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Grandmother in critical condition after stabbing

<p>A grandmother is in hospital in a critical condition after she was stabbed multiple times in an alleged DV incident in Perth's east. </p> <p>Police were called to a home on Jessie Road in Gooseberry Hill just after 5pm on Wednesday after neighbours allegedly heard  60-year-old Paulette Mountford's screams. </p> <p><em>Nine News </em>reported that her neighbours found her in the garden and were attempting to apply pressure to her neck and body before paramedics arrived. </p> <p>She was rushed to hospital where she underwent emergency surgery and remains in a serious but stable condition. </p> <p>Christopher John Sullivan, 72, was taken into custody at the property before being charged with one count of attempt to unlawfully kill.</p> <p>Her alleged attacker reportedly barricaded himself inside the home before tactical response officers negotiated for him to leave.</p> <p>Mountford is a church volunteer who has helped support victims of domestic violence. </p> <p>In a statement, her daughters said: "We are devastated and utterly heartbroken that our dear mother has endured such a horrifying ordeal." </p> <p>"All we want is for our mother to overcome her injuries."</p> <p>They also thanked everyone who rushed to her aid and those who are continuing to care for her. </p> <p>“For such a kind-hearted person to suffer so deeply is hard for us to understand," they said.</p> <p>“All that we want at this time is for our mother to overcome her injuries, and we pray and hope that she gets better soon.</p> <p>“She is a strong woman and we know she will be using all her strength to get better.”</p> <p>Sullivan appeared before the Perth Magistrates Court on Wednesday charged with attempted murder. </p> <p>He told the magistrate he intended to plead guilty but no official plea was entered, and the matter was stood down while he was provided legal advice. </p> <p>He did not apply for bail and was remanded in custody. </p> <p><em>Image: Nine</em></p>

Legal

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Hope: A double-edged sword in the human experience

<p>Hope has long been cherished as a source of strength in times of adversity. Yet, as explored in this edited extract from his new book <em>The Human Condition</em> by author Tony Grey, this fundamental emotion is not without its complexities and potential pitfalls.</p> <p>---</p> <p>As in the host of challenges explored in <em>The Human Condition</em>, the feeling of expectation and desire for something beneficial to happen, which we call hope, is as fundamental to the human condition as the will to survive; they’re linked within the evolutionary imperative. As Cicero pointed out, “dum spiro spero” (while I breathe I hope). Hope is a rolling prayer to life as time moves on, a whisper to the soul that things will turn out all right. </p> <p>The sentiment is generally unchallenged. Why should it be? In times of trouble, we need the balm of hope. Samuel Johnson said, “Hope is a species of pleasure, and perhaps, the chief pleasure this world affords.”</p> <p>While usually positive about hope, Greek philosophers were sometimes ambivalent about it, citing its propensity, through wishful thinking, to encourage indolence or actually cause harm. In Sophocles’ play Antigone, the Chorus sings, “Hope whose wanderings are so wide is to many men a comfort, but to many a false lure of giddy desires.” Plato observes that hope breeds a confidence which can exacerbate a precondition of arrogance in the powerful, leading to serious wrongdoing. “It is among these men that we find the ones who do the greatest evils.” </p> <p>Napoleon and Hitler are examples. And so is the Japanese government responsible for the Pearl Harbour attack.  At the World War Two surrender on the deck of the USS Missouri, a Japanese general was heard to say when he looked at the sky blackened by Allied aircraft flying past and the sea bursting with warships, “How did we ever hope we could win?”</p> <p>On the other hand, Plato stressed the motivational properties of hope when directed towards a good aim. And Aristotle links hope with the virtue of megalopsychia (high-mindedness) resulting from its inspirational role.</p> <p>I have an experience of this in my family. My nephew was born to my sister with intellectual disability, and other difficulties. His condition seemed hopeless. Nevertheless, from the first, hope was my sister’s support; it gave her the energy to carry on. Through the gloom it afforded a glimpse into the future where progress beckoned. And all along she demonstrated that hope is ineluctably linked to love.</p> <p>Aided by her husband, the father, she worked day and night teaching and inspiring the boy. When old enough he went to a special needs school and gradually progressed, indefatigably supported at home. Over time his condition improved so that eventually he could take and keep a simple job, cook food, and have friends (similarly disabled), a state absolutely unforeseeable at his early stage of life. Throughout all the difficulties, frustrations and threats of despair, hope sustained my sister and guided her to the wonderful achievement of saving a human life.</p> <p>In most instances, hope is personal in the sense that something specific to the individual or those who are close is wanted. However, it can range far beyond that into areas involving others such as team sports, politics, economic activity, justice, national and tribal identity, international relations – notably war, and pandemics like Covid. Within these fields, hope calls out for the survival and well-being of humanity and its prospects for moral and material progress. Such hope embraces faith in something bigger than the individual. If human beings have a purpose, its linked to that, and its fulfillment is somehow bound up in hope.</p> <p>This approach cries out for exploring a whole array of other challenges inherent in the human condition.</p> <p><strong>ABOUT THE AUTHOR</strong></p> <p>Tony Grey is an accomplished author residing in Sydney. His latest book, <em>The Human Condition</em>, ambitiously explores the hurly burly of human existence, and is available now for purchase through Halstead Press Publishers. Tony is the founder of Pancontinental Mining, a former director of Opera Australia and the Conservatorium of Music, and a former trustee of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Other books by Tony Grey include <em>Jabiluka</em>, <em>East Wind</em> and <em>Seven Gateways</em>. His writings have featured in the <em>Australian</em> <em>Financial Review</em>, <em>Quadrant</em> and the <em>Australian</em>. </p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Mind

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Popular TV host diagnosed with same condition as Bruce Willis

<p>Popular American TV host Wendy Williams has shared her diagnosis after being plagued by "hurtful rumours". </p> <p>The 59-year-old's medical team announced in a lengthy statement that she has been diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia: the same conditions actor Bruce Willis is battling.</p> <p>The news comes after Williams' family confirmed she had checked in to a facility to treat cognitive issues.</p> <p>“Questions have been raised at times about Wendy’s ability to process information and many have speculated about Wendy’s condition, particularly when she began to lose words, act erratically at times, and have difficulty understanding financial transactions,” her medical team said.</p> <p>They said Williams' symptoms first began in 2023, and was diagnosed with the neurological conditions just weeks later after undergoing a series of tests. </p> <p>Her team said both conditions have “already presented significant hurdles in Wendy’s life”.</p> <p>“Wendy would not have received confirmation of these diagnoses were it not for the diligence of her current care team, who she chose, and the extraordinary work of the specialists at Weill Cornell Medicine,” they said.</p> <p>“Receiving a diagnosis has enabled Wendy to receive the medical care she requires.”</p> <p>Williams chose to share the news to “advocate for understanding” and to “raise awareness” for the difficult conditions. </p> <p>“Unfortunately, many individuals diagnosed with aphasia and frontotemporal dementia face stigma and misunderstanding, particularly when they begin to exhibit behavioural changes but have not yet received a diagnosis,” her team said.</p> <p>“There is hope that with early detection and far more empathy, the stigma associated with dementia will be eliminated, and those affected will receive the understanding, support, and care they deserve and need."</p> <p>“Wendy is still able to do many things for herself. Most importantly she maintains her trademark sense of humour and is receiving the care she requires to make sure she is protected and that her needs are addressed."</p> <p>“She is appreciative of the many kind thoughts and good wishes being sent her way.”</p> <p>The TV presenter has previously been open with her medical battle with Graves’ disease and lymphedema, as well as other significant challenges related to her health.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Caring

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More than a third of people with dementia don’t know they have it – what to do if you suspect your partner has the condition

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-irving-1493654">Kate Irving</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/dublin-city-university-1528">Dublin City University</a></em></p> <p>Around <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-67613465">36% of people</a> in England with dementia are unaware they have the condition, according to a new report from the Dementia Commission.</p> <p><a href="https://chamberuk.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/12/231127-Dementia-Commission-Report-Embargoed.pdf">The report</a> suggests things health and care professionals can do to improve spotting early signs of dementia. But what can you do if you think your partner has the condition? And how can you broach the topic with them?</p> <p>If you are worried about your partner having dementia, here are some useful things to know.</p> <p>Dementia is a term for a range of diseases (for example, Alzheimer’s) which develop over time (months and years) and cause problems with memory and reasoning, communication, changes in personality and a reduction in a person’s ability to carry out daily activities, such as shopping, washing, paying bills or cooking.</p> <p>Dementia can present very differently in each person, so it’s about knowing what’s normal for your loved one. A person who has always been conscientious and organised starting to unravel is very different from a scatterbrained person just being slightly more scatterbrained.</p> <p>Grief and stress can affect memory yet not be the start of dementia. But they can also mask the start of dementia: we call this “diagnostic over-shadowing”.</p> <p>There are also age-related changes to cognition. For example, we take longer to learn when we get older. But a one-off event – no matter how dramatic – is not necessarily dementia. It’s about looking for a pattern of decline.</p> <p>If you see these changes happen in a short space of time (weeks or days) it is unlikely to be dementia and could be something more serious. This requires urgent investigation by a doctor.</p> <h2>Greatest fear</h2> <p>Dementia is one of the greatest fears of our age. The horror of perceived loss of self can cause people to avoid discussing the issue, discussing it in an unhelpful way (such as criticising or inadvertently humiliating) or discussing it with other relatives, but not the person they are noticing changes in.</p> <p>Over time, this can cause a lack of trust to develop. Discussing memory problems openly with the person at the point of a memory failure or if they raise the concern is best. Of course, it takes courage and makes us face our own vulnerability.</p> <p>Sometimes the person will be in denial or lack insight into the memory problems (this can be a symptom of dementia, but isn’t always). If someone raises a concern about their memory issues, I would urge you not to minimise this, as it probably took courage to admit their concerns.</p> <p>I heard a relative say to my mother: “Oh, you left the pot on the stove. I lost the car in the multistory the other day.” My mother had dementia – the relative did not.</p> <p>If they are adamant that they do not have concerns, this is harder to deal with. One approach is to say: “I know you are not concerned, but I am concerned and I wonder if you would see a doctor to ease my worries?”</p> <p>Also explaining that memory problems can at least to some extent have reversible causes means a visit to the doctor to at least rule these out is an important step. It may also be encouraging to say to the person: “If there is something with your memory that will get worse over time, would you want to know?” (Most people <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2408568/">answer yes</a> to this).</p> <h2>Seeing a GP</h2> <p>If your partner agrees to visit a GP, it is helpful to prepare by filling in a diary for a week with the kind of memory (or other) problems experienced, what was happening at the time and the effect of the memory failure. This can be shared with a GP to help them to understand the issues.</p> <p>When people hear even the suggestion of the word dementia, they are faced with the uncertainties of what will become of them, of what they will lose, what they can keep up and where they will end up. These uncertainties are often shared with family members. But research shows that positive aspects of timely diagnosis <a href="https://www.scie.org.uk/dementia/symptoms/diagnosis/early-diagnosis.asp">outweigh fears</a> over time.</p> <p>At the same time, there are often ongoing stresses to do with memory impairments or confusion. With these stresses, everyday life can be troublesome, family relationships can suffer, and people can find it difficult to be supportive of each other.</p> <p>Being honest and open is the best policy. Stating that we are in this together, I want to help, let’s meet whatever happens head on, can help. If a person becomes resistant, it may be there is another family member who might better assist the person.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/219172/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-irving-1493654"><em>Kate Irving</em></a><em>, Professor of Clinical Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/dublin-city-university-1528">Dublin City University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/more-than-a-third-of-people-with-dementia-dont-know-they-have-it-what-to-do-if-you-suspect-your-partner-has-the-condition-219172">original article</a>.</em></p>

Mind

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Name that rash: 6 common skin conditions (and how to treat them)

<p><strong>Psoriasis</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What psoriasis is like:</em></span> Psoriasis is made of red, scaly plaques that can be itchy and painful. It can show up anywhere but is most commonly found on the scalp, as well as the outside of the elbows and knees. It usually starts between age 10 and 30 and tends to be a chronic condition. “It’s a stubborn disease that waxes and wanes, so people have it for their whole lives,” says dermatologist Paul Cohen.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes psoriasis:</em></span> This skin rash is the result of your immune system attacking the skin’s cells, and creating new ones too quickly, which then build up into the plaques. There’s no one single cause, but the condition runs in families. Stress, obesity, smoking and having many infections (particularly strep throat) increase your risk.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat psoriasis:</em></span> The first step is generally topical steroids, which can be used for a week or two at a time to clear up the plaques. For ongoing treatment, people use a synthetic form of vitamin D (which slows skin growth), medicated shampoos and retinoids (a topical version of vitamin A). Daily exposure to sunlight also seems to help, as does moisturising well. For more serious cases, options include oral medications that suppress the immune system and phototherapy done in a doctor’s office with a special light. (Discover more applications of light therapy.)</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> Serious cases can involve the joints, a condition called psoriatic arthritis. Also, psoriasis increases your chances of having some other diseases, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and autoimmune conditions such as Crohn’s – all of which are, like psoriasis, linked to inflammation.</p> <p><strong>Hives</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What hives are like:</em></span> Hives are itchy, raised welts that often have a red ring around them. Their most salient characteristic is that they disappear after about a day, only to show up later in a different location. They come in two forms: acute, which lasts six weeks or less, and chronic.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes hives:</em></span> Hives are often the result of the body releasing histamine as part of an allergic reaction to drugs, food or some other irritant. They also commonly appear after a viral illness, as a side effect of your immune system revving up to battle the disease. “There are a number of potential triggers,” says dermatologist Katie Beleznay. In most cases, she adds, the specific origin is never determined.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat hives:</em></span> Since hives are a histamine reaction, over-the-counter antihistamines are the first line of defence. If that doesn’t clear them up, ask a doctor if you should use a stronger antihistamine or oral prednisone, an anti-inflammatory medication.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> Rarely, people suffer from ongoing outbreaks of hives almost daily for six weeks or more, a condition called chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). The treatment for CIU is the same as for regular hives, but in some cases, it can also be a sign of an underlying thyroid disease or cancer.</p> <p><strong>Eczema</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What eczema is like:</em></span> Eczema presents as patches of red, scaly skin that are extremely itchy, especially at night. These rashes often appear on the inside of your elbows and knees. If it’s more serious, the skin might blister or look thickened and white in those areas.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes eczema:</em></span> Eczema is the result of having a weakened skin barrier, which can lead to inflammation and an overreaction from your immune system. Most people are born with it, and your genes are partly to blame. “You’re more predisposed to eczema if you have a family history of asthma, hay fever or the condition itself,” says Lisa Kellett, a dermatologist in Toronto. Some research also suggests that it might be a reaction to pollution, or to not being exposed to enough germs in childhood. (Kids who have dogs, for example, are less likely to have eczema.)</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat eczema:</em></span> For general maintenance, apply a thick, hypoallergenic moisturizer to affected areas immediately after a bath or shower and at night. More serious flares will need topical prescription steroid creams or non-steroid immunosuppressant creams. People with stubborn eczema might also try phototherapy, which uses UVB light to help calm your immune system and reduce itchiness.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> Rarely, what looks like eczema is actually skin cancer, as both can appear red and scaly. “The difference with skin cancer is that it doesn’t go away if you use a steroid,” says Kellett.</p> <p><strong>Contact Dermatitis</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What contact dermatitis is like:</em></span> Contact dermatitis is a variation of eczema, and it looks similar – red, itchy patches on your skin. But unlike that chronic condition, this skin rash is a reaction to something specific and appears only where the offending object has made contact. “Poison ivy, for instance, will show up as a streak where the branch touched the skin,” says Beleznay.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes contact dermatitis:</em></span> Besides poison ivy, other common culprits that can cause the immune system to go into overdrive are face cream, jewellery or fragrances. You can also develop a new intolerance to something you’ve used for a long time, such as Polysporin. If it’s not clear what caused it, your dermatologist can do a patch test, putting small amounts of suspected substances on your skin to see if you react.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat contact dermatitis:</em></span> Contact dermatitis is treated with topical steroids, or a stronger oral one, to calm down your immune system and stop the reaction.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> Like eczema, the red and scaly presentation of contact dermatitis could be confused for skin cancer, which is another reason to visit your doctor if you’re not sure what caused it.</p> <p><strong>Rosacea</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What rosacea is like:</em></span> As rosacea is a dilation of the blood vessels in your cheeks and nose, it often presents as red, sensitive skin in those places. Another form of the condition also includes bumps that resemble acne. For some people, the skin on their nose thickens, making it appear larger.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes rosacea:</em></span> We don’t know what brings rosacea on, but, as with eczema, you’re more likely to have it if others in your family do, too. You’re also prone to acquire the condition if you have sun-damaged skin. “Rosacea usually begins around the age of 35 and gets worse with time,” says Kellett. People often find their flare-ups come after eating or drinking specific things.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat rosacea:</em></span> For many, preventing activation of their rosacea is as simple as avoiding triggers – but that’s easier than it sounds and can be a serious test of a sufferer’s willpower. “Those are often the good things in life,” says Beleznay, citing coffee, spicy foods and alcohol as common aggravators. Some women find that everyday makeup is enough to cover up the cosmetic impact of the condition, while others use prescription creams or laser or light therapy to constrict the blood vessels in the cheeks and reduce redness. For those whose rosacea includes bumps, topical creams or oral antibiotics often get rid of them.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> Rarely, what looks like rosacea can be confused for the butterfly rash that’s a symptom of lupus, a serious autoimmune disease. The butterfly rash is named as such because of the shape it makes on the nose and both cheeks.</p> <p><strong>Shingles</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What shingles is like:</em></span> Shingles normally starts out as a tingly, numb or bruised feeling in a small area, most commonly a patch on the abdomen. A few days later, a painful skin rash with blisters appears over those places. As the condition follows the path of a nerve, the rash eventually presents as a stripe that lasts from two to six weeks.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>What causes shingles:</em></span> This one’s easy: chicken pox. Even once you have fully recovered from that virus, your body never totally beats it; it simply retreats and lies dormant in your nerve cells, where, decades later, it can re-erupt as shingles. You’re more likely to get them if you’re immunocompromised or over 50, the age at which most public health agencies recommend you get the vaccine.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How to treat shingles:</em></span> If you suspect you have shingles, see your doctor immediately. “You have to go right away because studies show that people do much better if the antiviral pills are started within 72 hours of the rash onset,” says Cohen. Additionally, sufferers are often given medication, like a local anaesthetic or codeine, to help control the pain.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Possible red flag:</em></span> The real worry with shingles is that for some people, if it is not contained quickly, the virus can lead to longer-term pain lasting over three months and in some cases over a year. If the skin rash appears on the face, it can even cause blindness.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/name-that-rash-6-common-skin-conditions-and-how-to-treat-them" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Body

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3 ways to prepare for bushfire season if you have asthma or another lung condition

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kazi-mizanur-rahman-1057615">Kazi Mizanur Rahman</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/joe-duncan-1472949">Joe Duncan</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jo-longman-1221029">Jo Longman</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p>Australia’s bushfire season is officially <a href="https://www.nsw.gov.au/media-releases/fire-season-commences">under way</a> during an <a href="https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/what-the-return-of-el-nino-means/">El Niño</a>. And after three wet years, and the <a href="https://www.afac.com.au/auxiliary/publications/newsletter/article/seasonal-bushfire-outlook-spring-2023#:%7E:text=For%20spring%202023%2C%20increased%20risk,bushfire%20this%20season%20are%20widespread">plant growth</a> that comes with it, there’s fuel to burn.</p> <p>With the prospect of <a href="https://theconversation.com/its-official-australia-is-set-for-a-hot-dry-el-nino-heres-what-that-means-for-our-flammable-continent-209126">catastrophic bushfire</a> comes smoke. This not only affects people in bushfire regions, but those <a href="https://theconversation.com/bushfire-smoke-is-everywhere-in-our-cities-heres-exactly-what-you-are-inhaling-129772">in cities and towns</a> far away, as smoke travels.</p> <p>People with a <a href="https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/rccm.202012-4471LE">lung condition</a> are among those especially affected.</p> <h2>What’s so dangerous about bushfire smoke?</h2> <p>Bushfire smoke <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/common-air-pollutants.aspx">pollutes the air</a> we breathe by increasing the concentration of particulate matter (or PM).</p> <p>Once inhaled, <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/particulate-matter.aspx">small particles</a> (especially with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or less, known as PM2.5) can get deep into the lungs and into the bloodstream.</p> <p>Concentration of gases in the air – such as <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/ozone.aspx">ozone</a>, <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/nitrogen-dioxide.aspx">nitrogen dioxide</a> and <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/sulphur-dioxide.aspx">sulfur dioxide</a> – also increase, to pollute the air.</p> <p>All these cause the airway to <a href="https://www.alfredhealth.org.au/news/the-effects-of-bushfire-smoke-explained/">narrow and spasm</a>, making it hard to breathe.</p> <p>This can be even worse for people with existing asthma or other respiratory conditions whose airways are already inflamed.</p> <p>Emergency department visits and hospital admissions for asthma-related symptoms <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0013935119305742?dgcid=author">rise</a> <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33601224/">after exposure</a> to bushfire smoke.</p> <p>Smoke from the bushfires in summer 2019/20 <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/system/files/issues/213_06/mja250545.pdf">resulted in</a> an estimated 400 deaths or more from any cause, more than 1,300 emergency department visits for asthma symptoms, and more than 2,000 hospital admissions for respiratory issues.</p> <p>Even if symptoms are not serious enough to warrant emergency medical attention, exposure to bushfire smoke <a href="https://www.qld.gov.au/health/staying-healthy/environmental/after-a-disaster/bushfires/bushfire-smoke-and-your-health#:%7E:text=Signs%20of%20smoke%20irritation%20include,throat%2C%20runny%20nose%20and%20coughing">can lead to</a> cough, nasal congestion, wheezing and asthma flares.</p> <p>If you have <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-causes-asthma-what-we-know-dont-know-and-suspect-96409">asthma</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-is-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-25539">chronic obstructive pulmonary disease</a>, <a href="https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/bronchiectasis#:%7E:text=Bronchiectasis%20is%20a%20condition%20that,These%20tubes%20are%20called%20airways.">bronchiectasis</a> or another lung condition, or you care for someone who has, here’s what you can do to prepare for the season ahead.</p> <h2>1. Avoid smoke</h2> <p>Monitor your local air quality by downloading one or both of these apps:</p> <ul> <li> <p><a href="https://asthma.org.au/what-we-do/current-projects/airsmart/">AirSmart</a> from Asthma Australia has live air-quality information to help you plan and act</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://airrater.org/">AirRater</a>, developed by Australian scientists, can be another useful app to monitor your environment, track your symptoms and help manage your health.</p> </li> </ul> <p>During times of poor air quality and smoke stay indoors and avoid smoke exposure. Close windows and doors, and if you have one, use an air conditioner to recirculate the air.</p> <p>Avoid unnecessary <a href="https://28bysamwood.com/blog/fitness/should-you-exercise-if-its-smoky-outside/">physical activity</a> which makes us breathe more to deliver more oxygen to the body, but also means we inhale more polluted air. Consider temporarily moving to a safer residence.</p> <p>Well-fitting N95/P2 masks can reduce your exposure to fine smoke particles if you must travel. However they can make it more difficult to breathe if you are unwell. In that case, you may find a mask with a valve <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-protect-yourself-against-bushfire-smoke-this-summer-154720">more comfortable</a>.</p> <h2>2. Have an action plan</h2> <p>Taking your regular preventer medication ensures your lung health is optimised before the danger period.</p> <p>Ensure you have a <a href="https://www.nationalasthma.org.au/health-professionals/asthma-action-plans">written action plan</a>. This provides you with clear instructions on how to take early actions to prevent symptoms deteriorating or to reduce the severity of flare-ups. Review this plan with your GP, share it with a family member, pin it to the fridge.</p> <p>Make sure you have emergency medication available, know when to call for help, and what medication to take while you wait. You may consider storing an emergency “reliever puffer” in your home or with a neighbour.</p> <h2>3. Have the right equipment</h2> <p>High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters <a href="https://www.phrp.com.au/issues/online-early/residential-indoor-air-quality-and-hepa-cleaner-use/">can reduce</a> smoke exposure inside the home during a fire event by 30-74%. These filters remove particulate matter from the air.</p> <p>A spacer, which is a small chamber to contain inhaled medication, can help you take emergency medication if you are breathing quickly. You may want to have one to hand.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/214065/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kazi-mizanur-rahman-1057615">Kazi Mizanur Rahman</a>, Associate Professor of Healthcare Innovations, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/bond-university-863">Bond University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/joe-duncan-1472949">Joe Duncan</a>, Clinical Associate Lecturer, Northern Clinical School and Lecturer, Internal Medicine. Rural Clinical School (Northern Rivers), <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jo-longman-1221029">Jo Longman</a>, Senior Research Fellow, The University Centre for Rural Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/3-ways-to-prepare-for-bushfire-season-if-you-have-asthma-or-another-lung-condition-214065">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Insider spills on Liza Minnelli's condition

<p>After spending years in the limelight entertaining people, Liza Minnelli now lives her life secluded, according to an insider. </p> <p>The 77-year-old is receiving round the clock care while she's living alone at home surrounded by her dogs, favourite movies, and the memories of her stardom. </p> <p>The actress, known for her role as Sally Bowles in the movie <em>Cabaret,</em> reportedly doesn't leave home much because her condition has deteriorated. </p> <p>"Liza doesn't leave home much anymore," an insider told the <em>National Enquirer</em>. </p> <p>"She's surrounded by her dogs, her favourite movies and her memories.</p> <p>"She has spent a lifetime making other people happy, now it's time to focus on herself."</p> <p>However, there is still some hope that the actress might return to the stage for one last goodbye. </p> <p>"She does have plans to return to the stage one more time to say goodbye, even if it's in a wheelchair," the same insider said.</p> <p>Minelli has dementia which is reportedly getting worse, and in 2000 she was diagnosed with viral encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain which causes weakness or loss of movement in parts of the body, difficulty speaking, confusion or disorientation, among other things. </p> <p>She hasn't been seen in public for nearly a year. </p> <p>"Liza often fidgets, her hands shake, and she looks look horrible," a source said about the star's condition to  <em>RadarOnline.com </em>at the time. "She sometimes doesn’t know who she’s talking to and has a hard time focusing."</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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Police officer in critical condition after terrifying cliff fall

<p>A WA police officer is fighting for her life after she was severely injured in a 10m fall from a clifftop in Pile, Croatia. </p> <p>Ella Cutler, 25, sustained life threatening injuries including multiple fractures to her skull, spine, 12 ribs and several limbs, puncturing both her lungs, leaving her in critical condition overseas. </p> <p>She is currently receiving around-the-clock care in a Dubrovnik hospital, and her family is desperate to bring the "much loved" police officer home. </p> <p>"We can only imagine how scared she would be if she knew the full extent of her injuries, and we cannot even begin to convey how frightened we are for her, and how important it is for her to come home," her brother Joshua Cutler wrote in a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/please-help-us-bring-ella-home" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe</a> page created for Ella. </p> <p>"She has too much living left to do, too many people to help, and too much love to give for this to be how this chapter ends.</p> <p>"She has a long hard road ahead of her, and she will need all the help she can get," he added. </p> <p>Although her loved ones have flown to be by her side, her travel insurance claims have reportedly been knocked back, and her medical bills are increasing by the day. </p> <p>The family hopes to raise $500,000 to cover hospital bills and an air ambulance to bring the “devoted public servant” home. </p> <p>“She will require many more months of care, multiple surgeries and months of physical rehabilitation before she is able to impact the world as she once did,” Josh said.</p> <p>"She can't do this alone, and neither can we," he added. </p> <p>They also thanked the doctors for their hard work, and explained that they hope to provide better facilities for Ella by moving her to a bigger hospital where she can receive specialised care, which is vital for further recovery. </p> <p>"They know the best thing for her is to be home where she can feel the full impact of the love from her family, friends, and community."</p> <p><em>Images: 7News</em></p>

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"I'm really worried": BBC icon reveals incurable condition

<p>British broadcasting legend Alistair Stewart has shared the details of his devastating diagnosis, just after announcing his retirement.</p> <p>The 71-year-old shared that after suffering a series of strokes, he was diagnosed with vascular dementia. </p> <p>The news comes after he announced his retirement, after a 50-year career in the media that saw him in prominent roles with both <em>ITV News</em> and <em>GB News</em>. </p> <p>In an interview on <em>GB News</em>, Stewart explained that he first began feeling "discombobulated" six to nine months ago, which left him fearing he had "early onset dementia."</p> <p>He told his <em>GB News</em> colleague Camilla Tominey, "I wasn't forgetful but things like doing your shoelaces up properly, making sure your tie was straight, remembering the call time for your program is four o'clock not five o'clock – not turning up early or late – and stuff like that."</p> <p>"And I then decided I might have something wrong up here." </p> <p>He went on to explain he went to his GP to explain his symptoms, to which his GP recommended he have a scan to determine the diagnosis. </p> <p>When his scan results came back, he was told he'd had a series of minor strokes.</p> <p>"And it was like a scene from Casualty or Emergency Ward 10 because the results came back and I had indeed had a series of minor strokes – that are called infract strokes." </p> <p>"Not the big one where your face falls down and your arm goes doolally. But it's like pepper shots and the cumulative effect of that is that I had a diagnosis of early onset vascular dementia."</p> <p>His condition is "incurable" however Stewart says he is following doctor's advice to try and slow the progression of the condition.</p> <p>Since receiving his diagnosis, Stewart has retired from his role at <em>GB News</em> after more than 50 years as a journalist and broadcaster.</p> <p>He shared in a statement, "I'm nearly 71 and I still get the most tremendous lift from live television – it's the best job in the world."</p> <p>"However, the rigours of preparing for two live interview shows a week, and commuting from Hampshire to London for them, are considerable. I want to reduce my commitment while I'm still ahead as an old broadcaster, rather than an ancient one."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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"A night in hospital and a trip to the burns unit later”: Concerned mum's warning against popular fruit

<p><em><strong>Warning: This article contains images that some readers may find distressing.</strong></em></p> <p>A mother has taken to the internet and shared photos of her son’s severe burns that came as a result of him playing with a popular fruit. “A night in hospital and a trip to the burns unit later.” She began in her Facebook post.</p> <p>Her son Otis was playing happily outside with a lime in the sunshine, but the next day horror ensued.</p> <p>“It wasn’t until the next day that we noticed a rash appeared.” The mother said.</p> <p>The parents had assumed the rash must’ve been an allergic reaction to the lime juice, however, the rash quickly developed into a “horrific burn,” she added.</p> <p>The parents took Otis to the hospital where they were informed their son was suffering from a condition called phytophotodermatitis.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cku5QH2thxE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cku5QH2thxE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Tiny Hearts (@tinyheartseducation)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Phytophotodermatitis, more commonly known as margarita burn, is a little-known condition which causes burns to the skin when a chemical called furocoumarin reacts to sunlight.</p> <p>The chemical is found in limes, citrus fruit and some plants.</p> <p>“The small lime he had been innocently playing with - had now burnt his skin horrifically!“ The mum said. “If our story can help raise awareness into phytophotodermatitis at least something good has come out of our horrific experience!”</p> <p>The woman has urged parents to be on the lookout for this little-known skin condition.</p> <p>To minimise the risks of phytophotodermatitis, <a href="https://www.healthline.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Healthline</a> suggests washing hands and other exposed parts of the skin immediately after being outdoors, wearing gloves when gardening, putting on sunscreen before going outdoors and wearing long-sleeved tops and pants in wooded areas.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: Getty</em></p>

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What your hands reveal about your health

<p>A weak grip predicts a higher risk of heart attack or stroke and lower chances of survival, according to a new Lancet study of more than 140,000 adults in 17 countries.</p> <p><strong>Finger length: Arthritis risk</strong></p> <p>Women with ring fingers that are longer than their index fingers, typically a male trait, are twice as likely to have osteoarthritis in the knees, according to an Arthritis &amp; Rheumatism study.</p> <p>Low oestrogen levels may be a factor.</p> <p>The same feature has been linked to higher athletic ability and verbal aggression in both genders.</p> <p>In men, a significantly longer ring finger (indicating an in-utero testosterone surge during the second trimester) is associated with having more children and better relationships with women – but a higher risk of prostate cancer.</p> <p><strong>Shaky hands: Parkinson’s disease</strong></p> <p>Trembling hands could be the result of too much caffeine or a side effect of certain medications like antidepressants.</p> <p>But it’s a good idea to see your doctor if the issue recurs.</p> <p>A tremor in just one hand can be a first symptom of Parkinson’s disease, or it can indicate essential tremor, a treatable disorder that causes uncontrollable shaking.</p> <p><strong>Nail colour: Kidney disease</strong></p> <p>When Indian researchers studied 100 patients with chronic kidney disease, they found that 36 per cent had half-and-half nails (the bottom of a nail is white, and the top is brown).</p> <p>The nail condition may be caused by an increased concentration of certain hormones and chronic anaemia, both traits of chronic kidney disease.</p> <p>See your doctor right away if you notice half-and-half nails or a dark, vertical stripe beneath the nail bed – this can be hidden melanoma, a skin cancer.</p> <p><strong>Grip strength: Heart health</strong></p> <p>A weak grip predicts a higher risk of heart attack or stroke and lower chances of survival, according to a new Lancet study of more than 140,000 adults in 17 countries.</p> <p>Grip strength was a better predictor of death than was blood pressure.</p> <p>Researchers say grip strength is a marker of overall muscle strength and fitness, and they recommend whole-body strength training and aerobic exercise to reduce heart disease risk.</p> <p><strong>Sweaty palms: Hyperhidrosis</strong></p> <p>Overly clammy hands may be a symptom of menopause or thyroid conditions, as well as hyperhidrosis, in which overactive sweat glands cause far more perspiration than necessary.</p> <p>Most people with the condition sweat from only one or two parts of the body, such as the armpits, palms, or feet.</p> <p>A doctor may prescribe a strong antiperspirant to decrease sweat production.</p> <p><strong>Fingerprints: High blood pressure</strong></p> <p>When UK researchers studied 139 fingerprints, they found that people with a whorl (spiral) pattern on one or more fingers were more likely to have high blood pressure than people with arches or loops.</p> <p>The more fingers with whorls a participant had, the higher his or her blood pressure was.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in Reader’s Digest. </em></p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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This common condition could be the cause of your heel pain

<p>When it comes to our feet, heel pain is one of the most common complaints. According to a 2017 report by podiatry groups My Foot Dr and Balance Podiatry, almost half of people wake up with heel and foot pain at least once a week.</p> <p>If you’re one of them, you’re probably wondering why you’re in so much pain. You might think it’s bruising, but the most common cause of chronic heel pain is actually a condition known as plantar fasciitis.</p> <p>Characterised by a sharp pain that feels like a pencil poking your heels, plantar fasciitis occurs when the fibrous tissue of the foot has been over-stretched, causing inflammation and pain.</p> <p>“Too many cases of heel pain are passed off as bruising or wrongly attributed to heel spurs or Achilles tendonitis,” Sydney-based podiatrist Dr Brenden Brown, founder of A Step Ahead Foot + Ankle Care, explains. “Addressing heel pain really does start with getting the right diagnosis.</p> <p>“Many people suffering from heel pain ignore their condition – hoping rest and time will cure it. Every day I see patients who have put up with their heel pain for months, years even. Unfortunately the ‘zero action approach’ will just prolong the pain.”</p> <p>So, how is plantar fasciitis treated? Well, there’s a number of treatment methods.</p> <p>First, avoid the temptation to go barefoot. “Walking around without shoes puts additional strain on the plantar fascia (the fibrous ligament that runs along the bottom of the foot, from the heel bone to the toes) – particularly first thing in the morning, when the muscles and tissues are tight.”</p> <p>The same goes for thongs, fashionable footwear and other unsupportive shoes, which may only make the issue worse. Instead, Dr Brown recommends “a shoe with a firm shell and a small amount of structured cushioning”. Additionally, the shoe should never bend in the middle.</p> <p>Next, you need to focus on strengthening rather than stretching, which may worsen your pain. “There’s an increasing body of evidence to support strengthening exercises and isometric holds,” Dr Brown says. “These are relatively easy to perform; they don’t require fancy equipment but they help strengthen the plantar.”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D8ApCyO9gGc" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>Ultimately, if you’re experiencing any type of foot pain, it’s essential to seek help.</p> <p>“Choose a practitioner who understands heel pain and is open to new approaches,” Dr Brown recommends. “Ask the right questions to find out whether they’re experienced in dealing with this particular type of foot pain. You can ask: Is this something you treat often? How many patients do you see a day with heel pain? What’s your success rate?”</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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Julia Morris reveals debilitating health condition

<p>Julia Morris has taken to social media to ask her followers for help and advice on dealing with her debilitating medical issue. </p> <p>The <em>I'm a Celebrity... Get Me out of Here</em> host shared a photo of herself looking unwell and miserable in bed, revealing that she has been suffering from vertigo. </p> <p>She simply captioned the photo, "Vertigo... Any thoughts?"</p> <p>Vertigo is an abnormal spinning sensation that causes you to feel dizzy, nauseous and off-balance.</p> <p>It can often be triggered by certain head movements or problems in your inner ear and makes all aspects of everyday life extremely difficult.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CslEhL-rJs8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CslEhL-rJs8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Julia Morris (@ladyjuliamorris)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Julia received help from her fellow famous friends in the comments, with comedian Dawn French sharing in her ailments. </p> <p>French wrote, "I’ve had it when on tour. Mine is related to the stage lighting. Sets m’brain off fizzin like a volcano. Try to diffuse the lighting maybe… ? and have an object that is lit in the darkness of the auditorium which your eyes can latch on to for focus. Good luck qweeeen x".</p> <p><em>Home and Away</em> star Lynne McGranger chose to keep her tips secret, advising Morris to "DM (direct message) me! I have the BEST remedy. Works every time."</p> <p>Former <em>Gogglebox</em> star Yvie Jones shared in the comments that she also suffers from the condition, and she was "scouring the comments section" for advice. </p> <p>Another, seemingly less helpful, commenter suggest Julia simply try the method of "vodka and valium" to feel better. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Bindi Irwin breaks down on camera about health condition

<p>Bindi Irwin has shown her vulnerable side in an emotional new video shared with fans about a personal ordeal.</p> <p>The 24-year-old spoke candidly to the camera for 15 minutes with guest appearances from husband Chandler Powell and their daughter Grace Warrior.</p> <p>In the video, Irwin recalled the “insurmountable” pain she experienced due to endometriosis before finally <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/how-did-you-live-with-this-much-pain-bindi-irwin-hospitalised" target="_blank" rel="noopener">undergoing surgery</a>.</p> <p>The wildlife warrior announced her diagnosis in March 2023, but the new video explains her symptoms - which started when she was just 14 - that left her with “extreme fatigue, nausea and pain”.</p> <p>“I had pain every single day of my life. No matter where we went, where we were going, I would be falling asleep. I felt like I constantly had the flu,” she said.</p> <p>The conservationist confessed she tried everything to solve the issue, undergoing CT scans, MRIs and ultrasounds.</p> <p>“I was always in pain. We tried for a year, and finally a doctor told me it was just part of being a woman.”</p> <p>Irwin said it was that comment from a doctor that led her to suffer in silence.</p> <p>However, after giving birth to her daughter in 2021, the pain “magnified” to a point where it was “out of this world”.</p> <p>“I remember countless times of Grace needing me, and me crawling to her cot at night,” she revealed, becoming emotional.</p> <p>“I can remember being with Grace and lying on the floor in agony. I had a stabbing pain in my side, I couldn’t get up or I would throw up, and I was scared I would pass out.</p> <p>“I was so scared because I was worried if I was alone with Grace, something would happen to me, and she would be on her own.”</p> <p>Irwin dubbed the pain “insurmountable” and something that “would knock me over”.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cr31hQDANTp/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cr31hQDANTp/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>She said that after returning to new doctors, she was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue.</p> <p>It was not until she spoke to a friend, Leslie Mosier, who recently had endometriosis surgery that she realised they shared similar symptoms.</p> <p>“Leslie said the only way to diagnose for sure is through exploratory surgery.”</p> <p>Irwin said she decided to undergo surgery in the US as her daughter would have Powell’s parents, who live in Florida, nearby for support while she recovered.</p> <p>At this point in her video, Grace woke up and joined her mum on camera.</p> <p>“Mama went for surgery and they found 37 lesions and a chocolate cyst on my ovary,” she said in a child-like tone for the sake of her daughter.</p> <p>“Ovary!” Grace chirped.</p> <p>“After surgery mama feels a lot better hey? I had to recover for quite a while, and mama feels so much better, and she can run around with you!”</p> <p>Irwin went on to share what she has learned being a part of the endometriosis community.</p> <p>She revealed that excision surgery is considered the “gold standard” for the disease, where lesions and cysts are removed.</p> <p>“Everyone says we need to educate the public, but there also needs to be a shift in health care. Doctors need more information because endometriosis has myriad symptoms. Doctors need the right tools to diagnose.”</p> <p>She explained that her own endometriosis has been classified as severe, which means she may have to undergo more surgeries in the future to keep symptoms at bay.</p> <p>“I feel like. I got a second chance at life... I feel like a new woman.”</p> <p>In a final message of encouragement, Irwin said, “If you’re in pain, it’s so hard to get up every day and forge ahead.</p> <p>“Keep searching for those answers and never give up on you.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram</em></p>

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Kerri-Anne Kennerley heads to the jungle … on one condition

<p>Former TV presenter Kerri-Anne Kennerly is returning to screens across Australia as one of 13 contestants heading into the South African jungle for the 2023 season of<em> I'm A Celebrity...Get Me Out Of Here!</em></p> <p>However, while the others will be forced to present a natural front to the cameras, Kerri-Anne wriggled her way into maintaining the “glamorous” look viewers have come to expect from her after 40 years in television. </p> <p>While speaking to Ten’s Nick Bond, Kerri-Anne revealed that the network’s head of entertainment, Stephen Tate, has been trying to get her to participate in the show every year since it began - something that gave Kerri some extra power when she finally did decide to dive in.</p> <p>She noted that the final offer had been one she “couldn’t refuse”, but that there had been “a few provisos” along with it. The most important of them was that she “get[s] to take makeup”, with Kerri stating that “natural is very overrated.” </p> <p>“I can’t be bothered doing that much,” she added, “but it won’t be natural because natural takes a long time. Every girl knows that.” </p> <p>But that’s not the only difference viewers can expect to see between Kerri and her fellow contestants, with the veteran presenter also scheduled to make her entrance a day after the rest. </p> <p>Not that she’s concerned, instead suggesting to Bond that they should simply “get better management. Not my problem.”</p> <p>The opinion of viewers doesn’t look set to faze her either. For anyone doubting that she’ll be able to handle the ‘rustic’ side of camp life, from outdoor bathroom facilities to some of the show’s more extreme challenges, Kerri had already dismissed their take, explaining that “I literally have ridden camels, bulls, horses … held snakes, including cobras and red-bellied blacks … been bitten by a ferret, been scratched by a lion cub.” </p> <p>Coupled with her experience with heights, Kerri-Anne may yet prove hard to beat for the others vying for the crown with her. </p> <p>12 dropped into camp the day before Kerri-Anne, each eager to face the challenges the jungle has in store for them, and to ultimately come out on top. </p> <p>Former <em>Australian Idol</em> judge Ian ‘Dicko’ Dickinson was the first to land, with <em>Married At First Sight</em>’s Domenica Calarco following suit, then <em>Yokayi Footy</em>’s Bianca Hunt, AFL Brownlow medallist Adam Cooney, <em>Home &amp; Away</em>’s Debra Lawrance, and <em>Geordie Shore</em>’s Nathan Henry. </p> <p>Up next came <em>KIIS National Drive Radio Show</em>’s Woody Whitelaw, celebrity chef Anna Polyviou, Olympic lightweight boxer Harry Garside, netball’s Liz Ellis, <em>Below Deck</em>’s Aesha Scott, and comedian Peter Helliar to round them out. </p> <p><em>Images: @kerriannekennerly / Instagram</em></p>

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Beloved singing star reveals condition that may force early retirement

<p>Scottish singer and songwriter Lewis Capaldi has opened up about his battle with Tourette’s syndrome, admitting it could lead him into early retirement.</p> <p>The <em>Before You Go</em> singer, 26, has shared details of his condition with fans in the past, making light of it online, even going viral on TikTok for how he handles his on-stage tics.</p> <p>Speaking to The Sun, the 26-year-old revealed it is a “very real possibility” he will have to put the mic down if his condition deteriorates.</p> <p>"It's triggered by stress, anxiety, and excitement. Basically, any strong emotion, you're f—ed," Capaldi, who was diagnosed with Tourette’s in 2022, said.</p> <p>"There are times it has been really bad and I've wondered whether I can continue to do this with the stress, anxiety, and Tourette's. It all comes as a direct result of doing this job.”</p> <p>Capaldi, renowned online for his self-deprecating sense of humour and cheeky commentary, said he has worried that the crowd may mistake his tics for drug use.</p> <p>He also revealed he may have to stop making music and performing if the condition progresses.</p> <p>"This isn't drugs, and I've had that accusation on nights out. People have asked me directly, 'Are you on drugs, is it cocaine?'" He explained.</p> <p>"If it got to a point where my quality of life was drastically diminished, I'd just have to quit.”</p> <p>Capaldi’s powerhouse voice has thrown him into the mix with UK greats including Sir Elton John and Ed Sheeran.</p> <p>He said that John has been a pillar of support during his struggles with anxiety, telling The Sun that the <em>Rocket Man</em> singer emails him regularly.</p> <p>In early 2023, a clip from Capaldi’s concert made waves online after fans helped him finish the song as he experienced a tic attack on stage.</p> <p>Capaldi was singing his perhaps most famous song, Someone You Loved, at a concert in Germany on February 21.</p> <p>Audience members were quick to notice the singer struggling, so they continued the song from where he left off, with him holding onto the microphone in an attempt to compose himself.</p> <p>In 2022, Capaldi shared his diagnosis with fans on Instagram.</p> <p>"I do the shoulder twitch a lot. And you see underneath every TikTok and stuff, people are like, 'Why is he twitching?', which is fine. Curiosity is fine. I get it," he said.</p> <p>"I haven't really learned much about it. I'm learning. I've got Botox on my shoulder to stop it moving. It worked for a bit," he said.</p> <p>"The worst thing about it is when I'm excited, I get it; when I'm stressed, I get it; when I'm happy, I get it. It happens all the time.</p> <p>"Some days it's more painful than others and some days it's less painful. It looks a lot worse than it is. Sometimes it's quite uncomfortable … but it comes and goes."</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

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Love Actually star's "crippling" health condition

<p>Martine McCutcheon has opened up about her struggle with the "crippling" symptoms of perimenopause. </p> <p>The actress, who shot to stardom for her role as Natalie in <em>Love Actually</em>, has shared a candid post about the issue affecting many women, and how the anxiety of perimenopause made her feel like she was losing her mind. </p> <p>"Perimenopause symptoms… Such fun!" she wrote on Instagram.</p> <p>"I have the hot flushes, the insomnia, the brain fog and fatigue … The list goes on doesn't it?!"</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqQvDExsOOd/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqQvDExsOOd/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Martine McCutcheon (@martinemccutcheon)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The actress went on to explain how her symptoms were exacerbated by her previous struggles with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as ME/CFS, which Martine has struggled with since her 20s. </p> <p>Sharing her experience with perimenopause,  McCutcheon said she wanted to raise awareness of the "crippling anxiety" which is a common symptom many women experience.</p> <p>"[It's a] kind of irrational anxiety that makes no sense whatsoever! You feel like you've lost your own damn mind!" she wrote.</p> <p>"Maybe it's just me, but I don't seem to hear about this side of it as much. I wanted to share this, just in case any of you out there feel the same and feel scared or worried – You aren't alone!" she added.</p> <p>McCutcheon revealed she went through "a phase of not even feeling confident enough to drive" which was very unlike her, but is now feeling better.</p> <p>Plenty of her followers have reached out in support of her honest post. </p> <p>Actress Selma Blair was one of the first to comment, writing, "I had a tough one. A tough menopause for three years. Early. From chemo. And the fog was very really tough. Anything goes. It's real and I'm sorry to anyone feeling alone and cranky and dizzy or whatever the case."</p> <p>Another grateful fan wrote, "Sending you all the strength. It's a crazy rollercoaster and thank you for sharing your experiences because it will help so many."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Caring

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Prince Harry accuses royal family of conditioning

<p>Prince Harry has revealed new detail into his experience with royal life while giving testimony in a surprise court appearance at London’s High Court. </p> <p>Harry was there for the second day of a preliminary hearing along with other high-profile individuals - who were alleged victims of phone hacking, privacy breaches, and the misuse of their private information - as they sought to sue Associated Newspapers Ltd [ANL].</p> <p>However, ANL want to discuss the claims without trial, having described them to be “preposterous smears.” </p> <p>And during his witness statement, the Duke of Sussex has taken aim at the royal family over where the blame lies for taking legal action against ANL, explaining that he has had “an uneasy relationship with the press” in the years after his mother Diana’s death. He went on to add that it was policy to “never complain, [and] never explain”, and this was exactly what he’d been taught.</p> <p>“Following the death of my mother in 1997 when I was 12 years old and her treatment at the hands of the press, I have always had an uneasy relationship with the press,” his witness statement read.</p> <p>“However, as a member of the Institution the policy was to ‘never complain, never explain.’</p> <p>“There was no alternative; I was conditioned to accept it. For the most part, I accepted the interest in my performing [of] my public functions.”</p> <p>According to Harry, the difficulties intensified when he began his relationship with now-wife Meghan Markle. The 38-year-old prince’s concerns over his family’s lack of action only grew, with Harry even telling the court he became “increasingly troubled by the approach of not taking action against the press in the wake of persistent attacks on, harassment of and intrusive, sometimes racist articles concerning Meghan.” </p> <p>He then explained that things had only gotten worse when the couple were expecting their first child, Prince Archie. </p> <p>And when it came to the News of the World phone hacking scandal, Harry claimed he was never so much as invited to a royal meeting. </p> <p>The Institution, he said, had “without a doubt [been] withholding information”, while making it “clear that we did not need to know anything about phone hacking”. He added that it had become clear to him that “the royal family did not sit in the witness box because that could open up a can of worms”, and that through pursuing his own legal advice, the “bubble had burst in terms of what I knew in 2020 when I moved out of the United Kingdom.” </p> <p>“There is this misconception,” he noted, “that we are all in constant communication with one another. </p> <p>“But that is not true.” </p> <p>As for why Harry was bringing his claims forward - including those that ANL even hired a private investigator to hack his friends’ phones and dig up information on his then-partner - he said that it was out of love for his country, and his mounting concerns over “the unchecked power, influence and criminality of Associated.</p> <p>“The evidence I have seen shows that Associated’s journalists are criminals with journalistic powers which should concern every single one of us. </p> <p>“The British public deserve to know the full extent of this cover up and I feel it is my duty to expose it.”</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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“I haven’t been able to move": Home and Away star's debilitating condition

<p dir="ltr">Former <em>Home and Away </em>actress Sophie Dillman has opened up about the debilitating pain she suffers as she battles with endometriosis.</p> <p dir="ltr">The star took to Instagram to share the realities of her condition with two drastically different photos.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Endometriosis can look like this or this depending on the day,” her caption began.</p> <p dir="ltr">In one photo, the actress can be seen smiling and posing for photos at an event. In the second photo, Dillman is pictured lying on the floor with a hot water bottle on her stomach.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I haven’t been able to move from the floor this morning because it’s too painful to even walk around the house,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But then some days it doesn’t affect me at all. I don’t know when the pain or swelling or nausea will start or end,” she wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">She then goes on to share that “the unknown is heartbreaking,” and gives a shout out to those who support their loved ones on the days they can’t get up.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We need more research, funding and answers. F***. Endo,” she ended her caption tagging <a href="https://www.endometriosisaustralia.org/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Endometriosis Australia</a>.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqP_7wyIqYn/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqP_7wyIqYn/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Sophie Dillman (@sophiedillman)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Dillman is one of nine women who suffer from endometriosis, which is when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside the womb, and it’s a chronic disease without a known cure.</p> <p dir="ltr">One option to reduce the pain is a laparoscopy- where a tiny camera is sent into the pelvic region to investigate and “remove any of the tissue that’s causing pain”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dillman has said that she’s undergone three of these surgeries and said that she has “a lot of tissue that they can’t remove because it’s in the lining of my various organs”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s exhausting and painful and ... sometimes awkward and it sucks,” she said, adding that the surgery does not address her situation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So it seems that it will be something I will have to continuously do throughout my life,” she added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bindi Irwin is another woman who suffered from endometriosis, and just this month she opened up about <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/how-did-you-live-with-this-much-pain-bindi-irwin-hospitalised" target="_blank" rel="noopener">her experience and the surgery</a> she undertook.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dillman hopes to raise awareness around the stigmas surrounding the condition that stops women talking about it or seeking help.</p> <p dir="ltr">The actress hopes that she can use her platform with almost 300,000 followers, and her role as an ambassador for Endometriosis Australia to continue educating others.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p> </p>

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Friendships may help protect women from health conditions in older age

<p dir="ltr">Human connection may, in fact, help protect women from chronic health conditions in older age, according to a Queensland-led study. </p> <p dir="ltr">The University of Queensland researchers tracked more than 7,600 Australian women aged between 45 and 50 for two decades as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.</p> <p dir="ltr">The study went as follows: Every three years, women filled out a questionnaire, rating their levels of satisfaction with a range of relationships, including partners, family, friends, work colleagues and any other social connections.</p> <p dir="ltr">Data also collected if they had been diagnosed with two or more of 11 chronic health conditions.</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">High blood pressure</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Heart disease</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Stroke </li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease </li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Asthma </li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Arthritis</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Cancer</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Depression</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Anxiety </li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Osteoporosis</li> <li dir="ltr" role="presentation">Diabetes</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">The researchers found 58.3 per cent of the women had developed more than one chronic disease during the 20 years of monitoring, from 1996 to 2016.</p> <p dir="ltr">Those with the lowest relationship satisfaction scores had the highest odds of having multiple chronic diseases.</p> <p dir="ltr">So, make friends and keep them around because it may just prevent a serious illness.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-4f8bbe2a-7fff-fc6b-fccb-0ad9a3a01ee3"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

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