Georgia Dixon

News

Thu, 11 May, 2017

7 things you never knew about M*A*S*H

7 things you never knew about M*A*S*H

Did you know M*A*S*H ran more than three times longer than the actual Korean War? It may have graced our screens for 11 years, but you might not know all there is to know about the classic TV series, M*A*S*H.

  1. No one wanted a laugh track – Despite pleas from the show’s producers, the network (CBS) went ahead and added in canned laughter. You might have noticed the laugh track growing quieter and quieter as the years progressed, and in the UK, the laugh track was removed entirely.
  2. CBS banned an “unpatriotic” episode – An idea for an episode was shot down by the network for being “unpatriotic”. It involved soldiers standing outside in the freezing cold to make themselves sick enough to be sent home – a tactic actually used during the war.
  3. The writers got back at complaining cast members – If ever an actor complained about their script (or asked for changes), the writing team would change the script to make it “parka weather”, making the cast swelter in jackets through days in excess of 32°C on their Florida film set.
  4. Patients were named after sports teams – After running out of names for patients visiting the hospital, the writers turned to baseball teams. In season six, four Marines are named after California Angels infielders, while in season seven, they named patients after the 1978 Los Angeles Dodgers.
  5. M*A*S*H hosted some big-name stars – Guest appearances on the show include Ron Howard, Leslie Nielsen, Patrick Swayze, Laurence Fishburne and Rita Wilson.
  6. The series finale broke records – The two-and-a-half-hour 1983 series finale, “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen,” was watched by a staggering 121.6 million people in the US alone – back then, that was 77 per cent of households with TV sets. It remains the most-watched episode of a TV show in US history.
  7. The time capsule didn’t stay buried long – In the series’ second-last episode, the M*A*S*H gang bury a time capsule. When the show wrapped up, the land used as the show’s set was sold, and a construction worker found the capsule just months later. After getting in contact with Alan Alda to return it, Alda told the worker he could keep it.
Tell us in the comments below, were you a fan of M*A*S*H?

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Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Calls for new COVID symptom to be officially recognised

Calls for new COVID symptom to be officially recognised

A skin rash can be the only symptom shown on people infected with COVID-19, a new study has found.

Researchers at King’s College London said skin rashes and ‘COVID fingers and toes’ can occur in the absence of any other symptoms, and should be considered as key diagnostic signs of the virus.

Data collected from 336,000 people on the COVID Symptom Study app revealed that 8.8 per cent of people testing positive for the disease in the UK had experienced skin rash.

An additional online survey of nearly 12,000 individuals with skin rashes found that 17 per cent of those with COVID-19 reported a rash as their first symptom of the disease. About one in five (21 per cent) of the people who were diagnosed with the virus had rash as their only symptom.

The rashes can come in three forms: hive-type rash with itchy, raised bumps; chickenpox-type rash with small, itchy red bumps; and ‘COVID fingers and toes’ with sore, reddish or purplish bumps on fingers or toes.

“Many viral infections can affect the skin, so it’s not surprising that we are seeing these rashes in COVID-19,” said Dr Veronique Bataille, consultant dermatologist at King’s College London and the study’s lead author.

“However, it is important that people know that in some cases, a rash may be the first or only symptom of the disease. So if you notice a new rash, you should take it seriously by self-isolating and getting tested as soon as possible.”

The recognised symptoms of COVID-19 by the World Health Organisation currently include fever, tiredness and dry cough along with loss of taste or smell, skin rash and discolouration of fingers or toes.

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Melody Teh

News

Thu, 26 Nov, 2015

Laid-back attitude could be bad for superannuation

Laid-back attitude could be bad for superannuation

According to research from University of New South Wales (UNSW) the laid-back Aussie attitude may be a significant obstacle to putting more into your superannuation and saving for future retirement.

UNSW academic Joanne Earl says that we would be better off spending time trying to understand where our own focus is in order to be more proactive with saving for the future.

Ms Earl has identified six personality types that influence how much we save.

1. Past negative

You focus on the negative things that happened in the past – but this is actually helpful with motivating you to save more. You save because you don’t want to make the same mistakes as others, such as seeing your parents underfunded in retirement.

2. Present hedonistic

It sounds contrary to common sense, but if you enjoy all that life has to offer right now this could make you a decent saver. You might be prompted to take measures to ensure you don’t experience a decline in your assets or lifestyle after you retire – after all, you want to keep on enjoying life no matter you age!

3. Future focused

You think about what’s to come, so it goes without saying that you’re a good planner.

4. Past positive

Being optimistic about the past might be preventing you from saving enough for the future. Seeing the past in a positive light may cause you to think there’s no need to plan, because things will work out just fine in the future.

5. Fatalist

It doesn’t matter what you do, what happens will happen. While you think about the future, you don’t believe there’s anything you can do about it. You’re unlikely to save because you don’t see the good in planning or saving.

Fortunately, once you work out which personality type you are and its potential flaws you can make changes to become more aware of your need to plan and save for your future.

To help you assess your category, UNSW posted an online survey here.

“If your top score puts you in one of the last two categories, then review your quiz results and apply the characteristics of whichever scores the highest out of past negative, present hedonistic or future focus to improve your planning,” says Earl.

Related links: 

In light of the pension changes, you need to consider this

Why are a record number of Aussies accessing super early?

Have you accounted for super in your will?

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Melody Teh

News

Thu, 26 Nov, 2015

Laid-back attitude could be bad for superannuation

Laid-back attitude could be bad for superannuation

According to research from University of New South Wales (UNSW) the laid-back Aussie attitude may be a significant obstacle to putting more into your superannuation and saving for future retirement.

UNSW academic Joanne Earl says that we would be better off spending time trying to understand where our own focus is in order to be more proactive with saving for the future.

Ms Earl has identified six personality types that influence how much we save.

1. Past negative

You focus on the negative things that happened in the past – but this is actually helpful with motivating you to save more. You save because you don’t want to make the same mistakes as others, such as seeing your parents underfunded in retirement.

2. Present hedonistic

It sounds contrary to common sense, but if you enjoy all that life has to offer right now this could make you a decent saver. You might be prompted to take measures to ensure you don’t experience a decline in your assets or lifestyle after you retire – after all, you want to keep on enjoying life no matter you age!

3. Future focused

You think about what’s to come, so it goes without saying that you’re a good planner.

4. Past positive

Being optimistic about the past might be preventing you from saving enough for the future. Seeing the past in a positive light may cause you to think there’s no need to plan, because things will work out just fine in the future.

5. Fatalist

It doesn’t matter what you do, what happens will happen. While you think about the future, you don’t believe there’s anything you can do about it. You’re unlikely to save because you don’t see the good in planning or saving.

Fortunately, once you work out which personality type you are and its potential flaws you can make changes to become more aware of your need to plan and save for your future.

To help you assess your category, UNSW posted an online survey here.

“If your top score puts you in one of the last two categories, then review your quiz results and apply the characteristics of whichever scores the highest out of past negative, present hedonistic or future focus to improve your planning,” says Earl.

Related links: 

In light of the pension changes, you need to consider this

Why are a record number of Aussies accessing super early?

Have you accounted for super in your will?

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

A two-year-old girl is dead and a six-year-old is in hospital with serious injuries after a car accident north of Adelaide.

A Mitsubishi SUV collided with a parked tyre truck at Shea-Oak Log on Wednesday morning around 10:45 am, according to police.

The two-year-old girl was a passenger in the car and died at the scene.

A six-year-old girl, who was also a passenger, was taken to Women’s and Children’s Hospital with serious injuries.

The driver, a 63-year-old woman, was airlifted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with serious injuries.

According to Seven News, the woman was the grandmother of the two girls.

Reports reveal that motorists attempted to help the two-year-old girl before paramedics arrived, and the toddler was cut from the car wreck by emergency services.

Following the accident, the Sturt Highway was blocked off for several hours for northbound traffic, while Major Crash investigators examined the scene.

“Major Crash Investigators want to speak with anyone who may have seen a light rigid tyre repair truck stopped on the northern side of the Sturt highway between 10.30 am and 10.43 am this morning,” SA Police said in a statement.

Ben Squires

News

Mon, 7 May, 2018

Mum's genius $3 Kmart hack

Mum's genius $3 Kmart hack

There’s no shortage clever ways you can reappropriate a bargain product at Kmart, and this latest hack might just change the way you pack for holidays forever.

A mother has shared the $3 Kmart hack that will give you a cute, convenient way to store shampoo, conditioner, shower gel and other essentials when packing.

Kmart -in -text

Image credit: Facebook

“Kmart sell these travel bottles in a 2 pack for $3. Filled them with shampoo, conditioner and shower gel and attached to a lanyard,” wrote Nat on Facebook.

“Perfect for my girls when we go camping to take to the showers. Also would be good for swimming lessons. I have ordered some stickers.”

With over 1,000 likes on Facebook already, Nat’s hack is a real winner.

Do you have any travel tips to share? 

Over60

News

Thu, 26 Mar, 2020

Ibuprofen and COVID-19 symptoms: Here’s what you need to know

Ibuprofen and COVID-19 symptoms: Here’s what you need to know

There’s been some confusion recently on whether we should or shouldn’t take ibuprofen to treat symptoms of COVID-19 – especially after the World Health Organisation (WHO) changed its stance. After initially recommending people avoid taking ibuprofen to treat symptoms of the new coronavirus disease, as of March 19 the WHO now does not recommend avoiding ibuprofen to treat COVID-19 symptoms.

The confusion began after France’s Minister of Solidarity and Health Oliver Véran announced on Twitter that taking anti-inflammatory drugs (such as ibuprofen or cortisone) could be a factor in worsening a COVID-19 infection. He recommended that paracetamol should be taken instead to treat the associated fever.

At the moment, the NHS only recommends taking paracetamol for COVID-19 symptoms, even though it admits there is no strong evidence showing ibuprofen worsens symptoms. The BMJ also states that ibuprofen should be avoided when managing COVID-19 symptoms.

Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). NSAIDs, including ibuprofen, normally have three main uses: they help with inflammation, pain, and fever. People might also take them for inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and for pain. However, paracetamol can also help treat pain and fever.

Fever is a higher than normal body temperature, and is one of the signs of COVID-19, along with a persistent cough and shortness of breath. The body develops a fever as a defence mechanism, where the immune system produces a chain of molecules that tell the brain to make and keep more heat inside to fight the infection.

While getting fever during an infection is part of the body’s defence mechanism, a serious rise in body temperature can be fatal and should be treated. Having fever is also uncomfortable because it often comes with shivering, headaches, nausea and stomach upsets. Taking an anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen or paracetamol will bring down a high temperature by lowering some of the fever molecules. However, doctors who compared the two in 2013 suggested taking paracetamol over ibuprofen for normal chest infections because they found a small number of people’s illness got worse with ibuprofen.

Cause for concern?

Some of the reasons that there’s a concern taking ibuprofen will make COVID-19 symptoms worse comes from previous studies that have shown people with other serious chest infections (such as pneumonia) experienced worse symptoms and prolonged illness after taking an NSAID, including ibuprofen.

But it’s difficult to say if taking ibuprofen in these instances directly causes worse symptoms and prolonged illness, or if it’s because taking ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatories help manage pain, which may hide how serious the illness is and could stop people from asking for help earlier – delaying treatment. Or, it might be to do with ibuprofen’s anti-inflammatory effects. One theory is that anti-inflammatory medicines can interfere with some of the body’s immune response, although this is not proven for ibuprofen.

However, two French studies warn doctors and pharmacists not to give NSAIDs when they see signs of chest infections, and that NSAIDs shouldn’t be given when children are infected with viruses. There’s no agreement on why ibuprofen could make chest infections worse, but both studies reported worse outcomes in patients who had taken a NSAID to treat their condition.

A recent letter to The Lancet suggested that ibuprofen’s harm in COVID-19 is to do with its effect on an enzyme in the body called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) – though this has yet to be proven. This caused additional worries for patients taking angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for existing heart conditions. Several leading organisations have rightly warned patients not to stop taking their regular medicines in light of unconfirmed theories.

Because novel coronavirus is a new type of virus, there is currently no evidence proving that taking ibuprofen will be harmful or make COVID-19 symptoms worse. Research in this area is developing fast, but with so much misinformation about COVID-19 and ibuprofen use, the cautious approach is to avoid ibuprofen with COVID-19 if at all possible – especially for those with pre-existing health conditions. Anyone who thinks they might have COVID-19 can consider using paracetamol instead of ibuprofen for managing their fever, unless they’re told otherwise by their doctor or pharmacist.

In the meantime, the UK’s Committee of Human Medicines and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) have been asked to review all the evidence to understand ibuprofen’s impact on COVID-19 symptoms. Naturally, people already prescribed an anti-inflammatory drug for a health condition should ask their doctor’s opinion and not just stop their medication.

It’s worth noting, however, that ibuprofen and NSAIDs can trigger stomach ulcers and indigestion and might not be suitable for some people with heart disease, kidney and liver problems, and asthma, as well as people over 65, and those who drink more alcohol. These drugs should not be used in people with very high blood pressure, and women trying to get pregnant or already pregnant.

Paracetamol, which can also treat pain and fever, may be preferred. Though it takes up to an hour to work, it’s safe to use for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, and can be taken with or without food. Some people need to take extra care with paracetamol and should speak with their doctor or pharmacist first, for example if they have liver or kidney problems.

The usual dose of paracetamol for adults is one or two 500 milligram tablets up to four times in 24 hours, with at least four hours in between doses. Most people use a syrup to give paracetamol to children. How much to give depends on your child’s age, but again paracetamol should only be given up to four times in 24 hours, with at least four hours between doses.

Pharmacies have been running short of paracetamol and some shops have been rationing sales. For those exhibiting symptoms, a box of 32 tablets should last for at least four days. At this time of crisis, it’s important people make sure they’re not stockpiling medicines unnecessarily and depriving others who are equally in need of paracetamol and other vital drugs.The Conversation

Parastou Donyai, Professor and Director of Pharmacy Practice, University of Reading

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Ben Squires

News

Wed, 28 Oct, 2015

Colouring books for adults? They’re selling like hotcakes

Colouring books for adults? They’re selling like hotcakes

British illustrator, Johanna Basford, was working as a commercial illustrator for big brands when she had a novel idea: colouring books for adults. Basford who describes herself as an “inky illustrator” loves creating intricate black and white scenes.

“For years people have been telling me that they would like to colour my monochrome creations, so I pitched [Laurence King Publishing] a colouring book for grownups,” she said. “At that time colouring for adults wasn’t the global trend that it is now, so they were understandably a bit sceptical.”

However, once Basford sent them a few pages of her artwork, the editors were sold. Basford went on to create Secret Garden, an adult colouring book inspired by Scotland’s Brodick Castle Gardens, where her grandfather was the head gardener.

“The formal rose gardens of the castle, the Bavarian summer house and lily-studded ponds were wonderful places to play as a child; a great place to cultivate a wild imagination!” she said.

Basford’s intricate creations have plenty of tiny hidden detail to entertain adults and spark their creativity.

“I think everyone has a creative spark; they just need the opportunity to let it flourish,” she explained. “A blank sheet of paper can be daunting, but a colouring book has the outlines already there, making it easier to pick up a pencil and begin making your mark.”

Image credits: Johanna Basford

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

A two-year-old girl is dead and a six-year-old is in hospital with serious injuries after a car accident north of Adelaide.

A Mitsubishi SUV collided with a parked tyre truck at Shea-Oak Log on Wednesday morning around 10:45 am, according to police.

The two-year-old girl was a passenger in the car and died at the scene.

A six-year-old girl, who was also a passenger, was taken to Women’s and Children’s Hospital with serious injuries.

The driver, a 63-year-old woman, was airlifted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with serious injuries.

According to Seven News, the woman was the grandmother of the two girls.

Reports reveal that motorists attempted to help the two-year-old girl before paramedics arrived, and the toddler was cut from the car wreck by emergency services.

Following the accident, the Sturt Highway was blocked off for several hours for northbound traffic, while Major Crash investigators examined the scene.

“Major Crash Investigators want to speak with anyone who may have seen a light rigid tyre repair truck stopped on the northern side of the Sturt highway between 10.30 am and 10.43 am this morning,” SA Police said in a statement.

Alex O'Brien

News

Tue, 31 May, 2016

Beautiful poem captures the pain of Alzheimer’s

Beautiful poem captures the pain of Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the cruellest afflictions someone can suffer. However, the key for many loved ones of Alzheimer’s sufferers lies in finding beauty and hope even in the darkest times. This achingly beautiful poem perfectly captures the pain and heartbreak of Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Alzheimer’s Wing

As insubstantial as torn cicada wings

their old bodies are shot through with light,

the fallen leaves of autumn blown loose,

adrift and swaying in a fluky breeze of

incomprehension and the moment’s present.

 

The once beautiful boys in uniforms

and photographs, the doctor, general,

ex-headmaster, larrikins and wits,

sunny as spring and smiling, now stand

in tracksuit pants and food dashed shirts,

shuffle corridors and sitting rooms,

gather against the locked glass door,

uneasy ghosts in waiting, in search of home,

lost beds, watches, false teeth, cigarettes,

wives, daughters, memories, reasons why.

They play games or sit in vinyl chairs and snooze.

 

Sun through afternoon and picture windows

paints haloes on their heads, stipples skin

stretched on frames of bone, the light and shade

of our benevolent confinement.

 

What’s your favourite poem? Let us know in the comments below.

Written by Brook Emery, extracted from “With My Father-In-Law”.

This is an extract from Falling And Flying: Poems On Ageing, Edited by Judith Beveridge and Dr Susan Ogle, Brandl & Schlesinger.

All proceeds from book sales will go directly to the Penney Ageing Research Unit at the Royal North Shore Hospital. For Book sales, please email sogle@med.usyd.edu.au. For Donations, please click here.

Related links:

This couple won’t let Alzheimer’s erase 70 years of love

Beautiful photo series captures the pain of dementia

New research links Alzheimer's risk with negative thoughts about ageing

MREC-TAG-HERE

Over60

News

Wed, 24 Jun, 2020

Defund the NSW Police Force Movement gains traction

Defund the NSW Police Force Movement gains traction

The recent Stop All Black Deaths in Custody rally brought central Sydney to a standstill, as citizens from all backgrounds came together to call for an end to the systemic racism and violence in the NSW policing and criminal justice systems.

Law enforcement in this state developed out the British colonising project, at a time when its focus was on dispossessing First Nations peoples from their lands, whether that be via fatal force or paternalistic policy.

The colonial legacy in the modern Australian system is all-pervasive. A stark reminder of it was the sight of NSW police surrounding the Captain Cook statue in Sydney’s Hyde Park last Friday night, as Black Lives Matter protesters were overwhelmingly outnumbered by the presence of officers.

NSW Coalition governments of the last decade have had a tough on crime focus. And in late 2018, state premier Gladys Berejiklian upped the numbers of police by 1,500 officers, which was the largest increase in NSW policing in 30 years.

Yet, with the NSW population being just over 7.5 million people, there are questions to be asked about why such a comparatively small population would warrant NSW police being one of the largest forces in the English-speaking world.

And with the brute force of policing systems under the microscope right now, it may be high time to contemplate defunding the NSW police.

The global campaign

Calls to defund police aren’t new. But, the campaign has gained recent attention sparked by the graphic footage that showed African American man George Floyd being killed in public by a group of Minneapolis police officers, who were acting as if they were simply doing their duty.

Defunding the police entails divesting funds from police forces and reallocating the finances towards investment in community-based forms of ensuring public safety and community support.

Following the killing of Floyd, the Minneapolis City Council voted to dismantle its police department as it was deemed nonreformable. And council president Lisa Bender told CNN, that councillors are looking towards “a new model of public safety” that actually serves its purpose.

The Australian context

UTS Jumbunna Institute professor Chris Cunneen explained in a recent article that defunding would work differently in Australia, as this country doesn’t have separate police departments funded by councils, but rather reimagining the system would involve federal, state and territory governments.

The professor of criminology points out that the defund the police campaign poses questions as to whether the current investment in policing and prisons is the way to go, or if alternatives, such social housing and domestic violence services, could lead to a reduction in crime.

An example of how it would work, Cunneen outlines, is that instead of sending police out to deal with people suffering a mental health crisis – which often ends in violence – funds could be diverted towards establishing a mental health emergency response unit that could be deployed.

And the professor has further explained that community-based models are already operating in many Aboriginal communities, whereby locals take part in night patrols that ensure public safety, prevent harm and also provide assistance to those in need.

The overpolicing of First Nations

The fact that the NSW Police Force continues to operate with racial bias towards First Nations people is readily apparent when considering the statistics.

The NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) custody report for the end of March this year reveals that 43 percent of those in NSW juvenile detention facilities were First Nations youths, yet they only account for around 5 percent of the state population under 18 years old.

Then there’s the NSW adult prisoner population. Of the 13,525 inmates at the end of March, 3,437 were Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people, meaning 25 percent of that population was First Nations, while Indigenous people only account for around 3 percent of the overall populace.

The Guardian has revealed that despite a cannabis cautioning scheme operating in NSW, between 2013 and 2017, police took 80 percent of Aboriginal people found with small amounts of cannabis to court, which compared with just 52 percent of non-Indigenous people found with the drug.

Last year’s UNSW report Rethinking Strip Searches by NSW Police outlines that despite only making up 3 percent of the state population, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people account for 10 percent of those police strip search in the field, and 22 percent of those strip searched in custody.

And it’s an advantageous moment to reflect on the fact that NSW police has increased its use of strip searches by twentyfold since 2006.

This has particularly been the case over the last five years, to the point where peak hour commuters at Central Station are now greeted with screens used to conduct these searches.

A colonial legacy

But, considering the NSW Police Force is so weighed down by historical prejudice, it might be asked if the Minneapolis model of dismantling the institution and building a new community-based body that doesn’t harbour prejudicial attitudes towards certain sectors of society is needed.

As Melbourne Law School senior fellow Amanda Porter told Sydney Criminal Lawyers last week, the policing bodies charged with dealing with the Aboriginal resistance to colonisation were all incorporated into the current NSW police system.

The policing academic added that the early NSW Mounted Police has been described as “the most violent organisation in Australian history” by local historian Henry Reynolds.

Inherent prejudice

A recent incident in a Surry Hills park and its aftermath reveal that the prejudice in the current policing system just might be too deeply ingrained.

Footage shows a NSW police constable kick the legs out from under a 16-year-old Aboriginal boy and throw him face first onto the ground.

And while the teenager did make a verbal threat towards the officer, it was part of an exchange they were both partaking in.

Indeed, the boy posed no actual physical threat to the constable whatsoever and yet the officer resorted to violence.

The constable felt emboldened enough to do this just a week after the Floyd killing, when the entire globe was focused on police violence towards people of colour. And two days later, NSW police commissioner Mick Fuller simply put the incident down to one of his officers having “a bad day”.

So, when you have the top cop casually dismissing an assault upon a First Nations teenager by one of his officers, it’s quite obvious that there’s something rotten in the state of the NSW Police Force.

Written by Paul Gregoire. Republished with permission of Sydney Criminal Lawyers.  

Basmah Qazi

News

Thu, 25 Oct, 2018

The brilliant $8 Kmart hack for kids scared of going to the toilet at night

The brilliant $8 Kmart hack for kids scared of going to the toilet at night

What was supposed to be a hilarious Kris Kringle gift actually turned out to be a genius hack for those who are trying to help children overcome their biggest fears.

Savvy mum, Mel Thitchener, was perusing through the Christmas aisle at her local Kmart and came across the genius Toilet Seat Night Light, and in true Kmart fashion, it’s as cheap as chips with a price tag of $8.

Speaking to Mamamia, she said: “It is just a jokey gift from the Kmart Kris Kringle section, but I thought it could be used in a more practical fashion all year round.”

The light – which turns on once it senses movement – is installed onto the toilet and according to Mel, has made her children more confident when going to the bathroom during the middle of the night.

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The stuff you buy to keep your "kids" happy 😂 #forthekid #honestly #lightuploo #lightuptoilet #toiletlight

A post shared by Natalie Kennedy (@webbedys) on Sep 20, 2018 at 7:08am PDT

“We’ve had the light for the last two nights and my kids – five years old and nine years old – are really happy with it.

“It saves blinding yourself by turning on the full light and the motion sensor and automatic turn off means you aren’t wasting batteries all night.”

The mother-of-two was so impressed, she took to Facebook to share her hack with other mothers currently in the same situation.

After posting on Kmart Mums Australia Facebook group, Mel discovered that the hack has already proven to be a huge success with mums commenting on what a help it has been for toilet training.

“We have one and it’s great. No more sitting on pee on the seat or stepping in pee after my little man goes to the loo in the middle of the night," one mum said.

“Perfect for little ones going to the toilet at night!!!” wrote another.

“This would be great for toilet training!” said one user.

Since Mel posted the affordable hack, it has garnered over 350 comments and has been liked 1700 times with mums flocking to Kmart to pick one up for themselves.

The toilet light hooks onto the toilet bowl under the seat and has various different colour settings so you can go from blue to pink in the matter of seconds.

The light is currently not available online, but customers are advised to contact their local Kmart to enquire about stock levels.

What do you think about this nifty toilet hack? Let us know in the comments below.

Michelle Reed

News

Fri, 22 Jan, 2016

Sugar-free carrot cake muffins

Sugar-free carrot cake muffins

For a healthier alternative to a classic, try this sugar and dairy-free carrot cake muffins. We promise you won’t even notice the difference!

Makes: 12

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups grated carrot
  • 1 cup wholemeal flour
  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • ½ cup walnuts, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup chopped dates
  • ½ cup mashed banana
  • ¼ cup oil (olive, coconut or macadamia), plus 2 tsp extra
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon allspice
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180°C.
  2. Place carrot, flour, almond meal, baking powder and walnuts in a large bowl.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and blend with a stick mixer until smooth (or us a blender).
  4. Pour the wet mixture into the dry ingredients and use a wooden spoon to fold through. When batter has come together, set aside for 5 minutes to thicken,
  5. Use the extra oil to grease a muffin tray (or use muffin cups). Spoon the batter into the cups and bake for 25-30 minutes. Muffins are cooked when a skewer comes out clean.
Source: The Healthy Mummy

Related links:

Apple and strawberry pie

Spiced apple and fig jam

Gluten-free chocolate pikelets

 

Georgia Dixon

News

Thu, 19 Jan, 2017

How to focus on what’s important

How to focus on what’s important

Sophie Scott is the national medical reporter for the ABC, in addition to being a prominent public speaker. Sophie has won numerous awards for excellence in journalism and is the author of two books, Live a Longer Life and Roadtesting Happiness.

Why is it that your perspective on life can change so dramatically when you change your environment?

I have been fortunate enough to take some time away from my day-to-day routine. What I realised is that clear air, away from all the distractions, gives you space to reconsider what is important and meaningful to you.

Getting away from distractions can allow you to think more clearly, to quieten your inner thoughts so you can really listen to your intuition and authentic thoughts. But our modern world conspires against this quiet reflection.

We are so switched on with phones, emails, notifications, and devices pinging to get our attention. And a “fear of missing out” stops us from turning it all off and just giving our full and interrupted attention to what we are doing at that moment.

Neuroscience tells us that for every distraction, when we are disrupted or have to stop midway through a task, it can take up to 15 minutes to get back on track and focussed again. We fear we are “missing out” if we are not connected 24/7 but what I have realised that if we are plugged in and connected, what we are missing out on is a deeper sense of peace and calm.

One of the leadership experts I have been reading is Canadian author Robin Sharma. He’s a lawyer who became overwhelmed with the rat race and left that fast-paced life to write and lecture on leadership.

One of his key messages is that “focus is more valuable than IQ”. “An addiction to distraction is at the end of your creative production,” he writes.

I have come to believe that distraction really is the enemy of creativity. I think it’s one of the reasons that we find it hard to stick to the goals that we set, whether it’s to lose weight, succeed at work or be a better partner.

Think about the most successful person you know who is living an authentic life, according to their values. The great communicators, leaders and innovators, whether it’s Oprah Winfrey or Steve Jobs, were all completely focussed on their specific goals. They ignored distractions and instead stuck with what they believed in, even when obstacles were put in their way.

We can all bring that same sense of focus and quiet determination to whatever we want to achieve.

But how can we do it? Mindfulness and meditation is one good way to teach our brains to filter out the distractions and to boost our ability to focus. (I write about it in my book Roadtesting Happiness.)

Meditation is a proven technique to tame that voice in your head, to weed out the negative thoughts and to focus, really focus on what’s important. The science on the benefits of meditation to boost focus and reduce stress is unequivocal.

According to scientist Sara Lazar, from Massachusetts General Hospital, regular meditation can directly alter and structure and functioning ability of the brain.

“We found that regular meditation can lead to structural changes in the part of the brain governing sensory, cognitive and emotional processing,” she said.

So while I can’t promise you that I won’t check my social media, before I do, I will stop and think, “what am I giving up by doing this, take a few deep breaths and ask myself is there a more meaningful use of my time”.

What steps have you taken to feel more focused and less distracted in your busy world?

Related links:

How to create a life with meaning

Aristotle’s advice to live your best life

5 signs to help you spot a narcissist

Courtney Allan

News

Fri, 10 May, 2019

LEGO Masters star Maddy opens up about her challenging past

LEGO Masters star Maddy opens up about her challenging past

For some, appearing on the hit new show LEGO Masters might be enough of a childhood dream come true, but not for Maddy.

Maddy appears on the show with her husband Jimmy, but for the Melbourne-based children’s entertainer, she wanted to do more.

Maddy has written a book for kids, which she hopes will teach young people, their families and schools the signs of an eating disorder.

She told 9Honey Celebrity:

"It's called When Ana Came to Stay and it's a kid's insight into eating disorders and the challenging things that come with that," she explained.

"It's based on personal experience and I'm hoping that this book can reach out and help even just one kid."

Maddy was only nine years old when she started to develop her own eating disorder.

"I was really young," she says. "I wasn't hospitalised until I was a teenager so throughout those early years, I started developing really toxic behaviours and habits around food and they were really subtle changes.

"I've gone through my fair share of therapy and counselling wondering 'what started it, what caused it?' and I think it's a combination of being a really sensitive kid growing up and a perfectionist as well.

"I was always wanting to be the best in school, in sports, in all of these things and sort of push myself and then paired with low self-esteem and having role models that I wanted to look like -- that's how it started."

However, it wasn’t until Maddy was a teenager that she realised that she had an eating disorder.

"It's such a challenging disease because it does sneak up and it takes time to develop and the next day you're in hospital -- or even worse," she says.

She’s written a book to help young boys and girls who risk going through the same things she went through.

"This book is for me wanting to get the message out to young kids, families and schools that if there are young people struggling that we can nip things in the bud before they become bad," she says.

If you’re worried about yourself or someone you care about, call The Butterfly Foundation on 1800 334 673. 

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Meghan Markle gives speech for first time since leaving royal family

Meghan Markle gives speech for first time since leaving royal family

Meghan Markle has given her first speech since stepping down as a senior member of the royal family.

The Duchess of Sussex virtually addressed via webcam at the United Nations’ annual virtual Girl Up leadership summit on Tuesday.

Girl Up has a presence in 120 countries and works to “empower women and inspire them to get involved in social change,” and Meghan contributed by giving advice on how to deal with critics and “push through the fear”.

More than 40,000 people tuned in around the world.

“Your generation is often referred to as digital natives, and you understand that our online world has the power to affirm and support as much as it does to harm,” the 38-year-old said during her speech.

“We are not meant to be breaking each other down; we are meant to be building each other up. So use your voice both on and offline to do just that – build each other up, support each other.”

Markle urged the people watching to make use of their own voices to “drown out the noise” and the critics they might face as they fight to make change.

“There will always be negative voices and sometimes those voices can appear to be outsized, and sometimes they can appear to be painfully loud,” she said.

“You can and will use your own voices to drown out the noise. Because that’s what it is – just noise. But your voices are those of truth. And hope. And your voices can and should be much louder.”

Royal Commentator Victoria Arbiter informed Sunrise that the event was particularly “significant” as it is “setting the stage for the type of work Meghan is going to want to do moving forwards.”

“This is an opportunity to launch herself as a philanthropist and as an authority on this topic on this side of the atlantic,” she said.

“I think we’re going to see a lot more of this going forwards.”

Arbiter went on to say Harry and Meghan are in a lucrative position.

“Let’s take an event in the future in which she could be paid... a number of experts in the field have said that individually Harry or Meghan could command upwards of $500,000 for an appearance,” Arbiter said.

“If they appear at something together, they could be looking at $1,000,000.”

“If Harry and Meghan want to maintain their lifestyle then they’re going to need to make some significant money moving forwards, and public speaking is the most lucrative way to do that.”

Danielle McCarthy

News

Tue, 12 Dec, 2017

5 hacks that will make holiday entertaining so much easier

5 hacks that will make holiday entertaining so much easier

The holidays are a beautiful time of gatherings with family and friends but unfortunately, the pressures of hosting can leave many feeling stressed and exhausted during the festive season.

To decrease the load of entertaining, follow these home hacks.

1. Set up a first aid station

If there is a clear first aid station, guests can tend to themselves instead of asking you for a product every time an accident happens. Key things to include in your first aid station include band-aids, burn spray, sunscreen and insect repellent.

2. Designate a relaxation room

Choose one room in your house that is away from everyone for anyone who needs a break from the hustle bustle or who isn’t feeling well. Make sure there is a fan in the room and a blanket for the guests’ comfort.

3. Tie a bottle opener to the esky

To avoid being asked multiple times for a bottle opener, tie it to the esky or drinks tub before the guests arrive. It will be one less thing for you to worry about on the day.

4. Make edible dessert cups

There are many recipes to make dessert cups or you can opt for waffle ice cream cones if you don’t have time to make anything. These dessert cups will give you an easy dessert that involves no washing up.

5. Use cupcake liners to keep bugs away

If you’re entertaining outside, turn cupcake liners upside down and place them over drinks to keep flies away. You can even punch a hole through them for straws!

What are your home hacks for holiday entertaining? Let us know in the comments below. 

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Fans in tears as MasterChef favourite heads home

Fans in tears as MasterChef favourite heads home

Masterchef fans did not take the departure of Callum Hann very well, with many taking to social media to praise the season two return for his humble attitude and his kindness.

Former MasterChef winner Adam Liaw honoured Callum on Twitter and joked that his nice guy persona is “all an act”.

“You all really need to know that @callumskitchen’s wholesome nice guy persona on #MasterChefAU is all an act. In reality he’s actually even nicer,” Liaw wrote.

As friends Laura Sharrad and Callum cooked against each other on Tuesday, it became easily one of the most emotional episodes this season.

Unfortunately, the texture of his snapper ultimately let him down, and he was farewelled with a thoughtful send-off from Melissa Leong, who heartfully praised the fan favourite.

While the judges and contestants became overcome with emotions, they could only elbow tap to say goodbye due to the strict coronavirus restrictions.

“The name Callum Hann is synonymous with this competition,” judge Melissa said.

“10 years ago you might have walked into this kitchen as a boy, but this time you’ve returned as a dad”

“Every time you walk through those doors, humility and integrity has always followed. We are so proud of you,” she added.

Callum was overcome with emotion following his cook against Laura and asked producers for a minute to compose himself.

“It kinda just hit me there at the end of the cook,” he said once he’d finished.

“The last few nights months have been massive inside and outside the competition … I’m feeling really emotional because either Laura is sending me home or vice versa which really sucks.”

When he began cooking, he admitted it would be tough to go against his close friend in the kitchen.

“I can genuinely say this will be the hardest challenge for me for this season,” he said.

“Laura and I have worked together, we’ve been mates for six years, she’s a really deserving person to be in the semi-final as well. To feel like I’m either being eliminated or I’m gonna be eliminating a mate is really tough.”

Callum and Laura were left battling it out for a spot in the semi final after Reynold and Emilia both were confirmed to go on to the next round.

In the end, Callum’s mushy fish was what was his demise, despite the flavours of his creation wowing the judges.

Laura admitted she had “fangirled” over Callum when he came second to Adam Liaw in season 2.

“I never thought that we would be here together,” Laura said.

“We’ve worked together, we’ve hung out, we’re really good friends and it’s been really amazing to do it with someone who is as amazing as Callum. He’s so loving, so humble, so gracious.

“He’s an amazing dad. He should be really proud of himself.”

Fans were equally as devastated to see the star go, taking to Twitter to air their tears.

“I’m really excited to get back to Adelaide,” Callum told the camera.

“My beautiful wife, Crystal, has sacrificed a lot for me to be here for that, so, just excited to get home and give them both a cuddle and be there as much as I possibly can.”

Reynold Poernomo, Emelia Jackson and Laura Sharrad are heading into the semi-finals on Sunday.

Over60

News

Thu, 15 Aug, 2019

Secret to happy marriage? Couple has worn matching outfits for 70 years

Secret to happy marriage? Couple has worn matching outfits for 70 years

Francis and Rosemary Klontz first met when they were just teenagers at junior high in Auburn, Washington.

70 years later, they’re still going strong.

When asked about their secret to a successful relationship, they credited their mutual love of music … and matching outfits.

“Well, my mother got us matching shirts when we were in high school,” Rosemary explained. “I picked them out – and so … we’ve matched ever since.”

“I thought she was the cutest little thing when she came into our town,” Francis recalled.

“By the time we were seniors [at school], we started going together,” he said.

They both tied the knot at just 19 years of age.

Now they’re both 87-years-old, with Francis being all too familiar with the term “happy wife, happy life” as he let’s his wife choose his outfits every day.

“She just lays it out for me, and I don’t have to worry about a thing!” he said.

And while they both share the same passions, the duo say the secret to their everlasting marriage is remaining in-sync with one another.

“Jesus first, others second, yourself last – that’s the way to spell ‘joy’,” Rosemary said.

Scroll through the gallery above to see the stylish duo in action.

Over60

News

Wed, 31 Jul, 2019

So grown up! Nicole Kidman's daughters just landed major Hollywood roles

So grown up! Nicole Kidman's daughters just landed major Hollywood roles

They’re so much like their mother already! Nicole Kidman’s daughters with husband Keith Urban, Sunday, 11, and Faith, eight, have just landed their very own major movie roles for an upcoming film. 

Their very first role is one in a film likely to be seen by many excited children in September – Angry Birds 2.

Sunday will be playing a bird called Lily, while her little sister Faith is voicing a bird named Beatrice.

The young girls are sure to be knockouts considering their talented bloodline. It's not their first time in front of the camera either, after they joined their mother in playing extras on a TV series she was shooting in New York.

Pictures of Kidman in her character for the HBO series The Undoing were captured of her on set, with her two young daughters standing alongside her.

Both Sunday and Faith were wearing school uniforms in a street in Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

It’s quite clear Nicole likes to keep her two youngest children by her side – and that includes in-between shoots or even when she is working.

Nicole told E! News last year that her eldest daughter Sunday had gotten her own small role at school – hinting she might want to take after her talented mother.

“My daughter just got cast in her school, so that's been the main priority, learning lines with her,” Kidman said.

The Golden Globe winner has opened up in the past about her unconventional parenting methods – admitting she doesn’t let either of them have a phone.

Next to that, neither of her girls are allowed to use social media, including Instagram.

Even despite being “unpopular” in her daughter’s eyes, she still tries to “keep some sort of boundaries".

Nicole told E! News last year that her eldest daughter Sunday had gotten her own small role at school – hinting she might want to take after her talented mother.

“My daughter just got cast in her school, so that's been the main priority, learning lines with her,” Kidman said.

Scroll through the gallery above to see Nicole and her two daughter's spending a day on set together in New York – and how much Sunday and Faith have grown!

Over60

News

Wed, 17 Jun, 2020

MasterChef’s Tessa Boersma slammed over steak dish

MasterChef’s Tessa Boersma slammed over steak dish

MasterChef contestant Tessa Boersma has left fans baffled with her meat and three veg dish during Tuesday night’s challenge.

Tessa’s Tomahawk steak, which was served as part of the immunity challenge, failed to impress both judges and viewers.

“I think the steak’s cooked further than it should be,” said judge Jock Zonfrillo.

“You know, she had 60 minutes – more than enough time to cook that at a lower temperature.”

Fans on Twitter criticised the dish’s appearance, saying Tessa’s use of the meat cut was wasteful.

“Did Tessa just cook that entire tomahawk to get one middle piece? What happens to the rest of it?” one wrote.

“The plating leaves a lot to be desired,” one posted.

“It’s disgraceful that Tessa cooked that huge chunk of meat and is only using a slice,” another commented.

Despite viewers’ concern, the leftover food in the MasterChef kitchen did not go to waste. The remainders were donated to food charity SecondBite, reports said.

SecondBite CEO Jim Mullan told 10 daily: “Everything you see in the pantry that’s applied through the program, everything that we can possibly salvage, we collect and divert it to people in need, generally in the Melbourne area.”

Contestant Laura Sharrad also told news.com.au some of the unwanted produce went in the garden’s compost. “It’s so amazing to see all the split bin systems also in place to make sure everything is getting disposed of properly,” she said.

Reece Hignell ended up winning the challenge, with Judge Melissa Leong describing his gin tart with ginger ice-cream, juniper berry meringue and quince puree as “to die for”.

Over60

News

Thu, 2 Jul, 2020

New swine flu with pandemic potential found in China

New swine flu with pandemic potential found in China

Researchers in China have discovered a strain of swine flu that is capable of triggering another pandemic.

A report published in peer-reviewed science journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences earlier this week identified the G4 EA H1N1 strain of flu, which is genetically descended from the H1N1 strain that caused a pandemic in 2009.

It has “all the essential hallmarks of a candidate pandemic virus”, scientists at Chinese universities and China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention said in the study.

Researchers took 30,000 nasal swabs from pigs between 2011 and 2018. A total of 179 swine flu viruses were isolated, the majority of which were a new kind that has been dominant among pigs since 2016.

Following various experiments, G4 was found to be highly infectious, replicating in human cells and causing more severe symptoms in ferrets than other viruses do.

Any immunity humans gain from exposure to seasonal flu does not protect against G4, tests also showed.

As many as 4.4 per cent of the general population appeared to have been exposed to the virus, therefore showing that it has passed from animals to humans. There is no evidence yet that the virus can be passed between humans.

“Controlling the prevailing G4 EA H1N1 viruses in pigs and close monitoring in human populations, especially the workers in swine industry, should be urgently implemented,” the study authors said.

The World Health Organisation will read the Chinese report carefully, spokesman Christian Lindmeier told a Geneva briefing on Tuesday.

“It … highlights we cannot let our guard down on influenza and need to be vigilant and continue surveillance even in the coronavirus pandemic,” he said.

There is no imminent threat of a new pandemic despite the virus’ capability to infect humans, said Carl Bergstrom, a biologist at the University of Washington.

“There’s no evidence that G4 is circulating in humans, despite five years of extensive exposure,” he said on Twitter. “That’s the key context to keep in mind.”

The new swine flu is still “in the stage of examination”, said Anthony Fauci, the director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

It’s not “an immediate threat where you’re seeing infections, but it’s something we need to keep our eye on, just the way we did in 2009 with the emergence of the swine flu.”

Over60

News

Tue, 26 May, 2020

"'The virus is afraid of Betty!"

"'The virus is afraid of Betty!"

Fans around the world have rejoiced with the news that Golden Girl legend Betty White is safe and well amid the coronavirus pandemic.

White, 98, is self-isolating in her home in California, with visits from animal friends, including ducks.

"No one permitted in except those who must. Has helpers who are great with her," White's rep said in an email to Today.

"The animal community is watching over her," White's publicist said, adding, "The virus is afraid of Betty!"

Her friend Tom Sullivan confirmed to Closer that she is also keeping her mind active during the lockdown.

“She reads the L.A. Times cover to cover,” he said.

“She owns literally thousands of crossword puzzle books and is constantly doing them to keep her mind jumping. This is really serious with her.”

As well as keeping her mind active, White has been relaxing with a cocktail or two.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Betty White (@bettymwhite) on Jul 11, 2016 at 2:54pm PDT

“Betty loves to joke that vodka keeps her young,” her friend says with a laugh.

“She loves the image of her sitting at home in a rocking chair, drinking a martini and watching game shows, but she’s not really a big drinker. That’s not her. She’ll only take a few sips of a cocktail if the occasion calls for it.”

White also has a message to the world.

“Betty’s message to the world is to slow down and enjoy what you have: family, friends, your pets,” says the friend.

“She says that the pandemic is serious, but we have come through worse. It’s Mother Nature’s way of telling us all to slow down.”

White has spent 80 years working in television and has the longest career in the history of television.

Over60

News

Wed, 15 Jul, 2020

Princess Beatrice releases stunning new portrait ahead of her wedding

Princess Beatrice releases stunning new portrait ahead of her wedding

Princess Beatrice has surprised fans by having a stunning photograph taken.

The photo was taken as part of the Chaos SixtyNine Lips cover and was taken by photographer Phil Poynter.

He shared the snap on his Instagram, explaining that HRH Princess Beatrice of York "was kind enough to sit for a personal portrait session".

"Here's the result... Stunning!", he wrote.

Princess Beatrice has been keeping out of the spotlight as she was forced to delay her wedding to fiance Edoardo Mapelli due to the coronavirus pandemic.

There was speculation before the cancellation that there would be a smaller and more intimate event held, but the wedding was cancelled altogether as Beatrice's beloved grandparents Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip would not be able to attend the event.

A spokesperson for the couple told PEOPLE at the time: "There are no plans to switch venues or hold a bigger wedding. They aren't even thinking about their wedding at this time.

"There will come a time to rearrange, but that's not yet."

Over60

News

Wed, 15 Jul, 2020

Dannii Minogue allowed to skip hotel quarantine

Dannii Minogue allowed to skip hotel quarantine

Danny Minogue has returned to Australia after travelling from the United States, however she will not be placed under the government’s strict mandatory 14-day hotel stay.

The pop star and her son have been granted an exemption by the Queensland government on medical grounds.

Instead of being forced to remain in the confines of a hotel, the two will spend 14 days at their Gold Coast private residence.

Minogue returned from the COVID-19 hotspot the United States over the weekend and headed straight to her Gold Coast property.

Minogue is still under the same strict hotel quarantine measures in her home, as no one is allowed to come and go from the property.

Unlike many other Australians who are returning from overseas, Minogue will not foot the mandatory $2800 bill for hotel accommodation each returning adult has to pay under current Queensland quarantine laws.

Millions of dollars has gone towards paying for thousands of travellers who have returned to Australia to quarantine in hotels since March.

On Monday night; the Queensland government said they could not comment on Minogue’s case.

“While we cannot comment on individuals, Queensland Health has strong arrangements in place whether people are quarantining inside or outside hotels,’’ a spokesperson told 7NEWS.

Over60

News

Wed, 17 Jun, 2020

MasterChef’s Tessa Boersma slammed over steak dish

MasterChef’s Tessa Boersma slammed over steak dish

MasterChef contestant Tessa Boersma has left fans baffled with her meat and three veg dish during Tuesday night’s challenge.

Tessa’s Tomahawk steak, which was served as part of the immunity challenge, failed to impress both judges and viewers.

“I think the steak’s cooked further than it should be,” said judge Jock Zonfrillo.

“You know, she had 60 minutes – more than enough time to cook that at a lower temperature.”

Fans on Twitter criticised the dish’s appearance, saying Tessa’s use of the meat cut was wasteful.

“Did Tessa just cook that entire tomahawk to get one middle piece? What happens to the rest of it?” one wrote.

“The plating leaves a lot to be desired,” one posted.

“It’s disgraceful that Tessa cooked that huge chunk of meat and is only using a slice,” another commented.

Despite viewers’ concern, the leftover food in the MasterChef kitchen did not go to waste. The remainders were donated to food charity SecondBite, reports said.

SecondBite CEO Jim Mullan told 10 daily: “Everything you see in the pantry that’s applied through the program, everything that we can possibly salvage, we collect and divert it to people in need, generally in the Melbourne area.”

Contestant Laura Sharrad also told news.com.au some of the unwanted produce went in the garden’s compost. “It’s so amazing to see all the split bin systems also in place to make sure everything is getting disposed of properly,” she said.

Reece Hignell ended up winning the challenge, with Judge Melissa Leong describing his gin tart with ginger ice-cream, juniper berry meringue and quince puree as “to die for”.

Alex O'Brien

News

Wed, 1 Oct, 2014

New doco proves over-60s are the real style-setters

New doco proves over-60s are the real style-setters

Examining the lives of seven uber-fabulous over-60 New Yorkers whose eclectic personal style and vital spirit guides their approach to ageing, this already internationally acclaimed film is a sellout.

Based on the popular blog – Advance Style – byAri Seth Cohen who has been blogging his photos of stylish older women since 2008, he teamed up with filmmaker Lina Plioplyte to turn the blog into a documentary.

Capturing the spirit of women aged between 62 and 95, Advanced Style screened to sellout audiences at the Melbourne International Film Festival in August, premiered in New York on September 26 and was released at select cinemas in Australia on October 2 (see details below).

Mr Cohen started photographing stylishly dressed when he moved to New York City. "It was all my grandmother's fault," he laughs. "She was just this wonderful, giving, fashionable, interesting woman."

Growing up in sunny California, Mr Cohen's says his grandmother was his best friend with whom he loved to spend time with going through her old scrap books and watching old movies together. "I learned everything from her, I learned about aesthetics, I learned how to be a good person."

The blogger’s grandmother was also the one who encouraged him to move to the big apple. "If you want to be creative, move to New York," he says. So in 2008 he took that advice and it wasn’t long before he encountered a number of "incredibly dressed, eccentric, outrageous, classic" older people on the streets of New York. "I started taking their photos and I started the blog."

It was around that time that he met filmmaker, Lina Plioplyte, in a coffee shop, who had also only recently moved to New York City.

“Lina Plioplyte, director of the film, and I met six years ago when I first moved to NYC,” Mr Cohen explains, continuing, “She was working at a coffee shop and we admired one another's crazy mix of paisley and tropical patterns and I asked if we could be friends. I told her that I wanted to start a blog where I photographed some of the most stylish, vital, and interesting older people in New York and she told me that she was just about to start a position at a fashion magazine making videos. Lina and I ran into each other about a month later at a gallery. She had been seeing my posts on Advanced Style and asked if she could make a few videos of the ladies for my blog. We started with Debra Rapoport and interviewed her about her style. From there we moved on to Tziporah and Ilona and quickly realized that these videos were about much more than just style. The ladies began to open up to us and share their lives and secrets to their incredible vitality. Lina and I became so captivated by their stories that we couldn't stop filming.”

Mr Cohen said the women he features in his photographs serve as an inspiration for people who want to feel good about themselves. "The film, the blog, my book, they're really about style - personal style and lifestyle," he told 774 ABC Melbourne's Rafael Epstein. "These women dare to be bold but that's their personal style. It's really about how they live their lives."

Drawing a distinction between style, which is personal, and the global fashion industry, Mr Cohen thinks the "The fashion world is scary," he reveals. "It doesn't include older people and it doesn't include people of different weights, and it doesn't include people of different races.”

Lithuanian born, Ms Plioplyte, who started working on this film at 25, said American culture is "all about anti-ageing, firming, tightening, thinner, younger," she says. When she began work on the doco she revealed that she’d "already started worrying about getting older," but wonderfully, the women in the documentary became mentors for her. "These women were just flaunting their styles and not hiding at all," she smiles.

Interestingly, while the film is definitely a celebration of the women it features, it’s not a picture of sunshine and roses. "It was really important not to make only a purely positive film," said Ms Plioplyte. And then Mr Cohen explains that the women in the film were competitive. "If Lina didn't show that I don't think the audience would respond to the film as being honest," he said.

The women in the film have a vain side too and that shows, but it is that pride that makes them so vital in their old age. "That self confidence shows in the way that they present themselves to the world."

Despite the women's individual eccentricities, Mr Cohen hopes the women in the film are as inspirational to other people as his grandmother was to him. "It's really all in memory of her," said Mr Cohen. "The hope and the goal of the blog is to really help people embrace their age and see that there's so much to life in your 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s and 100s."

Now showing in select cinemas in Australia

Cinema Nova, Melbourne

Kino Cinema, Melbourne


Palace Brighton Bay, Melbourne


Palace Como, Melbourne


Hayden Orpheum Picture Palace, Sydney


Palace Norton Street, Sydney


Palace Verona Cinemas, Sydney


Luna Palace Windsor, Perth


Palace Electric, Canberra


Palace Centro, Brisbane


Regal Twin Cinemas, Brisbane


Palace Nova Eastend, Adelaide


State Cinema, Hobart

Over60

News

Thu, 21 Nov, 2019

​The one royal fashion protocol Kate Middleton deliberately ignores

​The one royal fashion protocol Kate Middleton deliberately ignores

The royal family have laws they must follow for every public greeting they have.

This also comes down to food choices and particularly, wardrobe decisions.

Guidelines such as wearing light nail polish and avoiding black clothing during daytime royal engagements are all rules the British family are reportedly required to follow.

However, the Duchess of Cambridge is one of the latest members to apparently break protocol during a recent engagement in Norfolk, to open the Nook Children’s Hospice, as part of her role as patron of the East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices.

The Duchess donned an eye-catching magenta skirt by Oscar de la Renta, black Gianvito Rossi heels and an Aspinal of London clutch.

She finished the look off with a black pair of opaque tights – which is, according to royal experts, a massive no-no.

CNN royal expert Victoria Arbiter says it is irregular for royals to be spotted out in public wearing non skin-coloured tights or pantyhose.

She previously told Insider following the 2017 engagement photo of Duchess Meghan to Prince Harry, which showed the former Ms. Markle wearing a dress without stockings that we “never see a royal without their nude stockings.”

It is definitely not the first time the duchess has worn the darker-coloured tights, as she regularly steps out in black tights for royal engagements.

At the time, Arbiter explained that nude stockings are “really the only hard, steadfast rule in terms of what the Queen requires”.

This means, her Majesty’s wardrobe decisions do not have to be followed by her younger family members.

Alexandra Messervy, chief executive of The English Manner, told Instyle that royals are “at liberty to choose whatever colour tights they wish, and indeed often opaque colours work well with outfits.

“I think the only reason they have chosen ‘nude’ in recent years is because they have become so much more fashionable, and the ‘bare legs’ look became the craze.”

Scroll through the gallery to see Duchess Kate breaking a royal protocol. 

Melody Teh

News

Tue, 6 Mar, 2018

Vikki Campion’s ex-fiance denies he is the father of her baby

Vikki Campion’s ex-fiance denies he is the father of her baby

Vikki Campion's former fiance has denied he is the father of her unborn child after Barnaby Joyce revealed over the weekend there was a “grey area” over paternity.

Ms Campion, 33, was due to marry media executive John Bergin in November 2016 but the couple split up in August and “haven’t spoken to each other since”.

She is now pregnant with her first child due in April and is in a relationship with the former deputy prime minister.

However, Joyce claimed in a new interview on Saturday the child's paternity is “a bit of a grey area” because he was on a trip to Europe at around the time she conceived.

On Monday, Bergin denied he could be the father of Campion’s baby, telling The Daily Telegraph: “I haven’t seen Vikki since late 2016, any suggestion that I am the father of Vikki’s child is incorrect.”

“I'm sure you can appreciate that I don't have anything further to add,” he said.

The former couple were due to marry in the NSW Southern Highlands in November 2016 however they split three months before the wedding day.  

He did not comment on how the relationship ended, simply saying, “I’m just a spectator in this like everybody else.”

He also denied reports Campion had refused to return the ring.

“It seems that some people feel like they can just make things up,” he said.

The issue of paternity was thrown into doubt when Joyce himself said he cannot be sure if he is the father of Campion’s child, but he does not plan to get a paternity test and will raise the child as his own.

“It's mine, on the record, there it is. And can I say, even if it wasn't, I wouldn't care, I'd still go through this, I'd still love him,” Joyce on Saturday. 

But on Monday, he said questions about the baby are “nobody’s business” but his and Campion’s.

“Anything that’s personal in nature is nobody else’s business but mine and Vikki’s, nobody else’s business. So we’re not here to be part of some ongoing litany of discussions about this,” he said.

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Sam Stosur faces online hate after baby announcement

Sam Stosur faces online hate after baby announcement

It seems Australia still has a long way to go.

And that was proven after Sam Stosur was on the receiving end of many ignorant comments after her baby announcement on Tuesday.

The Aussie tennis champion took to social media to reveal she’s a mother for the first time, announcing partner Liz Astling gave birth to a baby girl last month.

Stosur said she and Astling welcomed baby Genevieve into the world on June 16.

“Life in lockdown during coronavirus has been challenging in many ways but personally it's been one of the most exciting and happy times of my life,” Stosur wrote on Instagram alongside two photos of Genevieve.

“It has been a whirlwind time but we could not imagine life without her now.

“Mum and Evie are doing well and it's so amazing to be home with them both. We are absolutely in love with this little bundle and rolling with the happy chaos.

“We can't wait for what's to come and to watch little Evie grow up....Although not too quickly we hope.”

While the majority of fans and colleagues were overjoyed by the surprise announcement, there were some disgusting comments that followed.

Stosur has never explicitly spoken up about her sexuality or relationship with Astling, but she did thank her after winning the Spirit of Tennis Award at the Newcombe Medal night in 2019.

“To my Mum, Dad, … and my partner Liz, you have given me the love, support and every opportunity to pursue my dream and I’ll be forever grateful,” she wrote on social media at the time.

She also criticised Margaret Court after she made a comment saying that “tennis is full of lesbians” and suggested players should boycott Margaret Court Arena at the Australian Open.

Danielle McCarthy

News

Thu, 29 Nov, 2018

Inside the tragic marriage of Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones

Inside the tragic marriage of Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones

Princess Margaret and Antony Armstrong-Jones, the first royal couple to televise their wedding, were regarded as one of Britain’s most glamorous couples.

However, sadly the truth behind their marriage was much different.

After Antony was commissioned to photograph Margaret in 1958, a secret relationship between the two ensued.

Speaking to Town & Country magazine, royal biographer Anna de Courcy, said: “Nobody knew about their relationship, there wasn’t a whisper about it."

“She would see him in secret at his studio and yes, he would join her at parties, but no one could pinpoint which man she was interested in.”

Although the couple were said to be “besotted” with one another, Antony continued to have multiple affairs right up until their engagement on February 26, 1960.

Not only was the photographer involved with actresses Gina Ward and Jacqui Chan, but he also fathered an illegitimate child with his close friend, Camilla Fry.

Antony and Camilla’s son, Polly Fry, was born just weeks after he tied the knot with Princess Margaret.

The Queen gave her approval for the union but asked they delay officially announcing the news of their engagement until the birth of her son Prince Andrew.

The tradition-breaking marriage saw Antony become the first commoner to marry into the British royal family in over four centuries.

In 1961, the couple welcomed their first child, David, into the world and three years later, Sarah was born.

However, a new BBC documentary Princess Margaret: The Royal Rebel has described Antony as an “absent” and “uncaring” husband.

A close friend of Margaret’s, Jane Stevens, said on the documentary: “It was naughty in a way because he married Princess Margaret, and therefore knowing who he was marrying, he should have helped her, but he didn't.”

"He stuck with the job he had [photography], which had nothing to do with the royal family, and that was hard for her."

Another friend of the royal, Lady Anne Glenconner, told the BBC: “Tony loved all royal things at the beginning, but then he got bored and off he went.”

Antony’s decision to continue his photography work led to the downfall of their relationship, having various flings while he completed assignments.

Reportedly, Margaret also brought lovers home while he was away, including her daughter’s godfather Antony Barton, Mick Jagger, Peter Sellers and Warren Beatty.

While they were out in public together, Antony would also humiliate his wife in front of others.

The Guardian reported that at one party, he said: “Shut up and let someone intelligent talk.”

Allegedly, one note to his royal wife read: “You look like a Jewish manicurist and I hate you.”

The couple eventually separated in 1976, with Antony marrying Lucy Hogg in 1978 – they divorced in 2000.

Princess Margaret never remarried before passing away in 2002. 

Michelle Reed

News

Thu, 28 Jan, 2016

The 30-second trick for bigger looking eyes

The 30-second trick for bigger looking eyes

If you’re constantly on a quest to look more awake (who isn’t?!) you’ve probably invested in a number of lotions and potions to help with the task. While the latest eye serum and shadow may make some difference to the texture and colour of your eyes, they can’t change the dimensions. That’s where the humble lash curler comes into play. Curling your eyelashes helps open and widen the eye creating a fresher, more “awake” appearance without the need for anything else (though a coat or two of mascara improves the effect even more!) Here’s how to do it!

  1. Make sure you start with perfectly clean lashes. Any residual eye make-up can clog the curlers or worse still, cause lashes to get stuck in the clamps, leading to all kinds of painful issues.
  2. For lashes that really last, hold your lash curler under a warm hair dryer for five seconds. This heats the appliance, which in turn creates more curl and staying power. Just make sure you test the temp before applying to your sensitive eyes.
  3. Position your warm curler at the very base of your lashes and gently squeeze. Hold for five to 10 seconds then release.
  4. Move the curler to the middle of your lashes and do the same.
  5. Finally, curl the tips by repeating the above steps.
  6. Amplify the impact by applying one to two coats of lengthening or volumising mascara, making sure to start at the roots and “wiggle” the brush through to the lips. Voila! Perfect peepers every time!

Alex O'Brien

News

Thu, 12 May, 2016

What you need to know about Facebook's new reaction buttons

What you need to know about Facebook's new reaction buttons

Facebook is now giving you more options than ever to express yourself. The new reactions mean you can respond to someone’s status in a variety of ways including love, wow, sad, angry and even wow.

Not sure how to enable them? Read on to find out.

On your desktop – On the browser version of Facebook, simply hover over the LIKE button, and the new reactions will pop up in a bar above. (Just be careful; it's very easy to accidentally "wow" or "love" someone's status inadvertently when you mouse over the new options.)

On mobile – You may need to close the Facebook app on your phone and reopen it before the reactions appear. Once you hit the LIKE button on a post, a message will appear that instructs you to hold down on that button to bring up the other reactions. So don't be dismayed if you don't see the new reactions immediately.

Do you like Facebook’s new reaction buttons? Tell us in the comments below.

Related links:

How to avoid Facebook scams

Back to basics: How to upload photos to Facebook

How to save articles on Facebook to read later

Joel Callen

News

Mon, 1 Jun, 2015

People with hearing loss suffer in silence

People with hearing loss suffer in silence

More than half of Australians with hearing difficulties have done nothing about their condition, a Newspoll survey commissioned by Cochlear has found.

Around one in five Australians suffer from some form of hearing impairment, which not only makes it difficult to communicate with others but can increase your risk of loneliness and depression as well as damage relationships with friends and family.

However, a survey of more than 1,200 adults found that 52 per cent of those suffering hearing loss have not doing anything about their impairments. Of those, 40 per cent had not even consulted a doctor or health professional.

This is despite the fact that 72 per cent of people said they struggled in noisy environments, a quarter said their working life was affected and nearly half of people reported hearing loss adversely impacted interactions with friends and family.

Professor Graeme Clark, who created the cochlear implant for moderately to profoundly deaf people, told the Sydney Morning Herald that many people were embarrassed by their condition.

“It's obvious that the stigma of hearing loss still has a major impact on people's quality of life, but it must be remembered that hearing loss affects people of all ages, from newborns to elderly people – and there's nothing to be ashamed of,” he said.

So if you’ve got hearing loss, please don’t suffer in silence. Get your ears checked so you can live life to the fullest. 

Georgia Dixon

News

Fri, 9 Dec, 2016

5 iron packed foods that are not meat

5 iron packed foods that are not meat

Vegans and vegetarians are all too familiar with the challenge of getting enough iron, without turning to meat consumption. However, the World Health Organisation has deemed iron deficiency as “The most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world”. They also report that two billion people – over 30 per cent of the world’s population – are anaemic, many due to iron deficiency which can cause fatigue, tiredness, and decreased immunity. So clearly, it’s not only non-red meat eaters who struggle to meet their daily requirements.

Generally, to meet the recommended daily quota, men and non-menstruating women should receive about 10mg of iron daily. If you’re a vegetarian or simply don’t want to eat that much meat, here are five alternatives that will help you keep your iron intake on track.

1. Spinach

Popeye was onto something with this one! Not only is spinach a great source of iron, it also contains magnesium, manganese, folate, calcium and potassium. According to researchers from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, it can even reduce your risk of kin cancer.

2. Potatoes

Potatoes cooked in every form will provide you with a healthy does or iron, however, not all varieties are created equal. Russets are the richest source of iron with one that measures between three and four and a half inches in diameter containing over milligrams of iron, which is 40 per cent of the daily iron requirements for men or 18 per cent for women.

3. Pistachio nuts

Almonds, brazil nuts and cashews are often touted for their iron properties. However, of all the popular nut varieties, pistachios have the most iron, containing 14mg per 100g. In fact, they have nearly four times the amount of the other varieties. They’re also a great source of protein, vitamin E, calcium and magnesium, pistachios make the ideal healthy snack.

4. Dark chocolate

You don’t need to tell us twice. Dark chocolate is not only a satisfying treat for your sweet tooth, it has eight milligrams of iron per 100gms. It's also known to lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol.

5. Eggs

When it comes to getting your daily nutrients, eggs are a diet superhero. One large 60gm whole egg without the shell contains six grams of protein. Of this protein, three grams is contained in the egg yolk and three grams in the egg white. 

Do you have any iron packed, vegetarian recipes to share with the community? Let us know in the comments below.

Related links:

High protein foods to promote healthy ageing

Should we really be eating red meat?

4 reasons to eat chocolate everyday

Over60

News

Thu, 26 Mar, 2020

COVID-19 blame game: Who’s really at fault for the Ruby Princess fiasco

COVID-19 blame game: Who’s really at fault for the Ruby Princess fiasco

The Australian Border Force has laid blame on New South Wales Health for the mishandling of the Ruby Princess arrival in Sydney. 

Michael Outram, the ABF’s commissioner stated it was not the border control’s responsibility to extend health checks.

The NSW government however has insisted it is the federal authorities who are to blame after they categorised the cruise ship carrying 2,700 people as “low risk”.

The release of the passengers resulted in a major wave of 133 infections into Australian communities.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Cruisedaily (@cruisedaily) on Aug 18, 2019 at 12:12pm PDT

The catastrophic mistake has resulted in politicians expressing outrage over the systematic failure to isolate the Ruby Princess passengers and its crew.

The ship docked in Sydney on March 19 and it had three passengers and one crew member who displayed flu-like symptoms and had been swabbed.

One passenger had been taken to hospital by via ambulance and passed away due to COVID-19.

However, passengers were allowed to disembark and make their way home, which included overseas flights. Each passenger was urged to self-isolate for 14 days.

At a press conference on Wednesday, Berejiklian said ABF officials and state colleagues had incorrectly advised NSW Health that the Ruby Princess was low risk.

The politician went on to say stopping transmission was a joint responsibility.

“Every single agency needs to take responsibility for our borders,” she said. “Whether it’s a ship at a port, whether it’s a planeload of people coming in from overseas. We’re still having thousands of people coming in on planes every single day.

“All authorities have to step up, including NSW Health, including all the other authorities involved.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Gladys Berejiklian (@gladysb) on Mar 23, 2020 at 9:50pm PDT

“What is really imperative at this time, we realised, is strong communication between authorities and everybody stepping up.”

Dr Kerry Chant who is NSW’s chief health officer said in a statement that the ship had originally checked in at a Wellington dock in New Zealand and found no cases of COVID-19.

She went on to say NSW authorities had checked in on all the passengers of the Ruby Princess once they recognised coronavirus had been on the vessel.

Dr Chant assured reporters there was “no action that NSW Health could have taken to prevent those people acquiring the disease”, as they had acquired it on the ship. She said NSW Health were working hard to limit onward transmission, and that if there had been any “we would have deployed health teams.”

“Of course, with hindsight, we would have acted differently, had we known we had a Covid-positive cruise ship.”

Chant fiercely defended NSW Health letting passengers fly home overseas, as it was part of an agreed protocol to send them into self-isolation at home.

She said authorities are tracing of people sitting in rows around infected passengers was being conducted.

Kristina Keneally who is the Labor’s spokeswoman on immigration said the Ruby Princess would be able to be traced back to many COVID-19 cases in Australia.

“We have now 133 passengers and counting from the Ruby Princess cruise ship that have tested positive for coronavirus,” she said.

“The Ruby Princess cruise ship coronavirus cases account for 10% of the cases in NSW. And, quite tragically, there has already been one death.

“They went into taxis and public transport, they interacted with friends and neighbours, they went to shops, they were allowed to travel across the country,” she said.

“It is gobsmacking that we are in this circumstance today. We need to ask, we need to demand to know how this happened and we need to ensure it does not happen again. The Australian government needs to get on top of this situation very quickly.” Topics

Outram’s timelines of interactions between the ship and NSW Health are as follows:

He said that ABF’s responsibilities went as far to checking passports and ensuring that customs regulations were complied with.

He said the federal Department of Agriculture was responsible for biosecurity checks.

“On the 17 March, 2020, NSW Health requested the following information from the Ruby Princess’s senior doctor: estimates of arrival into Sydney, a log of details of passengers and crew presenting with fever or acute respiratory symptoms or both, travel histories, and whether tests were conducted and the results,” Outram said.

“On March 18, at 9.39 am the senior doctor on the Ruby Princess notified the health department with the following: they had collected viral swabs for a few cases of febrile influenza, negative test, and that those people had been isolated. They also requested a transfer for other passengers who had unrelated illnesses.”

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Gladys Berejiklian (@gladysb) on Mar 22, 2020 at 3:38pm PDT

“On March 18 2020, at 5.17pm, they stated: ‘The NSW Health panel assessed the Ruby Princess as not requiring onboard health assessment in Sydney.’”

Outram said NSW Health had asked for Ruby Princess to send the 15 samples to a NSW Health lab for Covid-19 testing and to attach lab forms as required.

“NSW Health stated to the Ruby Princess, ‘You are free to disembark tomorrow. However, in accordance with the Australian government guidance, all passengers must go into self-isolation for 14 days,’” Outram said.

The ABF commissioner continued by saying that on the 18th of March, the Department of Agriculture was informed through Ruby Princess that a risk assessment had been conducted.

He also went on to say that the ship had been considered “low risk” – an assessment that is consistent with NSW Health’s version of events.

 “NSW Health decided not to board the vessel and attend, and that they had also given clearance for all passengers to disembark the vessel,” Outram said.

“That red light has just gone green. So, the vessel came into port on March 19.

“They felt the vessel was low risk and there was no need to attend the vessel, but our six officers wore masks and gloves nonetheless.”

Melody Teh

News

Fri, 19 Aug, 2016

Woman shows you how to pack 100 items into hand luggage

Woman shows you how to pack 100 items into hand luggage

Do you like to pack light? Want to breeze out of the airport without waiting for your luggage to finally appear from the baggage carousels? This video is for you.

In an effort to show that you don’t have to bring an assortment of oversized suitcases with you on every trip away, English TV host and former Bond Girl Rachel Grant has proven that you can pack more 100 items into a small carry-on suitcase. As you’ll see in the video, she manages to fit in 23 items of clothing, as well as multiple pairs of shoes, more clothes and a bunch of accessories into a standard carry-on suitcase.

See how the incredible packing feat is accomplished in the video below. 

Alex O'Brien

News

Thu, 12 May, 2016

What you need to know about Facebook's new reaction buttons

What you need to know about Facebook's new reaction buttons

Facebook is now giving you more options than ever to express yourself. The new reactions mean you can respond to someone’s status in a variety of ways including love, wow, sad, angry and even wow.

Not sure how to enable them? Read on to find out.

On your desktop – On the browser version of Facebook, simply hover over the LIKE button, and the new reactions will pop up in a bar above. (Just be careful; it's very easy to accidentally "wow" or "love" someone's status inadvertently when you mouse over the new options.)

On mobile – You may need to close the Facebook app on your phone and reopen it before the reactions appear. Once you hit the LIKE button on a post, a message will appear that instructs you to hold down on that button to bring up the other reactions. So don't be dismayed if you don't see the new reactions immediately.

Do you like Facebook’s new reaction buttons? Tell us in the comments below.

Related links:

How to avoid Facebook scams

Back to basics: How to upload photos to Facebook

How to save articles on Facebook to read later

Melody Teh

News

Wed, 31 Aug, 2016

Easy peanut butter fudge

Easy peanut butter fudge

The perfect combination of sweet and savoury, whip up this treat in just a few minutes and enjoy the bite-sized deliciousness. It will also make a thoughtful gift when packaged up in a jar with a ribbon on top.

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup butter
  • ½ cup milk
  • 2 ¼ cups brown sugar
  • ¾ cup smooth peanut butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 ½ cups icing sugar
Method:

  1. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over a medium heat.
  2. Stir in the brown sugar and milk. Bring to the boil and boil for two minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the peanut butter and vanilla extract.
  4. Pour the icing sugar into a large bowl and pour the butter mixture over the top and beat until smooth.
  5. Pour into a 20cm by 20cm pan lined in baking paper and chill in the fridge until firm.
  6. Cut into squares and serve.
Related links:

Looking for another easy dessert? Try this simple lemon yoghurt cake

This avocado hummus couldn’t be simpler to make

Making your own salted caramel sauce is easier than you think

Georgia Dixon

News

Wed, 23 Nov, 2016

3 questions to ask when choosing a Power of Attorney

3 questions to ask when choosing a Power of Attorney

It’s certainly an unpleasant thought to consider, but it’s important to remember that your financial obligations will not disappear, even if you lose capacity to meet them. That’s why it is so important to appoint the right Power of Attorney.

What’s less clear perhaps, is what you should be looking for when selecting a Power of Attorney. Follow this guide of questions to ask yourself, and you can be confident you’ll get one of the most important decisions of your life right.

1. Do they have capacity to fulfil the role?

As the NSW Government states, “In order to make a valid Power of Attorney you must be 18 years or over and have the capacity to understand the nature and effect of the appointment.” A Power of Attorney must also have the capacity to keep records of dealings and transactions undertaken on your behalf. If this is in question, it’s worth seeking the assessment of a qualified medical professional like a doctor, psychologist or psychiatrist.

2. Do they have any conflicts of interest?

A Power of Attorney is someone you trust to make the right decision on your behalf. So if there’s a conflict of interest in play, this can be a serious problem. Not only can a conflict of interest potentially inhibit their ability to make rational, impartial decisions on your behalf, it can also potentially result in devastating consequences, not just from a financial standpoint but also in terms of your personal wellbeing.

3. Do you trust them?

And perhaps, the most important question to ask when choosing a Power of Attorney is whether or not you trust the person selected. A good Power of Attorney will always make the right decision on your behalf, no matter what external and internal factors are at play. For this reason, it’s important to choose someone you trust for this important position.

Have you appointed a power of attorney yet? Do you think there’s enough information available to find out who will make the best choice?

Let us know in the comments below, we’d love to hear from you.

Related links:

Managing money for a loved one with dementia

Preparing for old age when you don’t have children

5 legal terms you need to understand

Michelle Reed

News

Tue, 6 Oct, 2015

What is a life-cycle super product? And do you need one?

What is a life-cycle super product? And do you need one?

Super can be confusing and it’s easy to avoid the questions, stick with the same fund you’ve always had and just get on with it. But it pays to know about new trends in the market – especially if they can make you more money. Life-cycle super products are becoming increasingly popular and statistics from the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) show that almost 30 MySuper funds have life-cycle investment strategies as their default option and many more have it as part of their overall investment portfolio. So what is a life-cycle super product?

Essentially, life-cycle products involve the super company moving your balance across different investment pools based on your age. Your money will be focused on growth while you are young and move toward more conservative, low-risk options as you get older. The strategy allows you to take on more risk while you are younger and have more time to adjust to the fluctuations of the market. Then, when you are winding down your career and have amassed a significant balance, low risk investments ensure that your money is secure. Once you’ve chosen the life-cycle option you don’t need to do anything – your fund will handle all the changes for you.

These type of funds are increasingly popular because of the way they time risk. A balanced fund might provide a higher return over the long term, but a market downturn could mean that your balance is low right when you need it the most. During the financial crisis many retirees suddenly found that their super nest egg just didn’t exist anymore and there was no time for them to build it up again. Gradually reducing your risk over time is a prudent way to minimise your chance of switching investments at the wrong time, such as after a major fall in equities.

But there is a potential downside. Some critics argue that focusing on high growth investments when you are young, and have less money in your account, leads to a lower return overall. Then, when your balance is high, your funds won’t be working as hard as they once did.

Is life-cycle super for you? As with all super products, it depends on your circumstances. You’ll need to consider your age, employment status, super balance and assets before you make any changes. If you’re in your early 60s and plan to keep on working, life-cycle could give you a greater percentage of growth investments until you switch to more conservative options. Speak with your super fund or financial adviser to find out what will best suit you.

Related links:

How to calculate the bank balance you’ll need to retire

The weakening Aussie dollar could be harming your super

Is the government going to raise the age when Australians can access super?

 

Georgia Dixon

News

Fri, 9 Dec, 2016

5 iron packed foods that are not meat

5 iron packed foods that are not meat

Vegans and vegetarians are all too familiar with the challenge of getting enough iron, without turning to meat consumption. However, the World Health Organisation has deemed iron deficiency as “The most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world”. They also report that two billion people – over 30 per cent of the world’s population – are anaemic, many due to iron deficiency which can cause fatigue, tiredness, and decreased immunity. So clearly, it’s not only non-red meat eaters who struggle to meet their daily requirements.

Generally, to meet the recommended daily quota, men and non-menstruating women should receive about 10mg of iron daily. If you’re a vegetarian or simply don’t want to eat that much meat, here are five alternatives that will help you keep your iron intake on track.

1. Spinach

Popeye was onto something with this one! Not only is spinach a great source of iron, it also contains magnesium, manganese, folate, calcium and potassium. According to researchers from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, it can even reduce your risk of kin cancer.

2. Potatoes

Potatoes cooked in every form will provide you with a healthy does or iron, however, not all varieties are created equal. Russets are the richest source of iron with one that measures between three and four and a half inches in diameter containing over milligrams of iron, which is 40 per cent of the daily iron requirements for men or 18 per cent for women.

3. Pistachio nuts

Almonds, brazil nuts and cashews are often touted for their iron properties. However, of all the popular nut varieties, pistachios have the most iron, containing 14mg per 100g. In fact, they have nearly four times the amount of the other varieties. They’re also a great source of protein, vitamin E, calcium and magnesium, pistachios make the ideal healthy snack.

4. Dark chocolate

You don’t need to tell us twice. Dark chocolate is not only a satisfying treat for your sweet tooth, it has eight milligrams of iron per 100gms. It's also known to lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol.

5. Eggs

When it comes to getting your daily nutrients, eggs are a diet superhero. One large 60gm whole egg without the shell contains six grams of protein. Of this protein, three grams is contained in the egg yolk and three grams in the egg white. 

Do you have any iron packed, vegetarian recipes to share with the community? Let us know in the comments below.

Related links:

High protein foods to promote healthy ageing

Should we really be eating red meat?

4 reasons to eat chocolate everyday

Georgia Dixon

News

Thu, 1 Dec, 2016

5 signs to help you spot a narcissist

5 signs to help you spot a narcissist

Most of know a narcissist or someone with a few narcissistic tendencies. In actual fact, many of us have probably questioned whether we could possibly be on the narcissistic side of the spectrum. Rest assured that if you have pondered that theory then the chances are good that you’re in the clear.

Experts have found that the classic narcissist has little if any ability to be reflective. If you’re able to question some of your character traits and wonder what they could mean, then you’re displaying a kind of thoughtful insight that a true narcissist would not be incapable of.

The rise of the internet has seen the term “narcissist” bandied around frequently usually to describe those who are obviously vain, self- obsessed and/or selfish. While these traits are usually part of the narcissistic personality, true narcissism runs deeper and is far more complex. Here are five common characteristics to help you spot a narcissist “in the wild”.

  1. Superiority – The most obvious character trait of a narcissist is their sense of superiority and sometimes arrogance. In their mind, they are better than everyone else by a long shot.
  2. Self-entitlement – A narcissist feels that they are somehow entitled to more than everyone else. People with a healthy sense of self feel a moderate level of entitlement which experts agree is healthy. Narcissists however take it to a whole new level.
  3. Manipulative – Narcissists will manipulate a situation to achieve their desired outcome. In particular, they will carefully craft a scenario so that they come out looking like the star of the situation and receive all the credit while the actual person responsible is pushed by the wayside.
  4. Lacks empathy – A serious and complete lack of empathy is a classic trait of a narcissist. They are incapable of putting themselves in someone else’s shoes and can be very detached and cold.
  5. Will never apologise – A narcissist will never, ever believe that they are wrong. Even when presented with overwhelming evidence, they’ll will refuse to take responsibility for themselves or their actions.
Have you ever known a narcissist? What gave them away? Share with us in the comments below.

Related links:

Aristotle’s advice to live your best life

10 easy ways to relax and boost your intelligence

Being lazy can be a sign of high intelligence

Ben Squires

News

Thu, 14 Jan, 2016

Apricot jam

Apricot jam

With rich, sweet apricot flavours, this sticky jam is one of the best preserves we’ve ever had.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups (750g) chopped and crushed apricots (about 1kg purchased weight)
  • 3 tablespoon pectin
  • 3 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3 cups (660g) granulated sugar
  • 4 (250ml) glass preserving jars with lids and bands
Method:

1. Prepare boiling water in waterbath preserving pot or stockpot. Heat jars and lids in simmering water until ready for use. Do not boil. Set bands aside.

2. Wash, peel, and pit apricots. Finely chop apricots, and then crush with a potato masher. Measure required quantity of crushed apricots.

3. Add crushed apricots to a saucepan. Gradually stir in pectin. Pour lemon juice evenly over apricots. Bring mixture to a full rolling boil that cannot be stirred down, over high heat, stirring constantly.

4. Add entire measure of sugar, stirring to dissolve. Return mixture to a full rolling boil. Boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim foam if necessary.

5. Ladle hot jam into jars leaving 5 mm headspace. Wipe rim. Centre lid on jar. Apply band until fit is fingertip tight.

6. Process in boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove jars and cool. Check lids for seal after 24 hours. Lid should not flex up and down when centre is pressed.

Recipe courtesy of Jarden Home Brands, the makers of Ball preserving products. Visit their website here.

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Georgia Dixon

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Wed, 23 Nov, 2016

How to create a life with meaning

How to create a life with meaning

Margaret Cunningham, 61, is “semi-retired” from her role in digital communications. She is a hobby writer who particularly enjoys writing articles with a reflective viewpoint. A lifelong passion of health and fitness means she is known in her community as “that lady who runs”.

It’s involuntary, we don’t think about it, we just do it. Our birth right so to speak. “Life is but a breath.” Yes, it’s a biblical verse, but whether you are an atheist or a believer, there is no denying both the profundity and the common sense of these words. They’re irrefutable and they’re indisputable. Life is but a breath. Everyone breathing in, breathing out.

According to the internet, on average an adult will take approximately 16 breaths per minute, 960 breaths an hour, 23,040 breaths a day, and 8,409,600 breaths in a year, not counting exercise. Take a moment – let’s think about this. Breathing is our sole means of transport between birth and death. Breathing is life. The body can go for many weeks without food and for days without water or sleep, but life will cease in a matter of minutes if we stop breathing.

But surely there must be more to life than the mechanics of breathing. Where are we travelling to? Where are we going? Ahhh yes the age-old search for the meaning of life. The questions. What gives my life meaning? What is my purpose here? Is what gives our life meaning actually the “meaning of life”?

These are big questions and I have no big answers for you, however I do think the search may be far simpler and closer to home than we expect. Instead of asking “What is the meaning of life?” we should ask ourselves, “What gives my life meaning?” and the answer to this can be found in our stories. When we die the breaths of our lifetime will be represented by our stories.

We all have a story to tell. You don't have to be powerful, famous, or have done something amazing to have a story. I used to think I didn’t have a story to tell or more to the point, a story BIG enough or important enough to tell. Compared to some of the larger issues in life such as hunger, poverty, sickness and war, my story or my life seems insignificant and uninteresting.

It is not the size of the story that counts – our day to day experiences, our fragility, our success and failures are our stories.

Whatever your story, if it can make a positive impact on someone else’s life then that story certainly has meaning and it has breath. I was reminded of this recently when my daughter, who is in her 30s, rang me regarding an out-of-control situation with her feisty seven-year-old daughter. Mum was feeling vulnerable, fragile and disappointed with herself for letting the situation escalate to the point of no return for both her and her daughter. Not one of her proudest moments, she said. I happened to share with her a not very proud moment of mine and said I too had experienced those same feelings of fragility and failure. My daughter had no idea. She had felt quite alone with her dilemma and told me how helpful it was to hear my story. So you don’t have to conquer Everest to have a story. We all walk many different paths in life and we each have a story to offer this world through our experiences.

The In Hindsight series are my stories. They are moments of insight from my experiences. I do not want them to die so I am breathing them out. Your stories and your truth may be similar or completely different. But they are yours and you should own them. Breathing in, breathing out. Life is but a breath.

Read more articles from Margaret’s In Hindsight series here.

*Image is a stock photo and not of Margaret Cunningham.

Do you have a story to share? Head over to the Over60 “Share your story” page.

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Basmah Qazi

News

Wed, 13 Mar, 2019

Inside Michael Jackson’s mysterious second marriage

Inside Michael Jackson’s mysterious second marriage

Michael Jackson’s first marriage to Lisa Marie Presley is the one that garners the attention of the masses, but his second trip down the aisle is one that is just as intriguing as the former.

After starting a blossoming friendship with nurse Debbie Rowe at the medical centre where she worked, the King of Pop looked to her for comfort after his break-up with Presley.

“[He and Lisa Marie] had broken up and I was trying to console him because he was really upset,” revealed Debbie in the Jackson-approved TV special Michael Jackson: The Footage You Were Never Meant To See.

It wasn’t long before Jackson and Rowe said “I do” at the Sheraton on the Park Hotel in Sydney in November 1996, surrounded by close family and friends.

His best man was an eight-year-old boy.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Michael Jackson ❤️ Debbie Rowe (@rowejackson.96) on Feb 20, 2019 at 10:32pm PST

During the wedding, Rowe was heavily pregnant with her first child – Prince Michael – who she would later “gift” to Jackson and exclude herself from their lives.

The Thriller star had previously had his heart broken by Presley, who refused to give in to his desires of becoming a father, saying he was too emotionally immature to raise a child.

Presley filed for divorce in 1996, citing “irreconcilable differences”. Their short but incredibly public stint came to an end and now, in Leaving Neverland, the star’s child sex abuse accusers claim the entire marriage was a stunt.

The explosive documentary claims that Jackson hoped to distract the public as his relationship with young boys became more frequent.

“I remember Michael saying to me that he’s going to have to have these public relationships with women, so that people don’t think anything,” accuser James Safechuck said.

“He would always say that he’d have to go get married at some point, but that it wouldn’t mean anything.”

Despite Presley admitting that her feelings for Jackson were always real, she was not prepared to give him the one thing he desperately wanted: A baby.

That’s where Rowe came in, as the nurse was willing to provide him with a child.

“He said, ‘I really want to be a dad,’ and I said, ‘So be a dad.’ He looked at me puzzled. I said, ‘Let me do this. I want to do this. You’ve been so good to me. Please let me do this: You need to be a dad.’ I nagged him into it, if you will,” said Rowe.

Jackson went on to confirm the story, saying: “She said, ‘You need to be a daddy.’ She wanted to do that for me as a present.”

Rowe went on to give birth to their first child, Prince Michael, in February of 1997. Jackson later told Martin Bashir on Living With Michael Jackson that both the couple’s children were “natural conceptions”.

Rowe remembered the birth of their first child.

“Michael was definitely more excited than I was. He was SO excited when I had a contraction. He was welling up ... and then his son was born. The look on his face ... I'd never seen him that happy. That’s what made it wonderful for me, to see the look on his face.”

The child was immediately taken to Jackson’s Neverland ranch and was cared for by a team of nannies. Rowe saw him six weeks after she gave birth.

Then 14 months later, daughter Paris was born. Jackson said he “snatched” his baby girl from the hospital when she was only a newborn.

“I snatched her and just went home with all the placenta and everything all over her.”

Rowe didn’t seem to mind that her relationship with her kids was kept to a minimum.

“We have a non-traditional family, and if it makes people uncomfortable, it’s a shame they’re not more open,” Rowe said in 2003. 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Michael Debbie Jackson💜 (@debbiemichaeljackson) on Feb 16, 2019 at 3:58am PST

“We have a family unit, and I will always be there for him and the children. People make remarks: ‘I can’t believe she left the children.’ I did not leave my children. My children are with their father, where they’re supposed to be.

“My kids don’t call me mum because I don’t want them to. They’re Michael’s children. It’s not that they’re not my children, but I had them because I wanted him to be a father. I believe there are people who should be parents, and he’s one of them. I could do something for him, and this is what I could do.”

The couple filed for divorce in October 1999, and Rowe gave Jackson full custody of their two children.

It was something that was already in place during the marriage, as Rowe lived away from Jackson’s place of residence.

She blames the lack of privacy for their separation.

“We split up because I couldn’t deal with it. I couldn’t go to the grocery store. I wasn’t used to it. Michael was more than generous: ‘You don’t have to go to the grocery store.’ But I want to. I really want to,” she said in 2003.

It is understood that Rowe has a closer relationship with her daughter Paris, who is now 20, compared to her son Prince Michael.

Taking to social media, the mother made a supposed jab against her former spouse saying, “One of the saddest things in this world is to see a child grow up hating one of their parents because they only got one side of the story."

Do you remember when Michael Jackson married Debbie Rowe? Tell us in the comments below. 

Over60

News

Thu, 5 Mar, 2020

Are cyclists in NSW required to wear helmets?

Are cyclists in NSW required to wear helmets?

Remember when you were young, you’d jump on your bicycle and go for a ride to the park, to a friend’s place or to the park? Not a care in the world, using your handy companion to get from place to place? Perhaps the last thing you’d be concerned about would be getting pulled over by a police officer and issued with a penalty notice.

Well times have changed, and concerns about the potential consequences of collisions involving bicycles have led to the enactment of laws which make it mandatory to wear helmets when riding.

Dangers of riding without a helmet

Statistics suggest that one in five people injured on Australian roads are cyclists, and research – and perhaps common sense – says your injuries can be reduced by wearing approved head protection.

So, what are the laws when it comes to wearing a helmet while riding a bicycle in New South Wales?

And are they justified?

The Laws

Australia was the first country in the world to implement mandatory helmet laws.

Victoria implemented the first laws in 1990, and the rest of the country followed suit shortly thereafter.

In New South Wales, Rule 256 of the Road Rules 2014 states:

The rider of a bicycle must wear an approved bicycle helmet securely fitted and fastened on the rider’s head, unless the rider is exempt from wearing a bicycle helmet under another law of this jurisdiction.

Does the law apply to everyone, even kids?

Yes. The applies to all bicycle riders, regardless of age, including kids on bicycles with training wheels and those who are being carried as a passenger on a bike or in a bicycle trailer.

What is an approved bicycle helmet?

An ‘approved bicycle helmet’ is one which has a sticker or label certifying it meets the Australian and New Zealand standard, which is AS/NZS 2063.

Helmets manufactured after 31 March 2011 must have an identifying mark from a body accredited or approved by the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ) certifying compliance with the standard.

What is a road-related area?

The requirement to wear a helmet applies to roads as well as ‘road-related areas’, which under Rule 13 of the Road Rulesinclude:

  • an area that divides a road,
  • a footpath or nature strip adjacent to a road,
  • an area that is not a road and that is open to the public and designated for use by cyclists or animals, and
  • an area that is not a road and that is open to or used by the public for driving, riding or parking vehicles.
What is the penalty for not wearing a bicycle helmet?

The maximum penalty a court can impose for the offence is 20 penalty units, which amounts to $2200, but most cases are dealt with by way of ‘on-the-spot’ fines in the sum of $344 (at the time of writing).

The fine for not wearing a helmet in NSW is the highest in the country – by comparison, the fine is currently $207 in Victoria and $25 in the Northern Territory, and critics argue the enforcement of fines is little more than a revenue raising exercise for police, with 17,560 penalty notices being issued for the offence from 2016 to 2019. 

Can I Get an Exemption?

Whereas there are laws in a number of Australian jurisdictions which clarify the situations in which an exemption from wearing a bicycle helmet can be obtained, New South Wales is one of the strictest jurisdictions when it comes to getting an exemption.

Applications for exemptions can be sought from the Roads and Maritime services on grounds such as medical requirements and religious obligations, and are determined on a case-by-case basis. 

Do Mandatory Helmet Laws Work? 

Considerable controversy exists regarding the efficacy of mandatory helmet laws.

Whilst there is no doubt wearing a helmet in an accident could save your life, requiring helmets often means less people are willing to cycle.

An analysis by Professor Piet De Jong from Macquarie University found that the benefits of mandatory helmet laws were negligible compared to the potential health benefits of more people riding.

Regular cycling has considerable health benefits including cardiovascular fitness, increased joint mobility and decreased risk of obesity. It is arguable that this net public health benefit is considerable compared to the isolated risk of injury.

Concerns have also been raised that helmets may make some forms of injury more likely. Critics of current laws often cite that helmets can cause a form head rotation injury called a ‘diffuse axonal injury’.

This injury occurs due to the rapid acceleration and deceleration of the head such as in whiplash.

In 2010, anti-helmet activist Sue Abbott successfully had her conviction and fine quashed on appeal to the NSW District Court arguing that the laws made riding more dangerous due to risk of diffuse axonal injury.

Although District Court Judge Roy Ellis still found the offence proven, he did have this to say on bike helmet laws:

“I frankly don’t think there is anything advantageous and there may well be a disadvantage in situations to have a helmet – and it seems to me that it’s one of those areas where it ought to be a matter of choice.’’

However, Ms Abbott’s theories have been disputed by many medical experts. For example, an analysis of cases by physicians through the University of Sydney in 2013 the risks of severe head injury times higher in non-helmeted cyclists that those wearing a helmet.

The debate regarding cycling helmets is unlikely to end any time soon with many activists longing to ride with the wind in their hair, without a hit to their hip pocket.

Written by Jarryd Bartle and Ugur Nedim. Republished with permission of Sydney Criminal Lawyers.

Ben Squires

News

Mon, 7 Dec, 2015

3 beauty habits that are ageing you

3 beauty habits that are ageing you

We’ve all experienced the “if a little bit is good then a lot must be even better” philosophy when it comes to beauty products and procedures. If weekly facial exfoliation is good, then wouldn’t daily be even better? Unfortunately it doesn’t always work that way and certain beauty habits when either used too frequently or not carried out properly can end up causing more harm than good. Here are three beauty rituals to scale back to avoid damage and stall the ageing process.

We’ve all experienced the “if a little bit is good then a lot must be even better” philosophy when it comes to beauty products and procedures. If weekly facial exfoliation is good, then wouldn’t daily be even better? Unfortunately it doesn’t always work that way and certain beauty habits when either used too frequently or not carried out properly can end up causing more harm than good. Here are three beauty rituals to scale back to avoid damage and stall the ageing process.

  1. Over exfoliating – We know that gentle exfoliation with the correct products is great for the skin and slowing down the ageing process. Over zealous application or using a harsh, granule based product however won’t do your complexion any favours leaving it irritated and oily. For immediate relief you can apply an over the counter 1% hydrocortisone cream to soothe inflammation while supplementing this with a switch to gentle, fragrance free products. Longer term, try using a chemical (as opposed to physical) exfoliator. These products use acids like AHA’s to gentle buff away dead cells instead of physically scrubbing them off.
  2. Whitening your teeth – At-home teeth whitening kits have come a long way and are more effective than ever before. Unfortunately that also means they are more likely to cause damage if over used or used incorrectly. Teeth whitening kits use peroxide to remove stains. Applying this caustic chemical too often or in large amounts can lead to sensitive teeth, porous tooth enamel and irritated gums. For immediate relief, stop whitening and switch to a potassium nitrate based toothpaste like Sensodyne. Spreading a fluoride based paste over your teeth and leaving overnight can also help rebuild the enamel. Longer term, limit whitening to once every 6 months and follow the directions explicitly.
  3. Scraping your feet – There’s nothing quite as satisfying as really going to town with a pumice stone or foot file. Unfortunately, those instant results can be a touch addictive, leading to frequent over scrubbing or attacks with a blade based foot implement. Pumice stones are also a breeding ground for bacteria making them an infection waiting to happen. For immediate relief, apply an antibacterial cream to the broken skin and cover with a bandage for protection until healed. Longer term try investing in a stainless steel foot file which can be sterilised regularly and always scrub in the shower where skin will be softer and damage less likely to occur. 
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Alex O'Brien

News

Thu, 5 May, 2016

Where are they now: cast of Happy Days

Where are they now: cast of Happy Days

Can you believe Happy Days has been off the air for over 30 years? It was one of the most popular TV shows of the 1970s, bringing us the entertaining hijinks of the Cunninghams – the picture-perfect 1950s family – for 11 seasons. But where is the cast today? Let’s take a look at what Richie, Howard, Marion, Joanie and the Fonz are up to today. Flip through the gallery above to see what they look like now.

Ron Howard – Richie Cunningham

After Happy Days, Howard turned his talents behind the camera, becoming an acclaimed director and producer. Some of his films include Apollo 13, A Beautiful Mind, for which he received the Best Director Oscar in 2001, and The Da Vinci Code. Howard, 62, also produced, narrated and appeared in cult sitcom Arrested Development. His next big project is Inferno, one of the sequels to The Da Vinci Code, which will be released this year.

Henry Winkler – Arthur “Fonzie” Fonzarelli

Winkler, now 70, was the breakout star of Happy Days and continues his success to this day. His production company Fair Dinkum Productions created the shows MacGyver and Hollywood Squares. He also established a strong friendship with Adam Sandler, and the two appeared in several of the latter’s films together. He also had a recurring role on Ron Howard’s show Arrested Development. He has two children and one stepson with his wife Stacey.

Tom Bosley – Howard Cunningham

Bosley, who played the patriarch of the Cunningham family, went on to appear in several television shows including ER, Walker, Texas Ranger and That ‘70s Show. Bosley, who had been fighting lung cancer, sadly passed away from a staph infection in 2010, just weeks after his 83rd birthday.

Marion Ross – Marion Cunningham

87-year-old Ross has remained active on television since Happy Days ended, appearing on shows The Love Boat, The Drew Carey Show, That ‘70s Show and Gilmore Girls. In the 90s she moved into voice acting, scoring roles on cartoons SpongeBob SquarePants, Kung Fu Panda and The Wild Thornberrys. She currently lives in California and has two children with her late husband Paul Michael.

Erin Moran – Joanie Cunningham

Moran, 55, never found a role as successful as Richie Cunningham’s younger sister Joanie but continued to appear in television series after Happy Days ended. She starred alongside Scott Baio in the short-lived spinoff Joanie Loves Chachi. She has since appeared in The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote and was a contestant on the TV show Celebrity Fit Club. Sadly, not much is known about her whereabouts today, since she was forced out of her home in 2012.

Anson Williams – Potsie Weber

Like his Happy Days co-star Ron Howard, 66-year-old Weber moved into directing. He began with after-school specials before directing episodes of Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place, Sabrina the Teenage Witch and Charmed. He has also been successful in the world of business, specialising in producing “drug-free solutions to debilitating problems.”

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Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

Toddler killed on drive with grandmother

A two-year-old girl is dead and a six-year-old is in hospital with serious injuries after a car accident north of Adelaide.

A Mitsubishi SUV collided with a parked tyre truck at Shea-Oak Log on Wednesday morning around 10:45 am, according to police.

The two-year-old girl was a passenger in the car and died at the scene.

A six-year-old girl, who was also a passenger, was taken to Women’s and Children’s Hospital with serious injuries.

The driver, a 63-year-old woman, was airlifted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with serious injuries.

According to Seven News, the woman was the grandmother of the two girls.

Reports reveal that motorists attempted to help the two-year-old girl before paramedics arrived, and the toddler was cut from the car wreck by emergency services.

Following the accident, the Sturt Highway was blocked off for several hours for northbound traffic, while Major Crash investigators examined the scene.

“Major Crash Investigators want to speak with anyone who may have seen a light rigid tyre repair truck stopped on the northern side of the Sturt highway between 10.30 am and 10.43 am this morning,” SA Police said in a statement.

Ben Squires

News

Tue, 22 Dec, 2015

5 reasons to embrace going grey

5 reasons to embrace going grey

Whether you’ve gone completely silver, erring on the edge or just considering allowing your natural grey shade to shine, we’ve got good news: Silver locks have never been more popular. From Hollywood starlets to screen veterans like Judy Dench, it seems everyone is embracing the shift to grey. Here are five reasons we think silver is smokin’.

  1. It’s a silver medal – Cindy Joseph, 60-something model for brands like Olay, Aveda and Dolce & Gabbana, has said that her modelling career only took off once she embraced her silver locks. Since then she’s been an outspoken advocate of “celebrating silver” stating that as a precious metal, silver is highly prized and valuable. Why should hair shade be any different?
  2. It saves time and money – Monthly or even three-monthly visits to the hairdresser can really add up. Not to mention the amount of time spent in the chair. Forgoing the need for colour means a trim every few months with no need for lengthy and expensive visit. Think about what you could do with the money saved!
  3. It’s empowering – There’s something to be said about feeling comfortable in the skin your in and embracing the wisdom and experience that comes with ‘going grey.’
  4. You can still play around – While it may seem that choosing to go grey means a lifetime of the same colour, there’s no reason why you can’t have fun with your new hue. Helen Mirren and her lilac tinted locks are the perfect example of this.
  5. It can help you stand out from the crowd – In a sea of highlights, lowlights and bleached ‘do’s, a head of lustrous silver is truly a beautiful sight.
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Georgia Dixon

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Mon, 23 Jan, 2017

In praise of doing nothing

In praise of doing nothing

Margaret Cunningham, 61, is “semi-retired” from her role in digital communications. She is a hobby writer who particularly enjoys writing articles with a reflective viewpoint. A lifelong passion of health and fitness means she is known in her community as “that lady who runs”.

We are all habitually busy. The hustle and bustle of the outside world touches everyone. Men, women and children – always on, always connected, talking, always doing. And if we’re not busy doing, then we’re busy thinking. Our dreams, our regrets, our goals, our fantasies, our desires, then worrying, planning, questioning, analysing, and then more worrying. There is little space left for stillness. There’s just so much going on and being still is not what we’re used to. Anything that denies the human spirit of refreshment is ‘busy,’ and the busier you are the more important it is to be still. Let’s not forget we are human beings, not human doings. 

Yes, life today is a never-ending juggle of… well a juggle of everything and everyone. Our day to day life – work, leisure, relationships, and our spirituality – is swathed in a 24/7 plethora of opportunity.  When I was growing up our teachers used to say, “The world is at your fingertips”. Back then it was a figurative statement, not true literally, but a piece of advice to let me know I could go anywhere or do anything if I set my mind to it.

Today it is a literal truth – the world is literally at our fingertips and we can be connected 24 hours a day to busyness. The noise of ‘busy’ sneaks into our every empty space. It even invades our sleep, disturbing our dreams with the constant chatter of our minds. The modern world is moving at an ever-increasing rate. We race about the place as though energy is endless, and associate ‘being busy’ with ‘being successful’. If we’re not doing something, we’re not being productive. To do nothing is often thought of as being lazy or weak, but the reality is, we all need moments of ‘stillness’ or ‘nothing’ in our life.

Energy is not endless. Author Patricia Spadaro says there is a time for action and a time for stillness – hours of activity must be balanced with stillness. She says that chronic busyness without taking time out to be still is like driving a car that’s almost out of gas and pretending the tank is full. You can push the pedal to the metal for a few more miles, and even run on fumes for a bit, but then the engine sputters and spits—and splat, you’re stranded.

“And when it comes to our bodies, it’s not always a simple matter of filling up the tank and we’re on the road again. Better to fill up your internal energy reserves before your tank is empty,” she says.

We are all searching for that one thing. It’s what drives our busyness. We spend so much time searching the how, what, when, where, why of life from the outside-in, that we have become like robots rapidly moving from one of life’s events to the other, living to everybody’s agenda except our own.

I have always had a reflective personality and used to love a time of stillness. It used to set the mood for reflection and moments of insight. But about 20 years ago circumstances in my life changed and right at the time when stillness was most important I pushed it away. A grandchild to raise, an elderly mother to care for, an unwell husband and a full-time job with and additional daily two-hour travel time gave me the excuse to let this time slide. In the end the image I presented to the world was taking 100 per cent of my time but portrayed nothing of ‘me’ on the inside, and I missed me. Making time for stillness has been integral to reconnecting with ‘me’ again.

Stillness simply means – to do nothing. In her book, The Joy Diet, Martha Beck writes that “doing nothing is the most productive activity you will ever undertake.”

She says that when we speak of stillness, this is exactly what we mean. Doing nothing. Not meditation, or prayer, or brainstorming, or problem-solving, only stillness.

It sounds easy doesn’t it – doing nothing? It conjures up images of lazy days at the beach or maybe a deserted island somewhere. What I found was, it was not easy to do nothing. Much easier to be busy and I had to learn to be still and am still learning. Here are a few suggestions for how you can practice stillness on your own journey.

1. Make time for stillness

Deliberately plan and make a time for stillness. Commit to it. There is no right or wrong time of the day for stillness.  The right time is the time that suits you. Fifteen minutes is usually the ideal length of time to quiet your mind. 

2. Find the right spot

You can find a moment of stillness anywhere – on your couch, on the floor of your bedroom, in your backyard, sitting on a jetty with your legs dangling in the water, or in a room/corner dedicated entirely to these moments. The most important thing is that you find a quiet place where you can practice stillness without interruption. Don’t take your phone with you.

3. Get comfortable

Sit down, find a comfortable position, and close your eyes. Relax our body from your face all the way down to your toes.  As you move down the body, clench then unclench your muscles. Pay special attention to the face – lots going on there - unclench the jaw, bring the tongue off your top palate, close the eyes and still the eyes by lowering the eyeball down the body. 

4. Clear your mind

This is often the hardest part.  It is for me. The body may be still, but my mind is firing with rapidly moving thoughts. I start with a focus on my breathing. I count my breaths. Breathing in 1, 2, 3, 4, breathing out 1,2,3,4. This way I remain in the present and it stills the clutter of the mind. This needs practise so start small with just ten seconds of thinking nothing at all. If thoughts keep popping up don’t fight them, let them come and pass through. Don’t give up on this.

5. Observe

After you have finished take a moment to think about what you felt during this time. Did you feel vulnerable, scared, peaceful, awkward or was it just too difficult. I personally don’t know what this means for you but what I do know is you have been in exactly the right place. Keep going.

You can be in the right place by simply doing nothing. Space for stillness is not just essential to staying sane; it will be the key that opens the door to you. Who are you without your busyness? It’s a good question to start with.

Being busy and productive is important, but to be really effective we need to insert a stillness space into our day. That space where you can open and explore the inner promptings that nudge at us fleetingly before most of us brush them away.  Sometimes our own space on the inside is a very vulnerable place to be.

Swiss Psychiatrist, Carl Jung describes what can happen in this space beautifully, “Who looks outside, dreams. Who looks inside, awakens.”

Related links:

How to create a life with meaning

Don’t let fear stop you from your goals

Parents at war: the harm it does to kids

Basmah Qazi

News

Wed, 13 Mar, 2019

Inside Michael Jackson’s mysterious second marriage

Inside Michael Jackson’s mysterious second marriage

Michael Jackson’s first marriage to Lisa Marie Presley is the one that garners the attention of the masses, but his second trip down the aisle is one that is just as intriguing as the former.

After starting a blossoming friendship with nurse Debbie Rowe at the medical centre where she worked, the King of Pop looked to her for comfort after his break-up with Presley.

“[He and Lisa Marie] had broken up and I was trying to console him because he was really upset,” revealed Debbie in the Jackson-approved TV special Michael Jackson: The Footage You Were Never Meant To See.

It wasn’t long before Jackson and Rowe said “I do” at the Sheraton on the Park Hotel in Sydney in November 1996, surrounded by close family and friends.

His best man was an eight-year-old boy.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Michael Jackson ❤️ Debbie Rowe (@rowejackson.96) on Feb 20, 2019 at 10:32pm PST

During the wedding, Rowe was heavily pregnant with her first child – Prince Michael – who she would later “gift” to Jackson and exclude herself from their lives.

The Thriller star had previously had his heart broken by Presley, who refused to give in to his desires of becoming a father, saying he was too emotionally immature to raise a child.

Presley filed for divorce in 1996, citing “irreconcilable differences”. Their short but incredibly public stint came to an end and now, in Leaving Neverland, the star’s child sex abuse accusers claim the entire marriage was a stunt.

The explosive documentary claims that Jackson hoped to distract the public as his relationship with young boys became more frequent.

“I remember Michael saying to me that he’s going to have to have these public relationships with women, so that people don’t think anything,” accuser James Safechuck said.

“He would always say that he’d have to go get married at some point, but that it wouldn’t mean anything.”

Despite Presley admitting that her feelings for Jackson were always real, she was not prepared to give him the one thing he desperately wanted: A baby.

That’s where Rowe came in, as the nurse was willing to provide him with a child.

“He said, ‘I really want to be a dad,’ and I said, ‘So be a dad.’ He looked at me puzzled. I said, ‘Let me do this. I want to do this. You’ve been so good to me. Please let me do this: You need to be a dad.’ I nagged him into it, if you will,” said Rowe.

Jackson went on to confirm the story, saying: “She said, ‘You need to be a daddy.’ She wanted to do that for me as a present.”

Rowe went on to give birth to their first child, Prince Michael, in February of 1997. Jackson later told Martin Bashir on Living With Michael Jackson that both the couple’s children were “natural conceptions”.

Rowe remembered the birth of their first child.

“Michael was definitely more excited than I was. He was SO excited when I had a contraction. He was welling up ... and then his son was born. The look on his face ... I'd never seen him that happy. That’s what made it wonderful for me, to see the look on his face.”

The child was immediately taken to Jackson’s Neverland ranch and was cared for by a team of nannies. Rowe saw him six weeks after she gave birth.

Then 14 months later, daughter Paris was born. Jackson said he “snatched” his baby girl from the hospital when she was only a newborn.

“I snatched her and just went home with all the placenta and everything all over her.”

Rowe didn’t seem to mind that her relationship with her kids was kept to a minimum.

“We have a non-traditional family, and if it makes people uncomfortable, it’s a shame they’re not more open,” Rowe said in 2003. 

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A post shared by Michael Debbie Jackson💜 (@debbiemichaeljackson) on Feb 16, 2019 at 3:58am PST

“We have a family unit, and I will always be there for him and the children. People make remarks: ‘I can’t believe she left the children.’ I did not leave my children. My children are with their father, where they’re supposed to be.

“My kids don’t call me mum because I don’t want them to. They’re Michael’s children. It’s not that they’re not my children, but I had them because I wanted him to be a father. I believe there are people who should be parents, and he’s one of them. I could do something for him, and this is what I could do.”

The couple filed for divorce in October 1999, and Rowe gave Jackson full custody of their two children.

It was something that was already in place during the marriage, as Rowe lived away from Jackson’s place of residence.

She blames the lack of privacy for their separation.

“We split up because I couldn’t deal with it. I couldn’t go to the grocery store. I wasn’t used to it. Michael was more than generous: ‘You don’t have to go to the grocery store.’ But I want to. I really want to,” she said in 2003.

It is understood that Rowe has a closer relationship with her daughter Paris, who is now 20, compared to her son Prince Michael.

Taking to social media, the mother made a supposed jab against her former spouse saying, “One of the saddest things in this world is to see a child grow up hating one of their parents because they only got one side of the story."

Do you remember when Michael Jackson married Debbie Rowe? Tell us in the comments below. 

Courtney Allan

News

Tue, 2 Apr, 2019

Are Madeleine McCann's parents still together?

Are Madeleine McCann's parents still together?

After their three-year-old child Madeleine McCann disappeared on a family holiday in Portugal in 2007, Kate and Gerry McCann have been through hell.

After being named and cleared as official suspects in the investigation and having faced intense media scrutiny as the world developed an intense interest in the case, it’s any wonder whether or not the family have found peace.

Although the McCanns have accepted a life where their eldest daughter is permanently absent, it’s safe to say that they’re tough circumstances for any couple.

Which begs the question: Are they still married after all these years?

The couple are both doctors and met in Glasgow in 1993. They have been described by friends as “inseparable” and have been together ever since, according to Now To Love.

They had Madeleine in 2003 after going through IVF treatment and still currently live in the same house they have always lived in. The family live in Rothley, which is a small English town in Leicestershire.

Kate McCann has said things haven’t always been easy. She explained in her 2012 autobiography Madeleine: Our Daughter's Disappearance and the Continuing Search for Her that she withdrew into herself after the disappearance of Madeleine.

The couple were horrified by fears that their daughter might have been kidnapped by a sex trafficker or that she was taken by a paedophile.

"Tortured as I was by these images, it's not surprising that even the thought of sex repulsed me," Kate wrote in the autobiography.

"I worried about Gerry and me. I worried that if I didn't get our sex life on track our whole relationship would break down."

Kate explained that if it wasn’t for her husband’s supportive nature and kindness, their marriage wouldn’t have survived.

"He would put his arm round me, reassuring me and telling me that he loved me," she recalled.

Kate also mentioned that she visits Praia da Luz, which is the Portuguese resort town where their daughter disappeared.

She told the BBC:

"I do go back for personal reasons...

"It's obviously the last place we were with Madeleine and I still walk those streets and I guess try and look for answers. It helps me, most of the time."

Have you seen the Madeleine McCann documentary on Netflix? Let us know in the comments.

Ben Squires

News

Thu, 10 Mar, 2016

Watch the last interview Jon English gave

Watch the last interview Jon English gave

This morning we brought you the very sad news that Jon English has passed away.

Mr English’s passing, as the result of complications in surgery, has been felt around the music world. In this video above, we see the last official interview with the rock music icon, and we’re reminded just what a legendary career Mr English had.

RIP Jon, and thanks for the memories.

Video credit: Facebook / Studio 10

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Wed, 20 Apr, 2016

New research links Alzheimer's risk with negative thoughts about ageing

New research links Alzheimer's risk with negative thoughts about ageing

How you feel about ageing could influence your risk against Alzheimer’s, according to recent research.

A study by Yale University found a link between negative thoughts on ageing and an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s. The findings, published in the journal of Psychology and Aging, analysed data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Ageing, where 158 healthy people were asked to rate their agreement with statements like “older people are absent-minded” or “older people have trouble learning new things”. The participants answered the questions in their 40s and 25 years later underwent annual MRIs for a decade.

Researchers found the people who believed in negative age stereotypes had “significantly steeper decline” in their hippocampal volume – the brain region which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease – than their peers who were more age-positive. People who believed ageist stereotypes showed the same amount of decline in three years as their age-positive group in nine years.

In the first study to look at the link between ageist stereotypes and age-related diseases, the researchers noted there was no conclusive proof that negative thoughts on ageing impacted the decline, but speculated the stress could be a reason.

“We believe it is the stress generated by the negative beliefs about ageing that individuals sometimes internalise from society that can result in pathological brain changes,” Becca Levy, a lead researcher from the Yale School of Public Health, said in a statement.

“Although the findings are concerning, it is encouraging to realize that these negative beliefs about aging can be mitigated and positive beliefs about aging can be reinforced, so that the adverse impact is not inevitable,” Levy said.

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Ben Squires

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Fri, 26 Feb, 2016

Our favourite Elizabeth Taylor looks

Our favourite Elizabeth Taylor looks

Elizabeth Taylor was considered one of the great beauties of her time and the last major star to come out of the classic film era. The British-American actress, businesswoman and humanitarian began as a child actress in the early 1940s before catapulting to international stardom.

She was known for her short stature, violet eyes and vivacious charms. What really cemented Elizabeth Taylor as a mega-starlet was her quintessential old Hollywood style that captured the hearts of world. Her perfume, White Diamonds, is the highest selling celebrity fragrance of all time

We take a look back in pictures at how Elizabeth Taylor became the style icon of her generation.

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Alex O'Brien

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Wed, 20 Apr, 2016

New research links Alzheimer's risk with negative thoughts about ageing

New research links Alzheimer's risk with negative thoughts about ageing

How you feel about ageing could influence your risk against Alzheimer’s, according to recent research.

A study by Yale University found a link between negative thoughts on ageing and an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s. The findings, published in the journal of Psychology and Aging, analysed data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Ageing, where 158 healthy people were asked to rate their agreement with statements like “older people are absent-minded” or “older people have trouble learning new things”. The participants answered the questions in their 40s and 25 years later underwent annual MRIs for a decade.

Researchers found the people who believed in negative age stereotypes had “significantly steeper decline” in their hippocampal volume – the brain region which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease – than their peers who were more age-positive. People who believed ageist stereotypes showed the same amount of decline in three years as their age-positive group in nine years.

In the first study to look at the link between ageist stereotypes and age-related diseases, the researchers noted there was no conclusive proof that negative thoughts on ageing impacted the decline, but speculated the stress could be a reason.

“We believe it is the stress generated by the negative beliefs about ageing that individuals sometimes internalise from society that can result in pathological brain changes,” Becca Levy, a lead researcher from the Yale School of Public Health, said in a statement.

“Although the findings are concerning, it is encouraging to realize that these negative beliefs about aging can be mitigated and positive beliefs about aging can be reinforced, so that the adverse impact is not inevitable,” Levy said.

Related links:

10 ways to bring good vibes in your life

Inspiring quotes from the world’s most successful people

10 questions to work out what really make you happy

Michelle Reed

News

Thu, 13 Oct, 2016

How to work out in 20 minutes

How to work out in 20 minutes

Finding the motivation to exercise, day in and day out, is often equally as testing as actually breaking a sweat. Whilst your friends brag about their morning hikes and Pilates classes, you wonder how they find the time and the energy for such gruelling work outs.

It may surprise you to learn that spending hours exercising is actually completely unnecessary. 

Over60 spoke to PhD qualified nutritional scientist and former fitness instructor, Dr Joanna McMillan, to find out how high intensity interval training (HIIT) can benefit over-60s.

A basic definition of HIIT is the repetition of exercise sets, alternating with short, active recovery periods. “For a lot of people, this is a lot easier to handle then doing a tough class or an hours run. Your period of doing something more high intensity are shorter” Joanna explains.

Benefits of this type of training include:

  • It increases your metabolism
  • You burn more calories than you would in a traditional workout
  • You continue to burn fat 24 hours after your workout
  • It can take you as little as 20 minutes
  • No equipment needed – design a workout around what you have.
However, Joanna says that the biggest win for over-60s with this type of training is not cardiovascular endurance, but healthy bones.

“One of the great things about doing high intensity interval training is that a lot of older people are walking or playing golf, bowling, swimming, because they think it’s better for their joints, but it’s not great for improving bone health. You’ve got to do something with a bit more impact”.

Studies show that strength training over a period of time can help prevent bone loss, and may even help build new bone.

Before you let images of dumbbells, treadmills and weight machines turn you off the concept, remember that HIIT training is flexible and Joanna assures that you can completely customise the training technique according to you.

“The good thing about HITT is that it is all relative to your level of fitness, you just have to make sure you are, at times, exerting yourself to close to your maximum performance”.

Joanna explains the best ways to apply HITT to your work out if you are a beginner is simply changing up your usual walk.

Walk for 30 seconds at a steady pace, and then for the next 30 seconds, walking at your briskest level. From here, you can build up to a more strenuous workout.

IsoWhey personal trainer and athlete Nardia Norman, has curated a special workout for Over60, aimed at those who are already at a fair cardiovascular level.

Perform the below exercises as many reps as you can in a 20 second period. Then, rest for 40 seconds before moving onto the next exercise. Follow the order of steps one to six.

After completing one circuit, rest for two mins. Repeat another three to four times depending on your fitness level.

  1. Body weight squats onto a chair
  2. Incline Ppush up (against wall or chair)
  3. Right leg leading step up
  4. Left leg leading step up
  5. Alternating Lunges
  6. Bird/dog exercise, which you can view how to do here.
All of the exercises in the circuit are compound exercises, meaning they use more than one muscle group at once, and are considered to be the most functional. Nadia has designed the program to improve the quality of movement needed for everyday living.

“Movements such as bending over, reaching overhead, walking, picking up items and getting out of bed will be improved with general strength training”.

However, Joanna warns that you still need to exercise with caution. “You have to be careful if you have a pre-existing heart disease, type 2 diabetes or any serious health problems.  Have a check-up with your doctor and work with your physiologists to make sure you’re working out right for your condition”.

Have you tried one of the training methods mentioned? How did it go? Let us know in the comments below.

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Number-one reason your health deteriorates as you age

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Melody Teh

News

Fri, 19 Jun, 2015

Mixed berry clafoutis

Mixed berry clafoutis

In case you didn’t know, a clafoutis is a baked French dessert that calls for berries to be arranged in a greased baking dish and covered with a thick batter. And if that description didn’t sell you, take our word for it, this clafoutis is delicious. Enjoy our mixed berry variation – but use your favourite berries.

Ingredients:

  • 150g raspberries
  • 150g blueberries
  • 1 tablespoon brandy
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 1/2 cup plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 3 large free range eggs
  • ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 250ml pouring cream
Method:

  1. Preheat your oven to 180°C, and lightly grease a baking dish.
  2. In a large bowl, mix your berries with the brandy and leave aside.
  3. Sift the flour into a large bowl, and stir in the sugar, salt, and baking powder.
  4. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, cream, and vanilla extract. Slowly add the cream mixture to the flour mixture and stir until it forms a smooth batter.
  5. Arrange the brandied fruit in the baking dish and slowly pour the batter over the top, ensuring the berries are evenly distributed.
  6. Bake for 35 minutes until the clafoutis is puffed and lightly golden brown. Remove from the oven, top with extra fresh berries, and dust with a little icing sugar.
  7. Serve with a dollop of whipped cream, or a little ice cream.
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ronit

News

Thu, 15 Oct, 2015

3 great ways to make money after you retire

3 great ways to make money after you retire

Online marketplaces are only growing – and mobile apps on smartphones are making it easier to tap into ways to use them and line your pockets with a little extra cash on the side.

If you have spare time and can price your skills right, you could turn simple things your knack for grammar and attention to fine detail into getting paid to edit someone’s resume for them, or perhaps rent our your spare room while you’re on vacation.

1. Take a simple task from Airtasker and get paid for it

Is there something you can do that another person might not have time or skills to do themselves? Sometimes they do, and just don’t have the inclination – but they do have cash. On AirTasker you can sign up to bid on tasks others post on the site. The quicker you are to respond, the higher chance you’ll get the job.

Jobs you might find here are things like – cleaning a flat, fixing someone’s resume, assembling IKEA furniture and more. 

2. Rent out your home on Airbnb

If you have a spare room, you might want to consider listing it on AirBnB – it won’t take more than an hour or two if you have a digital camera, or a smartphone.

Decide how much you’ll charge per night (Airbnb will take three per cent of your earnings) and give your first couple of visitors a discount so they’ll review you well. You will need to declare your earnings at the end of the financial year, but since it doesn’t take much to set up your home with some fresh towels and clean sheets, it’s certainly a handy way to pocket some cash.

3. Use your ute

Someone is always looking for someone with a ute that they can talk into helping them move a few items in and out of their home. The good news is that through MeeMeep you can quote how much you’ll lend your wheels out for on advertised jobs. Some of these might be eBay buyers who just want to pick up a fridge or other goods they can’t fit in their car boot. 

Georgia Dixon

News

Fri, 21 Oct, 2016

The easy-peasy guide to exercise as you age

The easy-peasy guide to exercise as you age

Sitting and lying down are classified as “sedentary” behaviours. You can be sedentary while watching television, driving your car or even whilst sitting down at a table with your laptop.

Leading integrative cardiologist Dr Ross Walker warns that “Physical inactivity as a result of a sedentary lifestyle can lead to something known as ‘disuse syndrome’, which may include conditions and illnesses such as premature ageing, obesity, cardiovascular vulnerability, musculoskeletal fragility, and depression”. In fact, every additional hour a day you spend sitting is linked to doubling the risk of being disabled.

The simple way to avoid becoming sedentary is by making sure that the level of activity you are doing is sufficient. You may think that simply going for a long stroll from the couch to the biscuit aisle at the corner shop will do the trick. However, Dr Walker explains that this isn’t quite enough.

“Low intensity exercises such as gardening and walking are definitely great to include into your daily routine, but you should not rely on these alone to alleviate risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle.”

To ensure that you are getting enough exercise, Dr Ross advises that you need to incorporate a “moderate intensity” activity into your daily routine, for at least 30 minutes. Absolute moderate intensity has been defined by the Victorian government health guidelines as any activity that expends three-and-a-half to seven calories per minute.

Here, we breakdown some ways that you can ensure you meet this target, and ones that don’t pounding the pavement. The Illinois Wellness Centre has suggested some activities that are not normally what we think of as moderate exercise, but can be used to expend the necessary calories.

Since calorie expenditure will vary according to different individual’s fitness levels, we also share easy ways that you can measure your exertion, to make sure you are hitting the level you need to. These methods from the Victorian Government's Better Health Channel make it a whole lot easier than you might think.

1. Go for a walk and talk in the park

Walking is a great way to improve and maintain your overall health, especially when done a tad more vigorously. Grab yourself a walking buddy and head down to your nearest oval, park, or even just a quiet street. Or, talk on the phone (as long as you are in a safe area). To make sure you are exercising at moderate intensity, use “the talk test” to monitor your exertion by taking note of these simple signs:

  • If you can talk and sing without puffing at all, you’re exercising at a low level.
  • If you can comfortably talk, but not sing, you’re doing moderate intensity activity. This is where you want to be!
  • If you can’t say more than a few words without gasping for breath, you’re exercising at a vigorous intensity.
2. Do the housework

Doing the housework can be a real bother, but it can also do you a world of good. Next time your dusting, vacuuming or just generally tidying, you can take you pulse to help you turn chores into exercise. Taking your pulse at regular intervals lets you know whether you are exercising within your target heart rate range. You can do this easily by locating the radial pulse on your inside wrist. Take your pulse before you start cleaning and then again when you’ve been cleaning for about five to 10 minutes. Continue taking your pulse at regular intervals.

To take your pulse:

  • Put the first three fingers of one hand against the inner wrist of the other hand just below the thumb.
  • Lightly press your fingers into the hollow next to the tendon on the thumb-side – your artery lies just beneath the skin.
  • Using a watch with a second hand, count your pulse for 15 seconds. Multiply this figure by four to get your beats per minute. (For example, 31 pulse beats over 15 seconds equals a pulse rate of 124 beats per minute.)
Your heart rate target range may need to be professionally recalculated to take your health and general fitness into account, but the general rule is as below. Always remember that medications and environmental factors can affect this, and read all the info on the Better Health Channel to find out exactly how to use this method in detail.

  • Age 60 to 65: 80 to 112 beats per minute
  • Age 60-plus: 78 to 109 beats per minute
3. Play with the grandchildren

Running around after the little ones in the back yard can be healthy as well as fun, if you keep your calorie expenditure in the right zone. Next time you’re tickling, picking up or playing with toy trucks, take a moment to measure your activity using the exertion rating scale. To keep within a moderate intensity, aim to experience the exercise signs three to seven in the chart below.

Exertion Table

Chart from Better Health Channel.

What ways do you exercise that don’t feel like work? Let us know in the comments below.

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Georgia Dixon

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Mon, 24 Oct, 2016

10 easy ways to relax and boost your intelligence

10 easy ways to relax and boost your intelligence

It can be oh-so tempting to kick back with a glass of wine and your favourite TV show at the end of the day, but as relaxing as this might be, it isn’t exactly doing wonders for your mental – or physical – health. Bright Side has come up with 10 ingenious ways to help you unwind AND become smarter at the same time.

Sound good? Take a look at their ideas above and tell us in the comments, what do you do to relax at the end of the day?

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Thu, 17 Oct, 2019

A real princess: Duchess Kate’s special tea party for cancer patients melts hearts everywhere

A real princess: Duchess Kate’s special tea party for cancer patients melts hearts everywhere

It was a scene many young children have imagined- a princess tea party with a real life princess.

Duchess Catherine attended an important tea party set up for her at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital during the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s Royal Tour in Pakistan. 

The mother of three happily obliged to wear a toy tiara when she visited 7-year-old Wafia Rehmani, while Prince William playfully sipped out of a tiny pink cup “brimming” with hot tea. 

The young patient, from over the border in Afghanistan, is battling a kidney tumour but hopes to be a doctor when she grows up. 

Wafia showed the Duke and Duchess her own toy medical kit. 

Princess Diana visited the same hospital over 20 years ago in 1996 and 1997. 

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal) on Oct 16, 2019 at 8:07pm PDT

Earlier in the day, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited the Badshahi Mosque inside the Walled City for an interfaith meeting to talk about promoting harmony and community. 

The royal couple also stopped by the National Cricket Academy in Lahore and both stepped up to the pitch. 

Prince William even managed to hit the ball for a six. 

The Duchess of Cambridge also gave her first speech of the tour at SOS Children's Village in Lahore, speaking parts of it in Urdu.

Georgia Dixon

News

Wed, 19 Oct, 2016

6 ways to stay active while you watch TV

6 ways to stay active while you watch TV

It was around the fourth episode of Outlander one wet weekend that I understood the true glueing-your-bum-to-the-seat effect of TV on demand and streaming services like Netflix.

As one gripping episode of drama rolls seamlessly into the next, there's not even an ad break to nudge you off the couch. Before you know it, you've watched three hours of TV and barely moved a muscle.

Just when you thought we couldn't get more sedentary than we already are, along comes a glut of good TV drama delivered in formats capable of turning even natural born fidgets like myself into sofa- bound sloths.

Watching multi-episode blocks of Game of Thrones or The Night Manager might be fabulous entertainment - but with a pile of studies linking prolonged sitting to chronic disease and death, it's no way to end a day already rich with long bouts of sitting in a car or behind the desk.

My Outlander binge made me think that maybe we need a view-and-move habit. In other words, find easy ways to mix viewing with simple movements. Doing stretches is one, but Alex Lawrence, Industry Development Officer from Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA), has a few others.

"I wouldn't recommend watching back to back episodes for long periods but if you do there are ways to break up the inactivity and get some benefits for your body as well," he says.  "As well as jumping on a treadmill or an exercise bike in front of TV, there are simple exercises that build strength and balance by using your own body weight."

1. Body weight squat

Stand with feet shoulder width apart and hands stretched out in front for extra balance.  Lower yourself by bending your knees until they're almost at a right angle with your thighs parallel to the floor. Keep your back straight; don't let your knees extend over your toes. Try 8-15 squats and aim for two or three sets.

2. Wall sit

Stand with your back against a wall and feet in front of you. Bend your knees and slide your back down the walls until you're in a squat position. Feet should be hip distance apart, thighs parallel to the ground and knees should be over your ankles.  Hold for 45 seconds. Holding a heavy object at the same time makes it harder.

3. Calf raises

Stand up straight and slowly move up onto your toes, lifting your heels off the ground. Slowly lower your heels. Aim for three sets of 10-20 repetitions.  

4. Side plank

Helps strengthen core muscles. Lie on your side propped on one elbow. Your shoulder should be directly above your elbow. Raise your hips so that your body is in a straight line. Aim for 45 seconds each side.  

5. Standing on one leg

Helps maintain balance - worth doing because balance diminishes without our realising it, says Alex Cross. Stand on one leg for as long as possible - and swap legs. For an extra challenge, pass a tennis ball from one hand to the other at the same time.

6. Invest in a therapy band

These stretchy bands (AKA resistance or exercise bands) are great for building strength with simple exercises.  The UK's National Health Service website has an easy at-home workout which includes exercises using resistance bands.

"Breaking up long periods of sitting for any reason is good advice - and it's best to involve movement not just standing up," says Associate Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis of the University of Sydney's School of Public Health.  

There's very little evidence that standing is enough to make muscles contract - and it's the muscle contraction that comes with movement that helps keep levels of blood glucose healthy and reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, he explains.

As for counteracting a long day's sitting, new research published in The Lancet in July found that 60 to 75 minutes daily of moderate intensity exercise (like brisk walking) seemed to eliminate the risk of premature death from any cause and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease linked to long hours of sitting. But as Stamatakis points out, not many of us manage to fit that in.

"The reality is that sitting now plays a big part in our lives so it's important to highlight the importance of reducing sitting time or breaking it up regularly and frequently with movement – but ideally this should be in addition to regular moderate to vigorous physical activity," he says.

But The Lancet study also found that an hour or so's exercise didn't seem to cancel out the risk of death when the sitting involved long hours in front of TV.

The reason why this may be complex – there are question marks over whether the health risk linked to heavy TV viewing is due to sitting, adds Stamatakis.

"There are other factors linked to watching a lot of TV that are associated with poor health including unemployment – and TV time may also be linked to increased snacking," he says.

Do you have any exercises you do at home that you can share with the community? Let us know in the comments below.

Written by Paula Goodyer. First appeared on Stuff.co.nz.

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Tue, 3 Mar, 2015

Hearing loss could be harming your relationship

Hearing loss could be harming your relationship

If you or your partner suffer from hearing loss, it could be affecting more than just your day-to-day life – it could also be deteriorating your relationship. The simple truth is that the key to a strong relationship is good communication. When that breaks communication breaks down, it can put a strain on what was once a strong bond.

Let’s take a look at why this is:

On average, people take up to 10 years to seek help for hearing loss. Combine this troubling fact with the shame some people feel in admitting their hearing isn’t what it once was, and you can have a relationship where miscommunication is bound to happen. Thirty-nine per cent of people say that miscommunications are the biggest contributor to stress in their relationship.

Even when you and your partner are aware of any hearing difficulties, arguments can still arise from one of you being misheard.

Related link: How you can help someone with hearing loss

But, believe it or not, there are some simple things you can do to help make hearing loss a non-issue in your relationship.

Setting expectations is an important part of this equation. If you and your partner take the time to understand that hearing loss can affect the time it takes to respond to even the simplest questions, you’ll be off to a great start.

Patienceis key. The few extra seconds that it can take for someone to process a statement or question can feel like a lifetime for their partner. Remember that they may be filling in the blanks between the few words they heard you say. Give them time, and don’t dismiss them if you don’t get an answer straight away.

Remember, don’t let hearing loss cause friction. Take the time to work through the problem, and you’ll be just fine.

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Ben Squires

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Mon, 1 Feb, 2016

The most popular perfumes that defined a decade

The most popular perfumes that defined a decade

Coco Chanel once said “A woman who doesn’t wear perfume has no future”.

This may have been a dramatic overstatement, but it worked. Chanel No. 5 is one of the most popular fragrances of all time with a bottle being sold every 30 seconds.

Iconic fragrances are akin to clothing pieces in their persuasive role in colouring fashion traditions. As visually iconic as Marilyn Monroe’s white, blow up dress was in 1955, those close to her knew her well by her signature Chanel No 5 scent.

The historic magazine pages are filled with fragrances that once upon a time gifted the experience of a new sensation and set the world alight. As Christian Dior says “What I remember the most about the women who were part of my childhood was their perfume – perfume lasts much more than the moment.”

Here are eight of the world’s most classic and recognisable scents that captured and defined a decade.

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Michelle Reed

News

Fri, 17 Jul, 2015

Understanding super fees

Understanding super fees

Every super fund will charge you fees for the services they provide. Some may charge less than others, and super funds that have lower fees will build your savings faster. But is that really all there is?

Main types of fees

Fees are usually deducted from your account at the end of the month, or when an action is taken. They can either be a dollar amount or a percentage of the money in your account. Usually you’ll be paying for:

  • Member fees – the normal administration fees that cover the costs of keeping your super account.
  • Management or investment management fees – these can vary depending on the different investment options used for managing your money.
  • Contribution fees – covers the administration expenses of getting and investing your contributions.
  • Adviser service fees – any personal advice provided about your super and investments are charged here. Your adviser may also get a commission if they’ve recommended certain investments to you.
  • Insurance premiums – you can usually choose to lower or increase the level of cover based on your needs.
The best way to tell if you are paying too much is to compare your fees with other superannuation products that provide similar services. The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) provides a Superannuation Calculator that will help you compare.

Choose a fund with lower fees. Even the difference of 1 per cent in fees will add up decades from now and eat into your investment money.

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Danielle McCarthy

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Fri, 16 Jun, 2017

Why some TV dialogue is so hard to hear

Why some TV dialogue is so hard to hear

Lauren Ward is a Doctoral researcher in Audio Engineering and General Sir John Monash Scholar the University of Salford.

Within 24 hours of the first episode of wartime drama SS-GB being broadcast the BBC received 100 complaints. Viewers took to Twitter to vent their frustrations with the sound. Many highlighted their annoyance that SS-GB was just the latest drama to be plagued with audibility problems. The debate has stretched to the House of Lords, with peers asking whether consultation with broadcasters is needed to address the issue.

So is making television sound understandable as simple as asking actors to speak up? The short answer is: no. Clean recordings and well enunciated speech will always make dialogue easier to understand. However, the relationship between the audio from our television and what we understand as speech is much more complex.

Many news sources and some of the Lords blamed “modern flat televisions which place more emphasis on picture quality” than sound quality.

There is some evidence to support this idea. A recent study investigating how television sets effect speech intelligibility showed the frequency responses (how loud different frequencies are, relative to each other) in different television sets differed by 10 to 20 decibels. This means the low pitched, rumbling background sounds might be made louder than intended, while the higher pitched voices stay the same volume. This issue is made worse by locating the speakers in the television sets so they point downwards or even backwards.

Speaker quality is likely a contributing factor but not all television programmes have suffered the same complaints as SS-GB. Assuming that viewers did not exclusively watch SS-GB with poor quality television speakers, this means there are other factors at play.

Have I heard this before?

Humans are quite good at understanding speech in challenging or noisy situations. Research indicates personal and psychological factors play a role in how well we are able to do this. Similarly, these factors may affect how we hear dialogue on television.

For example, you might find it easy to understand Bart and Homer’s banter in your 500th episode of The Simpsons while multitasking on Twitter and making a cuppa. But when the first episode of the newest crime drama comes on, you may find that you have to sit down and pay full attention to understand the speech. How well we understand speech is effected by whether we have heard a talker, a particular accent or what they are talking about before.

The effect of a familiar speaker on how well we understand speech is termed the “Familiar Talker Advantage”. Studies have shown that we are able to understand our spouse’s voice (a highly familiar voice) better than unfamiliar voices. Even voices we have only recently heard are easier to understand than those we are completely unfamiliar with.

How predictable the content of the speech is also effects how easily we understand it. It has been well established that when we have language or content cues in the speech, we recognise speech twice as accurately, even in the most challenging of listening situations. If we hear Homer Simpson’s brazen American voice exclaiming “Who ate all the …”, our brains are likely to insert the missing word as “doughnut”, not “bell peppers”. And we probably wouldn’t even notice we were doing it.

Happy Valley, another drama which had similar complaints to SS-GB, had accents pointed to as the issue. On that occasion, the Lords criticised “indecipherable regional accents”. It has been shown, for American English, that some accents are generally harder to understand than others regardless of your own accent. Though when hearing is greatly challenged by competing noise, speech in your own accent is easier to understand.

Familiarity with an actor’s voice, their accent and what they may be speaking about changes our perception of the clarity of dialogue. This does not solve the issue of audibility more generally though.

I’m no expert, but I know what I like

Part of what makes the problem of audible speech on television difficult to solve is that there is no consensus on what “good sound” sounds like. Even among the barrage of complaints about SS-GB, some found no issue with the dialogue.

MREC-TAG-HERE

Similar patterns have been seen in previous research by the BBC. An experimental football broadcast by the BBC in 2013 allowed viewers to adjust the volume of the crowd compared with the commentary. While most users (77%) agreed that they liked the personalised broadcast, they differed in their preferences. Some balanced commentary and crowd noise while others preferred all crowd noise or all commentary.

The technology which allowed the user to alter the sound mix in the 2013 experiment is called object based broadcasting. In the future, this may allow viewers to alter the levels of different segments of the broadcast based on their preference or their needs on their own televisions. Studies have shown that using the technology in this way can improve speech intelligibility. It has also been proposed by the BBC as a way forward for improving television sound for the hard of hearing.

The many factors effecting speech intelligibility mean that one particular sound mix will rarely make everyone happy. The provision of “personalisable” broadcast mixes, using object based broadcasting, may be the solution.

Written by Lauren Ward. First appeared on The Conversation.The Conversation

Over60

News

Thu, 16 Jul, 2020

Calls for new COVID symptom to be officially recognised

Calls for new COVID symptom to be officially recognised

A skin rash can be the only symptom shown on people infected with COVID-19, a new study has found.

Researchers at King’s College London said skin rashes and ‘COVID fingers and toes’ can occur in the absence of any other symptoms, and should be considered as key diagnostic signs of the virus.

Data collected from 336,000 people on the COVID Symptom Study app revealed that 8.8 per cent of people testing positive for the disease in the UK had experienced skin rash.

An additional online survey of nearly 12,000 individuals with skin rashes found that 17 per cent of those with COVID-19 reported a rash as their first symptom of the disease. About one in five (21 per cent) of the people who were diagnosed with the virus had rash as their only symptom.

The rashes can come in three forms: hive-type rash with itchy, raised bumps; chickenpox-type rash with small, itchy red bumps; and ‘COVID fingers and toes’ with sore, reddish or purplish bumps on fingers or toes.

“Many viral infections can affect the skin, so it’s not surprising that we are seeing these rashes in COVID-19,” said Dr Veronique Bataille, consultant dermatologist at King’s College London and the study’s lead author.

“However, it is important that people know that in some cases, a rash may be the first or only symptom of the disease. So if you notice a new rash, you should take it seriously by self-isolating and getting tested as soon as possible.”

The recognised symptoms of COVID-19 by the World Health Organisation currently include fever, tiredness and dry cough along with loss of taste or smell, skin rash and discolouration of fingers or toes.

Melody Teh

News

Tue, 10 Feb, 2015

English overtakes French as the world’s sexiest accent

English overtakes French as the world’s sexiest accent

The French have long held the position as masters of love but they may have just lost their place for sexist accent in the world.

A Time Out Global Dating survey of 11,000 people in 24 cities have chosen the British accent as the most attractive one. It was followed by the American, Irish and our very own Aussie accent. In fact, French was only chosen by 7.7 per cent people, coming in at fifth place.

However, all was not lost as Paris ranked as the city with the best dating scene. This was followed by Melbourne, Kuala Lumpur, Beijing, Chicago and London.

The study also asked respondents of their outlook in love. Sydneysiders were the happiest singles with 31 per cent declaring themselves “proudly single” while in the Big Apple, the opposite was true. The survey found 45 per cent of New Yorkers said they were “sad to be single.”

Technology was important in the modern day dating scene, with 58 per cent admitting to sussing out a date on social media first. 

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