</p> <p>The link between Australian identity and Vegemite was popularised internationally by Men At Work’s 1981 song Down Under, with the lyrics “He just smiled and gave me a Vegemite sandwich”.</p> <p>The 1980s also saw <a href="https://youtu.be/h5r3HAJh8es">the first remake of the 1950s television campaign</a>, re-colourising it for nostalgic young parents who had grown up with the original.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/h5r3HAJh8es?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>In February 2022, the first international arrivals welcomed back into Australia post-COVID were greeted with a DJ playing Down Under, koala plushies and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/feb/21/today-we-rejoined-the-world-hugs-tears-and-vegemite-as-australia-reopens-international-borders">jars of Vegemite</a>.</p> <p>On Vegemite’s centenary in 2023, the unassuming spread is now firmly cemented as an Australian cultural icon. Love it or hate it, Vegemite is here to stay. <!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/204917/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hannah-viney-1153558">Hannah Viney</a>, Researcher, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-rose-in-every-cheek-100-years-of-vegemite-the-wartime-spread-that-became-an-aussie-icon-204917">original article</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Restaurant's "brutal" note divides customers

<p>A restaurant has come under fire for their "brutal" note to difficult patrons, encouraging "privileged" customers who wish to "customise or modify" their menu, to stay home instead.</p> <p>A sign posted to the restaurant's front door urged customers with allergies to eat elsewhere as staff simply cannot "provide the service they require".</p> <p>While some applauded the restaurant's no-nonsense stance, others were shocked by the "rude and disgusting" message.</p> <p>"No means no. Are you one of the small group of people who have been living and entitled and privileged life?" The sign reads.</p> <p>"Maybe your mother has taken the onions out of your salad, put the dressing on the side, or substitute your vegetables. Here, however, all meals are served precisely the way we prepare them. We do not offer custom meals."</p> <p>"Remember, we are not your mother and we are definitely not genies that will make your every wish come true."</p> <p>Chef Jozef and restaurant owner Nathalie listed alternative choices for the "privileged" few including hiring a private chef, cooking for themselves "precisely the way you like", trying another establishment or accept their hospitality as it is offered. </p> <p>"We have been cooking for almost 50 years. We have many kind, friendly people, acquaintances and families that have been coming for many decades," they wrote. </p> <p>"So look around, it is a pleasure to see their happy smiles and provide them with our best food possible."</p> <p>The message also called out those with allergies and food sensitivities, encouraging them to take their business elsewhere. </p> <p>"It is simply not possible to guarantee each product used in this kitchen. Furthermore, we do not have the qualifications to provide you with the service you require," they said. </p> <p>The strongly worded sign caught the attention of many online, with some praising the restauranteurs as "honest" and "brilliant". </p> <p>"Amen, the public is not always right. And actually most of the time they're not. This establishment is well within their right to post this," one person commented. </p> <p>"You know from the very start how things are. It's one restaurant. If you don't like it, there are so many others you can go to instead... No need to have a sook. Just go elsewhere. Some of us would enjoy a restaurant like this," a second pointed out. </p> <p>Despite some support for the restaurant's honesty, others were taken aback with lots of people criticising the hard-line stance for being "snarky" and "rude".</p> <p>One disgruntled person commented, "If you are not able or willing to provide what your guests need or even give service, it might seem better to be honest but this message is rude and disgusting. Don't seek employment in service roles and then complain."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Facebook</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Adorable reason behind Chris Hemsworth’s red carpet cheat notes

<p>Chris Hemsworth has been married to Spanish actress Elsa Pataky for almost 13 years, and while she speaks fluent English, Hemsworth is yet to master her native tongue.</p> <p>On June 8, he was at the premiere of his Netflix film Extraction 2 and was caught with some Spanish words scrawled on the palm of his hand.</p> <p>The 39-year-old was then photographed with what appeared to be a cheat sheet, which he personally found hilarious.</p> <p>“After years of coming to Spain and being asked ‘has my Spanish improved’ I can safely say it’s in the palm of my hand,” he wrote on Instagram alongside the photo.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CtOqVmTJ1sx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CtOqVmTJ1sx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Chris Hemsworth (@chrishemsworth)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The actor revealed what was written on his hand during a guest appearance on local TV program El Hormiguero (Spanish for The Anthill).</p> <p>In the interview, Hemsworth also shared that his three children with Pataky - daughter India, 10, and twin sons Tristan and Sasha, 9 - find it funny that he doesn’t speak nor understand the language.</p> <p>“I try, but I can’t. My children laugh at me when I try to have a conversation with them in Spanish,” he admitted.</p> <p>“Sh*t, f**k, what happened? … I know that, that’s what my wife yells at me. The more she gets angry, the more she speaks Spanish.”</p> <p>Speaking to <em>Today</em> in 2017, Pataky said she had pretty much given up on teaching Hemsworth her native language, focusing on teaching their children instead.</p> <p>“He promised me, he said, ‘I’ll be speaking Spanish in two months.’ There we go, we have been together for six years,” Pataky – who speaks five languages: English, Spanish, Italian, French and Romanian - told <em>Today</em>.</p> <p>“That’s important, that’s what my mum did to me, talked in Romanian. I start to speak in English, I’m like, ‘I don’t express myself great.’ I got used to making an effort to speak to [the kids] in Spanish.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram</em></p>

Movies

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11 things people who live to 100 have in common

<h2>Centenarian similarities</h2> <p>Living to be 100 requires a fair amount of luck, it’s true. But people who make it past the century mark also share some healthy habits that we could all benefit from. Here’s what we know centenarians have in common.</p> <h2>They have good genes</h2> <p>If you have at least one parent who lived to 95 or older, you have a better shot at a healthier (and presumably longer) life yourself, a 2017 study published in <em>The American Journal of Cardiology</em> found. Researchers reported that subjects with at least one parent living past age 95 had 29 per cent lower odds of having hypertension, 65 per cent lower odds of having a stroke, and 35 per cent lower odds of having cardiovascular disease than those whose parents died before age 95. That held true even when – and here’s the surprising thing – there were significant differences in social-economic status, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle habits. “They were no more likely to eat low fat and only a small number were vegetarians,” says endocrinologist, Dr Sofiya Milman. While only about 25 per cent of longevity is related to genetics, that fraction seems to be the driving force behind how far those lifestyle habits (the remaining 75 per cent) can take you.</p> <h2>But genes aren’t everything</h2> <p>Longevity is complex. “Multiple genes are related to how long we live,” says professor of psychiatry, Dr Dilip Jeste. He’s also part of a team studying residents in Cilento, a region in Italy where the elderly live exceptionally long healthy lives. “In other words, if you have genes for certain types of fatal cancers, then the other genes that promote longevity may have less of an influence.” To hit the centenarian jackpot, an array of genes needs to be working together in your favour, but “there’s a lot more under our control than we think,” he adds. For example, take a set of twins with genes that predisposed them to lung cancer. If one smoked and one didn’t, the smoker would be 5.4 times more likely to develop lung cancer than the other, thus significantly hurting his chances at longevity.</p> <h2>They ‘postpone’ chronic illnesses</h2> <p>Chalk this up to those longevity genes. “Many centenarians get age-related diseases, such as cancer, at a much later age,” says Dr Milman. In a joint study between Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health, she and a team of researchers found that the age at which their centenarian subjects experienced certain diseases were delayed between 18 and 24 years. So could escaping serious illnesses by the time you reach 100 be an indication that you’ve got some more good years ahead of you? Perhaps. In a 2008 issue of <em>The Journals of Gerontology</em>, researchers who examined supercentenarians (age 110 and older) found that most were independent in terms of daily life activities at the age of 100 and few were in nursing homes or other forms of assisted living before the age of 105.</p> <h2>They stay physically active</h2> <p>Physical activity throughout life, including your senior years, is associated not just with good health, but longevity as well. A National Institutes of Health study reports that just 2.5 hours of moderate activity a week could extend your life by 3.4 years. It turns out, some of the regions around the world with standout longevity are close-knit communities in rural areas. For these folks, work is often more physical than a desk job, and they’re probably not spending hours in a car every day. The Okinawa Centenarian Study, which followed residents of the Japanese village that boasts one of the world’s highest centenarian ratios, notes that regular physical activity throughout most of the centenarians’ lives (in conjunction with other healthy habits) allowed them to have “impressively young, clean arteries.” They didn’t lift weights or run 5Ks; they simply made fitness part of their lifestyle, whether it was taking strolls or tending to the garden. And in Villagrande, Sardinia, where men live about as long as the women (which is a rarity – typically, women outlive men), researchers attribute their day-to-day physical activity – most were shepherds in this mountainous region – to the men’s impressive longevity.</p> <h2>They don’t overeat</h2> <p>Places brimming with 100-year-olds have an unspoken custom: eat mindfully. “I’m stuffed” is just not something you’d hear at the table. They also tend not to eat alone and instead share their meals with family and friends, notes Dr Jeste. In Okinawa, for example, elders may even say, before a meal, “Hara hachi bu,” a Confucian concept that means “eat only until your stomach is 80 per cent full.” The upshot? The elderly Okinawans consumed about 7900 kilojoules a day throughout their lives. Australians consume an average of 8700 kilojoules. Why is that a problem? It seems that over-eating over-stresses our metabolic systems, while kilojoule restriction (as long as we get the necessary nutrients) is associated with lower levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin sensitivity, and other conditions that speed up the ageing process. In fact, as authors of a joint Harvard-Salk Institute paper write, “At present, calorie restriction remains the most robust [i.e., evidence based] strategy for extending health and lifespan in most biological models tested.”</p> <h2>They eat healthy foods</h2> <p>The diets of these regions populated with healthy older people are different, but what they do have in common, says Dr Jeste, is what they don’t eat. “You don’t see a lot of high-fat or high-sugar foods.” For example, in Sardinia, the Mediterranean diet prevails; it’s rich in fish, fruits, vegetables, and healthy oils, all typically locally sourced. This is also true in Cilento, which boasts a diet especially rich in olives and rosemary. While Western foods have infiltrated Okinawa in recent years, its diet traditionally consists of only a little fish and pork, and plenty of vegetables, beans, tofu, seaweed, and complex carbohydrates, particularly purple and orange sweet potatoes.</p> <h2>They feel connected</h2> <p>In areas with higher-than-usual concentrations of centenarians, seniors are often an integrated part of their community. For some, church provides that connection. In Loma Linda, California, the only Blue Zone town (locations around the globe known for longevity and good health) in the United States, the seniors are Seventh-day Adventists; in Sardinia, they tend to be devout Roman Catholics. Religion encourages its believers to carve time during the week to go to church, which is not only a chance to strengthen their connection to God but to mingle with family and friends. As centenarian women interviewed in the Sardinia study repeatedly mentioned, it’s their ties to their family and God that’s kept them alive and kicking for so long.</p> <p>Maintaining quality social bonds, whether with fellow parishioners, family, or friends, have been linked to better health, while social isolation has been associated with an increased risk of inflammation in adolescents and worsened hypertension in old age. Studies published in the <em>Journal of the American Heart Association and Cancer</em> have also associated a strong social network (of the real, as opposed to virtual, kind) with better recovery from disease, including breast cancer and heart attack.</p> <h2>They feel respected</h2> <p>It’s probably not a coincidence that in areas with an unusually high number of centenarians, the culture is one that truly respects the elderly. In Sardinia, seniors are part of everyday society, not shuttled off into retirement and nursing homes. As a child of an elder interviewed in Cilento told researchers: “We always come to our father. He is still our point of reference and an example for us, for the way he takes things.”</p> <h2>They enjoy the outdoors</h2> <p>Part of the advantage of living in a rural, close-knit community is that you have open land, perfect for gardening or strolling. You can walk to a neighbour’s house (or even to work or run errands), and the air is fresh and clean. It’s pleasant. And while Loma Linda, California, is hardly a rural village, it’s populated by Seventh-day Adventists, who specifically promote getting outside in their official manual: “…we live intelligently in accordance with health principles of exercise, respiration, sunshine, pure air, use of water, sleep, and rest.”</p> <p>Why is being outside so helpful? “Multiple factors come into play,” says Dr Jeste. While some may partly credit vitamin D from sunshine for lengthening life, he believes that other factors may have more to do with it. “When you’re outdoors, you’re being active,” he says, whether you’re gardening or walking to or from somewhere. “You’re also looking at trees and nature. You’re more apt to interact with other people than feeling isolated. All this can promote happy feelings.” That, in turn, promotes a positive outlook on life.</p> <p><em>This article originally appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/11-things-people-who-live-to-100-have-in-common" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Retirement Life

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“They snack-shamed my three year old”: Mum fires up on school note

<p>An American mother has taken to social media to share her Pringle problem with the world. </p> <p>As Megan Peavey explained in her TikTok video, she’d sent her three-year-old son to school with some chips in his lunchbox to enjoy when snacktime rolled around. </p> <p>However, the staff at the school weren’t exactly of the opinion that Pringles were the right choice, going so far as to suggest Megan had purposefully done the wrong thing and given her child something ‘unhealthy’. </p> <p>“Look at what happened to me today,” she said in the now-private clip. “I sent my son to school with Pringles, which is a very age appropriate snack for a three year old.” </p> <p>She went on to explain that the school had responded by sending the boy home with his empty chip container, the line “please help us make healthy choices at school” written across it in bold black marker. </p> <p>“They wrote that on his Pringles cup,” she said, “they snack shamed my three year old, they snack shamed me, by writing that passive-aggressively on his trash.</p> <p>After asking viewers what they might do in that situation, she described how she got in touch with the school, calling them out on what they’d done, and they “did not label things as healthy and unhealthy” in their house “because that starts eating disorders”.</p> <p>“Do you think that’s ridiculous?” came her final question. “Because I f***ing do.” </p> <p>Megan later shared an update on the entire situation, outlining how she had spoken to the school’s director, and was told “it was passive-aggressive of me to keep sending Pringles after the note”. </p> <p>But, as she pointed out, she didn’t believe Pringles to be an ‘unhealthy’ snack like they did.</p> <p>“I consider things like Doritos, Cheetos, and Milky Way bars to be unhealthy,” she noted, before adding that she regularly sends her son to school with the likes of granola bars with his other snacks, and that she just would have appreciated the school speaking to her directly without leaping to the note. </p> <p>Megan stood her ground and didn’t apologise to the educators, before she “walked downstairs and I just checked my son out - we’re done there.”</p> <p>Her comments were flooded by fellow parents who were more than eager to back her up, with many noting that they may not have handled it so well themselves - one even wrote that she’d have sent her child with an entire tub and a handwritten “no thank you” the next day. </p> <p>“I cannot even explain how out of line and wild this seems to me - on the school's part," another said.</p> <p>“On his birthday…send pringles for EVERY kid in the class,” someone suggested.</p> <p>And one pre-k teacher even came forward to share her take, noting “never would I ever tell a family to 'make healthy choices'. My girls get a bag of chips with their sandwiches, along with fresh fruit."</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Woman slams parking note asking if she was “truly disabled”

<p dir="ltr">A driver has been left fuming after an “entitled” parking note was left on her mother’s car accusing them of misusing a disabled parking spot.</p> <p dir="ltr">Canberra resident Cheyenne took to <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/canberra/comments/12x8cr9/the_absolute_gall_to_leave_this_on_my_mothers_car/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reddit</a> to share her horrific experience and a photo of the note left on her mother’s car.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Hi, are you truly disabled,” the note read.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You both walked from your car like athletes. Please follow the rules.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Cheyenne who was left fuming at the situation captioned the post with “The absolute gall to leave this on my mother’s car in Gungahlin shops parking.”.</p> <p dir="ltr">She then explained: “My mother is disabled, her disability isn’t visible. She was legally given a disability parking permit because she is DISABLED! What a moron”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking to <a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/aussie-woman-slams-entitled-parking-note-how-dare-they-041811992.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Yahoo</em> News Australia</a>, Cheyenne said that “it’s frustrating” because her mum doesn’t look like she has a disability, even though she has “multiple”.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also explained that her mum has suffered with a polycystic kidney and liver. After a kidney transplant caused further health issues, she was granted a disability badge.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Because she has all of her limbs and is able-bodied, many people have the wrong idea and get entitled," Cheyenne added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Other Reddit users have shared similar experiences.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have arthritis in my spine and elsewhere – disabling, yet completely invisible. Have had old women yell at me for parking in the disabled spots, despite having a permit,” one user wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My mother recently had surgery so she’s not able to drive. Ordinarily she has a disabled permit anyway. I picked her up from a doctor's checkup and a woman gave me a serve for parking in the disabled bay as I was picking up my mum. People are so quick to judge,” wrote another.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m sorry you found this note on your car. There’s no need to ever justify why you have a disabled ‘sticker’. It’s no-one’s business but your own,” commented a third.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Reddit</em></p>

Caring

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Million dollar baby! Video of newborn covered in money sparks outrage

<p>The bizarre moment a new father covered his newborn child in $100 bills has gone viral, sending social media into a frenzy over the strange act. </p> <p>The video shows a sleeping newborn in a crib in a hospital's nursery, while an adult covers the baby boy in $100 bills. </p> <p>Despite a blanket covering the baby's body, many were quick to point out just how many germs and bacteria live on cash notes, with many worried about the child picking up an infection from the dirty money. </p> <p>According to <a href="https://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1914560_1914558_1914544,00.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer noopener">TIME</a>, paper money can reportedly carry more germs than a household toilet - and hundreds of species of microorganisms can live on the cash for days. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Man covers his new born baby with hundreds 😳 <a href="https://t.co/AFEYajIY6N">pic.twitter.com/AFEYajIY6N</a></p> <p>— Daily Loud (@DailyLoud) <a href="https://twitter.com/DailyLoud/status/1650660162930196485?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 25, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>People took to Twitter to show their outrage at the germs, with one person saying, "Bro just created a bacteria blanket for a newborn."</p> <p>Another shared the same sentiment, writing, "Unless those are brand new bills straight from the bank, he just covered his baby in a blanket of germs."</p> <p>Another person said, "Very very unhygienic I hope baby doesn't get sick..." while a fourth added, "Money is full of pathogens, I wouldn't compromise the baby's health."</p> <p>Others cut the happy parent some slack, saying it was a strange decision to shower the baby with money, but said they could understand the person's excitement over the bundle of joy. </p> <p>One person said, "Probably a proud first-time father and isn't thinking about how ridiculous this is. Down the line he'll show his baby the picture and they'll have a good laugh out of it."</p> <p>Another wrote, "An unusual way to wish prosperity to the newborn but again different stroke for different folks!"</p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Senior bank robber’s unexpectedly polite note

<p>A 78-year-old woman has caused some commotion with her bizarre Missouri bank heist. </p> <p>Bonnie Gooch, who already has two bank robbery convictions to her name, has collected a brand new charge - one count of stealing, or attempting to steal, from a financial institution - for her actions at the Goppert Financial Bank in Pleasant Hill. </p> <p>However, it’s the note that Bonnie had for the bank’s teller that has drawn the most attention around the world, with the senior bank robber allegedly stating that she “didn’t mean to scare” anyone. </p> <p>As <em>The Kansas City Star </em>reported, Bonnie supposedly entered the establishment just after 3pm, ‘disguised’ by her facemask and sunglasses. After approaching the counter, she is said to have handed over a note that demanded “13,000 small bills”, and another that read “thank you sorry I didn’t mean to scare you”.</p> <p>Prosecutors in Cass County said surveillance video from inside of the bank showed Bonnie banging on the counter and demanding that the teller hurry up. </p> <p>Bonnie made her getaway from there, but was ultimately caught by law enforcement officers, who reported that her car smelled of alcohol, and had money spread across its floor. Despite this, she is not facing any alcohol related charges. </p> <p>Pleasant Hill Police Chief Tommy Wright described the incident as “just sad’, and noted that Bonnie - as far as they were aware - had not been diagnosed with any notable ailments.</p> <p>“When officers first approached her, they were kind of confused ... it’s a little old lady who steps out,” he explained. “We weren’t sure initially that we had the right person.”</p> <p>He also noted that in his three decades as a police officer, he had never encountered a robbery suspect of a similar age to Bonnie. </p> <p>But it wasn’t Bonnie’s first rodeo, with Bonnie having been convicted for her actions in California in 1977, and again in another Kansas City suburb in 2020. Her probation for the latter only ended in November 2021. </p> <p>At the time of her 2020 theft, court documents cited by <em>Fox 4 </em>note that Bonnie’s son explained she had left the house “angry” and had declared that she was “going to rob a bank”.</p> <p>She is now being held on a $25,000 USD (~$37,500 AUD) bond at a Cass County detention centre for her 2023 crime. </p> <p>And as Police Chief Tommy Wright also revealed to <em>Fox 4</em>, he and his team were evaluating whether or not Bonnie would require further services as her case progressed through the criminal justice system. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Legal

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Sour note spoils Hilary Swank’s double delight

<p>Hilary Swank has delighted fans around the world by announcing the birth of her “miracle” twins. </p> <p>The 48-year-old actress took to her social media with an image of herself at sunset, a baby - a boy and a girl - cradled in each arm, overlooking the water. Or, as Hilary called it in her caption, “pure heaven”. </p> <p>“It wasn’t easy. But boy (and girl!) was it worth it,” she wrote, before wishing her 1.5 million  followers a happy Easter. </p> <p>Hilary shares her happy new additions with entrepreneur Philip Schneider, who she married in 2018. The two have made no secret of their desire to expand their family, with Hilary opening up multiple times in interviews over the years, most recently to <em>Good Morning America</em> in late 2022 while publicly revealing her pregnancy. </p> <p>"This is something that I've been wanting for a long time,” she said, “and my next thing is I'm gonna be a mum. And not just of one, but of two. I can't believe it. It's so nice to be able to talk about it and share it."</p> <p>And as she told <em>Extra</em>, also in 2022, the timing hadn’t previously been correct, with the actress focussed on her career and unable to find the right relationship. According to Hilary, “all the elements needed to come together and be right” for motherhood. </p> <p>“It’s just something I thought about even as a young girl,” she added. “It’s something that was on my mind, so it’s nice to be here and just be pregnant."</p> <p>In 2020, Hilary spoke to <em>The Daily Mail </em>about how she felt she was “very maternal”, and shared her belief that not having children did not have the power to render someone - like herself at that point - unable to be maternal. </p> <p>"I’ve heard a lot of women say that they’ve been told, 'oh, you’re kind of a failure,'” she said. “Or, you know, 'didn’t you come here to procreate?’. There are so many different ways to procreate!</p> <p>“Any type of mothering, any type of nurturing, is being a mother.”</p> <p>Now that Hilary has taken her own nurturing to the next level, after months of sharing the various milestones and moments in her pregnancy journey with her supporters, she has been met with an outpouring of love and celebration from friends, fans, and family. </p> <p>“Aaaaahhhh!!!!! Congratulations,” wrote an excited Viola Davis. </p> <p>“So happy to see you turkeys soaking up the sea, the sun and the salt air! Love you. Welcome to planet earth little ones. Hope you have a lovely stay here,” gushed actor Misha Collins. </p> <p>“Congratulations!!!!!!!!! God bless!” declared actress Lindsay Lohan, who had recently shared that she was also expecting her first child. </p> <p>However, not all were on board with Hilary’s joy, with some mean-spirited souls taking issue with the actress’s move into motherhood at 48. </p> <p>“When she is my age, those kids will be fourteen. Ack. Why? I don't understand people,” one complained. </p> <p>“And I don’t understand people that leave comments like this one!” a fed up supporter shot back, while another opted for a humble facepalming emoji. </p> <p>“These kids are going to be well cared for and well loved,” another pointed out. “What’s not to understand and celebrate??”</p> <p>“It's not your place to understand! She's waited her entire life to have these babies, it's nobody's business at what age she wanted to have them or was actually to have them either!!” said one more passionate fan, before they added the most important piece of advice the troll would be receiving, “just be happy for her or just shut up.”</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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“100 is just a number”: Centenarian’s sweet solution for a long and happy life

<p>When Shirley Goodman reached the milestone age of 100 years old, the last thing on her mind was slowing down. </p> <p>And the centenarian, who lives in Florida, has shared her advice for living a long and happy life - though what she had to say has taken many by surprise.</p> <p>Rather than stressing the importance of getting enough rest and following a strict diet, as we so often hear, Shirley believes her passion for having fun, doing what she enjoys, and eating her share of well-deserved treats to be the secret of her success. </p> <p>As Shirley told <em>Today</em>, “I feel great. 100 is just a number to me.”</p> <p>This is despite the two open-heart surgeries she has undergone - including a bypass, and the installation of a pacemaker and a stent. Shirley also experiences difficulties with her vision and her hearing, but nothing will keep her from embracing life and doing what she loves: dancing.</p> <p>“My legs are still working,” she said. “I’m an optimist. I try to do positive thinking all the time. That’s very important. I have a bracelet that says ‘Positivity’ on it. </p> <p>“I wear it every day and I try to stay positive.”</p> <p>She started dancing when she was just eight years old, even opening up her own dance school at 17. And while she did close down her business after marrying, she never gave it up, following her heart - and her dancing feet - in her free time instead. </p> <p>And in recent years, Shirley has taken that same passion to a whole new realm, establishing herself on the internet as ‘The Dancing Nana’. On Instagram, her family regularly share clips of Shirley dancing, and even participating in some viral internet trends, from doing ‘the floss dance’ to ‘the Tush Push’. </p> <p>It was the latter that propelled her to viral heights in 2019, when a clip surfaced of a then-96-year-old Shirley enjoying herself at her nephew’s wedding reception, outshining the younger guests on the dance floor with her spectacular footwork and twirls. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwLLINgB2uX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwLLINgB2uX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by The Dancing Nana (@the.dancing.nana)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I would advise people,” she told <em>Today</em>, “if they like music at all, to keep it in their lives and don’t just sit home in a rocking chair.”</p> <p>“I attribute [my long life] mostly to two things. One is my family,” she later added, “I have a wonderful, devoted family. </p> <p>“And the jazz, the music down here in Sarasota, and my tap dancing. That’s what keeps me going.”</p> <p>And while Shirley has dabbled in other pursuits, dancing still holds the key to her heart, as nothing else quite took with her, with the 100-year-old confessing that she “wasn’t crazy” about golf, and played tennis until she was 90. </p> <p>“I only walk as far as my mailbox,” she added, “which is about five minutes.” </p> <p>She does, however, enjoy her share of yoga. Every morning, she FaceTimes her daughter for a session, and the two spend some mindful time together from their respective homes in Florida and New York.</p> <p>Another thing Shirley very much enjoys is a sweet treat. And as some longevity experts admitted to <em>Today</em>, many who reach impressive ages like Shirley don’t often focus on their recommended share of vitamins and other ‘healthy’ snacks.</p> <p>“I don’t eat healthy food,” Shirley admitted. “My kids would holler at me … but when I hit 90, they stopped bothering me.”</p> <p>As Shirley’s 71-year-old daughter Joan added, they all just assumed Shirley was going to outlive them, but that “you would not want to write a cookbook based on her nutritional recommendations. I think the secret is to enjoy what you’re eating.”</p> <p>Top of Shirley’s most loved menu is “anything that’s cooked in batter”, or some chocolate and other sweets of the like. She enjoys a piece of chocolate after each of her meals, and views breakfast as the perfect opportunity for a chocolate chip cookie - however, you won’t catch her nibbling on any dark varieties, as milk chocolate with some nuts is what she prefers to reach for. </p> <p>And when it comes to home cooked meals with some vegetables, Shirley isn’t a fan. </p> <p>“I say ‘cook’ is a four letter word, so I don’t cook very much,” said. “I eat very small portions, but I eat everything and anything I like.”</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Desperate rental times call for desperate rental note-taking

<p>Renting can be difficult at the best of times, and as many around the world can attest, some landlords have little interest in the upkeep of the properties they’re letting, or in those paying hundreds to thousands of dollars a week to reside in them. </p> <p>And one renter has had enough, deciding it only right to warn whoever might take over their lease after them - a move that Councillor Jonathan Sriranganathan wholeheartedly backed, sharing the renter’s cheeky tactics to Facebook for all to see. </p> <p>“If you’re moving out of a rental and your landlord/agent is showing the property to new prospective tenants,” he wrote, “consider leaving some notes or posters like this in a few prominent locations around the home. </p> <p>“Legally, an agent or landlord shouldn’t be touching or interfering with them in any way.” </p> <p>He later edited the post to include that “this is an actual photo from a Brisbane renter”, and to tell everyone that “no, it wasn’t me - I live on a houseboat.”</p> <p>Attached was an image of the renter’s bold move - a series of notes stuck to what appears to be the inside of a door, each one highlighting a different issue they had faced while living there, with no solutions - or even attempts at one - mentioned. </p> <p>“NOTE TO SELF,” the first one announced, with the following going on to list everything from recurring mould (a common issue faced by renters), nearby construction and its consequent dust and noise, as well as “non-negotiable” rent rises.</p> <p><iframe style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjonno.sri%2Fposts%2Fpfbid0MToFp2CzdfGPKD6fq9GYUiiG6H1Wxe8d2GJ9cpYtNP9qYusvm79eX4LaetnNVSptl&show_text=true&width=500" width="500" height="716" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>People were quick to join the discussion - most were on the side of the renter, with one popular comment suggesting that “there should be a system that black lists landlords for breach of agreements, the same way tenants can be black listed for damage.</p> <p>“We also need a website to rate our property managers, landlords and properties.” </p> <p>“Yep. For far too long Landlords have had free reign to abuse their power with no sort of recording or accountability of their behaviour,” wrote one. “I’ve had some wonderful ones and some horrendous ones.” </p> <p>“I used to pull prospective tenants aside and fill them in,” shared another. </p> <p>“A few nervous and cranky landlords in this thread,” quipped one. </p> <p>Meanwhile, someone only had one thing to run by everyone, “so an artistic ‘beware ye, all ye who enter here’ wouldn't be beyond doing?” </p> <p>Others failed to see so much as the funny side - without even mentioning the underlying problems the renter and councillor were begging people to address - and instead tried to scare any like-minded renters from trying something similar. </p> <p>“And good luck with getting a positive rental reference after pulling a stunt like that,” said one. </p> <p>“If you don’t like the rental property just move on,” one suggested, leading many to suspect that they had never - or at least not in a long time - attempted to secure a rental property. </p> <p>“What I don't get is.... if something is causing you this much grief..... do it yourself or pay someone, if the realestate don't pay.... meh you can at least move on with your life for a few hundred dollars,” someone else said, apparently unaware of the limitations many renters are faced with when it comes to touching their rental. </p> <p>Councillor Sriranganathan returned to the post to share comments he’d made to <em>The Courier Mail</em>, adding that “too often, landlords and agents fail to disclose serious property maintenance and amenity issues when a lease is signed so they can trick tenants into paying more rent than a place is worth.</p> <p>“I think it’s great when outgoing tenants can inform future renters of property defects so they know the issues before they sign the contract. Perhaps there should even be a publicly accessible register where tenants can list maintenance issues that haven’t been rectified in order to hold property managers accountable.</p> <p>“Unfortunately the minor reforms (to minimum housing standards) … won’t do much to address unrectified maintenance issues, because many tenants are still afraid that if they request repairs or make complaints, their lease won’t be renewed.</p> <p>“It’s ridiculous to blame chronic maintenance issues on a shortage of tradies. The problem is that landlords who hoard houses are collecting tens of thousands per year in rent, but don’t care enough about their tenants’ welfare to repair dodgy power points or leaking roofs.”</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

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