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"Tax the boomers": Outrage over elderly couple's complaint after $1m Lotto win

<p>A "greedy" elderly couple have been rinsed online after complaining about losing their age pension payments after they won the Lotto. </p> <p>The couple, aged 73 and 67, wrote into <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/money/super-and-retirement/we-won-the-lottery-but-lost-our-pension-could-we-have-prevented-this-20240702-p5jqga.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Sydney Morning Herald</em></a>'s financial advice column with Noel Whittaker to ask how they could've prevented losing the government funds and still kept hold of their million-dollar winnings. </p> <p>The couple's submission read, "We are a couple... both retired and receiving the full aged pension. We recently won $1,000,000 in the lottery and have placed that money in a basic interest-bearing savings account with our bank."</p> <p>"We intend to use that money to buy a new house and sell our existing one but may just renovate. The windfall has stopped our pension completely until we spend the money, which is all good and well. But could we have prevented the pension loss in any way?"</p> <p>Whittaker responded that the couple should consider themselves extremely fortunate and enjoy the money, saying they "could have a far better lifestyle living off capital instead of relying on welfare". </p> <p>He also urged the couple not "spend to get a pension". </p> <p>The boomers' questions quickly drew attention online, with many flocking to Facebook comments to slam the couple for their "greed". </p> <p>One person wrote, "If you won the lotto, why would you want the pension?", while another added, "Ah yes, the call of the boomers everywhere, 'I have millions but where's my pension money?'"</p> <p>Others said the Lotto winners should consider themselves lucky they are now able to provide for themselves, with one person writing, "Pension is a support system to allow you to survive without/reduced work in retirement. If you are a multimillionaire then you don't need it."</p> <p>Another person echoed the sentiment, saying, "Wow, what entitlement. The pension is a safety net, if you don’t qualify for it think yourself lucky."</p> <p>Other social media users simply shared their outrage towards the boomer generation, as one frustrated person wrote, "Won a million and whinging they can't scam the taxpayers, what self-centered arrogance", while another added, "Tax the boomers! No more handouts."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <div class="x6s0dn4 x3nfvp2" style="font-family: inherit; align-items: center; display: inline-flex; min-width: 604px;"> <ul class="html-ul xe8uvvx xdj266r x4uap5 x18d9i69 xkhd6sd x1n0m28w x78zum5 x1wfe3co xat24cr xsgj6o6 x1o1nzlu xyqdw3p" style="list-style: none; margin: 0px -8px 0px 4px; padding: 3px 0px 0px; display: flex; min-height: 15px; line-height: 12px; caret-color: #1c1e21; color: #1c1e21; font-family: system-ui, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, '.SFNSText-Regular', sans-serif; font-size: 12.000001px;" aria-hidden="false"> <li class="html-li xe8uvvx xdj266r xat24cr xexx8yu x4uap5 x18d9i69 xkhd6sd x1rg5ohu x1emribx x1i64zmx" style="list-style: none; display: inline-block; padding: 0px; margin: 0px 8px;"> </li> </ul> </div>

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Eye infections might seem like a minor complaint – but in some cases they can cause blindness and even death

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/adam-taylor-283950">Adam Taylor</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/lancaster-university-1176">Lancaster University</a></em></p> <p>When you think of eye infections, what comes to mind? Puffy, swollen bruised feeling eyelids that get glued together with gunk overnight? That feeling of having grit in your eye that can’t be cleaned away? Eye infections may seem like a relatively minor – if unsightly and inconvenient – complaint, but they can also be far more serious.</p> <p>Take the deadly outbreak of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5022785/">antibiotic resistant</a> bacteria <a href="https://www.cff.org/managing-cf/burkholderia-cepacia-complex-b-cepacia"><em>Burkholderia cepacia</em></a> in 2023-24, for example.</p> <p>Between January 2023 and February 2024, contaminated brands of lubricating eye gel were linked to the infection of at least 52 patients. <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/contaminated-eye-gel-outbreak-death-b2523446.html">One person died</a> and at least 25 others suffered serious infections.</p> <p>The outbreak has now subsided and products are <a href="https://www.gov.uk/drug-device-alerts/specific-brands-of-carbomer-eye-gel-recall-of-aacarb-eye-gel-aacomer-eye-gel-and-puroptics-eye-gel-potential-risk-of-infection-dsi-slash-2023-slash-11#update-2-april-2024">back on the shelves</a> but it isn’t the first time that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8335909/">medicinal products</a> have led to outbreaks of <em>B cepacia</em>.</p> <p>The bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen known to pose a significant risk to people with cystic fibrosis, chronic lung conditions and weakened immune systems. The infection likely progresses from the mucous membranes of the eyelids to the lungs where it leads to pneumonia and septicaemia causing <a href="https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/17/2/295">death in days</a>.</p> <p>But it’s not just <em>B cepacia</em> that can threaten our health. Something as simple as rubbing our eyes can introduce pathogens leading to infection, blindness and, in the worst case, death.</p> <p>Bacteria account for up to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16148850/">70% of eye infections</a> and globally <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9032492/">over 6 million people</a> have blindness or moderate visual impairment from ocular infection. Contact lens wearers are at <a href="https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/contact-lens-related-eye-infections">increased risk</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pWsx8i1kaxs?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>The eye is a unique structure. It converts light energy to chemical and then electrical energy, which is transmitted to the brain and converted to a picture. The eye uses about <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK11556/">6 million cones and 120 million rods</a> which detect colour and light.</p> <p>Eye cells have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8775779/">no ability to regenerate</a> so, once damaged or injured, cannot be repaired or replaced. The body tries its best to preserve the eyes by encasing them in a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK531490/">bony protective frame</a> and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482428/">limiting exposure</a> having eyelids to defend against the environmental damage and ensure the eyes are kept lubricated.</p> <p>Despite our bodies’ best efforts to shield the eyes from harm, there are a number of common eye infections that can result from introducing potential pathogens into the eyes.</p> <h2>Conjunctivitis</h2> <p>The outer-most layer of the eye, the sclera, bears the brunt of exposure and to help protect it, it is lined by a thin moist membrane called the <a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/body/24329-conjunctiva">conjunctiva</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RZ4danuJwd0?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>The conjunctiva is <a href="https://innovations.bmj.com/content/9/4/253">highly vascularised</a>, which means it has lots of blood vessels. When microbes enter the eye, it is this layer that mounts an immune response causing <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8328962/">blood vessels to dilate</a> in the conjunctiva. This results in <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/conjunctivitis/about/symptoms.html">“pink eye”</a>, a common form of conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis can be caused by bacteria, allergens or viruses and typically heals by itself.</p> <h2>Blepharitis</h2> <p>Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelid and usually affects both sides. It can cause itchy eyes and dandruff-like flakes. It’s most commonly caused by <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.3109/09273948.2013.870214"><em>Staphylococcus</em> bacteria</a>, or the <a href="https://cks.nice.org.uk/topics/blepharitis/background-information/causes/">dysfunction of the glands</a> of the eyelids. It can be treated by <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/blepharitis/">cleaning the eyes</a> regularly.</p> <h2>Stye</h2> <p>A stye (also called <a href="https://www.college-optometrists.org/clinical-guidance/clinical-management-guidelines/hordeolum">hordeolum</a>) is a painful infection of the upper or lower eyelid. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5370090/">Internal styes</a> are caused by infection of an oil-producing gland inside the eyelid, whereas <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28723014/">external styes</a> develop at the base of the eyelash because of an infection of the hair follicle. Both are caused by bacteria, typically <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/1874715">the <em>S aureus</em> form of the <em>Staphylococcus</em> species</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/INKrGOdy824?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Styes can be treated by holding a clean flannel soaked in warm water against the affected eye for five to ten minutes, three or four times a day. Do not try to burst styes – this could spread the infection.</p> <h2>Keratitis</h2> <p>Keratitis is the inflammation of the cornea, the transparent part of the eye that light passes through. The cornea is part of the eye’s main barrier against dirt, germs, and disease. Severe keratitis can cause ulcers, damage to the eye and even blindness.</p> <p>The most common type is bacterial keratitis; however, it can also be caused by <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7998329/">amoeba</a>, which can migrate to other parts of the body – including the brain – and cause infection and <a href="https://theconversation.com/nasal-rinsing-why-flushing-the-nasal-passages-with-tap-water-to-tackle-hay-fever-could-be-fatal-225811">even death</a>.</p> <p>Noninfectious keratitis is most commonly caused by wearing contact lenses for too long, especially while sleeping. This can cause scratches, dryness and soreness of the cornea, which leads to inflammation.</p> <h2>Uveitis</h2> <p><a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/uveitis/">Uveitis</a> is inflammation of the middle layer of the eye. Although relatively rare, it is a serious condition and usually results from viral infections such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8501150/">herpes simplex</a>, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29023181/">herpes zoster</a> or <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-09126-6_40">trauma</a>. Depending on where the inflammation is in the eye, the symptoms can be anything from redness, pain and floaters to blurred vision and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1772296/">partial blindness</a>.</p> <h2>Exogenous endophthalmitis</h2> <p>This is a rare but serious infection caused by eye surgery complications, penetrating ocular trauma (being stabbed in the eye with a sharp object) or foreign bodies in the eye. Foreign bodies can be anything from dirt and dust to small projectiles such as shards of metal from drilling, explosives or soil from farm machinery and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7286045/">many other sources</a>.</p> <h2>Dacryocystitis</h2> <p>Dacryocystitis is the inflammation of the nasolacrimal sac, which drains tears away from the eye into the nose. This condition can be <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8443113/">acute</a>, <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/6700662">chronic</a> or <a href="https://www.jebmh.com/articles/a-study-of-congenital-dacryocystitis.pdf.pdf">acquired at birth</a>. Most cases are caused by <a href="https://bmcophthalmol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12886-020-01792-4"><em>Streptococcus pneumoniae</em> and <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em></a> bacteria.</p> <p>The condition mainly affects newborns and those over 40. Seventy-five per cent of cases are women and it’s most commonly found in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6039673/">white adults</a>. It can lead to the stagnation of tears, creating a breeding ground for microbes.</p> <h2>Careful with contacts</h2> <p>Proper eye hygiene reduces the risk of all these conditions – and this is even more important for contact lens wearers.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uENHAntJOIA?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Appropriate hygienic cleaning of lenses is paramount. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30789440/">Non-sterile water</a>, <a href="https://www.aao.org/eye-health/glasses-contacts/contact-lens-care">spit</a> and other fluids can transfer <a href="https://www.science.org/content/article/bacteria-living-your-contact-lens-solution">potentially dangerous</a> <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482476/">microbes</a> into the eye – a warm, moist environment that makes an ideal breeding ground for bacteria – leading to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9542356/">localised infection</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3972779/">blindness</a> or progress to a more serious <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9835757/">systemic infection or death</a>.</p> <p>Any persistent and painful redness or swelling of eyes should be checked by a registered health professional.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/227252/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/adam-taylor-283950">Adam Taylor</a>, Professor and Director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/lancaster-university-1176">Lancaster University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/eye-infections-might-seem-like-a-minor-complaint-but-in-some-cases-they-can-cause-blindness-and-even-death-227252">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Fan called out over "racist" complaint at Sir Paul McCartney's concert

<p>A fan has copped some backlash after complaining about an "Acknowledgment of Country" sign at Sir Paul McCartney's concert in Sydney over the weekend .</p> <p>The sign read: "We acknowledge the Gadigal of the Eora Nation and all family groups connected to this Country, as the Traditional Custodians of the land on which we gather and perform today.</p> <p>"We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples here today." </p> <p>It was displayed over two large screens during McCartney's gig at Allianz Stadium, and concertgoer Kobie Thatcher was not happy with it. </p> <p>"You can't even go to a concert now without an "acknowledgement of country,"" she tweeted on Saturday. </p> <p>Most fans were quick to call her out on her "racist" remark. </p> <p>"You went to a Paul McCartney concert and are complaining about treating POC [people of colour] with respect?" one wrote.</p> <p>"The Beatles refused to play to segregated concerts in the USA. Peace and love is what you take to his concerts, not division and hate." </p> <p>"Oh for gods sake, get over it, he also flew the pride flag, I guess your knickers are in a twist about that too!" another commented. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">You can’t even go to a concert now without an ‘acknowledgement of country’ 🙄 <a href="https://t.co/lHmqgtroTz">pic.twitter.com/lHmqgtroTz</a></p> <p>— Kobie Thatcher (@KobieThatcher) <a href="https://twitter.com/KobieThatcher/status/1718177010915455229?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 28, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>"You &amp; other racists could move to Texas, if that would be better for you," a third added. </p> <p>"You conservatives are always getting triggered so easily huh," a fourth commented. </p> <p>However a few others agreed with Thatcher's tweet. </p> <p>"I thought this "welcome to country" crap was gonna be finished after we ALL voted No!" wrote one person.</p> <p>"So sick and annoying. Disgusting too," another added. </p> <p><em>Images: Getty/ X</em></p>

Legal

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World Cup star files official complaint over "unsolicited kiss" with Spanish football boss

<p>Jenni Hermoso has filed an official complaint against Luis Rubiales over an "unsolicited kiss" at the Women's World Cup final. </p> <p>Following Spain's victory of England in the final, Rubiales, the Royal Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) chief, kissed Hermoso on the lips while congratulating the team.</p> <p>The Spanish footballer is accusing Rubiales of sexual assault, as she said the kiss was not consensual. </p> <p>Despite this, Rubiales has defended his actions and is refusing to step down. </p> <p>The official complaint, which was filed on Tuesday, is key for a preliminary investigation into the incident, which prosecutors at Spain’s top criminal court have opened for the alleged crime of “sexual assault”, to move forward.</p> <p>In the days after the incident, Hermoso said the unwanted kiss had left her feeling “vulnerable and like the victim of an assault”, with a statement on social media describing it as “an impulsive, macho act, out of place and with no type of consent on my part”.</p> <p>Rubiales has apologised for his conduct but insists the kiss was consensual, as he has refused to quit his role despite both the RFEF and FIFA calling on him to do so.</p> <p>In a display of solidarity, <span style="caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;">56 national team members have </span><span style="caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px;">condemned the government for what they deemed to be "<a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/impunity-for-macho-actions-is-over-why-the-entire-spanish-world-cup-team-has-quit" target="_blank" rel="noopener">macho actions</a>".</span></p> <p style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1rem; caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji';">A collective statement, issued through their union, was signed by all 23 members of the winning squad, including Hermoso, as well as 32 other team members.</p> <p>In the statement, they declared their refusal to participate in international matches as long as Rubiales remains at the helm of the RFEF.</p> <p>After the official complaint was lodged, the RFEF sacked the head coach of the Spanish women’s team, Jorge Vilda, after he was the only member of the women’s national team coaching staff not to resign in protest at Rubiales’s behaviour.</p> <p>Vilda’s dismissal was confirmed amid accusations he had repeatedly backed Rubiales and saw no issue with his behaviour. </p> <p>In addition to the complaint from Hermoso, Spain’s Sport Administrative Tribunal (TAD) opened a case against Rubiales for “serious misconduct”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p style="color: #111111; font-family: Georgia, serif; font-size: 22px; line-height: 28px; margin-bottom: 20px; margin-top: 20px;"> </p> <figure class="sc-11i7hbm-0 eUyOEq" style="margin: 0px; font-family: Roboto, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;"></figure>

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School’s complaint about bus driver days before Hunter Valley crash

<p dir="ltr">Teachers at Green Point Christian College, on the Central Coast, raised their concerns about Brett Andrew Button’s driving conduct just days before the <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/more-than-we-can-bear-hunter-valley-bus-crash-victims-identified" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tragic accident in the Hunter Valley</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">They alleged that Button had a "lack of attention" while he was driving Year 5 students on an excursion to Bathurst last Thursday and Friday, and have sent a letter to parents confirming that he was the driver.</p> <p dir="ltr">Principal Phillip Nash told <em>9News</em> about the teachers' concerns that Button was "often chatting to teachers" instead of focusing on the road.</p> <p dir="ltr">"On the trip to Bathurst our teachers raised concerns about the driver and reported them at the end of the trip as per our usual procedures," the Principal wrote in the letter to the parents.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We ask staff to report anything of concern or anything inadequate in regard to the bus and or the driver.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Their concerns were not such that they felt they needed to contact us on the trip, however."</p> <p dir="ltr">The school has since reported their concerns to bus company Linq and have also shared the letter of complaint to the police investigating the Hunter Valley tragedy.</p> <p dir="ltr">Police have confirmed that they have received the letter of complaint and the teachers who were on the bus during the school trip are expected to be interviewed.</p> <p dir="ltr">The bus company has also shared a statement to <em>9News</em> confirming that they have received the letter of complaint.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We have been made aware by the media of a letter from Green Point Christian College sent to its students' parents," the statement read.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The concerns raised in the letter had not been brought to our attention until today.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We have received no other complaints about Mr Button before receipt of that letter.</p> <p dir="ltr">"As with all of our drivers, Mr Button was only engaged after he passed an independent driver assessment, and his references were checked.</p> <p dir="ltr">"It would be inappropriate for us to comment any further."</p> <p dir="ltr">Button has<a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/hunter-valley-bus-driver-faces-court" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> faced court</a> and is facing 11 charges including 10 counts of dangerous driving occasioning death, and one count of negligent driving.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: 7News / Seven/ Roni Bintang / Getty Images</em></p>

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Four-year-old entrepreneur wins out against council complaints

<p dir="ltr">Four-year-old Leo Tyres is the proud owner of his very own fruit and vegetable stand, better known as Leo’s Little Shop, but his enterprise hasn’t come without its share of struggle. </p> <p dir="ltr">He first had to overcome a hurdle most small business owners know an awful lot about - a slow start. And from there, things escalated, when a complaint made to the local council against his stand almost shut down business for good. </p> <p dir="ltr">Leo operates his pop-up store, selling discounted fruit and vegetables with slight defects from outside his home in Gatton, Queensland. </p> <p dir="ltr">And as Lockyer Valley Mayor Tanya Milligan told<em> 9News</em>, the complaint had been about “a business that was operating in a residential area. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Like most councils, we are complaint-driven, we have an obligation to go and check it out.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“If it’s a permanent structure, it becomes a shop,” she explained, before noting that if that were the case then the young family would have had a lot of hoops to jump through. </p> <p dir="ltr">Luckily for little Leo - and the 2000 locals who got behind a petition to save his venture - Milligan was of the opinion that “it’s no different to me than the old-fashioned lemonade stall or garage sale.” </p> <p dir="ltr">And so, the stand remains open for business, with Leo at the helm. </p> <p dir="ltr">As for how his regulars feel about the outcome, Leo was happy to report that “they say ‘good on ya’.” </p> <p dir="ltr">Leo’s mother, Barbra Sanchez, is delighted with the result as well, and shared some of the benefits of his experience, noting that “he is learning several life skills from interacting with people, [and he’s] saving money.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Those people are, of course, his customers, but also his suppliers. Local business is important to the youngster, who sources his produce from local farmers who are unable to sell the fruit and vegetables due to the ‘imperfections’ in their appearance.</p> <p dir="ltr">While he started out with just a bag of limes and two pumpkins, Leo’s empire has grown from there, and he now has his very own trailer to help with the crucial work of sourcing, carrying, and selling his wares. </p> <p dir="ltr">He was more than eager to share this proud achievement, too, declaring that he can now “take 10 pumpkins in the trailer! 10 pumpkins.” </p> <p dir="ltr">And for anyone wondering just what the four year old might be doing with his hard-earned savings, Leo was happy to explain, telling <em>9News</em>’ Cam Inglis, “I just buy toys.” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: 9News</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Gardener exposes neighbour over loud mowing complaint

<p>A neighbourhood “bully” has been slammed online after threatening to call the police on a gardener for making “too much” noise while cleaning up an overgrown property.</p> <p>James Selmes, from Lush Cut Lawns, was tidying a garden of a home in Blacktown, west of Sydney, when the disgruntled neighbour approached him to complain about the noise.</p> <p>“Mate, I’m just from up the road, how long are you going to be doing this for?” the miffed man asked.</p> <p>Mr Selmes told him he had been working on the lawn for a couple of hours, and that he’d likely be working a few more.</p> <p>“All morning you’ve given me a f***ing headache. You need to finish it up,” the man demanded.</p> <p>The gardener said it had only been two hours and that he was “allowed to mow lawns”.</p> <p>“It’s as simple as that. The neighbours have seen this lawn bad, and no one has even bothered to come and help them,” Mr Selmes said.</p> <p>“Perhaps if you guys helped, we wouldn’t have this issue.”</p> <p>The neighbour rejected his comments, responding “Do you think I care about that?”</p> <p>“Let me tell you again, I’m going to be a nice guy, 15 minutes alright? 15 minutes before I call the police. I can’t have this all morning.</p> <p>“So are you going to be here another two hours?"</p> <p>Mr Selmes advised him there were no laws against mowing during the middle of the day.</p> <p>“I’m allowed to mow lawns in the morning or any time during the day between reasonable hours,” he said, with the neighbour hitting back, “yeah, reasonable!”</p> <p>Mr Selmes again attempted to argue his point.</p> <p>“I’m here mowing the lawn, I’m here to help somebody out, that’s all I’m here to do,” he explained.</p> <p>It was clear the neighbour paid no mind to Mr Selmes’ remarks as he maintained he was going to call the police.</p> <p>“Fifteen minutes, I’ll call the police. You make up your own mind,” he said.</p> <p>At his wit's end, Mr Selmes encouraged the neighbour to call the police if he deemed it necessary.</p> <p>“Go and call the police then, I don’t really care. Seeya!” he said.</p> <p>Once the neighbour left, Mr Selmes said it had taken 18 months for him to receive a negative reaction to his work.</p> <p>“Well, that’s a first. It took me a year-and-a-half for someone to complain about the noise. Oh well, what’s he going to do? It’s not against the law."</p> <p>“Tough sh** as they say. I’m just here to do a job and that’s it. People can be kind of weird, hey.”</p> <p>The video of the encounter was uploaded to YouTube, attracting more than 1.8 million views and nearly 5,000 comments of support.</p> <p>“I bet that guy is a pain in the a*se to the entire neighbourhood. You did a great job on this lawn. And you told the guy what you thought of his threat,” one comment read.</p> <p>“After that encounter with that miserable neighbour, I would have definitely taken my time and made sure every inch of that property was perfect,” another added.</p> <p>“He is the same type of neighbour I had who would yell at the kids for laughing too loud as they played outside. Blessings to you for not letting him bring you down,” a third wrote.</p> <p><em>Image credit: YouTube</em></p>

Home & Garden

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ABC threatened with legal action over coronation coverage

<p dir="ltr">The Australian Monarchist League have threatened to take legal action against the ABC over their coronation coverage, specifically the comments made on their hour-long special <em>The Coronation: A discussion about the Monarchy in 2023</em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">The programme, focussed on the monarchy’s relevance to Australia, featured <em>The Drum</em>’s Julia Baird and Jeremy Fernandez as hosts, with a panel that included the likes of<em> Q&amp;A </em>host Stan Grant and Australian Republic Movement co-chair Craig Foster. Julian Leeser - a Liberal MP and monarchist - and Teela Reid - a Wiradjuri and Wailwan woman - were also involved.</p> <p dir="ltr">The coverage, which broadcast in Australia three hours before King Charles III’s coronation, faced a wave of criticism from the Australian Monarchist League, as well as <em>3AW</em> radio host Neil Mitchell, ABC audiences, and Liberal MPs.</p> <p dir="ltr">And now, the AML have announced their intention to take their complaints further, with a statement from AML national chair Philip Benwell declaring that their “legal advisers are preparing a formal complaint to the board of the ABC in regard to the production and airing of Saturday's extremely biased pre-Coronation programme specifically designed to attack the Constitution and the Crown. Our Executive and others are meeting this week to formalise our approach.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So vitriolic are their attacks on the King, the monarchy, the British settlement and everything that came thereafter that they forget that they are the very people who want our vote for their Voice to the Parliament.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Brenwell noted that they were inviting “pertinent comments” regarding the broadcast to help compile their formal complaint, specifying that these should “include specific comments made during the programme by interviewers and panellists”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Neil Mitchell, radio host for <em>3AW</em>, had a lot to say about the coverage too, noting his opinion that it had “misread the mood”, as well as his desire for the ABC to see the broadcaster held accountable. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Somebody in the ABC needs to be accountable for this,” he declared, “as the national broadcaster it should have been the place you go to see the coverage of the coronation, instead you see all this bitterness about our Indigenous history.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He also took the opportunity to point out that the panel had featured four individuals, with “three of them republicans”. </p> <p dir="ltr">The fourth - and only monarchist - Julian Leeser agreed that the broadcast had gotten “the balance wrong” when it came to their panel compilation. </p> <p dir="ltr">As Mitchell added, “to have only one of four panellists as supporters of our existing constitutional arrangements meant there was little opportunity for a panel discussion that reflected the warmth and respect Australians have for King Charles.” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Q&amp;A</em></p>

TV

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Britain’s Got Talent burned by 334 complaints after "insensitive" stunt

<p><strong>Warning: This article contains content that some readers may find disturbing.</strong></p> <p><em>Britain’s Got Talent</em> is in hot water with its 16th season after the second episode drew in a staggering 334 complaints - a total of 400 across both episodes, Ofcom reported. </p> <p>The stunt that caused the ire, dubbed “insensitive” and “unacceptable” by the public, saw a professional stuntman named Thomas Vu cover himself in a fire-retardant gel, before he was set alight and left to solve a Rubik’s Cube.</p> <p>In the wake of the stunt, hosts Ant and Dec were quick to issue a warning to viewers, telling them “do not try this at home, ever.” </p> <p>And when the clip was uploaded to the official <em>BGT</em> Twitter account, the text ‘do not try this at home’ is splashed across the video. </p> <p>However, distressed viewers still took to the comments section to share their distaste, with one writing that it was “absolutely ridiculous and irresponsible [and] should never have been allowed to be televised especially on a family programme!!”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Stuntman Thomas Vu solved the Rubik's cube in the most UNEXPECTED way: <a href="https://t.co/nSEWOokCSb">https://t.co/nSEWOokCSb</a></p> <p>Do not try this at home!<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/BGT?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#BGT</a> <a href="https://t.co/awPLBTmaEf">pic.twitter.com/awPLBTmaEf</a></p> <p>— BGT (@BGT) <a href="https://twitter.com/BGT/status/1649110690987376642?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 20, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>“BGT totally ill-considered showing a guy setting himself on fire whilst solving a Rubik’s Cube,” tweeted another. “No thought to the fact that impressionable children watch the show.”</p> <p>“Don’t get me wrong,” one began, “people do crazy stuff and it’s their choice and that’s fine by me but maybe that last act should have been well after the 9pm watershed?? Not sure that kind of playing with fire thing is suitable for young kids who probably stay up to watch <em>BGT.</em>”</p> <p>“Like what has <em>BGT</em> come to when we set people on fire for entertainment,” someone else said on the matter. </p> <p>And as yet another user put it, “sorry but showing a man setting himself on fire on a ‘family’ show is not acceptable. Even with the mention ‘do not try this at home’.”</p> <p>Concern for children continued from there, with one tweeting “The Rubik’s Cube fire stunt on <em>BGT</em> was totally inappropriate. Did you not think about burn victims and how seeing this would affect them?”</p> <p>Meanwhile, others simply found the stunt to be insensitive, with one even referencing the 1965 Bradford City disaster when they wrote “I just find this insensitive to anyone that has been through any trauma caused by fire.”</p> <p>Criticism for the episode was so intense, coupled with the volume of complaints flowing in, that the show was forced to issue a statement, telling viewers “<em>Britain’s Got Talent </em>showcases a mix of variety acts to engage audiences. </p> <p>“In this case, it was made very clear on screen that this act should not be tried at home and the programme was subject to strict compliance rules."</p> <p><em>Images: Britain’s Got Talent / ITV</em></p>

Body

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Kiwi journalist hits back at viewer’s complaints about her Māori tattoo

<p dir="ltr">A popular New Zealand newsreader has hit back at an irate viewer who has repeatedly complained about her traditional Māori face tattoo, asking him to keep his comments for “another lifetime”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Oriini Kaipara made headlines in 2021 when she became the first person to bear a moko kauae - a traditional Māori tattoo that covers a woman’s lips and chin - while anchoring a prime-time news broadcast in New Zealand.</p> <p dir="ltr">While many viewers have applauded Ms Kaipara, others were less kind, with one repeat objector prompting her to take to Instagram to respond on Thursday, saying she had “had enough” of his complaints.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Today I had enough. I responded. I never do that. I broke my own code and hit the send button,” the Newshub presenter shared with followers in a since-deleted post.</p> <p dir="ltr">The viewer, identified only as David, had written to the entire newsroom to complain about Ms Kaipara’s tattoo, which he mislabelled as a “moku” and said was “offensive” and “a bad look”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We continue to object strongly to you using Māori TV presenter with a moku, which is offensive and aggressive looking. A bad look,” he wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">David also objected to the use of te reo Māori during broadcasts, despite the fact that the Māori language features in most Kiwi TV broadcasts.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She also bursts into Māori language which we do not understand. Stop it now,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Instagram, Ms Kaipara shared her full response to him.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Thank you for all your complaints against me and my ‘moku’. I do find them very difficult to take seriously, given there is no breach of broadcast standards,” she wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If I may, I’d like to correct you on one thing – it is moko not ‘moku’. A simple, helpful pronunciation guide of ‘Maw-Caw’ will help you articulate the word correctly.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I gather your complaints stem from a place of preference on how one must look on-screen, according to you. Moko and people with them are not threatening, nor do they deserve such discrimination, harassment or prejudice.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Moko are ancient cultural markings unique to the indigenous people of Aotearoa, myself included. We mean no harm or ill intent, nor do we deserve to be treated with such disregard. Please refrain from complaining further, and restrain your cultural ignorance and bias for another lifetime, preferably in the 1800s.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She ended her message with, “Nga mihi matakuikui o te wa,” a polite te reo Māori farewell, and signed off as “the lady with the moko kauwae who speaks Māori but MOSTLY English on TV”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking to the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/newshubs-oriini-kaiparas-response-to-viewers-complaint-about-her-offensive-moko-kauae/LWLE2VNRPXM2GJTQ73Z3FNME74/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em> after, Ms Kaipara said the viewer had been “relentless” in his complaints.</p> <p dir="ltr">“These types of complaints are being sent by a minority,” she told the publication, adding that she receives plenty of “lovely and thoughtful” messages from viewers.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The fact that my existence triggers some people is testament to why we need more Māori advocates in key roles across every sector.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Kaipara, who is of Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Rangitihi and Ngāi Tūhoe descent, has previously said she got her moko in 2019 to remind herself of her identity as a Māori woman.</p> <p dir="ltr">“When I doubt myself, and I see my reflection in the mirror, I’m not just looking at myself,” she explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m looking at my grandmother and my mother, and my daughters, and those to come after me, as well as all the other women and Maori girls out there. It empowers me.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d248cbbc-7fff-de3f-a32a-984cc801f082"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: @oriinz (Instagram)</em></p>

Technology

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PETA complaint leads to controversial art installation being dismantled

<p dir="ltr">A controversial art installation has been dismantled in Germany after animal rights organisation PETA filed a complaint. </p> <p dir="ltr">The installation titled <em>A Hundred Years</em>, first exhibited in 1990 by artist Damien Hirst, was designed to see hundreds of flies die, prompting outrage from PETA. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg museum was issued an oral warning from the German city’s veterinary office, to which Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg director Andreas Beitin told local media, “We thought flies were not covered by the Animal Welfare Act.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>A Hundred Years</em> consists of a glass display case partitioned in half, with flies being hatched on one side of the glass. </p> <p dir="ltr">When they venture through a hole in the partition, the flies are drawn to an artificial light which burns the flies on contact. </p> <p dir="ltr">The cycle continues until the end of its exhibition.</p> <p dir="ltr">Hirst has previously described the artwork as “a life cycle in a box.” </p> <p dir="ltr">In the original iteration, the flies flocked around a bloody cow’s head, to which curator Hans Ulrich Obrist described the work in its original form as “dangerous and frightening.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Killing animals has nothing to do with art, it only shows the arrogance of people who literally go over corpses for their own interests,” Peter Höffken of PETA said in a statement. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to Germany’s Animal Welfare Act, there “must be good reason for one to cause an animal harm.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The managing director of the art museum, Otmar Böhmer, told the German Press Agency that they agree with PETA’s sentiment. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We share the basic idea of the animal welfare organisation that animals are not there to entertain us or exploit them,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">The museum said it will contact Hirst’s studio to establish whether <em>A Hundred Years</em> can be presented with artificial flies. If not, it has recommended that the work not be presented again.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Art

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Mum hits back at neighbour over chalk complaint

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A New York mum and author who received complaints from a neighbour over her son’s chalk drawings in their apartment block’s courtyard has responded with a public letter - and it’s written in chalk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ashley Woodfolk then shared her letter on Twitter, receiving a flood of positive responses.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“GOOD EVENING TO EVERYONE EXCEPT the woman at my co-op who complained to the board about me and my toddler using sidewalk chalk in the courtyard,” Ashley Woodfold captioned the photo of her handiwork.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter, written in blue and yellow chalk, reads: “This will be the last time using sidewalk chalk in the courtyard since it seems to be such a problem for you (and only you).</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">GOOD EVENING TO EVERYONE EXCEPT the woman at my co-op who complained to the board about me and my toddler using sidewalk chalk in the courtyard.<br /><br />So I wrote her a little letter. <br />In sidewalk chalk. In the courtyard. <a href="https://t.co/Tbw52ZtVV1">pic.twitter.com/Tbw52ZtVV1</a></p> — Ashley Woodfolk (@AshWrites) <a href="https://twitter.com/AshWrites/status/1452812801651757056?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 26, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m sorry harmless fun that brought my toddler joy (and has actually helped him learn all of his letters and most of his numbers - his favourites are E and 8) causes you so much distress that you had to complain to the board and waste everyone’s time when our building has so much bigger real problems.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Woodfolk also detailed how the COVID-19 pandemic had seen her have to entertain her son in new, safe ways.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think you’re aware that we’re in a pandemic and while I’d love to take my kid to museums and the movies I don’t feel safe doing that, and sometimes even local parks are more crowded than I’m comfortable with,” she continued.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The courtyard was a safe space but now there are limits on that too.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There are only a few weeks of nice weather left, and I sincerely hope that you enjoy the use of the sidewalk-chalk free courtyard for the remainder of the fall.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And I hope that every time it rains, rain that would have washed away any colourful ABCs I wrote on the ground, you think of me. All my love, Ashley.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Her post has received more than 200,000 likes, as well as a flood of positive comments.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One fan even sent her a package of sidewalk chalk from their Etsy shop for her son.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I own a small business making sidewalk chalk in all sorts of fun shapes and colors. I would love to donate chalk to you and your son ❤️ please check your DM’s! <a href="https://t.co/2MoQzpxIHX">pic.twitter.com/2MoQzpxIHX</a></p> — Amy ✨ (@alj_jayhawk) <a href="https://twitter.com/alj_jayhawk/status/1453114023868833794?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 26, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Others shared their opinions and the enjoyment they received from seeing kids’ chalk drawings.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“An elderly lady in our neighbourhood bought chalk for all the kids during the pandemic because she said she felt less lonely taking walks and seeing their art,” one person </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/parenting/author-ashley-woodfolk-writes-epic-courtyard-letter-to-neighbour-who-complained-about-her-childs-drawings/342b88f6-5acd-4eae-8019-5a87c6821ccf" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">shared</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As a childless guy, even I think chalk doodles are cute and bring a spark of life and creativity to the environment,” a second person said. “I can’t fathom how someone could be upset about it.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: @AshWrites / Twitter</span></em></p>

Relationships

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Daring mum seeks revenge on her noisy neighbours

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A mum in Wales has come up with a genius way to seek revenge against her noisy neighbours while on holiday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Heather Minshull and her family were trying to enjoy a peaceful holiday at a Welsh holiday park, when their neighbours had other plans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a caravan next door, Heather and her family could hear their rowdy neighbours having a loud get-together after arriving at midnight and blasting The Beatles at full volume. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When Heather asked politely if they could turn their music down, they simply refused. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After a sleepless night, Heather played out her ingenious revenge plan: by waking them up at 7am with the sound of screeching seagulls. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The clever mum got a leftover loaf of bread and threw it on top of their caravan roof, attracting a flock of the noisy birds. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Heather, originally from Manchester, shared her devious plan on TikTok, with the caption reading, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Was I wrong? I think not” and “Payback’s a b**ch.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said in her video that her plan was a success, saying “The group woke up straight away.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There were three young men in the caravan, as they came outside to investigate the noise.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Heather said, “They were all looking angry and rough, and clueless over what was going on!”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: TikTok @heatherminsh</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Angry residents ask neighbours to ban their kids from being outside before 9am

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A frustrated resident of Mosman on Sydney’s affluent harbourside has penned a letter to their neighbours about their noisy kids playing outside before 9am.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter was shared to a Mosman community Facebook page and received an abundance of comments from bewildered locals calling their request “ridiculous”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the letter, the author begins with a passive aggressive “Congratulations on your renovations”, implying the noise has been going on for some time. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They go on to write “we have endured many months of construction noise and now we are being disturbed by your kids in the backyard early in the morning.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7842875/mosman-complaint.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2b1d8847ab754020896603c90569cdb7" /></p> <p><em>Image credit: Facebook</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The author goes on to request that their neighbours keep their active children inside until 9am, instead of 7:30am when they are “disturbing the peace in the neighbourhood.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter concludes by stating “Kids will be kids but I’m simply asking if they can go out later so your neighbours are not awoken too early in the morning.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While some locals living in the elite suburb with an average house price of $4.1million sympathised with the person who wrote the complaint, most did not. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One commenter wrote, “'Seriously! We are in lockdown… We all need to show a little patience.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another perplexed neighbour said, “FFS let them get some outside air before at-home learning starts. It's good for them… Suck it up neighbours.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, through all the comments calling out the author of the note, some jumped to their defence. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One local parent wrote, “I have two kids and I never let them play in the garden until around 9am. I think it's really inconsiderate.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images/Facebook</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Kmart accused of enforcing gender stereotypes on kids

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A customer has complained about Kmart’s range of children’s clothing, accusing the retail giant of “gender stereotyping”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a Facebook post, shopper Swagata said she was frustrated by the differences in Kmart’s range of kids t-shirts for boys versus girls.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She claimed that the designs of girls tops included words such as “love”, “more love”, and “smile” while boys tops featured phrases like “adventure”, “wild woodlands”, and “alpine trails”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Could you possibly be more gender stereotyping with your kids clothes?” the shopper wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She went on to suggest kids clothes should be gender neutral to give shoppers and kids a wider choice.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Thumbs down from this parent,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The complaint comes after a recent petition called on Kmart to stop separating children’s clothing into “boys” and “girls” sections and instead offer one range for all children, claiming the retailer was sending the “wrong” message to kids.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Many parents of young boys will tell you their son loves pink, rainbows and flowers but simply cannot wear clothes in these styles like girls do without taking them from the girls section, which sends a strong message that the things they like are ‘wrong’,” the petition read.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Similarly, many parents of girls lament the lack of dinosaurs, trucks and non-frilly styles in the girls’ section.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, the petition has received some backlash from parents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t mind if they want to remove the ‘Boys’ and ‘Girls’ signage and just make a ‘Children’s’ section,” one commentor wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But please don’t mix the actual clothing items up so that we have to trawl through racks of ‘boys’ clothes to get to the ‘girls’ clothes we actually want, or vice versa.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Kmart spokesperson previously told 7NEWS.com.au that the store embraces inclusion and diversity.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“At Kmart, we are proud to offer customers a wide range of children’s clothing in lots of different styles and it’s certainly not our intention to stereotype children based on gender,” the spokesperson said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The store layout reflects a majority of the way our Kmart customers shop and the difference between our boys and girls apparel range (in terms of fit) is marginal, so all customers have the opportunity to shop both areas for children.”</span></p>

Beauty & Style

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The one complaint Prince Philip had about the Queen

<p>Prince Philip had "only one complaint" about Queen Elizabeth during their 73-year marriage.</p> <p>The Duke of Edinburgh would complain about the reigning monarch for "always being on the phone," according to his biographer Gyles Brandreth.</p> <p>On Wednesday, the royal author appeared on the British TV show Lorraine where he shared some insight about Philip based on 40 years of friendship.</p> <p>“He said to me, ‘God, she’s never off the phone. Never off the phone. Who is she talking to?’” Brandreth recalled, as quoted by UK’s<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-9494835/Prince-Philips-complaint-Queen-73-year-marriage.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a>.</p> <p>“It was the only time he ever complained about the Queen,” Brandreth shared. “He knew his whole life was supporting the Queen. He never put a foot wrong, he always turned up right day, right uniform, on time, one step behind her.”</p> <p>The biographer shared that the monarch often spoke to her racing manager over the phone to talk about horses, one of her passions, during the evenings.</p> <p>Philip, who spent more than seven decades supporting his wife, passed away on April 9 at age 99. He is known as Britain’s longest-serving consort.</p> <p>The Queen, a very private person who isn’t known for giving extravagant displays of affection, once called him “her rock” in public. Behind palace doors, Philip called his wife Lilibet; but he referred to her in conversation with others as “The Queen”.</p> <p>Philip is survived by the Queen and their four children – Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward – as well as eight grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.</p>

Relationships

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Why BBC was hit with 100,000 complaints over Prince Philip coverage

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>According to<span> </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/politics/14625897/bbc-receives-100000-complaints-prince-philip-coverage/"><em>The Sun</em></a>, the BBC has received 100,000 complaints from members of the public over the coverage of Prince Philip's death.</p> <p>BBC cleared its programming schedule to cover the death when Prince Philip died at the age of 99 to run more than 24 hours of programmes about the Duke of Edinburgh.</p> <p>The BBC said: "We are proud of our coverage and the role we play during moments of national significance."</p> <p>Programs that people were eager to watch, including EastEnders and the MasterChef final were replaced by news programmes.</p> <p>The decision to shut down regular programming received so many complaints that there was a dedicated form on the BBC website to process them.</p> <p>BBC is currently not saying how many complaints it received, but a fortnightly bulletin of all complaints is due to be published on Wednesday.</p> <p>Viewers turned off in droves after the blanket coverage was too much, with BBC Two losing two-thirds of its audience between the prime times of 7 pm to 11 pm.</p> <p>The coverage has quickly become the most complained about television event in British history.</p> <p>One insider told <em>The Sun</em>: “I feel sorry for the Beeb.</p> <p>“They would be criticised and accused of not being respectful enough if they didn’t lay the programmes on.</p> <p>“But they seem to have left many people very cross.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Buckingham Palace investigating bombshell Meghan bullying complaints

<p>Buckingham Palace has vowed to launch a thorough investigation into bombshell claims that the Duchess of Sussex bullied young staff before her and Prince Harry split from the royal family.</p> <p>The complaint was made known after<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/royal-aides-reveal-meghan-bullying-claim-before-oprah-interview-7sxfvd2c3" target="_blank"><em>The Times</em></a><span> </span>reported that the couple's communication chief filed a bullying complaint against Markle in 2018.</p> <p>According to the complaint, some young staff were reduced to tears by Markle's bullying.</p> <p>“Senior people in the household, Buckingham Palace and Clarence House, knew that they had a situation where members of staff, particularly young women, were being bullied to the point of tears,” a source told<span> </span><em>The Times.</em></p> <p>Communications secretary Jason Knauf submitted the complaint in order to protect staff at Kensington Palace, with a former aide agreeing that it “more like emotional cruelty and manipulation, which I guess could also be called bullying.”</p> <p>Allegedly, Prince Harry asked Knauf not to continue with the complaint.</p> <p>The statement from Buckingham Palace was unusual and reads:</p> <p>“We are clearly very concerned about allegations in<span> </span><em>The Times</em><span> </span>following claims made by former staff of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.</p> <p>“Accordingly, our HR team will look into the circumstances outlined in the article. Members of staff involved in the time - including those who have left the household - will be invited to participate to see if lessons can be learned.</p> <p>“The royal household has a Dignity at Work policy in place for a number of years and does not and will not tolerate bullying or harassment in the workplace.”</p> <p>Markle has outright denied the claims and said she was "saddened" by them through her spokesperson.</p> <p>“Let’s just call this what it is — a calculated smear campaign based on misleading and harmful misinformation. We are disappointed to see this defamatory portrayal of The Duchess of Sussex given credibility by a media outlet,” said the spokesperson for Markle and Harry, in part, to The Times.</p> <p>“It’s no coincidence that distorted several-year-old accusations aimed at undermining the duchess are being briefed to the British media shortly before she and the duke are due to speak openly and honestly about their experience of recent years,” read a separate statement from the spokesperson.</p> <p>“The duchess is saddened by this latest attack on her character, particularly as someone who has been the target of bullying herself and is deeply committed to supporting those who have experienced pain and trauma,” it continued. “She is determined to continue her work building compassion around the world and will keep striving to set an example for doing what is right and doing what is good.”</p>

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Fourth woman makes complaint against Brittany Higgins' attacker

<p><span>The man accused of raping his colleague Brittany Higgans has been accused by a fourth woman of assault.</span><br /><br /><span>The former Liberal staffer has had yet another complaint made about him to the police in Canberra on Sunday, after the anonymous woman learnt the identity of the man Ms Higgins claims assaulted her in 2019.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839993/brittany-higgins.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3128fefe6424484a852466b898d8e083" /><br /><br /><span>The fourth woman said she was at Canberra’s Public Bar in 2017 after work, when the man reached his hand under the table and stroked her thigh.</span><br /><br /><span>A third woman also came forward and claimed she was raped by the same male staffer while she volunteered for the Coalition's 2016 election campaign.</span><br /><br /><span>That woman told <em>The Australian</em> newspaper that the male staffer bought her several drinks on a night out.</span><br /><br /><span>She became so drunk she vomited, so she decided to call an Uber home, but says the man assured her his hotel was nearby and he would “look after her”.</span><br /><br /><span>She went on to allege that she woke up with her shirt open, her jeans pushed down and the staffer “lying on top of me”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I believe his actions … constitute sexual assault, because he performed or tried to perform sexual acts on me whilst I was … unable to provide valid and informed consent,’’ she said.</span><br /><br /><span>The young woman — who had not had sex before — did not go to police at the time.</span><br /><br /><span>“I was severely embarrassed about it and felt dirty and ashamed,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Higgins, who alleges she was raped on a couch in Defence Minister Linda Reynolds’ office.</span><br /><br /><span>She says the assault took place in March 2019, and is set to meet with the Australian Federal Police tomorrow to make a formal complaint.</span></p>

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Mercedes driver divides the internet over hospital car park complaint

<p><span>A mighty car park debate has caused great tension after a woman claimed an inconsiderate motorist blocked her from getting from the wheelchair access point to her car.</span><br /><br /><span>The Mercedes driver parked in an Australian Council for Rehabilitation of Disabled (ACROD) clearance zone to drop her friend at Fiona Stanley Hospital, south of Perth, on Thursday.</span><br /><br /><span>She quickly became frustrated to see what had happened when she returned to her vehicle.</span><br /><br /><span>A smaller vehicle had parked alongside her in the zone, which prevented her friend from being able to get back in via the wheelchair access point.</span><br /><br /><span>The woman shared an image of the incident to Facebook and gave a recall of the situation.</span><br /><br /><span>She criticised the “thoughtless person”, who also had an ACROD pass, for parking so closely to her.</span><br /><br /><span>“I came out of the hospital today, having transported my friend that is having radiation treatment and in a wheelchair, to find that some thoughtless person also with an ACROD pass displayed had parked in the space available for me to access my car,” the woman wrote.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839398/mercedes.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2451c9e77f454270b04daf79cd1142d2" /><br /><span>“I hope that if you see this you will appreciate the inconvenience that it caused my friend and be more considerate next time.”</span><br /><br /><span>More than 100 people weighed in on her complaint with many divided on who they believe was in the right.</span><br /><br /><span>“Has anyone considered the person in the other car and their situation. They seem to be getting the raw deal here and no one knows their condition,” one person said in response.</span><br /><br /><span>Others targeted the woman for her crooked parking.</span><br /><br /><span>“The Mercedes Benz needs to learn how to park,” one wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>Others asked why the woman could not simply move her vehicle a little further forward so her friend would not have any issues.</span><br /><br /><span>“Next time move the car forward and your friend would not have had any problems hopping in – really no inconvenience,” one wrote.</span></p>

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