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Royal family celebrates Queen Camilla's 77th birthday

<p>Queen Camilla is 77! </p> <p>Senior members of the royal family have wished her a very happy birthday, with the Prince and Princess of Wales sharing a portrait of her, taken by the Princess on Wednesday. </p> <p>The portrait was featured on the cover of a special commemorative edition of <em>Country Life</em> magazine, two years ago, which the queen helped edit for her 75th birthday. </p> <p>"Wishing Her Majesty a very Happy Birthday!" the Prince and Princess wrote on social media. </p> <p>The royal family's official X account also shared an image of her posing on the balcony of author Victor Hugo's former home in Guernsey on Tuesday, with the caption: "Wishing Her Majesty The Queen a very Happy Birthday today." </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">🎂 Wishing Her Majesty The Queen a very Happy Birthday today! <a href="https://t.co/Wv5fStZdlm">pic.twitter.com/Wv5fStZdlm</a></p> <p>— The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily/status/1813462770127392939?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 17, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>The Queen celebrated her birthday early, with private tour of Hugo's former home, the Hauteville House, where he lived for 15 years during his exile from France, which Camilla called a "remarkable treat". </p> <p>She was presented with some  vintage cheddar by Guernsey Dairy as "an early birthday present" and a group of school children from Sark sang Happy Birthday in the island's native language, Sercquiais.</p> <p>The Queen thanked the children and praised them for their singing. </p> <p>However, it was back to work for the Queen on her official birthday on Wednesday, with an appearance at the State Opening of Parliament, where she  joined the King for the traditional carriage procession to the House of Lords. </p> <p>One of the Queen's friends told the <em>Daily Mail </em>that: "It's not the tip-top way she would choose to be spending her birthday, but you won't ever hear a single word of complaint. <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">About anything, really.</span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">" </span></p> <p>"For someone who wasn't born into the Royal Family, she's got an extraordinarily strong sense of duty and the temperament to cope."</p> <p><em>Image: X</em></p> <p> </p>

Family & Pets

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Bon Jovi shares sad family news

<p>Jon Bon Jovi's mother, Carol Bongiovi has died aged 83, just three days before her birthday. </p> <p>Carol passed away at Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch, New Jersey, on Tuesday.</p> <p>The star paid a heartbreaking tribute to her, telling <em>People</em>: “Our mother was a force to be reckoned with, her spirit and can-do attitude shaped this family.”</p> <p>“She will be greatly missed.”</p> <p>No cause of death has been given. </p> <p>Carol affectionally known to fans as "mum Jovi" was a former Playboy Bunny and the founder of the Bon Jovi band's official fan club. </p> <p>Jon previously spoke about his mother's influence on his career in a 2020 interview with <em>The Big Issue</em>. </p> <p>"What I got from my parents was the ability to make the dream reality," he explained. </p> <p>"Even if you truly weren't any good at your craft, if you believed you were, you could work on it. As I got older I realised that was a great gift that I got from my folks.</p> <p>"They truly believed in the John Kennedy mantra of going to the moon. 'Yeah, of course you can go to the moon. Just go, Johnny.' And there I went."</p> <p>He also shared a <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C9QAG10uRk-/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">clip</a> from his 2020 music video for <em>Story of Love </em>on Instagram, which featured his parents and captioned it: "Momma. We carry you with us. Always ❤️❤️"</p> <p>According to <em>People</em>, Holmdel Funeral Home is in charge of Carol’s funeral, which will be private. </p> <p>Carol is survived by her husband John, her rocker son and other two children, Matthew and Anthony Bongiovi, as well as eight grandchildren.</p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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"Beyond devastated": Four-month-old baby dies after family outing

<p>A four-month-old baby girl has died after being exposed to extreme heat during a July 4 outing with her family. </p> <p>Weather records show that temperatures in the region soared to 120°F (48<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">°C) last Friday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">The infant, identified as T</span>anna Rae Wroblewski, had been out on a boat on Lake Havasu with her parents when she suddenly fell ill and lost consciousness on Friday evening.  </p> <p>Her family performed CPR until first responders arrived and were able to rush her to a local medical centre. </p> <p>She was then airlifted to Phoenix Children's hospital, where she was pronounced dead. </p> <p>Her parents are struggling to come to terms with their daughter's death, with mum Tanya Wroblewski saying: “We are beyond devastated, heartbroken, there are just no words.” </p> <p>“I will never understand why you had to leave us, you were just too perfect. I love you endlessly and I will look for you everywhere angel,” she shared in a Facebook post. </p> <p>The medical examiner has yet to release the infant's official cause of death, but authorities suspect that her death was brought on by a heat-related illness according to local news outlet, <em>News 12</em>. </p> <p>Tannas mum has also shared how difficult it was trying to explain her death to the infant's older sister. </p> <p>“We don’t understand why you had to leave, how could she?” she wrote. </p> <p>“She’s left out toys for you and made sure your favourites were all in the bassinet before bed the last couple nights. We are so heartbroken without you baby girl.”</p> <p>Her death is still being investigated by local authorities. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook / Alyssa Wolf Wroblewski/ NY Post</em></p> <p> </p>

Travel Trouble

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Woman seeks advice over family member’s list of “stupid” baby names

<p dir="ltr">A woman has asked for advice after seeing her cousin’s list of potential baby names, with many of them being classed as “just stupid”. </p> <p dir="ltr">The woman took to Reddit to explain how her cousin sent her baby name list to her family group chat, and no one has yet replied. </p> <p dir="ltr">"This was all sent in a family group chat and no-one has replied yet. I feel bad because at least she has put some thought into these names, especially compared to how most of us were named. On the other hand, well, you saw the names," the woman posted on Reddit. </p> <p dir="ltr">The names her cousin has shared and her logic behind them include: </p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Urf (Earth..because no matter where the child lives in life, it will always be on Earth. Can't fault the logic on that one – Elon Musk might take umbrage though.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Seaeoh (CEO. Apparently names dictate destiny and this name will cosmically transform the child into a successful business magnate.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Stamp (She was in a long distance relationship with the father for a while and they used to send each other letters with...stamps. Sounds like what a caveman character in a film would be called.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Biotic (Connected to antibiotic. This will protect the child from disease. Antibiotic would be and I quote, 'Ridiculous because it would sound like 'Aunty' which would cultivate bullying because she would sound old.')</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Ayeai (AI. In the future AI will take over and if it turns nasty it will go easy on her kid because they share a name.)</p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">The woman explained that her cousin's logic for going with something very different for a name is "so many children nowadays have unique names that it will eventually become normal and people with 'standard' names will be the ones looking foolish." </p> <p dir="ltr">She also added that her cousin's husband isn't "brave enough" to say anything about the names and hopes she will lose interest. </p> <p dir="ltr">The people of Reddit had a lot to say about the choices, with one person commenting, “Those are all just terrible." </p> <p dir="ltr">"I say this in the kindest way possible. She is delusional and I dare say, stupid. That poor future child deserves better," wrote another user. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another suggested a normal name might actually be unique now and wrote, "Having a 'standard' name is what is unique now. How many kids are being named David and Lisa?" </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Family & Pets

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John Farnham celebrates his 75th birthday with family

<p>John Farnham has been snapped celebrating his 75th birthday at an intimate dinner with his closest family. </p> <p>The iconic Aussie rockstar turned 75 on Monday, and marked the occasion at a dinner out with his wife Jillian Billman, his son Robert Farnham and Robert’s wife, Melissa.</p> <p>Melissa, who married Robert just months ago, took to social media to celebrate the occasion.</p> <p>“Happy birthday Papa J. Looking forward to making many more happy memories with you guys,” she shared.</p> <p>Robert also posted a sweet image of the “birthday boy” as the pair enjoyed some time relaxing with their feet up.</p> <p>Rob also shared another photo of him and his father to mark the milestone birthday, with the photo showing the father and son duo smiling at each other at Rob's wedding.</p> <p>This is the second time Farnham has been seen on social media since his extensive surgery to remove a tumour from his mouth, resulting in a reconstructing of his jaw. </p> <p>John was recently seen at Robert and Melissa's <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/john-farnham-steps-out-at-son-s-wedding-for-first-time-since-jaw-surgery" target="_blank" rel="noopener">wedding</a>, as the 74-year-old icon looked remarkably well and largely unchanged since his challenging surgery in August 2022.</p> <p>In the heartwarming photos shared on Instagram, John posed alongside his son, both beaming with happiness, as John looked dapper in a black suit with a bronze tie and matching pocket square. </p> <p>The joyous occasion was beautifully captured in a series of family photos, including John's wife, Jill, and other close family members.</p> <p>Fans flooded the comments with heartfelt messages, celebrating the happy family and John's remarkable recovery. "Such a beautiful father and son pic," one fan wrote, while another added, "Congratulations to you both. It's so nice to see your Dad, he looks fantastic! Love to you all."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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How you experience the menopause may have a lot to do with your family

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/megan-arnot-416253">Megan Arnot</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/ucl-1885">UCL</a></em></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30346539">menopause</a> happens around the age of 50, and for many women, the end of their fertile life is accompanied by uncomfortable symptoms, such as hot flashes, night sweats and anxiety. In the West, it is generally taken as read that these symptoms are a normal part of the menopause. But <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11330770">cross-cultural research</a> suggests that menopause symptoms are not necessarily inevitable.</p> <p>For example, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18521049">Japanese women</a> rarely report hot flashes, whereas for European women they are a common complaint. As a result, scientists have begun to focus on what causes this difference in experience and the potential impact that behavioural and lifestyle factors, such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16735636">smoking</a>, might have.</p> <p>Our latest <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ece3.5705">study</a> adds to this knowledge. We found that living away from your genetic family may worsen the menopause.</p> <h2>Family matters?</h2> <p>Where people live once they’re married varies across cultures. To investigate whether these different living arrangements affect menopause symptoms, we travelled to south-west China to collect data.</p> <p>In this region, there are groups with distinct living arrangements. First, the Han and the Yi, in which women typically leave their family after they’ve got married and live with their husband’s family. Second, the Mosuo and Zhaba, who engage in the practice of <em>zou hun</em> (“<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486437">walking marriage</a>”), where the husband and wife live separately with their own related families, and only visit each other at night.</p> <p>We found that women who remained living with their own family following marriage had significantly less severe menopause symptoms than those who went to live with their husband’s family.</p> <h2>In-law conflict</h2> <p>Many anthropologists are interested in how different levels of relatedness within households can have behavioural and physiological implications. For the menopause, we think the difference in symptom severity between the groups may be the result of the different levels of conflict that result from being more or less related to other members of your household.</p> <p>If a woman lives with her husband’s family, then until she has children, she is unrelated to anyone in the household. This lack of relatedness can cause <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40806-017-0114-8">tension</a> between the new wife and her husband’s relatives as they have little direct genetic interest in her.</p> <p>As well as conflict with non-related household members, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/evan.20226">earlier research</a> has shown that women who live with their husband’s family tend to argue with their partners more and are also more likely to get divorced. Additionally, rates of domestic violence are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27279077">higher</a> when women live away from their genetic family.</p> <p>But how does this relate to the severity of menopause symptoms? We think that increased levels of household conflict would result in the woman being more stressed. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4795524/">Stress</a> is known to worsen pain perception and so could aggravate menopause symptoms.</p> <p>In contrast to women who leave their kin group, women who live with their own family once they’re married also tend to have higher levels of <a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/slowes/publications/matrilineal-spousal-cooperation">social support</a>. There are more people to help with childcare and more shoulders to cry on. This can help to lower stress and thus soften the mental and physical burden of the menopause.</p> <h2>Global perspectives</h2> <p>While our research was conducted in China, globally, we see a wide range of living arrangements, which themselves can bring different levels of conflict and social support. In the West, many women live away from their families, which may mean that they lack social support, perhaps contributing to more turbulent menopause symptoms. Distance from one’s own family can also be seen to increase <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2005.00155.x">conflict</a> within the household – be it between a husband and wife, or wife and in-laws.</p> <p>These results aren’t an excuse to visit your in-laws less, but they show that menopause symptoms are not only about hormonal irregularities. They may also be a product of your social environment, which should be worth bearing in mind when approaching and going through the menopause.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/123621/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/megan-arnot-416253">Megan Arnot</a>, PhD Candidate, Evolutionary Anthropology and Behavioural Ecology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/ucl-1885">UCL</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-you-experience-the-menopause-may-have-a-lot-to-do-with-your-family-123621">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Body

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What are family trusts?

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jamie-thwin-1542004">Jamie Thwin</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/brett-david-freudenberg-226795">Brett David Freudenberg</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/melissa-belle-isle-1541984">Melissa Belle Isle</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a></em></p> <p>Many of us associate trust funds with their depictions in popular culture – tools used by the mega-rich to distribute enormous family incomes among “trust-fund babies”.</p> <p>Recently, they even went viral as the centrepiece of a <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@girl_on_couch/video/7363742421588512043?lang=en">TikTok audio</a> by user @girl_on_couch, who was famously “looking for a man in finance. With a trust fund. 6'5. Blue eyes.”</p> <p>But trusts – which allow assets to be managed by one party for the benefit of others – are more widespread than many people realise.</p> <p>And they’re not just for the super wealthy. In 2020-21, <a href="https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2024-01/p2024-489823-teis.pdf">more than a tenth</a> of all Australians who lodged a tax return reported trust income.</p> <p>Among the most common types of trust in Australia are family trusts, which are often designed to hold family assets or manage a family business. But their popularity has seen them regularly <a href="https://www.afr.com/policy/tax-and-super/treasury-eyes-tax-on-60b-in-family-trusts-20240131-p5f1fr">in the sights</a> of government and the tax office.</p> <p>So what exactly are family trusts, and why are they so controversial?</p> <h2>First, what’s a trust?</h2> <p>A trust is a legal arrangement where a person nominated as a “trustee” manages assets for the benefit of another person or particular group of people. It isn’t a separate legal entity, but rather a kind of legal relationship.</p> <p>A trust imposes what’s called an “equitable obligation” on its trustee to hold and manage trust assets according to specific conditions. These are set out in a “trust deed” for the explicit benefit of others, known as the trust’s “beneficiaries”.</p> <p>The trustee acts as the legally appointed administrator of trust assets. But the beneficiaries still have what’s called “equitable interest” under the arrangement – certain rights to benefit from those assets.</p> <p>Trustees can be individuals or companies. And many trusts include an “appointor” who has ultimate control. This appointor can appoint or remove the trustee at any time, and in many cases must consent to any changes in the trust deed.</p> <h2>What’s a family trust, and why do people use them?</h2> <p>In Australia, a family trust is a type of “discretionary trust”. Unlike a “fixed trust”, this means the trustee can make decisions about how assets and income are allocated among beneficiaries.</p> <p>Family trusts are typically set up by a family member for the benefit of the family as a whole. A family trust deed can nominate multiple beneficiaries. These could include not only parents, children, grandchildren and other family members, but also other trusts and even companies.</p> <p>Family trusts are often used to take advantage of their tax implications. This is because between years, trustees can vary the distribution of income among beneficiaries.</p> <p>Any undistributed income left in the trust is taxed at the top marginal tax rate of 45%. But if distributed to beneficiaries with lower personal marginal tax rates, it is instead taxed at those rates, which can lower the total tax paid.</p> <p>This explanation oversimplifies the picture, and there are a range of important caveats.</p> <p>For example, if a beneficiary is non-resident of Australia for tax purposes, the trustee will be liable to pay tax on their behalf. And distributing trust income to beneficiaries aged under 18 can attract penalty taxes at the top marginal rate.</p> <h2>Why are they controversial?</h2> <p>Family trusts have attracted scrutiny from regulators and the public for a range of reasons – perhaps chief among them, this broad ability to lower taxation by splitting income.</p> <p>The private nature of many trusts means there is often minimal public reporting, so it can be difficult to determine who in society is benefiting from trust income, and how. There are also concerns that they can be structured inappropriately to hide income.</p> <p>Trusts can also help safeguard a family’s wealth by shielding a family’s assets from the liabilities of individual members. The beneficiaries of a discretionary trust generally have no legal entitlement to its assets.</p> <p>This means that if the beneficiary goes bankrupt or gets divorced, the trust’s assets may often be protected from any claims.</p> <p>In 2019, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) released the findings of an <a href="https://www.ato.gov.au/about-ato/research-and-statistics/in-detail/general-research/current-issues-with-trusts-and-the-tax-system">independent review</a> into trusts and the tax system. Some key areas of concern include:</p> <ul> <li>income tax shuffles (individuals exploiting differences in income definitions between trust law and tax law to dodge higher marginal tax rates)</li> <li>using convoluted structures like circular trusts (two trusts that are beneficiaries of each other) to obscure trust income and who the ultimate beneficiaries are, and</li> <li>trusts failing to lodge tax returns.</li> </ul> <p>The use of trusts as a business structure in Australia may yet require further review.</p> <p>This should not only seek to examine the legislation underpinning trusts, but also improve education for accountants to better understand trust and tax law.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/232601/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jamie-thwin-1542004">Jamie Thwin</a>, PhD Student (Tax Law), <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/brett-david-freudenberg-226795">Brett David Freudenberg</a>, Professor of Taxation, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/melissa-belle-isle-1541984">Melissa Belle Isle</a>, Lecturer Taxation, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-are-family-trusts-232601">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Money & Banking

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Families of murdered campers finally break silence after Greg Lynn verdict

<p>The families of Russell Hill and Carol Clay have issued an emotional statement following the shocking <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/shocking-verdict-in-trial-of-murdered-campers" target="_blank" rel="noopener">verdict</a> in the murder trial against former Jetstar pilot Greg Lynn. </p> <p>On Tuesday, the jury found Lynn guilty of murdering Carol Clay in March 2020, but was found innocent on charges of murdering Russell Hill. </p> <p>The jury came to their shocking split decision after seven days of deliberation following the five-week trial. </p> <p>After the jury made their decision, the families of the two late campers issued an emotional statement. </p> <p>“Russell Hill and Carol Clay’s families are both relieved and devastated at the verdicts in the trial of Gregory Lynn,” a joint statement from the pair’s loved ones said.</p> <p>“We thank the jury for their verdict of guilty in the murder of Carol Clay. It was an extremely difficult task given that the accused destroyed so much evidence."</p> <p>“The verdict of not guilty in relation to the murder Russell Hill is devastating. There was not enough evidence to be sure of how he died.”</p> <p>The families said they understood the prosecution had an “enormous job putting a case together with limited evidence”.</p> <p>“The accused was the only person who saw and experienced what happened,” loved one said.</p> <p>“He was also the only person who emerged alive.”</p> <p>The statement thanked Victoria Police and its missing persons squad for their hard work in the case, volunteers who spent weeks searching for their loved ones, and Hill and Clay’s friends and family for their “support throughout this harrowing experience”.</p> <p>“We are heartbroken at the loss of our loved ones. It will take time to absorb the verdicts, put this behind us and set about healing and getting on with our lives,” the family said.</p> <p>Victoria police assistant commissioner Martin O’Brien said the Hill and Clay families had endured a difficult four years.</p> <p>“Their courage and resilience in the face of their grief, amidst enormous public attention, has been nothing short of extraordinary,” O’Brien said.</p> <p>“We will continue to support them in every way possible following this decision.”</p> <p>Throughout the trial, Lynn maintained his innocence, saying he did not kill the two campers, but admitted <span style="caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;">to destroying their bodies and the crime scene. </span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 16px; caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; background-color: #ffffff;">However, both prosecutors said he killed both of the campers intentionally and then tried to cover up his crimes. </span></p> <p><span style="background-color: #ffffff;"><span style="color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, Segoe UI, Roboto, Helvetica Neue, Arial, sans-serif, Apple Color Emoji, Segoe UI Emoji, Segoe UI Symbol, Noto Color Emoji;"><span style="caret-color: #212529;">Following the jury's verdict on Tuesday,</span></span></span><span style="caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;"> Lynn was taken back to prison where he awaits his sentence.</span></p> <p><em><span style="caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;">Image credits: Victoria Police</span></em></p>

Caring

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Cafe providing free meals to families faces shutdown

<p>Kirsty Parkes spends a lot of her time providing food and clothes to those in need amid the cost-of-living crisis by running a community cafe. </p> <p>But now, her beloved cafe may close if she doesn't receive urgent financial help. </p> <p>"We need to pay our bills in order to keep this going and if we don't pay our bills, people don't eat," Parkes, who has a big family of her own, told <em>A Current Affair</em>. </p> <p>Community Cafe in Sydney's south-west became a safe haven for dozens of men, women and children, with over 100 people showing up every day. </p> <p>The cafe is a place where people can get food, clothes and toiletries for free, as well as connect with others. </p> <p>"We want to help people restore their value and restore their dignity," Parkes said.</p> <p>"Our currency is just a little bit different. So instead of using money, we use manners. Because manners and kindness are free."</p> <p>However, with an increase in costs and a lack of donations, the beloved cafe may soon be forced to close. </p> <p>"Whether there's a rate rise, whether there's a petrol hike, all of these little things affect us tremendously and affect the numbers here," she said.</p> <p>"We need to come up with some funds really desperately before then just to keep us open," she added. </p> <p>She said that at this stage they require "around about $20,000. Our electricity bill alone is almost $10,000."</p> <p>She added that  Cabravale Diggers, who have been paying the cafe's rent, and Liverpool City Council, who have also been providing financial assistance, can't continue to hold responsibility for all of the bills. </p> <p>"We've had fantastic sponsorship, we have fantastic people that back us ... but they can't carry the burden of this," Parkes said.</p> <p>"This is something that the whole community needs to get behind and support."</p> <p>The cafe provides invaluable support for customers like Ted and Lola, who find it hard to find a similar community. </p> <p>"I go to church. Not even a church will help me," Lola said.</p> <p>"These people - I don't even know them and out of nowhere they're taking rich and poor, whoever turns up."</p> <p>"It's hard living on a pension. It's very hard," Ted added. </p> <p>Parkes added that as things are starting to run out, she has had to impose rations, which has been difficult for her. </p> <p>"We've had to then turn around and say 'look today, sorry we can only give you two loaves of bread because we just don't have enough for everyone that's going to come through the door'," Parkes said.</p> <p>"That stuff breaks my heart. It absolutely kills me because people are hungry."</p> <p>From Friday, customers may have to be turned away.</p> <p>"It's terrible. How can we close? We see over 120 people a day. It's terrible," one of the volunteers at the community cafe said. </p> <p>"The community needs it. We can't close. We absolutely cannot close."</p> <p> Those who would like to help the cafe stay open have been encouraged to visit their <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Communitycafe.inc" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Facebook page</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: A Current Affair</em></p>

Caring

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"Family unity is key": Sarah Ferguson gives cancer update

<p>Sarah Ferguson has shared an update on her cancer journey during her appearance at the Cannes Film Festival. </p> <p>The Duchess of York was diagnosed with <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/fergie-reveals-second-cancer-diagnosis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">skin cancer</a> in January, not long after getting a mastectomy for her breast cancer, which she was diagnosed with in June 2023. </p> <p>When asked about her health, the royal told <em>People</em>: "This evening I am doing very well. I think that we've managed to get cancer in the right place rather than cancer ruling me. I've put cancer in the corner." </p> <p>Speaking on the amfAR Gala red carpet, the 64-year-old added that it was important to be aware and get checked for both breast cancer and melanoma. </p> <p>“I think you always have to be aware. I think it’s great to get checked for breast cancer [and] melanoma. I think you just have to be very candid about it," she told the publication. </p> <p>“I think a lot of people get very frightened to talk about these things. I’m very happy with my mastectomy and my breasts and just to talk about it.”</p> <p>Her diagnosis coincided with both her brother-in-law King Charles, and Princess Catherine's cancer diagnoses, although both of them have not disclosed what types of cancer they have. </p> <p>She praised the royal family for their "unity" during these difficult times and how she has been able to offer support to Charles and Catherine. </p> <p>"I think family unity is key… I think the key to life is that we all support each other," she said. </p> <p>"And also forgiveness is a great thing. I think forgiveness of yourself, and forgiveness of others." </p> <p>Earlier this month, the duchess' eldest daughter Princess Beatrice spoke about her mother's health in her debut TV interview on <em>This Morning</em>. </p> <p>"She’s such a phenomenal icon. As a mum she’s been amazing," she said, adding that despite going through so much in the last year, she felt inspired by her mum's resilience and sense of purpose. </p> <p>“She’s doing really well. She had a bumpy health scare last year but she’s all clear now. But I think at 64, she’s thriving. She’s been through so much, but now she’s coming into her own.</p> <p>“We are just reminded when any parent or individual has a health scenario, you really need to get the checks you need as early as you possibly can.”</p> <p><em>Image: DGP/imageSPACE/ Shutterstock editorial</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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"The most gorgeous family": Tributes flow for slain mother and daughter

<p>Police are continuing their investigation into the tragic deaths of Jennifer Petelczyc and her daughter Gretel, who were shot dead in their own home by a 63-year-old man. </p> <p>The mother and daughter were killed on Friday, when the man was allegedly searching for his ex-partner before he fatally shot the pair in their home at Floreat, north-west of the Perth CBD. </p> <p>Since their tragic deaths, loved ones and members of the community have come out in droves to pay their respects. </p> <p>"They're the most gorgeous family and it's absolutely just heartbreaking that this has happened," said family friend Imogen Harrris.</p> <p>She added the slain mum, 59, and her 18-year-old daughter were the "kindest, most light-hearted, beautiful people".</p> <p>Neighbour Claire Andrews remembered them as people who "always gave back to the community".</p> <p>Jennifer Petelczyc was known to be a caring and generous member of the community, as she installed a $5,000 defibrillator to be installed outside her home for local people to use in a health emergency.</p> <p>According to police, the man who allegedly killed the mother and daughter, Mark Bombara, was a licensed firearms owner who possessed at least 13 guns and took multiple firearms to the Floreat home as he searched for his ex-wife, who detectives say was a friend of Jennifer. </p> <p>It is understood that Bombara’s wife left him weeks ago and had been staying with Ms Petelczyc.</p> <p>Officers confirmed the man's former partner was not at the home but the two women were tragically killed.</p> <p>WA's Premier Roger Cook has described the murders as "chilling and horrific", saying, "This is a circumstance in which a woman has sought refuge from a friend. It would appear that as a result of that, that friend and her daughter have come to harm."</p> <p>"They're innocent people ... simply doing what we'd all want someone to do when we're facing difficult circumstances. By every measure it looks senseless, chilling and absolutely horrific."</p> <p>"I think we need to take the opportunity today ... to reflect on it and think about how we can all continue to make the world a safer place."</p> <p><em>Image credits: 9News</em></p>

Caring

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Michael Schumacher’s family's huge legal victory

<p>Michael Schumacher's family are celebrating a big win against a German magazine, after they published what they claimed was an "exclusive interview" but was actually AI-generated. </p> <p>The family have received a compensation payment of 200,000 euros ($327,065 AUD) more than a year after the magazine printed the fake interview with the Formula One legend. </p> <p>In April 2023, Schumacher appeared on the front cover of German publication Die Aktuelle under the headline, “Michael Schumacher, the first interview”.</p> <p>The publishers left a very small hint on the page that the article wasn't real, although adding that the interview “sounded deceptively real”.</p> <p>The article seemed to be a real interview, featuring artificial "quotes" from Schumacher about his health and his family. </p> <p>However, Schumacher has famously not been seen publicly since his ill-fated skiing accident in the French alps in December 2013, and his health battle has been kept intensely private by his family. </p> <p>But the article appeared to say otherwise, with one of there fake quotes reading, "I can, with the help of my team, actually stand by myself and even slowly walk a few steps.”</p> <p>“My wife and my children were a blessing to me and without them I would not have managed it. Naturally they are also very sad, how it has all happened."</p> <p>“They support me and are standing firmly at my side.”</p> <p>A spokesperson for the Schumacher family confirmed to Reuters the $327,065 judgement had been made against Funke Mediengruppe, the owners of the magazine.</p> <p>Funke Mediengruppe apologised to the family in the aftermath of the article and the editor of Die Aktuelle was sacked two days after it was published.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Attila Kisbenedek/EPA & HANNIBAL HANSCHKE/EPA-EFE / Shutterstock Editorial </em></p>

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Amanda Keller's emotional family update

<p>Amanda Keller has shared an emotional family update while live on-air on the <em>Jonesy and Amanda show </em>on Monday. </p> <p>The radio star has shared an update on how her husband's battle with Parkinson's disease has affected them, as they try to plan their son's 21st birthday party. </p> <p>“It was a hard week for me leading up to it because I wanted to put a slide show together to play throughout the night,” she told her co-host Jonesy. </p> <p>“And normally that is Harley’s domain. He has been the guy who will make the kid’s birthday invitations. He’s very creative. He will work on the computer to do this funky stuff. Normally, he would have done all of that. And with the way things are with Harley at the moment, he’s got Parkinson’s disease and things are just hard.”</p> <p>Keller, who has been married to her husband since 1989, revealed that he had been <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/amanda-keller-shares-heartbreaking-family-news" target="_blank" rel="noopener">privately battling</a> with the disease for seven years, on October 2023. </p> <p>She then went on to share how the disease has affected her husband's ability to perform tasks that he was once good at. </p> <p>“So that kind of skill set isn’t with him anymore. He doesn’t have dementia or any of that stuff, but that stuff’s hard for him to do now.</p> <p>"And so I was going through a whole lot of photos on my phone and seeing photos of when he was well, and it was a very emotional week leading up to the 21st.”</p> <p>She then went on to confess that the situation had made her feel “lonely” and that her heart broke for her husband, who she thought couldn't attend the birthday party. </p> <p>“Leaving the house to go to Jack’s party, I thought, you know, it’s not right that Harley can’t come. Yeah, I really felt lonely thinking it’s our son’s 21st, but how hard it is for Harley and how much he would have loved to have been there,” she continued.</p> <p>But her husband surprised her, and managed to attend the event despite his ill health. </p> <p>“So there we are, having a great time. The speeches are about to start and my friend Kate said to me, There’s Harley. And I looked over. And I know what it cost him to be there.</p> <p>"He and our friend Pam and our driver friend Cole had conspired to get Harley there for the speeches. And it was so moving.”</p> <p>Keller, who was tearing up at this moment, proudly added:  “And a lot of people were shocked because they hadn’t seen Harley for a while. But I know what it cost him to get there. And he said to me, how could I not be here?”</p> <p><em>Image: Jonesy and Amanda show/ news.com.au</em></p>

Caring

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Cameron McCarthy's family break silence

<p>Cameron McCarthy's have broken their silence following the former AFL player's <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/afl-player-found-dead-at-just-29" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shock death</a> at just 29.</p> <p>The former Fremantle and GWS player died last Thursday after he was found unresponsive by paramedics at a house in Lake Coogee, Perth. </p> <p>McCarthy's family have shared a heartfelt obituary in The West Australian a week after his death. </p> <p>“CAMERON ALEX: Our beautiful son and brother, Cameron,” they wrote. </p> <p>“It is with heavy hearts that we’ve had to say goodbye for now.</p> <p>“A huge hole now exists in our lives. It will never be the same without you. Through the ups and downs we all rode with you, and you knew that we loved you so much.</p> <p>“You lit up every room with that gorgeous smile, and we will cherish our memories with you forever.</p> <p>“Until we meet again. Rest peacefully. Love you always, Dad, Mum, Jessica, Hannah, Drew, Ryan, Poppy.”</p> <p>Just two days ago, West Coast defender Tom Barrass also shared a heartbreaking tribute to his best mate. </p> <p>“Last week, this earth lost a beautiful man named Cameron McCarthy,” Barrass wrote.</p> <p>“A man who wasn’t concerned with money or power, instead creativity and experience. A man who approached all things with energy and excitement, as if viewing them for the first time.</p> <p>“A man whose presence will be sorely missed, but whose outlook and opinion can be heard any time we wish to listen. Enjoy the journey and lean in. Trust your intuition and have conviction, as that’s all you’ve really got in the end.</p> <p>“Men like these are hard to come by; so full of love, kindness and laughter. But that’s why they’re so special, and the lessons they teach last a lifetime.</p> <p>“I’m gonna miss you Universal Brother. Say Gday to the big fella for me and put in a good word please. Rest in Peace," he concluded his post, with AFL players sending their love and condolences in the comment section. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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$2 billion lotto win tears family apart

<p>A man who won one of the biggest lottery jackpots in American history has been accused of cutting his family out of their promised share after winning $2 billion (AUD) in the Mega Millions jackpot. </p> <p>The unidentified man has been in a legal battle with his daughter’s mum since November, after he accused her of violating a nondisclosure agreement by telling the rest of the family about his fortune before their daughter's 18th birthday in 2032, according to the Independent. </p> <p>He bought the winning ticket in Lebanon, Maine on January 13 2023. </p> <p>The mum – identified by a pseudonym, Sara Smith – claimed that he was the one who told his family about his lotto winnings, not her. </p> <p>The man's father supported Smith's claim and said that his son told him about the win and all the things he planned to do with his new-found fortune, which he collected through an LLC in a lump sum of over $750 million. </p> <p>“February or March of 2023, my son came to my house … and informed me and my wife that he won a large amount of money in the Maine State Lottery,” his father wrote in new court documents. </p> <p>“I understand that my son has stated that he told me nothing about his money ‘other than the simple fact that I had won’,” the dad wrote. “That is not true.”</p> <p>He also claimed that he didn't ask his son for any money, but the lotto-winner allegedly made a bunch of promises, including building his dad a garage to fix up old cars, buying his childhood home, setting up a million-dollar trust fund and funding future medical expenses for his dad and stepmum.</p> <p>The lotto-winner also allegedly demanded his father to not talk to Smith. </p> <p>"I told him … ‘You are not the son I knew’,” his dad wrote in the filing.</p> <p>“He got angry, calling me a ‘dictator’ and an ‘a**ehole’. I have not heard from my son since, and he has not done any of [the] things he promised.”</p> <p>The half-billionaire refuted his dad and Smith's claims. </p> <p>“I made the mistake of telling my father that I had won the lottery without having him sign a confidentiality agreement,” he wrote. </p> <p>“Our relationship deteriorated quickly thereafter,” he continued.</p> <p>“I did not tell him what I was doing with my money, how I was going to benefit my daughter, or any facts other than the simple fact that I had won.” </p> <p>He also accused his ex-partner of trying to reveal his identity to the world and that she wrongly accused him of trying to kidnap their daughter after he refused to pay for her and her new boyfriend's vacation. </p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p> <p> </p>

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Family of eight forced to live in tent amid rental crisis

<p>A family of eight have been forced to live in a tent for over six months as they wait to find suitable accommodation after their last rental lease ended. </p> <p>Cameron and Tameka Fletcher and their six children, aged between one and 10, have been living in a tent and have had to move from campsite to campsite since September. </p> <p>The couple claimed that the government can't support them because they have "too many children", and are waiting for public housing, but they might not meet the criteria to be eligible for it. </p> <p>They were reportedly staying in a makeshift tent city in a suburban park north of Brisbane.</p> <p>"We've always had a house, we've never done this," Cameron Fletcher told <em>Nine News</em>. </p> <p>"Everyone here is going through the same thing. But it's the only way to get help."</p> <p>“We can only do what’s best for our kids, to keep a roof over their heads,” his wife added. </p> <p>One of the couple's daughters is due to start school next year, and they have been struggling to enrol her as the family doesn't have a permanent address. </p> <p>The family said they are also struggling with day-to-day activities like finding breakfast, washing their clothes and getting the kids ready for school, and are using solar camping showers purchased from Kmart to clean themselves.</p> <p>According to <em>Nine News</em>, the family would be happy with a three-bedroom home but were told by state housing officials that they can only be offered a five-bedroom home to avoid overcrowding, but there are currently none available. </p> <p>In a statement issued to <em>Yahoo News</em>, a spokesperson for Department of Housing said it “has been working with the family since September last year, including providing accommodation which they chose to leave”.</p> <p>"As we’ve been assisting them to find longer-term options, they have declined further offers of accommodation," the spokesperson said.</p> <p>"With regards to social housing, there are eligibility factors that need to be met, including income thresholds. However, the department continues to work with the family to find a private rental and give any other support they might need."</p> <p>This comes as new <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/rent-shock-what-youll-be-paying-in-every-australian-suburb-in-2024/news-story/10b67da9ebe170a2e2d37caa7e66bf40" target="_blank" rel="noopener">PropTrack</a> data, released in March, revealed that rent has increased by 17 per cent over the past 12 months, across all the capital cities in Australia. </p> <p>More than half of Queenslanders who have applied for social housing are reportedly homeless and have had to wait for over two years amid a lack of supply and increased demands.</p> <p>Earlier this year, the Queensland government announced it was aiming to build another 53,500 social homes by 2046, with a $3.1 billion funding boost to deliver one million homes. </p> <p><em>Images: Nine News</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Families including someone with mental illness can experience deep despair. They need support

<div class="theconversation-article-body"> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/amanda-cole-1484502">Amanda Cole</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p>In the aftermath of the <a href="https://theconversation.com/bondi-attacker-had-mental-health-issues-but-most-people-with-mental-illness-arent-violent-227868">tragic Bondi knife attack</a>, Joel Cauchi’s parents have <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/video/2024/apr/15/bondi-junction-stabbings-joel-cauchis-father-extremely-sorry-for-victims-video">spoken</a> about their son’s long history of mental illness, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia at age 17. They said they were “devastated and horrified” by their son’s actions. “To you he’s a monster,” said his father. “But to me he was a very sick boy.”</p> <p>Globally, one out of every eight people <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/mental-disorders">report a mental illness</a>. In Australia, <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/mental-health-services/mental-health">one in five people experience a mental illness</a> in their lifetime.</p> <p>Mental illness and distress affects not only the person living with the condition, but <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-health/chronic-conditions-and-multimorbidity">family members and communities</a>. As the prevalence of mental health problems grows, the flow-on effect to family members, including caregivers, and the impact on families as a unit, is also rising.</p> <p>While every family is different, the words of the Cauchis draw attention to how families can experience distress, stress, fear, powerlessness, and still love, despite the challenges and trauma. How can they help a loved one? And who can they turn to for support?</p> <h2>The role of caregivers</h2> <p>Informal caregivers help others <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-welfare/informal-carers">within the context of an existing relationship</a>, such as a family member. The care they provide goes beyond the usual expectations or demands of such relationships.</p> <p>Around <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/australias-welfare/informal-carers">2.7 million Australians</a> provide informal care. For almost a third of these the person’s primary medical diagnosis is psychological or psychiatric.</p> <p>It has <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1074840708323598">long been acknowledged</a> that those supporting a family member with ongoing mental illness need support themselves.</p> <p>In the 1980s, interest grew in caregiving dynamics within families of people grappling with mental health issues. Subsequent research recognised <a href="http://www.aihw.gov.au/chronic-diseases/">chronic health conditions</a> not only affect the quality of life and wellbeing of the people experiencing them, but also impose burdens that reverberate within relationships, caregiving roles, and family dynamics over time.</p> <p>Past studies have shown families of those diagnosed with chronic mental illness are increasingly forced to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24943714/">manage their own depression</a>, experience elevated levels of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23692348/">emotional stress</a>, negative states of mind and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21165597/">decreased overall mental health</a>.</p> <p>Conditions such as depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia can severely impact daily functioning, relationships, and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36875411/">overall quality of life</a>. Living with mental illness is often accompanied by a myriad of challenges. From stigma and discrimination to difficulty accessing adequate health care and support services. Patients and their families navigate a complex and often isolating journey.</p> <h2>The family is a system</h2> <p>The concept of <a href="http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/40336/1/16937_eng.pdf">family health</a> acknowledges the physical and psychological wellbeing of a person is significantly affected by the family.</p> <p>Amid these challenges, <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/psychology/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2024.1330720/full">family support</a> emerges as a beacon of hope. Research consistently demonstrates strong familial relationships and support systems play a pivotal role in mitigating the adverse effects of mental illness. Families provide emotional support, practical assistance, and a sense of belonging that are vital for people struggling with mental illness.</p> <p>My recent <a href="https://www.collegianjournal.com/article/S1322-7696(24)00004-0/fulltext">research</a> highlights the profound impact of mental illness on family dynamics, emphasising the resilience and endurance shown by participants. Families struggling with mental illness often experience heightened emotional fluctuations, with extreme highs and lows. The enduring nature of family caregiving entails both stress and adaptation over an extended period. Stress associated with caregiving and the demands on personal resources and coping mechanisms builds and builds.</p> <p>Yet families I’ve <a href="https://www.collegianjournal.com/article/S1322-7696(24)00004-0/fulltext">interviewed</a> find ways to live “a good life”. They prepare for the peaks and troughs, and show endurance and persistence. They make space for mental illness in their daily lives, describing how it spurs adaptation, acceptance and inner strength within the family unit.</p> <p>When treating a person with mental illness, health practitioners need to consider the entire family’s needs and engage with family members. By fostering open and early dialogue and providing comprehensive support, health-care professionals can empower families to navigate the complexities of mental illness while fostering resilience and hope for the future. Family members <a href="https://www.collegianjournal.com/article/S1322-7696(24)00004-0/fulltext">express stories</a> of an inner struggle, isolation and exhaustion.</p> <h2>Shifting the focus</h2> <p>There is a pressing need for a shift in research priorities, from illness-centered perspectives to a <a href="https://shop.elsevier.com/books/child-youth-and-family-health-strengthening-communities/barnes/978-0-7295-4155-8">strengths-based focus</a> when considering families “managing” mental illness.</p> <p>There is transformative potential in harnessing strengths to respond to challenges posed by mental illnesses, while also <a href="https://www.collegianjournal.com/article/S1322-7696(24)00004-0/fulltext">supporting family members</a>.</p> <p>For people facing mental health challenges, having <a href="https://www.sane.org/information-and-resources/facts-and-guides/families-friends-carers">loved ones who listen without judgement</a> and offer empathy can alleviate feelings of despair. Beyond emotional support, families often serve as crucial caregivers, assisting with <a href="https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/emergency-help/helping-someone-else/">daily tasks, medication management and navigating the health-care system</a>.</p> <p>As the Cauchi family so painfully articulated, providing support for a family member with mental illness is intensely challenging. Research <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4804270/">shows</a> caregiver burnout, financial strain and strained relationships are common.</p> <p>Health-care professionals should prioritise support for family members at an early stage. In Australia, there are various support options available for families living with mental illness. <a href="https://www.carergateway.gov.au/?utm_source=google&amp;utm_medium=paid-search&amp;utm_campaign=10626744435&amp;utm_adgroup=102994881737&amp;utm_term=carer%20gateway%20wa&amp;gad_source=1&amp;gclid=EAIaIQobChMIt8T6pJzIhQMVjAyDAx2KiQl1EAAYASAAEgLj-fD_BwE">Carer Gateway</a> provides information, support and access to services. <a href="https://www.headspace.com/?utm_source=google&amp;utm_medium=search&amp;utm_campaign=HS_Headspace_Brand-Exact_Search_AU-INT_Google_NA&amp;utm_content=&amp;utm_term=headspace&amp;gad_source=1&amp;gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4uKKvpzIhQMVFheDAx1bZgk8EAAYASAAEgLy6vD_BwE">Headspace</a> offers mental health services and supports to young people and their families.</p> <p>Beyond these national services, GPs, nurses, nurse practitioners and local community health centres are key to early conversations. Mental health clinics and hospitals often target family involvement in treatment plans.</p> <p>While Australia has made strides in recognising the importance of family support, challenges persist. Access to services can vary based on geographic location and demand, leaving some families under-served or facing long wait times. And the level of funding and resources allocated to family-oriented mental health support often does not align with the demand or complexity of need.</p> <p>In the realm of mental illness, family support serves as a lifeline for people navigating the complexities of their conditions.</p> <hr /> <p><em>If this article has raised issues for you, or if you’re concerned about someone you know, call <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/">Lifeline</a> on 13 11 14.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. 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More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/amanda-cole-1484502"><em>Amanda Cole</em></a><em>, Lead, Mental Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/families-including-someone-with-mental-illness-can-experience-deep-despair-they-need-support-228007">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Kyle Sandilands' family member among first victims stabbed in Bondi

<p>Kyle Sandilands became emotional as he described how his wife’s relative Yvonne Wineberg was one of the first women targeted during the terrifying stabbing <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/family-of-bondi-killer-break-silence" target="_blank" rel="noopener">attack</a> at Westfield Bondi Junction on Saturday. </p> <p>Speaking to co-host Jackie “O” Henderson and newsreader Brooklyn Ross, on <em>The Kyle &amp; Jackie O show</em> Monday morning, Sandilands revealed: “One of the first women to get stabbed in the shoulder was a family member of ours.</p> <p>“She’s a very close family member to my wife.</p> <p>“So, we were watching it on TV, and saw one of our families were involved and carted off to hospital.”</p> <p>He also said that a Bondi lifeguard, who was trapped in Myer during the incident after the store had pulled down their shutters to keep shoppers safe, had asked to be let out so he could help Wineberg. </p> <p>“He could see our family member that got stabbed laying on the ground. There was so much blood.</p> <p>“He said, ‘if I don’t get to her, she’s losing too much blood’, so they let him out, and he rendered assistance before the paramedics arrived.”</p> <p>Sandilands didn't name the lifeguard, but shared the horrors the lifeguard witnessed during the attack. </p> <p>“He said every 50 foot there was another person laying in a pile of blood — all the way down the mall,” the KIIS FM star said. </p> <p>Wineberg was released from hospital on Sunday afternoon.</p> <p>NSW Police identified Joel Cauchi as the killer on Sunday.</p> <p>He was fatally shot just minutes after he left six dead and 12 injured during the terrifying attack at the shopping centre on Saturday night. </p> <p>Cauchi's parents have <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/family-of-bondi-killer-break-silence" target="_blank" rel="noopener">spoken out</a> and expressed their devastation and disbelief at their son's actions, describing the attack as "truly horrific".</p> <p>They also said that they "have no issues with the police officer who shot our son as she was only doing her job to protect others and we hope she is coping alright.”</p> <p>Cauchi's victims included Pikria Darchia, 55, Ashlee Good, 38;  Faraz Tahir, 30; Dawn Singleton, 25; Jade Young, 47; and Yixuan Cheng, 25.</p> <p>A dozen others – mostly women – were also injured, including Good’s nine-month old baby girl. </p> <p><em>Images: 7NEWS</em></p> <p> </p>

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Family of Bondi killer break silence

<p>The devastating events that unfolded at Westfield Bondi Junction have left a community in shock and mourning, grappling with the aftermath of a senseless act of violence.</p> <p>Joel Cauchi's frenzied stabbing attack claimed the lives of six innocent people, leaving many others injured and traumatised. Now, amidst the grief and confusion, Cauchi's family has stepped forward to offer their perspective on the tragic incident.</p> <p>In a statement conveyed through Queensland police, Andrew and Michele Cauchi, parents of the assailant, expressed profound sorrow and disbelief at their son's actions, describing the events as "truly horrific".</p> <p>“We are absolutely devastated by the traumatic events that occurred in Sydney yesterday,” they said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of the victims and those still undergoing treatment at this time.</p> <p>“Joel’s actions were truly horrific and we are still trying to comprehend what has happened. He has battled with mental health issues since he was a teenager.</p> <p>“We are in contact with both the NSW Police Force and Queensland Police Service and have no issues with the police officer who shot our son as she was only doing her job to protect others and we hope she is coping alright.”</p> <p>Assistant Commissioner Roger Lowe of the Queensland Police provided additional insights into Joel's circumstances leading up to the attack. He disclosed that Joel had been diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 17 and had received treatment for mental health issues in the past. However, in recent years, his condition had worsened, casting a shadow over his family's attempts to understand and support him.</p> <p>The revelation that Joel had been sleeping in a vehicle or at a backpacker hostel prior to the attack underscores the challenges faced by individuals grappling with mental illness and homelessness. Despite sporadic communication with his family, Joel's isolation and distress seemed to have deepened in the days preceding the tragic incident.</p> <p>In the wake of the attack, the Cauchi family exhibited a remarkable level of cooperation with law enforcement agencies, expressing concern for the welfare of Inspector Amy Scott, who was compelled to use lethal force against Joel Cauchi. Their willingness to engage with authorities and convey their condolences to the victims' families highlights their recognition of the gravity of the situation and their desire for understanding and healing amidst the tragedy as the community mourns this unbearable loss<span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">.</span></p> <p>Cauchi' victims included Pikria Darchia, a 55-year-old artist and designer; osteopath Ashlee Good, 38; security guard Faraz Tahir, 30; Dawn Singleton, 25 – the daughter of Australian multi-millionaire advertising guru John Singleton; architect Jade Young, 47; and student Yixuan Cheng, 25. A dozen others – mostly women – were also injured, including Good’s infant child.</p> <p><em>Images: Nine News</em></p>

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Family of Hannah McGuire make heart-wrenching decision

<p>A tight-knit community have rallied behind the family of Hannah McGuire, a 23-year-old teacher who was allegedly murdered by her estranged partner. </p> <p>Hannah's parents have made the heart-wrenching decision to reopen their family-run pub, the National Hotel in the town of Clunes, north of Ballarat, in the days after Hannah's death. </p> <p>As the hotel reopened, locals came together to lay flowers, buy drinks and share memories.</p> <p>“It’s the saddest thing, I can’t believe it,” one patron told <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/news/pub-run-by-family-of-hannah-mcguire-allegedly-murdered-by-ex-partner-reopens-in-clunes-north-of-ballarat--c-14266127" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7News</a></em>. “To the young girl, we gave her all the best."</p> <p>In the wake of Hannah's death, the women of Ballarat are set to join together for an emotional gathering to demand an end to violence against women. </p> <p>The Ballarat region's Samantha Murphy, Rebecca Young and Hannah McGuire have all allegedly died at the hands of men since the beginning of February.</p> <p>A rally will begin at Ballarat train station on Friday before gathering at Camp Street, family members of the victims, community leaders and family violence specialists will address the gathering.</p> <p>Organiser Sissy Austin, who was herself savagely attacked while on a run in 2023, said the issue was a national crisis.</p> <p>"Us Ballarat women, we're coming together to stand in solidarity, to feel less alone and to show the country that we're united," Ms Austin told <em>AAP</em>.</p> <p>"We're here to fight for our rights to live safely in our community for generations to come.</p> <p>"The Ballarat community aren't going to succumb to the violence that has been perpetrated in our town."</p> <p>Ms Austin said the three killings in a little over two months had stunned the community.</p> <p>"Women are living on eggshells," she said.</p> <p>"The most immediate thing that we need to do, particularly as women, is to unite and show men who choose to use violence in our community that we stand against it," she added.</p> <p>"Enough is enough."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Google Maps / Facebook</em></p>

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