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Is an electric bike right for you? Here’s what to consider before you buy

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/muhammad-rizwan-azhar-1472288">Muhammad Rizwan Azhar</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/waqas-uzair-1486684">Waqas Uzair</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/oct/08/its-also-just-fun-why-a-growing-number-of-australia-families-are-ditching-cars-for-e-bikes">More Australians than ever</a> are riding electric bikes – a fact you may have noticed on the streets of our cities and towns.</p> <p>Electric bikes, or e-bikes, are typically equipped with an electric motor and a battery, providing power to help you pedal. Some allow you to boost and lower the amount of pedalling assistance you get.</p> <p>Globally, the transport sector produces <a href="https://www.un.org/sites/un2.un.org/files/media_gstc/FACT_SHEET_Climate_Change.pdf">about one-quarter</a> of greenhouse gas emissions. Finding cleaner ways to get around is vital to combating the climate crisis. E-bikes also offer solutions to the problems of traffic congestion, fuel costs and sedentary lifestyles.</p> <p>But is an electric bike right for you? Below, we discuss the pros and cons, to help you decide.</p> <h2>The pros</h2> <p><strong>– Reduce carbon emissions</strong></p> <p>In developed countries, transport can be one of the largest proportions of an individual’s carbon footprint. But you can <a href="https://sustainability.anu.edu.au/options-for-owning-an-e-bike">reduce your travel emissions</a> by 75% if you replace car use with an e-bike for short trips such as the work commute.</p> <p><a href="https://www.creds.ac.uk/publications/e-bike-carbon-savings-how-much-and-where/">Research has found</a> e-bikes, if used to replace cars, could cut carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions by up to 50% in England – or about 30 million tonnes a year. Other analysis showed the potential was <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X21003401">greatest</a> in rural areas.</p> <p><strong>– Connect with your community</strong></p> <p>The “car-rification” of our cities changed community dynamics. Retail became concentrated in <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0264837716312479">out-of-town shopping centres</a>, leading to a decline in smaller town centres. This provided fewer opportunities to meet our neighbours and has contributed to high rates of <a href="https://www.vox.com/features/23191527/urban-planning-friendship-houston-cars-loneliness">loneliness and social isolation</a>.</p> <p>Similar to <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308794595_From_Pedal_to_People_The_Social_Effects_of_Biking">regular cycling</a>, riding e-bikes helps create community bonds. It makes us more likely to engage with our surroundings and interact with people around us. You can even join an <a href="https://www.meetup.com/topics/electric-bicycles/au/">e-bike group</a> or community ride.</p> <p><strong>– Save money</strong></p> <p>E-bikes offer substantial long-term financial benefits to owners.</p> <p>In Australia, an e-bike costs from about A$1,000 to more than $5,000. An annual e-bike service will set you back <a href="https://www.choice.com.au/transport/bikes/electric/articles/how-to-maintain-your-electric-bike#:%7E:text=How%20much%20does%20an%20e,%24300%2C%20depending%20on%20what's%20included.">between $100 and $300</a>. And retailers <a href="https://crooze.com.au/blogs/news/the-costs-of-owning-an-ebike#:%7E:text=This%20means%20it%20costs%20roughly,electricity%20charges%20per%2030kms%20ridden.">currently</a> <a href="https://www.glowwormbicycles.com.au/blogs/electric-bikes/how-much-should-i-spend-on-an-e-bike">put the cost</a> of a full battery charge at 10–15 cents, translating to roughly $20 per year for an average commuter.</p> <p>Cars, of course, cost far more to run. For example, Victorian motoring body RACV <a href="https://www.racv.com.au/about-racv/newsroom/victorias-cheapest-cars-2023.html">last year found</a> the state’s cheapest car to own and operate was the MG3 Core light Hatch, with monthly costs of $734.84. Even taking into account charging costs and maintenance, you can see how quickly an e-bike would pay for itself.</p> <p><strong>– Get active</strong></p> <p>E-bikes are clearly better for your health than riding in a car.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9790588/">2019 study investigated</a> e‐bike commuting for inactive, overweight people living in regional Australia. It found e-bike users increased their physical activity by an average 90 minutes a week.</p> <p>A <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/sms.14155">literature review in 2022</a> found e-biking was a moderately intense physical activity on measures such as energy expenditure, heart rate and oxygen consumption. The benefits were lower than conventional cycling, but generally greater than walking.</p> <p>Women, in particular, have reported benefits from e-bike use. A <a href="https://activetravelstudies.org/article/id/991/">New Zealand study</a> showed e-bikes provided less fit women with “more empowering physical activity experiences” and increased their cycling confidence.</p> <h2>The cons</h2> <p><strong>– Safety challenges</strong></p> <p>Like any form of mobility, e-bikes must be used safely. Concerns around e-bikes include <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-09-13/fat-bike-boom-in-sydney-sparks-safety-fears/102823330">speeding</a>, <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/concerns-grow-over-safety-of-e-bikes-amid-reports-of-accidents-192619077845">accidents</a> and people riding <a href="https://www.nbnnews.com.au/2024/03/20/e-bike-safety-concerns-spark-in-lennox-head/">without helmets</a>.</p> <p>In May this year, Sydney’s Northern Beaches Council <a href="https://www.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/e-bike-and-e-scooter-safety">launched a public awareness</a> campaign on e-bike safety. <a href="https://www.northernbeaches.nsw.gov.au/council/news/media-releases/northern-beaches-council-leads-pack-e-bike-safety-campaign">The advice includes</a>:</p> <ul> <li>slow to walking pace when others are on the path</li> <li>ring your bell to signal your approach</li> <li>be ready for sudden changes.</li> </ul> <p>Government regulation on e-bikes is also important for public safety. For example <a href="https://fit-ebike.com/en-en/about-us/blog/s-pedelecs/">in Germany</a>, high-speed e-bikes are classed as mopeds and cannot be ridden on bike paths.</p> <p>Separately, e-bikes usually contain lithium-ion batteries which can explode and start fires – particularly in e-bikes bought from overseas retailers that don’t meet Australian standards. Before buying, <a href="https://www.fire.nsw.gov.au/page.php?id=9406">check advice from fire authorities</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/U58Pv7-7fnE?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p><strong>– Lack of cycling and charging infrastructure</strong></p> <p>Well-designed <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214140519301033">cycling infrastructure</a> encourages e-bike use. In Australia, governments are <a href="https://www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au/sites/default/files/2019-06/Cycling_Infrastructure_Background_Paper_16Mar09_WEB.pdf">slowly accepting</a> the need for infrastructure such as dedicated bike lanes and <a href="https://www.transport.nsw.gov.au/get-nsw-active/emicro-smart-micro-mobility-infrastructure">charging stations</a>, but <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-do-so-few-people-cycle-for-transport-in-australia-6-ideas-on-how-to-reap-all-the-benefits-of-bikes-229811">more money</a> is needed.</p> <p>In the Netherlands, a surge in e-bike sales has <a href="https://www.government.nl/topics/bicycles">driven</a> investments in cycling paths, improvements in bicycle parking at train stations, and other efforts to promote cycling and e-bike use.</p> <p><strong>– Higher upfront cost than a regular bike</strong></p> <p>The cost of buying an e-bike can be a barrier for some. For example, <a href="https://activetravelstudies.org/article/id/991/">NZ-based research</a> found the purchase cost meant the benefits were less likely to be available to lower-income women.</p> <p>So how can the cost barrier be overcome? In Australia, some companies offer e-bike rentals, via a weekly <a href="https://lug-carrie.com">subscription service</a>. And overseas, <a href="https://www.pbsc.com/blog/2021/09/pbsc-e-bike-sharing-schemes-in-15-cities-around-the-world">share schemes</a> mean people can access e-bikes without having to buy one.</p> <p>In 2023, <a href="https://www.service.tas.gov.au/services/government-help-and-support/concessions-and-discounts/apply-for-an-electric-vehicle-or-e-mobility-rebate">Tasmania became the first Australian state</a> to offer a subsidy for e-bike purchases, and the uptake was rapid. However, the scheme has now closed.</p> <p><strong>– Environmental impacts</strong></p> <p>Almost everything we buy has an environmental impact, and electric bikes are no exception. However, they are obviously a better alternative to conventional cars – and also have less impact than electric vehicles.</p> <p>Over the total lifecycle of the product, including manufacturing, an e-bike emits <a href="https://ecf.com/resources/cycling-facts-and-figures/environmental">about 10%</a> of the CO₂ emissions associated with producing an electric car, according to the European Cyclists Federation. And e-bikes <a href="https://electrek.co/2023/05/04/you-cant-trust-electric-bike-companies-battery-range/">consume</a> about <a href="https://ebikes.ca/learn/solar.html#:%7E:text=6%20wh%2Fkm%20would%20be,heavy%20loads%20and%20riding%20fast.">15 watt-hours per kilometre</a>, compared to electric cars which <a href="https://www.drive.com.au/caradvice/what-is-a-good-energy-consumption-figure-for-electric-vehicles/">consume around</a> 150 to 200 watt-hours per kilometre.</p> <p>E-bike battery systems also typically require fewer raw materials and simpler design than an electric vehicle, which <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0892687524000293">simplifies</a> the battery recycling process.</p> <h2>Cleaner, cheaper, better</h2> <p>Electric cars are crucial for replacing traditional vehicles on longer routes and for family travel. However, e-bikes offer a more affordable and lower-impact solution for commuting and short-distance travel – and if you buy a cargo e-bike, you can even take your family.</p> <p>Mass adoption of e-bikes in Australia requires better cycling infrastructure, new government regulation and price incentives. But in the meantime, thousands of Australians are already enjoying the benefits of e-bikes. Perhaps you could too?</p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/muhammad-rizwan-azhar-1472288">Muhammad Rizwan Azhar</a>, Lecturer of Chemical Engineering, Sustainable Energy and Resources, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/waqas-uzair-1486684">Waqas Uzair</a>, Research Associate, Advanced Battery Systems and Safety, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-an-electric-bike-right-for-you-heres-what-to-consider-before-you-buy-230024">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Travel Trouble

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"Lucky to be here": Gordon Ramsay reveals brutal injury after bike crash

<p>Gordon Ramsay has been left shaken after a bicycle crash left him in need of trauma surgery. </p> <p>The celebrity chef took to social media on Sunday to tell fans that he had been in an accident while biking in Connecticut US early last week.</p> <p>"This week I had a really bad accident while riding my bike in Connecticut. I'm doing ok and did not break any bones or suffer any major injuries but I am a bit bruised up looking like a purple potato," he wrote in the caption of the one minute-clip. </p> <p>In the video, he said that the accident "shook" him and added" Honestly, I'm lucky to be here.'</p> <p>Ramsay showed the horrific bruise covering his torso and stressed on the importance of wearing a helmet. </p> <p>"Those incredible trauma surgeons, doctors, nurses, who looked after me this week, they were amazing but honestly you've got to wear a helmet," he said.</p> <p>"I don't care how short the journey is, I don't care [about] the fact that these helmets cost money, but they're crucial. Even with the kids, or a short journey."</p> <p>He also shared a before and after photo of his cycling gear, with parts of his helmet broken and his clothing ripped. </p> <p>"Now, I'm lucky to be standing here. I'm in pain, it's been a brutal week, and I'm sort of getting through it," he said. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C8PYfVNxxFC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C8PYfVNxxFC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Gordon Ramsay (@gordongram)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The comment section was flooded with messages of support and well-wishes from concerned fans. </p> <p>"I thought it might have been a small crash but my god that bruise says otherwise! Glad you’re doing okay," wrote one fan. </p> <p>"The way my heart sank when you lifted your shirt," added another.</p> <p>"The world needs you chef!! Beyond happy to hear you are going to be okay, and thank God for that helmet! Happy Father's Day and speedy recovery goat!!"</p> <p>"Glad you're ok and hope you heal up quick!" added another. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Boomers vs. Bikers: Teens and elderly residents face off over bike rules

<p>A tense intergenerational argument has broken out in Sydney's Northern Beaches, as a group of seniors stopped two teenagers from riding their electric bikes on a footpath. </p> <p>The incident was captured on camera by a bystander and uploaded to social media with the caption, "Battle of the beaches. E-bikes vs. elderly", before quickly going viral. </p> <p>The video shows elderly man and woman standing outside a dental centre in the suburb of Mona Vale, stopping the youths from riding any further and are seen holding the bike as the teens appear to argue for their release.</p> <p>After the video garnered much attention, hundreds of people shared their thoughts on who was in the right. </p> <p>Many appear to have taken the side of the senior citizens, but in this case, with the teen’s ages not immediately clear, both parties could have a case. </p> <p>According to the<a title="www.nsw.gov.au" href="https://www.nsw.gov.au/driving-boating-and-transport/roads-safety-and-rules/bicycle-safety-and-rules/cyclist-road-rules#:~:text=Riding%20on%20a%20footpath,under%20the%20age%20of%2016"> New South Wales Government</a>, cyclists (on both pedal or electric bikes) are not allowed to ride on a footpath. However, children under 16 can ride on the footpath unless there is a “NO BICYCLES” sign. </p> <p>In the comment section, plenty of arguments backed the case of the seniors. </p> <p>“Elderly are right; it’s a footpath, it’s dangerous. Annoying they drive fast,” one wrote.</p> <p>Another said: “Look I don’t know what happened, but yesterday (kids) similar to these guys were zooming on an E-bike at a dog park, almost hit us, no bells or anything and off the path. If you have these, just stay on the road.”</p> <p>Others, however, were quick to side with the teens, as one person wrote, “Entitled old people thinking they are the police.”</p> <p>Another added, “Boomers need to admit they are bored and have nothing to do.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok</em></p>

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Sir Richard Branson in serious bike crash

<p>Richard Branson, the adventurous billionaire and founder of Virgin Group, is no stranger to pushing the limits. However, his latest escapade – a biking mishap on Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands – left him with shocking injuries, adding to a long list of near-death experiences throughout his life.</p> <p>In a recent Instagram post, Branson shared the aftermath of his bike crash, recounting how he flew off his bike after hitting a pothole on the picturesque island.</p> <p>The accident resulted in severe cuts on his elbow and a haematoma on his hip. Remarkably, despite the intensity of the crash, Branson escaped without any broken bones, though the same could not be said for his biking companion, Alex Wilson, who also took a spill but thankfully emerged relatively unscathed.</p> <p>"Took quite a big tumble while cycling in Virgin Gorda a little while ago!" Branson wrote. "I hit a pothole and crashed hard, resulting in another hematoma on my hip and a nasty cut elbow, but amazingly nothing broken.</p> <p>"We were cycling with Alex Wilson, who fell after me, but thankfully he was ok as well. I’m counting myself very lucky, and thankful for keeping myself active and healthy."</p> <p> </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C3OP6hBMP7B/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C3OP6hBMP7B/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Richard Branson (@richardbranson)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>This incident is just the latest in a series of biking accidents for Branson. In 2018, during an endurance charity race, he feared he had broken his back after another biking mishap. Similarly, in 2016, while cycling with his children in the British Virgin Islands, he had a terrifying headfirst collision with the road, leaving him fearing for his life.</p> <p>Branson's penchant for adventure has led him into numerous dangerous situations over the years. From surviving a sinking fishing boat during his honeymoon to crash-landing a microlight aircraft he didn't know how to fly, his life reads like a catalogue of adrenalin-fuelled escapades. Even the inaugural test flight of Virgin Atlantic in 1984 wasn't without drama, as an engine exploded mid-air.</p> <p>Skydiving accidents, near misses with hot air balloons, and daring stunts like wing-walking on a Virgin Atlantic plane or jumping off the Palms Casino in Las Vegas further illustrate Branson's willingness to embrace risk in pursuit of thrills.</p> <p>Despite the multitude of close calls, Branson maintains a resilient spirit, viewing each brush with danger as an opportunity for growth and appreciation for life. His Instagram post following the bike crash in Virgin Gorda captures this sentiment, as he reflects on his luck and gratitude for staying active and healthy.</p> <p>For Branson, it appears that the thrill of the unknown far outweighs the comfort of caution. As he aptly puts it, "After all, the brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all."</p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Tourist slapped with a fine while in a coma

<p dir="ltr">An American tourist has been slapped with a fine while fighting for his life in a coma, after being involved in a devastating collision. </p> <p dir="ltr">Rod and Barbara Maroney, an elderly couple from Phoenix, Arizona, were holidaying in Sydney and strolling down George Street, when Rod was hit by an e-bike riding down light rail tracks. </p> <p dir="ltr">The 64-year-old retired aerospace engineer was crossing the light rail tracks in September 2023 and did not see the electric vehicle coming, with the collision causing him to fly into the air.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rod had to undergo emergency brain surgery from his injuries and then spent the subsequent weeks in a coma. </p> <p dir="ltr">Even now, in the weeks after the accident, Rod is still struggling to recover.</p> <p dir="ltr">As the 64-year-old recovered in St Vincent’s hospital, Barbara was shocked to see a fine for $86 being shoved into the letterbox of her AirBnb by NSW police.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the fact that E-bikes are not permitted on the footpaths of Sydney’s CBD, and are also banned on the light rail corridors, Mr Maroney was the one who was slapped with the fine. </p> <p dir="ltr">The letter stated that Rod had committed the offence of “moving into rider’s path”, despite the fact that riding a bike along light rail tracks is not permitted, NSW Transport confirmed.</p> <p dir="ltr">Barbara, who is a semi-retired lawyer herself, decided to get the help from a lawyer who contested the fine, and as a result, it was withdrawn.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Him serving me while my husband is in the hospital in a coma was outrageous,” she told <em><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/ebike-rules-regulations-in-australia-tourist-fined-coma-sydney/f4f8fcde-1698-4aa6-a1b6-a30d6a1910d0">9News</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In the US, that would not be good service of process because my husband never lived at the Airbnb.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“If he really wanted to serve the citation, he should’ve gone to the hospital and dropped it in my husband’s unconscious lap, I guess.”</p> <p dir="ltr">After their ordeal, the couple wants authorities to take action over e-bikes in Sydney.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We shed a lot of tears at night together, both of us grieving for our loss of the man he was,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Why is Sydney’s council allowing silent, deadly bikes? Given the speed of the bike, Rod could have been killed.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Why are e-bikes not regulated like vehicles?”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: 9News</em></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-351f33a9-7fff-f7ec-f7a1-5efccc27e302"></span></p>

Travel Trouble

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Treadmill, exercise bike, rowing machine: what’s the best option for cardio at home?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lewis-ingram-1427671">Lewis Ingram</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hunter-bennett-1053061">Hunter Bennett</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/saravana-kumar-181105">Saravana Kumar</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p>Cardio, short for cardiovascular exercise, refers to any form of rhythmic physical activity that increases your heart rate and breathing so the heart and lungs can deliver oxygen to the working muscles. Essentially, it’s the type of exercise that gets you huffing and puffing – and fills many people with dread.</p> <p>People often do cardio to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30003901/">lose weight</a>, but it’s associated with a variety of health benefits including reducing the risk of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6481017/">heart disease</a>, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30191075/">stroke</a> and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27707740/">falls</a>. Research shows cardio also improves <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29334638/">cognitive function</a> and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26978184/">mental health</a>.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/physical-activity">World Health Organization</a> recommends a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity cardio per week.</p> <p>There are many ways to do cardio, from playing a team sport, to riding your bike to work, to going for a jog. If you’re willing and able to invest in a piece of equipment, you can also do cardio at home.</p> <p>The treadmill, stationary bike and rowing machine are the most popular pieces of cardio equipment you’ll find in a typical gym, and you can buy any of these for your home too. Here’s how to know which one is best for you.</p> <h2>The treadmill</h2> <p>In terms of effectiveness of exercise, it’s hard to look past the treadmill. Running uses most of your major muscle groups and therefore leads to greater increases in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1334197/">heart rate</a> and energy expenditure compared to other activities, such as cycling.</p> <p>As a bonus, since running on a treadmill requires you to support your own body weight, it also helps to build and maintain <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26562001/">your bones</a>, keeping them strong. This becomes even more important <a href="https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/exercise-your-bone-health">as you get older</a> as the risk of developing medical conditions such as osteopenia and osteoporosis – where the density of your bones is reduced – increases.</p> <p>But the treadmill may not be for everyone. The weight-bearing nature of running may exacerbate pain and cause swelling in people with common joint conditions such as osteoarthritis.</p> <p>Also, a treadmill is likely to require greater maintenance (since most treadmills are motorised), and can take up a lot of space.</p> <h2>Stationary bike</h2> <p>The stationary bike provides another convenient means to hit your cardio goals. Setting the bike up correctly is crucial to ensure you are comfortable and to reduce the risk of injury. A general rule of thumb is that you want a slight bend in your knee, as in the picture below, when your leg is at the bottom of the pedal stroke.</p> <p>While cycling has significant benefits for <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21496106/">cardiovascular</a> and metabolic health, since it’s non-weight-bearing it doesn’t benefit your <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0026049507003253">bones</a> to the same extent as walking and running. On the flipside, it offers a great cardio workout without stressing your joints.</p> <h2>Rowing machine</h2> <p>If you’re looking to the get the best cardio workout in the least amount of time, the rowing machine might be for you. Because rowing requires you to use all of your major muscle groups including the upper body, your heart and lungs have to work even harder than they do when <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32627051/">running and cycling</a> to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8325720/">deliver oxygen</a> to those working muscles. This means the energy expended while rowing is comparable to running and <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3193864/">greater than cycling</a>.</p> <p>But before you rush off to buy a new rower, there are two issues to consider. First, the technical challenge of rowing is arguably greater than that of running or cycling, as the skill of rowing is often less familiar to the average person. While a coach or trainer can help with this, just remember a good rowing technique should be felt primarily in your legs, not your arms and back.</p> <p>Second, the non-weight-bearing nature of rowing means it misses out on the same bone health benefits offered by the treadmill – although there is some evidence it still can increase bone density <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7551766/">to a smaller degree</a>. Nevertheless, like cycling, this drawback of rowing may be negated by offering a more joint-friendly option, providing a great alternative for those with joint pain who still want to keep their heart and lungs healthy.</p> <h2>So, what’s the best option?</h2> <p>It depends on your goals, what your current health status is, and, most importantly, what you enjoy the most. The best exercise is the one that gets done. So, choose whichever piece of equipment you find the most enjoyable, as this will increase the likelihood you’ll stick to it in the long term.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/213352/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lewis-ingram-1427671"><em>Lewis Ingram</em></a><em>, Lecturer in Physiotherapy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hunter-bennett-1053061">Hunter Bennett</a>, Lecturer in Exercise Science, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/saravana-kumar-181105">Saravana Kumar</a>, Professor in Allied Health and Health Services Research, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/treadmill-exercise-bike-rowing-machine-whats-the-best-option-for-cardio-at-home-213352">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

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“Fun until it wasn’t”: Grant Denyer takes smiling selfie moments before disaster

<p>Former <em>Sunrise</em> presenter Grant Denyer has taken to Instagram to report that he was involved in a disastrous biking accident.</p> <p>Grant, who has been training ahead of the 2023 Bathurst 12 Hour race this weekend, was with friend and training partner Mick when they ran into trouble. </p> <p>Despite dubbing the incident a “huge stack”, it seems no real injury was sustained, with Denyer’s sharing a light hearted take with his 408k followers. </p> <p>“No joke, 2 mins after this photo we had a huge stack doing wheelies and clipping handlebars,” he captioned the image. The photo in question features Grant and Mick on their bikes, cycling along a country road, with big smiles on each of their faces.</p> <p>“D*ckheads,” Grant said of the pair, and added that they were “putting in the big yards for the @bathurst12hr this weekend. Doing a lot of riding. New to it. As our crash proves … Thx Mick from @bathurstaquapark for being a great training partner. Most of the time”.</p> <p>Grant’s post was met with great amusement from his followers, with most making fun of the situation along with him. It didn’t seem to phase Grant, who met their comments with lighthearted jokes of his own. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoEdKdkrFGG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoEdKdkrFGG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Grant Denyer (@grantdenyer)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Two hands for beginners, legend,” wrote one. </p> <p>“Yeah um…. Was fun until it wasn’t!” Grant responded, going on to mention that they  “took each out and ended up in the scrub. Naturally we did it on the last kilometre of the run. It’s always the ‘last run’ isn’t it?”</p> <p>“Yep, you certainly were putting lots of effort into the big hill as I was passing,” said one supporter, suggesting they had spotted Grant out on the road. </p> <p>Grant, who mentioned that he was new to riding in his original caption, responded to confirm that “it does not come natural I can assure you!! These little legs work HARD”. </p> <p>Mick, Grant’s riding partner, came up in a few of the comments, and Grant made sure to praise his skill while still poking some fun at the whole situation. </p> <p>“He’s a wildcat that’s for sure! A beast on the bike.” He said of his training partner, “bloody talented at everything. Except keeping to himself”. </p> <p>Grant, who has quite the history with motorsports under his belt, will still be participating in the Bathurst 12 hour, an international endurance race that will span Friday through to Sunday.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

Travel Trouble

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“You are disgusting”: Prince William accuses man of stalking his children

<p dir="ltr">The Cambridges seem to be embroiled in a row with YouTube, after the family claim a video that breaches their privacy has been viewed thousands of times despite attempts to block it.</p> <p dir="ltr">The video, which clocked 20,000 views on Monday according to the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/you-are-disgusting-duke-of-cambridge-confronts-stalker-who-came-looking-for-his-children/G2V23LT2HCTYNTOZKGGDJBUQ44/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>, shows Prince William confronting a photographer after he was filmed on a bike ride with his family near Sandringham, Norfolk, sometime last year.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-a49da7cc-7fff-6cab-c9d3-8092ba55f520"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">William is seen reproaching the man, who was videoing the prince, while Kate and their three children are off-camera nearby.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Obsessed with Prince William kicking off <a href="https://t.co/NgKgyU5eLZ">pic.twitter.com/NgKgyU5eLZ</a></p> <p>— I Don't Know Her (@l_dont_know_her) <a href="https://twitter.com/l_dont_know_her/status/1541554976689897474?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 27, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“If you want to have this altercation we can have this altercation,” William says in the clip, while appearing to be calling someone on his mobile phone.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kate can be heard in the background, telling the man, “We came with our children.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I know, I know, I just realised who it was and I’ve stopped,” the man said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You didn’t, you’re out here looking for us,” William replied.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You drove past us outside our house, I saw you,” Kate said, which the man denied doing. </p> <p dir="ltr">The man claimed he wasn’t following the family, to which William replies: “Yes you are, you are stalking around here looking for our children”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Duke of Cambridge then references the incident where the man followed the family while on a bike ride, lashing out when the man denies following them.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You are outrageous, you are disgusting, you really are. How dare you behave like that,” William says.</p> <p dir="ltr">The short clip was uploaded over the weekend, over a year after the incident occurred.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kensington Palace has responded by claiming the clip is a breach of the family’s privacy, with William shown to be on a private bike ride with his family, who were blurred out in the video.</p> <p dir="ltr">It is understood that staff are seeking the removal of the video in line with their usual policy about privacy, which seems to have been successful as of publication.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, versions of the clip continue to circulate on other social media platforms, including TikTok and Twitter.</p> <p dir="ltr">The balance between William’s family’s privacy and their roles in the public eye is something he has spent many years negotiating with the British media, in which he has authorised a small number of photographs of the children to be released each year while insisting on otherwise total privacy.</p> <p dir="ltr">Traditional British print media doesn’t publish videos or photos of the royal family in private situations, particularly when Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis are involved.</p> <p dir="ltr">But images are often posted on social media and sold to European publications working under different laws.</p> <p dir="ltr">A spokesperson for YouTube is yet to comment on the situation.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7133d0e2-7fff-91e7-880d-93501fb7d3c1"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Twitter</em></p>

Legal

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10 bike-friendly cities around the world

<p><strong>Amsterdam, The Netherlands</strong></p> <p>When counting down the world’s most bike-friendly cities, where else but Amsterdam could take the top spot? With more bikes than people, the city is structured with cyclists in mind. Low speed limits in the centre curb the impact of the four-wheeled menace, while bike racks on public transport make it easy to take a load off if the saddle gets to be too much.</p> <p>Rental shops are ubiquitous, the terrain is famously flat, and an online bike-specific route planner makes it especially easy for non-locals to get around. Further afield, a countryside of tulip fields and windmills lies within a 30-minute ride from the city centre. It’s no wonder almost half of Amsterdammers commute on two wheels.</p> <p><strong>Copenhagen, Denmark</strong></p> <p>Not riding a bike in Copenhagen is like not riding the trains in India – you’re missing out on a quintessential part of the experience. It’s just a nice bonus that riding a bike is the most convenient way to wander around Copenhagen’s best attractions. Bike lanes abound, as do bike lane-specific traffic signalling.</p> <p><strong>Montreal, Canada</strong></p> <p>If there’s one city in North America built for bicycles, it’s Montreal. However, it’s only been in the past decade that the city has exploited its compact size for the benefit of the cyclist, installing hundreds of kilometres of bike lanes around the city, many segregated from traffic.</p> <p>Coupled with a thriving bike culture and scenic routes around and to its most famous parks, the city makes hopping on a bike an easy decision. And if you don’t already have one, Montreal is home to Bixi, the public bike share company that has exported its modular bike share system technology around the world.</p> <p><strong>Bogota, Colombia</strong></p> <p>Bogota’s ciclorutas crisscross the city, offering cyclists the chance to explore the Colombian capital in the company of the locals. It is by far the most bike-friendly city in South America, with arguably the most extensive bike path network in the world.</p> <p>The cycling network has been integrated with the local bus system, which offers bike parking at stops and stations, and it has been specifically designed to allow bike traffic to flow over Bogota’s topography. Each Sunday several primary and secondary roads are closed to automobiles for the leisurely enjoyment of cyclists and pedestrians.</p> <p><strong>Barcelona, Spain</strong></p> <p>Cycling has been a part of Barcelona’s infrastructure for ages. Any visit to tourist districts of the city will uncover a dozen or more bike tour operators vying for your business. Of course, this enthusiasm for cycling implies that it’s just as easy to tour the sights of the city on your own.</p> <p>In a few hours of riding you can see the iconic Gaudi sculptures in Parc Guell, the Sagrada Familia, the massive Nou Camp soccer stadium and the famous cityside sand of Barcelona beach. The city’s protected cycle lanes and well-signed navigational aids will ensure that you won’t get lost.</p> <p><strong>Berlin, Germany</strong></p> <p>With more than 1,000 kilometres of bike paths, the vast majority of which are protected lanes, it’s no wonder that Berliners love to get around by bike. For the traveller, the major sights are within easy reach on a bicycle.</p> <p>For a true taste of the Berlin bike lifestyle, it’s best to take in a sunny afternoon at the vacant Tempelhof airport, where locals cycle and rollerblade up and down the abandoned runways.</p> <p><strong>Perth, Australia</strong></p> <p>Western Australia’s isolated capital is actually one of the most liveable metropolises in the world thanks to glorious weather and smart city design. A large chunk of the intelligent infrastructure work has come in the form of hundreds of kilometres of bike paths, which allow Perthites to get into and around their city with ease.</p> <p>Commuters enjoy bike lockers and change stations, which are found across the city. For the visitor, numerous scenic routes line the coastline and the local Swan River. What’s more, the best way to see Rottnest Island, a vehicle-free nature park just next to the city, is naturally by bicycle.</p> <p><strong>Paris, France</strong></p> <p>Paris’ Velib’ Métropole public bike sharing system provides everything you need to explore the almost 500 kilometres of bike paths around the French capital. And with so much to see, it’s nice to know that a healthy chunk of those bike paths is protected from manic Parisian motorists.</p> <p>The greatest feature of Paris’ bike system, however, is its ubiquity. A Velib’ station is almost always within sight, or just around the next corner. So after a moonlight cruise past the Eiffel Tower or a sunny ride down the Seine, you need not worry about being left in the lurch.</p> <p><strong>Tokyo, Japan</strong></p> <p>The mega-city of Tokyo has one of the most expansive and futuristic public transit networks on the planet, but its residents still swarm the streets (and sidewalks!) on their bicycles. Though the extent of bike lanes is still limited compared to other transit infrastructure, safe drivers help ease the tension between car and cyclist.</p> <p>Unique automated underground bike parking garages provide for a bit of a technological thrill when you need to stash your ride. Meanwhile, cycling tours of Tokyo are as popular as bike commuting is with the locals, as it’s the best way explore the world’s largest city on a more intimate level.</p> <p><strong>Portland, Oregon, USA</strong></p> <p>American cities are historically notoriously anti-bike. The road networks and suburbs were built for automobiles, long commutes and few pedestrians. But Portland, America’s favourite oddball and progressive city, is decidedly at the forefront of the American bicycle revolution.</p> <p>More than its ubiquitous bike lanes and popular bike share program, the thing that sets Portland apart is the rabid bike culture. The city boasts more cyclists per capita than anywhere else in the USA, and many restaurants and cafes maintain bicycle parking racks. However, the biggest upshot of all this for the visitor whose chain has fallen off is that seemingly every second person is also a bike mechanic.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/10-bike-friendly-cities-around-the-world" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

International Travel

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Mountain biking gives this Tasmanian town a sustainable future. Logging does not

<p>In the late 19th century it was tin mining that drove the economic life of Derby, about 100 km from Launceston in north-eastern Tasmania. But the mine has long closed. From a peak of more than 3,000, by the 2016 census Derby’s population <a href="https://quickstats.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2016/quickstat/SSC60149">was 178</a>, with a 20% unemployment rate.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431452/original/file-20211111-17-1hl4tek.JPG?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=237&amp;fit=clip" alt="Map of Derby's location in northeast Tasmania." /> <br /><span class="caption">Derby’s location in northeast Tasmania.</span></p> <p>What has saved Derby from becoming another <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-21/world-class-mountain-bike-trail-transforms-derby-from-ghost-tow/9677344">mining ghost town</a> is finding a more sustainable mountain resource: mountain biking.</p> <p>This transition could be considered a <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-08/mountain-bike-boom-a-boon-for-country-towns/9153572">role model</a> for the world, a story of hope for mining communities seeking to transition away from unsustainable resource extraction to something more about maintaining balance with nature.</p> <p>But there’s something competing against this vision. As in many parts of Tasmania, and elsewhere, the forests through which the Blue Derby Trail Network trails have been built are still threatened by logging.</p> <h2>Origins of the the Derby venture</h2> <p>In 2015, with funding from the federal government, two local councils (Dorset Council and Break O'Day Council) opened the first 20 km section of the Blue Derby Trail Network, a system of mountain-bike trails that now extends 125 km through temperate old-growth rainforest, catering to a range of skill levels and riding styles.</p> <p>There are easy trails such as “Crusty Rusty”, a “mostly undulating” track with two crossings of the local Cascade River. There are extremely difficult trails, such as “23 Stitches”, 800 metres of “fast, descending jump trail, littered with dirt jumps, rollers and tabletops”.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3MJEoTyXbcg?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <br /><span class="caption">The 23 Stitches, rated ‘extremely difficult’</span></p> <p>The attractions of Blue Derby Trail Network were quickly acknowledged by interstate and international mountain-bike enthusiasts. By 2017 Dorset Council mayor Greg Howard was boasting the trails were attracting <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-12-26/mountain-bike-trails-driving-major-change-in-derby/9276384?nw=0">30,000 visitors</a> a year, with the initial investment of $3.1 million returning $30 million a year.</p> <h2>Turmoil amid renewal</h2> <p>Logging of Tasmania’s public forests is overseen by the state-owned business known as Sustainable Timber Tasmania (previously Forestry Tasmania). It manages 816,000 hectares of public forest designated as “Permanent Timber Production Zone land”. This area represents about 12% of Tasmania’s total land area and 24% of its forests.</p> <p>Each year Sustainable Timber Tasmania is required to extract 137,000 cubic metres of sawlogs from these forests. It maintains a “Three Year Plan” for what parts of Tasmania it is going to log. It updated this document in July 2021.</p> <p>This plan includes logging two coupes (<a href="https://www.sttas.com.au/forest-operations-management/our-operations/three-year-wood-production-plans/3yp-north-east-region">CC105A and C119A</a>) covering 85 hectares that border the Blue Derby Trail Network by the end of the year. A third coupe, covering 40 hectares, is scheduled for <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7070498/protesters-descend-on-mountain-bike-trails/">clear-felling in 2022</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431419/original/file-20211111-21-jy54dd.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431419/original/file-20211111-21-jy54dd.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Part of the Blue Derby trail system." /></a> <span class="caption">Part of the Blue Derby trail system.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://www.ridebluederby.com.au/" class="source">Blue Derby Pods Ride</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" class="license">CC BY</a></span></p> <p>Local views on this logging are mixed. Dorset Council mayor Greg Howard has said <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-31/derby-mountain-bike-trail-logging-concerns/12502316">it won’t make any difference</a> to the mountain bike trails. Conservationists and others are more defiant. Local conservation group Blue Derby Wild has <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7070498/protesters-descend-on-mountain-bike-trails/">organised protests</a>) involving cyclists, hikers and activists.</p> <p>This battle between logging and outdoor recreation in Derby exemplifies the conflict between extraction and conservation affecting communities across Tasmania, Australia and the world.</p> <h2>The value of mountain bike tourism</h2> <p>This week more than 180 Tasmanian tourism businesses signed <a href="https://tasmaniantimes.com/2021/11/on-forestry-tourism/">an open letter</a> calling for the state government to end logging in native forests. The letter says:</p> <blockquote> <p>Brand Tasmania promises an island at the bottom of the world where ancient forests and wild rivers await to reconnect people to their wild side, through nature based tourism experiences found nowhere else on earth.</p> </blockquote> <p>Mountain biking has become an increasingly valuable part of this tourism mix since the late <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00222216.1997.11949800">1990s</a>, when communities in iconic destinations such as Moab, Utah and Whistler, British Columbia began building mountain-bike trails.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Mountain biking in Canyonlands National Park, near Moab, Utah." /></a> <span class="caption">Mountain biking in Canyonlands National Park, near Moab, Utah.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <p>While the size and value of the industry internationally is difficult to <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1354816620901955">assess</a>, mountain bike tourists are <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1356766719842321">typically affluent</a>. They travel an average 12 nights a year, spending US$130 to US$23O each day of their visit. A <a href="https://www.auscycling.org.au/nat/news/mountain-biking-australia-economic-and-participation-analysis">study</a> published in March 2021 (commissioned by the group AusCycling and funded by the federal government’s <a href="https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/territories-regions-cities/regions/regional-community-programs/building-better-regions-fund">Building Better Region Fund</a>), estimates Australia’s mountain bike market is worth <a href="https://www.auscycling.org.au/nat/news/mountain-biking-australia-economic-and-participation-analysis">about A$600 million a year</a>, supporting more than 6,000 jobs.</p> <p>How does the mountain-bike tourism compare with the value of logging? Again, while there are no studies that directly quantify this, comparisons between logging and ecotourism more generally point strong to the latter. A study on the economic contribution of ecotourism versus logging in the <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Securing_the_Wet_Tropics.html?id=N9UshWGGUAIC&amp;redir_esc=y">Wet Tropics of Queensland area</a>, for example, found ecotourism was worth up to ten times more than logging.</p> <p>In Tasmania, the tourism industry directly employs about <a href="https://www.tra.gov.au/data-and-research/reports/national-tourism-satellite-account-2019-20/national-tourism-satellite-account-2019-20">21,000 poeple</a>, compared with about 2,500 in logging (at the time of <a href="https://www.tffpn.com.au/forest-facts/">the 2016 census</a>).</p> <h2>Clear-cut choice</h2> <p>Derby has been pioneer in mountain-bike tourism. Communities looking to emulate its success include <a href="https://lalarrbagauwa.harcourt.vic.au/">Harcourt</a> in Victoria, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-05/york-trails-adrenaline/100350674">York</a> in Western Australia. and <a href="https://aboutregional.com.au/mogo-locals-worry-about-the-impact-of-logging-on-mountain-bike-tourism/">Mogo</a> in New South Wales – which is also battling logging plans threatening the mountain bike trails.</p> <p>Mountain bikers predominantly seek out destinations based on the quality of the trail systems, the attractiveness of the terrain and appeal of the natural <a href="https://journals.humankinetics.com/view/journals/jsm/30/3/article-p265.xml">scenery</a>. But just as important is <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14775085.2016.1164069">support from the local community</a> and <a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/tri/2014/00000018/00000001/art00002">politicians</a>.</p> <p>In Derby the choice between logging and sustainable tourism should be clear-cut. Mining didn’t last. Nor can logging. Long-term protections are needed now.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/166176/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/richard-buning-943392">Richard Buning</a>, Lecturer in Tourism, School of Business, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/mountain-biking-gives-this-tasmanian-town-a-sustainable-future-logging-does-not-166176">original article</a>.</p>

Domestic Travel

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Princess Diana’s “shame bike” sells at auction for hefty sum

<p>A bicycle once used by Princess Diana has sold at auction for a shocking $79,000.</p> <p>Barry Glazer, Baltimore attorney, bid $79,000 for the blue Raleigh bicycle during a<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.burstowandhewett.co.uk/news/auction-find-lady-diana%E2%80%99s-bicycle/" target="_blank">Burstow &amp; Hewett Auctioneers</a><span> </span>auction in East Sussex last week.</p> <p>The bike was used by Princess Diana before her marriage to Prince Charles and had to be sold as the palace thought it was "not fit for a princess".</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841108/diana-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cb97f448a64f467cb69dcbf0ad38eea3" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>The<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.sussexlive.co.uk/news/sussex-news/princess-dianas-shame-bike-sold-5353641" target="_blank">press</a><span> </span>quickly began calling it Diana's "shame" bike and the Princess quickly sold it.</p> <p>Glazer has big plans for the bike as he will be "setting up a memorial dedicated to the British Family's basic racist roots".</p> <p>"The memorial will be set up in an enclave in his office located in a historic building, utilised by the underground 'railroad' to assist slaves to freedom in Baltimore," the statement said.</p> <p>African slaves were shipped to Baltimore by the English in 1642 to work on tobacco plantations.</p> <p>Glazer's firm said that the bike had become a "famous symbol of Diana's oppression".</p> <p>He also referenced comments made about racism by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle during their interview with Oprah Winfrey.</p> <p>"The memorial is particularly relevant now considering the present controversy with Harry and Meghan accusing their Royal Family of racism," the statement continued.</p> <p>"[Glazer] explained that the Royal Family's claim for superiority is rooted in the logic of white supremacy," the statement said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Money & Banking

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Cyclist cops unexpected fine after dobbing in dangerous driver

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A cyclist has been slapped with a fine after claiming he has footage of a car illegally overtaking him.</p> <p>Dashcam footage from the incident on August 9th was posted to the Facebook page Cycliq, which is a company that sells light and camera safety systems to cyclists.</p> <p>The video appears to show the car drive close to the cyclist as the car tries to overtake the cyclist as they were both travelling down a hill.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FCycliq%2Fvideos%2F3547100758647644%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe> <p>Under NSW road rules, drivers must leave at least a metre of space when the speed limit is 60kmph or 1.5m when the speed limit is more than 60kmph.</p> <p>However, the cyclist took the video to NSW Police only to be hit with a fine for travelling too far from the left-hand side of the road. </p> <p>“Took this to NSW Police and I ended up getting booked for not riding as near to left of the road as possible,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Descending down an unguttered road with blind driveways at 50kph, and I was as close to the left of the road that was safe in the circumstances.</p> <p>“It seems NSW Police intent on keeping road as perilous as possible for cyclists.”</p> <p>The fine was $116.</p> <p>Cycliq commented on the incident, saying that the decision was a "very sad indictment on the attitude of the NSW Police Force".</p> <p>“Change is happening whether they like it or not, and they are going to have to catch up with the times because the videos won’t stop coming and the pressure will only build,” it said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

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Appalling discovery along popular national park bike track

<p><span>Cyclists on the central coast of NSW made a horrifying discovery over the weekend while riding through a popular national park.</span><br /><br /><span>Many young families and bikers ride out to Bouddi National Park and Scott Uzelac, who is a keen mountain biker, is one of them.</span><br /><br /><span>While cycling with friends near Maitland Bay which is located inside the park, they were surprised when one suffered a flat tyre.</span><br /><br /><span>The group quickly realised what caused the flat.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837172/park-bike.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c0cece9748e74de2a0d8c3e49747d6cd" /><br /><br /><span>“I thought there must be a sharp root or something there so I started kicking the area and I couldn’t see anything,” he explained to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/central-coast-cyclists-booby-trap-discovery-bouddi-park-track-211146279.html" target="_blank">Yahoo News Australia.</a></em></span><br /><br /><span>Mr Uzelac then saw a leafy area which he also put his foot through, striking something hard.</span><br /><br /><span>“I got down on my knees and saw this row of nails sticking out a piece of 30 by 40 with two big anchor bolts... I couldn’t even count how many nails were sticking out.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837171/park-bike-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/10a1c9b4beac42b288b9eb556e72b106" /><br /><br /><span>Mr Uzelac says it’s an area he visits with his children, and “freaked out” over the startling discovery.</span><br /><br /><span>“I was shocked and a bit dumbfounded. I just couldn't believe somebody's done that, to be honest,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“If [my children] trod on it in the right way, the nails are that long it would have gone straight through their feet and through the other side.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Kincumber resident said many of the trails in the area, including the one he and his friends were on, have been created by mountain bikers due to a lack of routes.</span><br /><br /><span>However he says they are not recognised as official tracks.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837170/park-bike-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/15a52e11bd4d463ba1157dc5ed5d49a1" /><br /><span>The 41-year-old also pointed out that there has been an influx of walkers now using the unofficial tracks, who are furious with the cyclists using the paths.</span><br /><br /><span>“Some of the older walkers think they have the right [of way over cyclists], I’ve heard of some of the older bushwalkers throwing sticks on the trails so people can’t ride through them,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Uzelac took the booby trap to Terrigal police station.</span><br /><br /><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/central-coast-cyclists-booby-trap-discovery-bouddi-park-track-211146279.html" target="_blank"><em>Yahoo News Australia</em></a> reports investigations into its placement on the track are ongoing.</span><br /><br /><span>The father said there was growing pressure among riders to have designated routes identified by the local council, to distinguish separate pathways for cyclists and walkers.</span></p> <p><em>Images: Scott Uzelac</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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On your bike: Kate Langbroek’s husband wants a divorce after being sued for breaking lockdown laws

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Kate Langbroek explained that her husband, Peter Allen Lewis, is being sued by the city of Bologna for breaking lockdown laws during the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>She clarified to Triple M’s Moonman in the Morning that Peter, 44, had been caught riding his bicycle and was unaware that the rules for self-isolation in Bologna had changed overnight.</p> <p>She also reflected on the family’s stressful weeks in self-isolation, joking that her and husband might be “getting a divorce” to celebrate their anniversary this weekend.</p> <p>“Initially you were allowed to go out and exercise - which you know I would never do,” Kate said with a laugh. </p> <p>“Peter, my husband, actually got stopped by police on his bicycle three weeks ago at 7 am on a Sunday. They had changed the rules the night before. It was pretty intense. He's being sued by the city of Bologna.</p> <p>“And they [the police] said to him, "Have you got a lawyer?’”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9-IGRkgWS1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9-IGRkgWS1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Friday night dinner. At my Favourite* restaurant in bologna, with my Favourite** people. *only **only #anotherweekinlockdown #sixtakeitaly 💚🇮🇹❤️#coronavirus #covid #vivaitalia 🙏.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/katelangbroek/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Kate Langbroek</a> (@katelangbroek) on Mar 20, 2020 at 2:34pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Kate then revealed that the lockdowns have gotten more intense.</p> <p>“You cannot leave the house. I've probably left the house five times probably. It's just very difficult,” she added.</p> <p>She spoke about her upcoming anniversary, saying that things have been a bit hectic.</p> <p>“I said [to Peter], "How should we celebrate?’ And he said, ‘By getting a divorce!’”</p> <p>She spoke to Hughesy &amp; Ed that COVID-19 restrictions had brought her closer to her husband of 17 years, saying that they lie in bed like “little gumnut babies”.</p> <p>"We lie in bed like little gumnut babies just clutching each other's hands until we fall asleep ready to start it all again the next day," she said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Walking and biking in Darwin

<p>Exploring Darwin via the seaside walkways and protected bike paths is an often overlooked way to get away from the hubbub of the CBD and enjoy the waterfront of the Top End. Below are the three best routes for walking or riding around Darwin and surrounding suburbs.</p> <p>These paths have public toilets and water fountains at intervals, but remember to bring your own water to keep hydrated in the Darwin heat!</p> <p><strong>Darwin Esplanade</strong></p> <p>The Esplanade runs along the south-western edge of Darwin CBD and is an ideal place for a stroll. All along the length of the 1.6km paved walkway, are benches, large areas shaded by trees, memorials, informational signs, and beautiful look-out points.</p> <p>Take a break to look at the Darwin Centopath (commemorative of the ANZAC contribution), or stop simply stop off anywhere along the path, as it snakes through many grassy lawns and shaded areas.</p> <p>You will also be able to stop, look, and learn about different points of interest in Darwin Harbour including the nearby Navy Base.</p> <p><strong>Mindil Beach, Fannie Bay and East Point</strong></p> <p>Aside from being home of the beloved dry-season sunset markets, Mindil beach is an incredible place to walk, ride and spend the afternoon.</p> <p>Start at the Sky City Casino on the west end of the beach and walk along the sand or bike along the path toward the eastern end. Keep going along the paved path when you reach the end of the beach and let it guide you up a hill to the amazing look-out point where, to the left, you can see the whole expanse of the beach, and to the right, the beginning of Fannie Bay.</p> <p>As you continue along, you and the family might be starting to get a bit hungry- and perfect timing! You will be coming up to the NT Museum cafe, the Darwin Ski Club, and eventually the Darwin Sailing and Trailer Boat clubs. Grab a bite with a view before continuing along!</p> <p>After you pass the Darwin Sailing Club, about 2-3kms from the beginning of Mindil Beach, you will be coming up to a another slight hill. Manage to get to the top of this one, and you will be pleasantly surprised to see you have arrived on a protected biking and walking path. When followed to the end, the path will deliver you to the interesting WWII bunkers and museum on East Point Reserve. Don’t worry too much about directions from this point onwards, there are many helpful signs to guide you the right way!</p> <p>Before you reach East Point Reserve, be sure to stop at Lake Alexander; it’s a protected lagoon, that when open, is perfect for swimming, wading along the shore or even having a BBQ at one of the many public pits.</p> <p>To walk or ride the whole route from Mindil Beach to East Point Reserve is doable in one day, but keep in mind you can break-up the walk at any point and start along the path later on!</p> <p><strong>Nightcliff</strong></p> <p>Outside of the city in the northern suburbs area, is the magical little town of Nightcliff. When you are not at the Sunday morning market or visiting one of the local favourite cafes, take a stroll along the water and beach fronts in Nightcliff.</p> <p>Another protected bike and walking path will take you along about 3kms of spectacular water views, past the Nightcliff pier, the beloved Foreshore cafe and Nightcliff public pool, and eventually all the way to the empty and beautiful beaches of the Casuarina Coastal Reserve.</p> <p>All along the path in Nightcliff are interesting trees and shaded areas to sit and relax.</p> <p>Now, in order to get to/from the paths when staying in Darwin CBD, consider using the DarwinBus. A $3 ticket allows passengers access to all busses for 3 hours!</p> <p><em>Written by Luray Joy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/walking-biking-in-darwin/">MyDiscoveries.</a> </em></p>

Travel Tips

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“Definitely not OK”: Photo of bikes on Melbourne train divides the internet

<p><span>A picture of bicycles parked in front of an accessible seating on a Melbourne train has sparked an online debate over the appropriateness of using allocated spaces.</span></p> <p><span>The photo, which showed a pair of bikes locked to the railing in front of a priority seat, was shared to the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/disabilityparkingwallofshame/permalink/2693760433992019/">Australian Disability Parking Wall of Shame</a> Facebook group on Saturday.</span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7831309/bikesorry.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/98a9aa4af8f54dd2a3c2411cad34a1f1" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: Facebook</em></p> <p><span>“Not car related but train disabled seating on Frankston train line just now,” the poster wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“My opinion [is] they shouldn’t be allowed, what you think?”</span></p> <p><span>Some said that the owner of the bikes was within their rights to put their bicycles at the area in question.</span></p> <p><span>“If it’s empty and not blocking the aisle what’s the problem as long as they’re moved when the space is needed,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“Nothing wrong with bikes going there as that’s where they’re meant to go. But must be moved when needed for a wheel chair,” another commented.</span></p> <p><span>“If no one requires access at the time, makes sense to use the empty space,” one added.</span></p> <p><span>However, others believed the move was illegal or at least improper. </span></p> <p><span>“Should be fined. Disabled folk treated like crap as usual,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“People think that the signs DO NOT apply to them,” another added.</span></p> <p><span>“If someone needed the seats they are supposed to be offered up. But locking the bikes seems a bit over the top,” one chimed in.</span></p> <p><span>“Definitely not OK,” one said.</span></p> <p><span>According to <a href="https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/more/travelling-on-the-network/bikes-on-public-transport/">Public Transport Victoria</a>, bikes can be carried on metropolitan trains except at the first door of the first carriage, which is designated as a priority area for passengers with mobility impairment. </span></p> <p><span>It is not known whether the picture was taken on the priority carriage.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s important to be considerate of all passengers sharing the train network by ensuring seats, particularly those for the mobility impaired, are not obscured by objects – including bikes,” VicRoads told <em><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/definitely-not-ok-photo-on-melbourne-train-divides-the-internet-011858807.html">Yahoo News Australia</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>A <a href="https://melbourne.figshare.com/articles/A_more_inclusive_City_of_Melbourne_Easy_English_version/8206904">University of Melbourne study</a> found that inaccessible public transport was one of the main issues preventing the city from becoming more inclusive for people with disability.</span></p> <p><span>“Public transport is better than nothing but there are a lot of barriers I wasn’t expecting in such a big city,” wheelchair user Stacey Christie told <em><a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/sometimes-train-drivers-forget-you-how-to-make-melbourne-more-accessible-for-people-with-disabilities-20190927-p52vmk.html">The Age</a></em>.</span></p>

Domestic Travel

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Urgent safety warning: Kmart pulls popular Christmas toy from shelves after catching on fire

<p>A kids toy from Kmart, which was popular at Christmas, has been pulled from stores after several complaints it caught on fire.</p> <p>Samantha Sholly went to Facebook Sunday night to warn parents after the charging cable for the ATV Madness remote control quad bike purchased as a gift for her 4-year-old son caught on fire.</p> <p>“WARNING! If anyone has bought this ATV from Kmart, be very careful. We have had our charger catch on fire. LUCKY it was caught early!! (sic),” the mother warned online.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 333.571px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7822559/quadbike.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/136a695fc9fd471ab007b1c115728243" /></p> <p>The Adelaide mother says her babies were just a few metres from the charging cable in their kitchen on Boxing Day.</p> <p>Within two hours of the charging cable being plugged into an electric source, Samantha’s sister, Alexandra smelt something burning.</p> <p>The surrounding rubber of the charging cable had begun melting after a small flame lit from it.</p> <p>“It was pretty scary,” Ms Solly <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/pretty-scary-kmart-pulls-toy-after-reports-they-were-catching-fire-20190101-p50p4g.html">said to The Age.</a> “I’m just lucky my sister caught it when she did.”</p> <p>The Kmart quality teams said they were investigating claims its remote-controlled quad bike charger for the toy could be dangerous while charging.</p> <p>Several images and warnings have been posted on social media showing charging components that have melted through after catching fire. However, a recall on the product has not been issued, despite concern from parents online.</p> <p>A spokesperson told <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01-01/kmart-toy-pulled-from-shelves-over-fire-hazard/10675602">the ABC the decision to pull the popular toy</a> from shelves was made on Thursday.</p> <p>"At Kmart, we take the quality and safety of our products very seriously, which is why we made the decision to withdraw the remote-control quad bike from sale, pending investigation from our quality team," she said.</p> <p>Any concerns regarding the product have been encouraged to contact the Kmart customer service team at 1800 124 125.</p>

Home & Garden

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Outrage as cop fines Australia Post postie for riding bike on footpath

<p>A policeman has fined an Australia Post postman for riding his motorbike on the footpath, a move that has been slammed as “absolutely ridiculous”.</p> <p>Mick Jackson was delivering mail in Mannering Park, on the New South Wales Central Coast, last December when the officer booked him $330 for the offence of “drive on footpath”.</p> <p>“I just told him straight out: ‘If I can't ride on the footpath, I can't do my job,’” Mr Jackson said.</p> <p>The cop even followed Jackson back to his post office and fined him a second time for parking his bike on the footpath outside. </p> <p>Mr Jackson warned that the police officer's actions could “affect all posties”. </p> <p>“Australia Post has been around for a long time and they ride on the footpath, unfortunately,” he said. </p> <p>“What choice do you have? The letterbox ain't on the on the side of the road like they are overseas, so you just don't have a choice.”</p> <p><img width="413" height="547" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/06/26/01/4D9ABA6600000578-5881747-A_police_officer_fined_postman_Michael_Jackson_for_riding_his_mo-a-1_1529972376803.jpg" alt="A police officer fined postman Michael Jackson for riding his motorbike on the footpath - in a move slammed as 'absolutely ridiculous'" class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="i-6f153a539a085165"/></p> <p>Daily Mail Australia understands the cop issued the fine because neither the contractor or post office provided the officer with formal identification.  </p> <p>However, Mr Jackson was riding a traditional Australia Post red motorbike, wearing his regulation hi-vis and carrying mail and parcels at the time. </p> <p>Mannering Park post office licensee Kristina Budden also added the office did not have identity cards for its delivery men. </p> <p>“The bike was loaded with mail, you'd think that'd be enough,” she said. </p> <p>Mr Jackson took the matter to court and the offences of 'drive on footpath' and 'stop on path/in built up area' were dismissed by Magistrate Peter Feather last Monday.</p> <p>“It was a win for common sense,” said his solicitor, Doug Eaton from Effective Legal Solutions. </p> <p>An Australia Post spokesman said contractors and employees have the same right to drive on the footpath. </p> <p> </p>

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4 best places for seniors to bike in Australia

<p>See the country on two wheels.</p> <p>Before you sign up for a bicycle tour, there are a few things to consider:</p> <ul> <li>Be realistic about your level of fitness or just how much you want to ride each day.</li> <li>Make sure you have the proper safety gear and adequate travel insurance for this kind of activity.</li> <li>Check the weather and season – it’s no fun pedaling in scorching heat or pouring rain.</li> <li>Practice, practice, practice. Your first big ride shouldn’t be day one of the tour.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Barossa Valley, South Australia</strong></p> <p>Combine your love of cycling with your love of wine in South Australia’s iconic Barossa Valley. Tours run for up to five days, cycling from Adelaide, through the Hills and the German town of Hahndorf, and into the heart of the wine growing region. Make sure to factor in time for cellar door stops.</p> <p><strong>Great Ocean Road, Victoria</strong></p> <p>The Great Ocean Road is beautiful by car and it’s absolutely breathtaking by bike. This winding, cliffside road runs for about 250 kilometres and takes around four to five days end to end. But while it’s long, most of the riding is relatively easy so you can concentrate on spotting whales out in the ocean.</p> <p><strong>Scenic Rim, Queensland</strong></p> <p>Queensland is famous for its beaches, but head inland and you’ll discover rolling countryside and gentle mountains that are perfect for exploring by bike. Ride through unspoilt national parks, sleepy country towns and lush farmland, refueling with some of the region’s excellent produce. If you want to test yourself, there are also some challenging ascents that you can tackle.</p> <p><strong>The Australian Alpine Epic, Victoria</strong></p> <p>Once the snow melts on Mt Buller, this 40-kilometre trail is revealed. It is the only route outside of North America that has been named one of the world’s ‘epic’ ride by the International Mountain Bike Association. It will take only a full day to ride and you’ll need to have a reasonable skill level, but the stunning scenery makes the effort worthwhile.</p> <p>Do you like to cycle in Australia?</p>

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