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How do I keep my fruit, veggies and herbs fresh longer? Are there any ‘hacks’?

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/senaka-ranadheera-199225">Senaka Ranadheera</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p>We all know <a href="https://theconversation.com/frozen-canned-or-fermented-when-you-cant-shop-often-for-fresh-vegetables-what-are-the-best-alternatives-131678">fresh produce is good for us</a>, but fruit, vegetables and herbs have a tendency to perish quickly if left uneaten.</p> <p>This is because <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2212429219305188">even after harvesting</a>, produce from living plants tends to continue its biological processes. This includes respiration: producing energy from stored carbohydrates, proteins and fats while releasing carbon dioxide and water vapour. (Ever found a sprouting potato in your pantry?)</p> <p>On top of that, fresh produce also <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/journal/agriculture/special_issues/quality_safety_fresh_produce">spoils easily thanks to various microbes</a> – both harmless and ones that can cause disease, called pathogens.</p> <p>Simply chucking things in the fridge won’t solve the problem, as different types of plants will react differently to how they’re stored. So, how can you combat food waste and keep produce fresh for longer? Fortunately, there are some helpful tips.</p> <h2>Freshness and quality begin at the farm</h2> <p>Farmers always aim to harvest produce when it’s at an optimal condition, but both pre-harvest and post-harvest factors will affect freshness and quality even before you buy it.</p> <p>Pre-harvest factors are agricultural, such as climatic conditions, soil type and water availability. <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2212429219305188">Post-harvest factors</a> include washing and cleaning after harvesting, transportation and distribution, processing and packaging, and storage.</p> <p>As consumers we can’t directly control these factors – sometimes the veggies we buy just won’t be as good. But we can look out for things that will affect the produce once we bring it home.</p> <p>One major thing to look out for is bruised, wounded or damaged produce. This can happen at any stage of post-harvest handling, and can really speed up the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0308814609001411">decay of your veggies and fruit</a>.</p> <p>Moisture loss through damaged skin speeds up deterioration and nutrient loss. The damage also makes it easier for <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468014119301943">spoilage microbes</a> to get in.</p> <h2>To wash or not to wash?</h2> <p>You don’t need to wash your produce before storing it. A lot of what we buy has already been washed commercially. In fact, if you wash your produce and can’t get it completely dry, the added moisture could speed up decay in the fridge.</p> <p>But washing produce <a href="https://theconversation.com/do-we-really-have-to-wash-fruit-and-vegetables-53039">just before you use it</a> is important to remove dirt and pathogenic bugs.</p> <p>Don’t use vinegar in your washing water despite what you see on social media. Studies indicate <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16496573/">vinegar has no effect</a> on lowering microbial loads on fresh produce.</p> <p>Similarly, don’t use baking soda. Even though there’s some evidence baking soda <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03118">can remove pesticide residues</a> from the surface of some produce, it’s not advisable at home. Just use plain tap water.</p> <h2>Location, location, location</h2> <p>The main thing you need is the correct type of packaging and the correct location – you want to manage moisture loss, decay and ripening.</p> <p>The three main storage options are on the counter, in the fridge, or in a “cool, dry and dark place”, such as the pantry. Here are some common examples of produce and where best to put them.</p> <p>Bananas, onion, garlic, potatoes, sweet potato and whole pumpkin will do better in a dark pantry or cupboard. Don’t store potatoes and onions together: onions produce a gas called ethylene that makes potatoes spoil quicker, while the high moisture in potatoes spoils onions.</p> <p>In fact, don’t store fruits such as apples, pears, avocado and bananas together, because these fruits <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15538362.2013.748378#:%7E:text=%27Malindi%27%20had%20higher%20respiration%20rates,retention%20in%20fruit%20during%20ripening">release ethylene gas</a> as they ripen, making nearby fruits ripen (and potentially spoil) much faster. That is, unless you <em>do</em> want to ripen your fruits fast.</p> <p>All leafy greens, carrots, cucumbers, cauliflower and broccoli will do best in the low-humidity drawer (crisper) in the fridge. You can put them in perforated plastic bags to retain moisture but maintain air flow. But don’t put them in completely sealed bags because this can slow down ripening while <a href="https://ucanr.edu/sites/hdnmastergardeners/files/338860.pdf">trapping carbon dioxide</a>, leading to decay and bad smells.</p> <p>Some fruits will also do best in the fridge. For example, apples and citrus fruits such as oranges can keep fresh longer in the fridge (crisper drawer), although they can stay at room temperature for short periods. However, don’t store watermelon in the fridge for too long, as it will lose its flavour and deep red colour if kept refrigerated <a href="https://ucanr.edu/sites/hdnmastergardeners/files/338860.pdf">for longer than three days</a>.</p> <p>Most herbs and some leafy vegetables – like celery, spring onions and asparagus – can be kept with stems in water to keep them crisp. Keep them in a well-ventilated area and away from direct sunlight, so they don’t get too warm and wilt.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cHu10C1DAds?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><figcaption><span class="caption">Experimenting at home is a good way to find the best ways to store your produce.</span></figcaption></figure> <h2>Fight food waste and experiment</h2> <p><strong>Don’t buy too much.</strong> Whenever possible, buy only small amounts so that you don’t need to worry about keeping them fresh. Never buy bruised, wounded or damaged produce if you plan to keep it around for more than a day.</p> <p><strong>“Process” your veggies for storage.</strong> If you do buy a large quantity – maybe a bulk option was on sale – consider turning the produce into something you can keep for longer. For example, banana puree made from really ripe bananas can be <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0023643817300853">stored for up to 14 days at 4°C</a>. You can use <a href="https://theconversation.com/frozen-canned-or-fermented-when-you-cant-shop-often-for-fresh-vegetables-what-are-the-best-alternatives-131678">freezing, blanching, fermentation and canning</a> for most vegetables.</p> <p><strong>Consider vacuum sealing.</strong> Vacuum packaging of vegetables and berries can keep them fresh longer, as well. For example, vacuum-sealed beans can keep up to 16 months in the fridge, but will last only about <a href="https://www.vacpac.com.au/vacuum-sealed-life-expectancy-how-long-will-my-vacuum-sealed-products-last">four weeks in the fridge unsealed</a>.</p> <p><strong>Keep track.</strong> Arrange your fridge so you can see the produce easily and use it all before it loses freshness.</p> <p><strong>Experiment with storage hacks.</strong> Social media is full of tips and hacks on how best to store produce. Turn your kitchen into a lab and try out any tips you’re curious about – they might just work. You can even use these experiments as a way to teach your kids about the importance of reducing food waste.</p> <p><strong>Grow some of your own.</strong> This isn’t <a href="https://theconversation.com/growing-your-own-food-and-foraging-can-help-tackle-your-ballooning-grocery-bill-heres-how-216264">feasible for all of us</a>, but you can always try having some herbs in pots so you don’t need to worry about keeping them fresh or using up a giant bunch of mint all at once. <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-are-microgreens-better-for-you-than-regular-greens-73950">Growing your own microgreens</a> could be handy, too.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/226763/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/senaka-ranadheera-199225">Senaka Ranadheera</a>, Associate Professor, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-do-i-keep-my-fruit-veggies-and-herbs-fresh-longer-are-there-any-hacks-226763">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Food & Wine

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Finding joy at age 100: Talking to centenarians about living their best life at any age

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heather-joyce-nelson-1440914">Heather Joyce Nelson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-regina-3498">University of Regina</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/beverlee-ziefflie-1445320">Beverlee Ziefflie</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paula-mayer-1445321">Paula Mayer</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a></em></p> <p>Aging is seen as a period of loss, and there are unhelpful <a href="https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/10-myths-about-aging">myths about older adults</a>. Myths lead to treatable conditions being considered normal parts of aging, including cognitive decline, dementia, depression and loneliness. Some even consider exercise dangerous in older adults.</p> <p>At the same time, mainstream media promotes the message that <a href="https://doi.org/10.4236/jss.2017.58015">being young is central to a person’s value</a>. These ideas lead to ageism and older adults being seen as lesser.</p> <p>After spending time with six female centenarians in assisted living facilities, our research team — which included four nursing researchers and a documentary filmmaker — learned there is plenty still worth living for.</p> <p>Centenarians are a small but growing segment of the population with <a href="https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/en/daily-quotidien/220928/dq220928c-eng.pdf?st=LrkfjZE_">13,844 centenarians in Canada</a>, and our findings debunk myths about the experience of aging.</p> <p>We asked the centenarians questions about what brings them joy and how they plan for the future because we wanted to learn how the very elderly plan for and find ways to live their best lives. The results of this study were <a href="https://vimeo.com/showcase/looking-forward-at-100">turned into a 32-minute documentary</a> that captures participants’ long and interesting lives and offers insight into continued meaning experienced by centenarians in their daily lives. Three of the centenarians died shortly after the interviews took place.</p> <h2>Long and interesting lives</h2> <p>The participants were born between the years 1919 and 1922. They were children during the Great Depression and young adults during the Second World War.</p> <p>One of the women helped build bullet casings and worked on the <a href="https://www.britannica.com/technology/Lancaster-airplane">Lancaster bomber</a>. Another woman helped her husband protect the blueprints of the ill-fated <a href="https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/avro-arrow">Avro Arrow aircraft</a> when he brought them home from work. Two women lost their husbands when their children were small and had to go to work to support their families. They all experienced love and adventure.</p> <p>Our team was fascinated by their stories and wanted to further explore what their lives look like today.</p> <p>Betty, 101, saw happiness as a choice. “I don’t know what’s really to complain about. I went through life staying happy,” she said.</p> <h2>Joy and challenges</h2> <p>This study used a research method called <a href="https://www.scribd.com/doc/151684840/Braun-Clarke-2006-Using-Thematic-Analysis">thematic analysis</a> to find four themes: Finding Joy, Act your Age, Looking Forward and Putting Challenges into Perspective.</p> <p>The centenarians found joy each day and enjoyed the little things such as activities, visits and treats. Betty enjoyed cheating at solitaire and Jean, 100, played the piano. Clementina, 101, had fun gambling and Joyce, 100, continued to write stories and watch her grandchildren in music concerts.</p> <p>Family was central to their lives and they enjoyed spending time with their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Two of the women stated that raising their children was the biggest accomplishment in their lives.</p> <p>The centenarians also found great joy in reminiscing about their interesting lives. However, one of the challenges was that there was no one left alive who had the same shared experiences.</p> <h2>Limitations</h2> <p>The centenarians were constrained by the limitations of society, their bodies and their self-perceptions. “You have to act your age,” said Clementina. She physically described this phenomenon by clasping her hands together in her lap and sitting still.</p> <p>Some participants found life to be boring at 100 compared to their lives as younger adults. They had limited opportunities to do what they would like. “We had homes,” said Joyce, 100, describing how they had known better lives, which made it hard to accept the constraints of their current existence.</p> <p>In spite of these feelings, many of the participants continued to be busy and live life fully despite limitations. Jean, despite needing a wheelchair for mobility, continues to do people’s taxes for a volunteer organization, plays piano for church services and leads choirs within her facility.</p> <p>“I am constantly rebelling against my situation physically,” she said.</p> <p>The other women in this study also continued to challenge norms of what their age and disabilities meant. Joyce writes and submits short stories for publication, and has a poem in the war archives in Ottawa.</p> <p>Assisted living facilities often prioritize resident safety, but this can come at a cost to personal freedom. Some residents only leave their facility accompanied by a facility employee or a family member. Clementina rebelled against this restriction and at the age of 97, snuck out of her assisted living facility in a cab to go to the casino, pretending that she was going to meet her son.</p> <p>All of the participants put their life challenges into perspective. They all had lost spouses, friends and some had lost their children. “I was broken,” Clementina said about losing her husband.</p> <p>Christine, 102, was asked how she managed after losing her husband when her children were still small. “I am still here,” she said.</p> <h2>The future</h2> <p>Most of the centenarians had few plans for themselves for the future and were more interested in leading their day-to-day lives. Betty jokingly described the inevitability of her death and that she was “looking for the bucket.” Most described being prepared to die except for Jean, who laughed and said she didn’t have time to die. “I have too many plans.”</p> <p>The centenarians looked to the future of their families and the larger community and entrusted the next generation to make good choices.</p> <p>Participants in this study had long and interesting lives and continued to find meaning each day. This study supports the idea that older adults continue to lead engaging lives and that we need to support older adults to live their best lives at any age.</p> <p><em>This article was also co-authored by journalist and filmmaker Kelly-Anne Riess and retired nursing instructor Susan Page.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/206852/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heather-joyce-nelson-1440914"><em>Heather Joyce Nelson</em></a><em>, Assistant Professor of Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-regina-3498">University of Regina</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/beverlee-ziefflie-1445320">Beverlee Ziefflie</a>, Instructor, Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paula-mayer-1445321">Paula Mayer</a>, Associate Research Scientist, Nursing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/saskatchewan-polytechnic-5681">Saskatchewan Polytechnic</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/finding-joy-at-age-100-talking-to-centenarians-about-living-their-best-life-at-any-age-206852">original article</a>.</em></p>

Caring

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“Greatest innings of any kind ever”: Cricket world stunned

<p>ODI hero Glenn Maxwell has single-handedly rewritten the cricket record books, leaving fans and fellow players alike scratching their heads in disbelief.</p> <p>In the recent ODI match against Afghanistan, where Australia found themselves in a precarious position at 7/91 chasing 292, Maxwell delivered an innings that has now been dubbed the "greatest innings ever" – or, in the words of captain Pat Cummins, "Just ridiculous. I don't know how you describe that."</p> <p>Maxwell's adventure leading up to this awe-inspiring performance involved a mishap on the golf course that left him nursing an injury and missing Australia's previous World Cup game. It seems that the golf course has its share of hazards, but Maxwell was more than willing to make amends with his cricketing prowess.</p> <p>The drama reached its peak when Maxwell, the man of the hour, made his entrance. He defied all odds and stats, forming an unbroken partnership of 202 for the eighth wicket with the skipper, who contributed a modest 12 runs. While Cummins found himself with little to do but admire Maxwell's heroics, he summed it up perfectly, saying, "I couldn't get on strike! I just let Maxi do his thing, how am I going to say anything to someone batting like that?"</p> <p>The cricketing world was equally flabbergasted by Maxwell's performance. Former England captain Michael Vaughan declared, "This is the greatest ODI innings ever. It might be the greatest innings of any kind ever."</p> <p>And the accolades didn't stop there; even cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar couldn't contain his awe, taking to X (formerly known as Twitter) to exclaim, "From Max pressure to Max performance! This has been the best ODI knock I've seen in my life."</p> <p>Maxwell's knock of 201 not out featured 21 fours and 10 sixes and made him only the third batsman in World Cup history to score a double century. His list of records broken during the game is so long that you'd need a bigger scoreboard to fit them all. He set records for the highest score in an ODI run chase, the highest score at No.5 or lower, the first ever 200-run score in a run chase, the highest score for an Australian batter in an ODI, and the second-fastest 200 in an ODI.</p> <p>Maxwell's cramp attack while batting at 146 was just a minor hiccough in his incredible journey. Following on-field treatment, he continued to pummel Afghanistan's attack with an array of shots that had fans gasping for breath.</p> <p>After the match, the exhausted but victorious Maxwell said, "Horrific, I feel shocking. It was quite hot when we were fielding, I haven't done a whole lot of high-intensity exercise in the heat. It got a hold of me today, I was lucky to stick it out until the end."</p> <p>In the end, it was a rollercoaster of a match that had spectators on the edge of their seats. Maxwell's incredible innings will surely be talked about for years to come, and who knows, maybe the golf course will become the secret training ground for future cricketing legends.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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These 7 genius hacks will revive almost any plant

<p><strong>Look for signs of life </strong></p> <p>If your plant has turned brown and lost some leaves, don’t give up on it just yet. There is hope that you can revive a dead plant if the plant still has a few green leaves and pliable stems – buds are a sure sign too. Melinda Meyers, star and producer of Melinda’s Garden Moment TV and radio segments, says that reviving a plant takes patience (sometimes even years).</p> <p><strong>Think about the water</strong></p> <p>Plants that are over-watered appear wilted and may have brown or yellow leaves that make it look dead but with very moist soil. By contrast, if you have forgotten to water your plants,  the leaves will be brown but dried around the edges or curled up. Master gardener, Kristena LaMar, says that if you suspect over-watering is the cause of your plant’s demise, repot your plant in dry dirt.</p> <p>And if your plant is thirsty, water it! However, hold off on fertilising until the plant is in better health. Meyers warns that, “Fertilising a struggling plant can injure the tender roots of a recovering plant.”</p> <p><strong>Consider your lighting situation</strong></p> <p>If you recently moved your plant to a new spot, it’s possible it’s no longer getting enough light. Even if you didn’t move it, it’s possible its lighting situation changed. Did you recently buy heavier drapes? Plant a tree outside that’s now blocking the indoor sunlight?</p> <p>Try moving your plant to a sunnier window if it needs a lot of light. (Same goes with a plant that’s now getting too much sun; try a different location in your home.)</p> <p><strong>Find a humid spot</strong></p> <p>Plants absorb water through leaves as well as roots. So keep your plant in a humid spot that’s not too sunny and not too dry to help it recover.</p> <p><strong>Feed your plant carefully </strong></p> <p>People and pets aren’t the only things in your house that need food; plants can get malnourished, too. (Signs are discoloured leaves or slow or no growth.) Meyers recommends a fertiliser/nutritional supplement. Depending on the nutritional deficiency, providing the nutrition can help the plant recover nearly immediately within days.</p> <p>Other deficiencies may take longer – as in weeks – while others are chronic and may not ever fully recover, although these are rare with houseplants.</p> <p><strong>IV for plants </strong></p> <p>Another option for malnourished plants is a water-soluble fertiliser that will slowly release nutrients and is less likely to burn your plant’s roots. Add it to the watering can before watering plants. Only use fertiliser during the time when your plant should be growing. Over-fertilising or using the wrong fertiliser can burn the roots of the plant.</p> <p><strong>Compost</strong></p> <p>If you’ve tried everything, and your plant still can’t be revived, it might be time to let go. By composting your plants, the remains can be recycled as nutrient-rich dirt that can help your next houseplant thrive. Don’t beat yourself up – and next time buy a hearty, nearly kill-proof cactus.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/7-hacks-that-will-revive-almost-any-plant" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Home & Garden

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Give the gift of luxury on any budget

<p dir="ltr">As the weather starts to warm up, a lot of us are kick starting our summer holiday and Christmas plans. </p> <p dir="ltr">While trips away and what’s on the menu for Christmas lunch are obviously vitally important, it's also good to get a jump on buying Christmas presents for your loved ones. </p> <p dir="ltr">It can be hard to think of a thoughtful gift for that special someone, especially when that person may seemingly have everything. </p> <p dir="ltr">Luckily, L’Occitane’s Christmas gift giving guide has you covered. </p> <p dir="ltr">Featuring everything from affordable stocking fillers, to the most luxurious product packs, the L’Occitane 2023 Christmas collection is certain to have something for everyone. </p> <p dir="ltr">For those looking to really spoil their loved one, they have limited edition sets for the ultimate pamper experience. </p> <p dir="ltr">This year, L’Occitane have three collections on offer, each featuring heavenly scents and full-sized products for $129 each. </p> <p dir="ltr">For those on a tighter budget, or those looking to add in a little extra something special as a stocking filler, L’Occitane’s iconic mini baubles are back for another year. </p> <p dir="ltr">The baubles feature a range of mini products in varying scents for $25, giving each person a chance to fall in love with their new favourite product before committing to a full size version. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/ClnauzdvCFO/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/ClnauzdvCFO/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by L’Occitane en Provence | ANZ (@loccitaneanz)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">L’Occitane has a whole range of stocking fillers available, such as hand cream packs, deluxe Christmas crackers, and much more. </p> <p dir="ltr">For those who simply can’t wait until December 25th to unwrap their L’Occitane goodies, the luxury brand has brought back their deluxe Advent Calendars for another year. </p> <p dir="ltr">With both the Classic and Deluxe beauty advent calendars on offer, enjoy a little luxury everyday of December until Christmas Day.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CxIEHK7PDpG/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CxIEHK7PDpG/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by L’Occitane en Provence | ANZ (@loccitaneanz)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">You can feel good about gifting L’Occitane goodies for Chrstmas this year, as the brand continues to make improvements to the materials they choose to package their products in. </p> <p dir="ltr">This year, L’Occitane has reduced the use of single-use materials by a further 8%, as they make it their mission to create a positive impact for both people and the planet. </p> <p dir="ltr">So when it comes to picking the perfect present for your loved ones this festive season, look no further than the luxuries of <a href="https://au.loccitane.com/">L’Occitane</a> to give the gift of indulgence to those who matter most. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Air travel is in a rut – is there any hope of recapturing the romance of flying?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/christopher-schaberg-1451119">Christopher Schaberg</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/arts-and-sciences-at-washington-university-in-st-louis-5659">Arts &amp; Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis</a></em></p> <p>Amelia Earhart broke a transcontinental speed record 90 years ago, in July 1933, by flying <a href="https://airandspace.si.edu/multimedia-gallery/web11183-2009640jpg">her signature red Lockheed Vega</a> from Los Angeles to New Jersey in just 17 hours, seven and a half minutes. Earlier that year, Earhart had flown as an observer on a Northwest Airways winter flight across the U.S., testing the possibilities of a “Northern Transcontinental” route.</p> <p>Because those early airplanes couldn’t reach high altitudes, they weaved through dangerous peaks and the erratic weather patterns that mountain ranges helped create. One co-pilot <a href="https://www.deltamuseum.org/about-us/blog/from-the-hangars/2019/07/24/delta-stories-amelia-earhart">remembers the journey</a> as “seat-of-the-pants flying across the Dakota and Montana plains and through, over and around the Western mountain ranges.”</p> <p>How does air travel today compare?</p> <p>I’ve studied <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/02/engine-failure/552959/">airplane technology</a>, <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/09/a-forgettable-passage-to-flight/279346/">airport design</a> and <a href="https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/grounded">cultural attitudes</a> toward air travel, and I’ve noticed how aspects of flying seem to have calcified over time.</p> <p>Long-distance flight <a href="https://theconversation.com/longing-for-the-golden-age-of-air-travel-be-careful-what-you-wish-for-34177">advanced rapidly between the 1930s and the early 1960s</a>, shaving off the number of hours in the sky by half. But over the past 60 years, the duration of such flights has remained roughly the same. Meanwhile, the ecosystem of air travel has grown more elaborate, often leaving passengers squirming in their seats on the tarmac before or after flight.</p> <p>Coast-to-coast air travel is in a rut – but there are still efforts to improve this mode of transit.</p> <h2>Just another ordinary miracle</h2> <p>Transcontinental air journeys are clearly different 90 years after Earhart’s record-breaking exploratory flights: Travelers now take such trips for granted, and often find them to be pure drudgery.</p> <p>In 2018, <a href="https://thepointsguy.com/reviews/united-757-200-first-class-ewr-sea/">travel blogger Ravi Ghelani reviewed in minute detail</a> a United Airlines flight from Newark, New Jersey, to Seattle – roughly the same northern route that Earhart explored in 1933.</p> <p>But for Ghelani, seated in first class, it wasn’t the terrain or frigid temperatures that were the most cumbersome part of his adventure. It was a cheap complimentary blanket, which “barely qualified as one – it was very thin, very scratchy.”</p> <p>The dreaded blanket reappears in Ghelani’s summary of his trip: “My main qualm with this flight was the lack of a decent blanket – the tiny, scratchy blanket that was provided wasn’t cutting it for the six-hour flight.”</p> <p>I can imagine Earhart rolling in <a href="https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/legend-amelia-earharts-disappearance">her watery grave</a>: “You zip across the continent in six hours and you complain about a scratchy blanket?”</p> <p>Yet Ghelani’s account of a mundane cross-country flight reveals a truth: Commercial air travel just isn’t the adventure it was back in Earhart’s time.</p> <p>As one captain of a major U.S. airline who regularly flies long routes told me, “Today jetliners fly across the country from Los Angeles to New York, or Boston to Seattle, full of passengers oblivious to the commonplace practice it has become.”</p> <p>This pilot compared coast-to-coast flights to “iPhones, microwaves or automobiles” – just one more ordinary miracle of modern life.</p> <h2>Little indignities multiply</h2> <p>The high-risk adventure of air travel has been subdued, yet long flights today can paradoxically feel torturous.</p> <p>As philosopher Michael Marder puts it in his 2022 book “<a href="https://mitpress.mit.edu/9780262543712/philosophy-for-passengers/">Philosophy for Passengers</a>”: “When crew members wish passengers a ‘pleasant journey,’ I hear a dash of cruel irony in their words. How pleasant can the passenger experience be when you are crammed in your seat, with little fresh air, too hot or miserably cold, and sleep deprived?”</p> <p>I asked my colleague and <a href="http://airplanereading.org/story/55/frequent-flight">frequent flier</a> Ian Bogost about his experience of coast-to-coast trips, and his reply was illuminating: “The same trip seems to get longer every year, and less comfortable. There are reasons – consolidation, reduced routes, pilot and air-traffic labor shortages, decaying technical infrastructure – but it still feels like moving backwards.” In spite of widespread attempts to update aircraft and modernize terminals, the vast system of air travel can seem cumbersome and outdated.</p> <p>Recently at The Atlantic, reporter <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2023/07/clear-airport-security-lines-tsa-infrastructure/674809/">Amanda Mull wrote about</a> the biometric screening company Clear, describing this firm’s high-tech service to skip the ubiquitous toil of identity checks before flight, at the cost of surrendering some privacy and personal information. Mull concludes the reason more travelers will likely enroll in this service is that “traversing American airport security is simply that grim.”</p> <p>For Mull, the adventure of contemporary air travel isn’t the destination, or even the journey itself – it’s what you must do to get through the airport.</p> <p>Still, it’s worth noting that the majority of the human population has never boarded an airplane; flying cross-country remains <a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/air-space-magazine/how-much-worlds-population-has-flown-airplane-180957719/">a relatively exclusive experience</a>. For most people, the closest they’ll get to a coast-to-coast flight is seeing a small white scratch across the sky, as another airliner makes its arc at 35,000 feet.</p> <h2>2 futures of cross-country flight</h2> <p>Coast-to-coast travel is no longer about breakneck speed or defying elemental odds, and Earhart’s quests to push the limits of aviation couldn’t be further from the bland routines of contemporary air travel. Nor does it involve people dressing to the hilt to step aboard a jetliner for the first time, with passengers stowing their fancy hats in spacious overhead bins.</p> <p>Where are the new frontiers for transcontinental flight today?</p> <p>One area of innovation is in a greener form of flight. Solar Impulse, a completely solar-powered plane, took two months to fly coast-to-coast in 2013. It averages a plodding 45 mph at cruising altitude. As <a href="https://apnews.com/ded34ccc19f24aeea67ba3da130a2be0">The Associated Press reported</a>: “Solar Impulse’s creators view themselves as green pioneers – promoting lighter materials, solar-powered batteries, and conservation as sexy and adventurous. Theirs is the high-flying equivalent of the Tesla electric sports car.” Solar Impulse was more recently <a href="https://aviationweek.com/aerospace/aircraft-propulsion/solar-powered-skydweller-completes-first-autonomous-flights?check_logged_in=1">reconfigured as a remotely piloted aircraft</a>, with new experiments in long-distance solar flight underway.</p> <p>The comparison of Solar Impulse to a Tesla is handy because a different extreme can be found in Elon Musk’s company SpaceX. As part of the relentless development of its biggest vehicle, “Starship,” SpaceX has advertised the possibility of “<a href="https://www.spacex.com/human-spaceflight/earth/">point-to-point</a>” travel on Earth: for example, flying on a commercial rocket from Los Angeles to New York in 25 minutes. Never mind the physical tolls of a normal <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-would-anyone-want-to-sit-on-a-plane-for-over-18-hours-an-economist-takes-the-worlds-longest-flight-122433">19-hour flight</a>; it’s hard to imagine what such a brief yet fast trip would feel like, not to mention what sort of class divisions and bleak industrial launch sites such jaunts would rely on.</p> <p>Get there as fast as possible, using as much fuel as necessary; or glide lazily along, powered by the sun, saving the planet. These are two starkly different visions of coast-to-coast flight, one a dystopian nightmare and the other a utopian dream.</p> <p>In the middle, there’s what most flying mortals do: wait in lines, board unceremoniously and be relieved if you get to your destination without too much discomfort or delay.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/210778/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/christopher-schaberg-1451119">Christopher Schaberg</a>, Director of Public Scholarship, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/arts-and-sciences-at-washington-university-in-st-louis-5659">Arts &amp; Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/air-travel-is-in-a-rut-is-there-any-hope-of-recapturing-the-romance-of-flying-210778">original article</a>.</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Transgress to impress: why do people tag buildings – and are there any solutions?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/flavia-marcello-403040">Flavia Marcello</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p>In 1985 photographer Rennie Ellis <a href="https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/8707788">defined graffiti</a> as “the result of someone’s urge to say something – to comment, inform, entertain, persuade, offend or simply to confirm his or her own existence here on earth”. Since the mid-1980s, graffiti has crossed from vandalism to an accepted form of art practice through large murals or “pieces” and stencil art aimed at informing, entertaining and persuading us.</p> <p>But these are outnumbered by the tags you see everywhere. These stylised icon-type signatures define a hand style and confirm their author’s existence on Earth. These, for many of us, remain an eyesore. If you walk through an urban environment filled with tags, you may feel less safe. Heavily tagged areas can suggest the area is not cared for or surveilled.</p> <p>So why are Australian cities so full of tags? The problem is, the main solution proven to work is expensive. When tags go up, paint over them – and keep doing it. While anti-graffiti paint exists, it’s not widely used at present.</p> <h2>Why do people tag?</h2> <p>Graffiti in urban centres is often tied to the world-wide proliferation of hip-hop culture. Along with DJing, rapping and breakdancing, “Graf” or “writing” is considered one of its <a href="https://www.britannica.com/art/hip-hop">four pillars</a>.</p> <p>Posturing (or showing off) is a big part of tagging. When you see a tag on a freeway overpass or seemingly inaccessible building parapet, it’s not only confirming the tagger’s existence, it’s bragging. See how high I climbed! See what crazy risks I took!</p> <p>As one tagger in Sydney’s outer south-western suburb of Campbelltown <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-05/vandalism-graffiti-state-rail-authority-nsw.pdf">told researchers</a> in the 1980s:</p> <blockquote> <p>If you get on a train and see your name and know you’ve been here before that’s real good. Like, I was here. Or you see your mate’s name and you can say, hey, I know him […] It’s really good if you can get your name up in a difficult place where nobody else has. Other kids look at that and think, great!</p> </blockquote> <p>So why do people tag?</p> <ul> <li> <p>it boosts self-esteem and a sense of belonging to a social network, particularly for teens experiencing alienation at school</p> </li> <li> <p>it demonstrates bravado. Risky places have the added advantages of being both highly visible and harder to remove</p> </li> <li> <p>it gives graf artists practice for bigger pieces. You have to work quickly and accurately, especially in precarious positions where you could get caught at any moment.</p> </li> </ul> <p>While cities like Melbourne <a href="https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/art/where-to-find-the-best-street-art-in-melbourne">have embraced</a> larger murals and pieces as street art – even making them a tourist attraction – tagging isn’t regarded the same way.</p> <p>So why do non-taggers hate it? On a broader level, tagging can signify a sense of social degradation which makes people feel less safe.</p> <p>There’s no clear link between <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/rip/rip6">more graffiti and more crime</a>. Even so, the public perception is that tagging is a sign warning of the presence of <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-05/vandalism-graffiti-state-rail-authority-nsw.pdf">disaffected and potentially violent</a> people in gangs.</p> <p>Asked to picture a tagger and you will most likely come up with a stock photo stereotype: a male teenager in a hoodie from a seedy area. But you would not be completely right. It is true just under half (46%) of graffiti damage and related offences are committed by 14 to 16 year old males, but the largest percentage of offenders actually come from <a href="https://www.goodbyegraffiti.wa.gov.au/Schools/Facts-for-Students/Who-are-the-most-likely-offenders-of-graffiti">middle- to high-income families</a>.</p> <p>So what tools do we have to manage it?</p> <h2>Punishment</h2> <p>It’s perfectly legal to commission a graf artist to paint a wall of a building you own. Many people do this to avoid a street-facing wall being tagged. For it to be illegal, tagging or graffiti has to be done without the owner’s permission.</p> <p>Since the majority of taggers are under 18, if they’re caught, punishment will usually include a caution, fines (presumably paid by bemused but cashed up parents) and cleaning off tags.</p> <p>But punitive measures only go so far because the appeal of graffiti is the transgression. Other measures include keeping spray paint locked away or not for sale to under 18s as well as zero-tolerance rapid removal. This can work for a while, but taggers know their tags are temporary. It’s a constant game of cat and mouse a committed tagger will eventually win.</p> <h2>Technical solutions</h2> <p>If you’ve walked past workers scrubbing or pressure washing tags off walls, you may have wondered why there are no coatings which don’t let paint stick.</p> <p>These actually <a href="https://www.ipcm.it/en/article/anti-graffiti-paints-what-are-they-and-how-they-work.aspx">do exist</a>, and can work well. When in place, you can remove graffiti with a solvent rather than having to repaint. But they’re not widely used.</p> <p>Unless paints such as <a href="https://interestingengineering.com/innovation/7-inventions-from-mexico-that-would-go-on-to-change-the-world">Deletum 3000</a> are used everywhere this approach is unlikely to be effective.</p> <h2>Prevention</h2> <p>The problem with punitive and technical measures is the limited reach. The vast majority of unwanted graffiti <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/rip/rip6">goes unreported</a>. That’s why prevention is becoming more popular.</p> <p>How do you prevent tagging? By making it easier to report. By setting aside areas for taggers and graf artists. By commissioning pieces to deter graffers from illegal modes. And by talking directly to taggers about strategies. But these behaviour change efforts take time.</p> <p>People who hate tagging often believe taggers are motivated by negative emotions such as <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/publications/rip/rip6">boredom and rebelliousness</a>. For them it’s vandalism, a criminal act associated with gangs, petty crime, broken windows and a less attractive environment to live in.</p> <p>But the truth is, taggers are often motivated by positive emotions. Tagging, for them, brings pride, pleasure, enjoyment and community. That’s why behaviour change approaches can be hard.</p> <h2>So what’s the best way forward?</h2> <p>In the 1990s, many cities declared war on skateboarders, using punishment and installing metal stoppers on well-skated urban areas. But the real solution was simpler: create skate parks.</p> <p>For taggers, the answer may be similar. Give them spaces such as little-used alleyways to practise their art. And for the rest of us, the solution may be to look at tags with different eyes. Not as a sign of crime and the collapse of civilisation, but as a need for validation, for transgression, for community and all the other things you probably wanted when you were a teenager.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/205492/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/flavia-marcello-403040">Flavia Marcello</a>, Professor of Design History, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/transgress-to-impress-why-do-people-tag-buildings-and-are-there-any-solutions-205492">original article</a>.</em></p>

Art

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Tips to train your pet at any age

<p><strong><em>Dr Katrina Warren is a veterinarian and one Australia’s most loved and trusted pet experts. She is the PAW by Blackmores ambassador.</em></strong></p> <p>Dogs are often an integral part of our family, a loving and loyal companion throughout the years. We educate ourselves with a plethora of media when bringing home and raising other members of our family with love and care, why not pay the same attention to our furry family members as advised by one Australia’s most loved and trusted pet experts, Dr Katrina Warren.</p> <p><strong>Bringing baby home: Puppy</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">A guide to vaccinations</span></p> <p>Just like human babies, puppies need vaccinations to protect them from the many infectious diseases out there. They need a series of vaccinations to protect them against Parvovirus, Distemper, Hepatitis and Canine Cough. Your puppy will need to receive these injections by a veterinarian and should have received their first vaccination prior to coming to you – ask the breeder for the vaccination certificate. Vaccination costs for your pup may seem steep, but consider the veterinary bills for treating your dog if it develops one of these illnesses – it could easily run into the thousands.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Dental care </span></p> <p>To keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy, it is important to include some hard food in their diet. You can offer raw chicken necks and wings from 12-14 weeks of age. Brushing is also a great idea - it may seem like a novelty, but dogs have just as many dental problems as humans, which can cause pain (not to mention terrible breath!) in the long run. Train your puppy from a very young age to let you brush its teeth, to make it a normal part of their routine. Be sure to use specific dog toothpaste, as human toothpaste can be irritating to a dog’s digestive tract.</p> <p><strong>Teenage angst: Adolescence</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Chewing</span></p> <p>Dogs are curious by nature and will chew almost anything they can get their mouths on, especially while they’re puppies and are teething. This is great if it’s a dog toy or a tasty bone, but not so great if it’s your new pair of expensive running shoes or the leg of a couch. Although chewing usually subsides within a year, it can become a bad habit if it’s not managed early on.</p> <p>If you have a young dog, puppy-proof your place by moving easily chewable items such as plants or electrical cables so they’re not easily accessible. Try not to leave your puppy unsupervised in areas like your garden or living room - there’s no point in getting angry at the puppy for an action that is natural for them, which happened because they weren’t being supervised.</p> <p><strong>Young at heart: Mature Dog</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Barking </span></p> <p>Firstly, find out what your dog is barking at. As dogs usually bark the most right after their owners leave home for the day, give your dog something to do every time you leave the house, like a chew toy stuffed with food. </p> <p>Dogs left outside are exposed to many more disturbances than indoor dogs and their barks are more easily heard by the neighbourhood.  Ideally leave your dog inside preferably in a room away from the street with a radio or TV playing to mask the sound of outside noise. Reward your dog often for quiet behaviour – if he starts barking, use a word like ‘quiet’ and reward only once your dog stops barking.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Jumping on people</span></p> <p>When he was little, everyone was probably entranced by the cute little puppy who jumped up at them, laughing and wagging his teeny tail. Now he's a bigger dog, no-one wants his dirty paw marks all over their clothes. But his behaviour is not his fault, because your loving attention has trained him to think that jumping up is a fun and rewarding thing to do.</p> <p>Now you have to do the opposite from what you did when he was little. Instead of making eye contact and touching him when he jumps up, do the opposite. Turn around and stand still completely ignoring him. Wait until he has all four feet on the ground and then give him a little treat. Keep on doing this, and it will take many, many times, and he will eventually learn that he only gets a treat and your attention when he is sitting. As before, there is no point in shouting and pushing, because to a dog this is still attention and will only confuse him about what you want him to do.</p> <p><em>This is an excerpt from PAW by Blackmores eBook: <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://pawbyblackmores.uberflip.com/i/714306-20-things-no-one-tells-you-about-raising-a-healthy-dog" target="_blank" rel="noopener">20 things no one tells you about raising a healthy dog</a></strong></span> - a go-to-guide for pet owners to help through the different ages and stages of raising a healthy dog.</em></p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Family & Pets

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The trick to removing a stain from any surface

<p>When it comes to household tasks there’s one in particular that makes everyone shudder. I’m referring, of course, to cleaning. No one likes to clean and no matter how often you clean your home it’s never fun.</p> <p>But that doesn’t mean it has to be difficult. The following guide will teach you the best way to tackle stains on any household surface.</p> <p><strong>Carpet stains</strong></p> <p>While some people may opt to hire a carpet cleaner, there are actually very few carpet stains you can’t clean yourself. Add a splash of vinegar to the stain and dampen a cleaning cloth. Gently pat at the stain and rinse the cloth at regular intervals. Repeat this process until the stain lifts.</p> <p>Then sprinkle bi-carb on the damp area and work it into the carpet a little. Once the bi-carb dries, use a vacuum to clean it up.</p> <p>If you like, sprinkle some lemon juice to freshen things up. If you’ve done everything right you’ll be left with clean, fresh smelling carpets.</p> <p><strong>Tile and hardwood flooring</strong></p> <p>Add vinegar to a bucket of water and use it to mop up as much of the stain as possible. Apply more vinegar directly to the stain. Combine with bi-carb and wait a few minutes for a chemical reaction. You will notice some bubbling and frothing.</p> <p>Gently scrub at any marks with a brush until clean. Finally, use clean water to either wipe or mop the area again to finish things off.</p> <p><strong>Bathroom surfaces</strong></p> <p>Bathrooms are tough to clean but this mixture makes mould and mildew a thing of the past. Combine 1½ cups bi-carb soda, one cup of liquid soap, ½ cup of water and ¼ cup of vinegar together in a bucket.</p> <p>Use this to clean shower screens, remove mildew and scrub tile grout. For maximum effect use a coarse sponge or hard bristled brush.</p> <p><strong>Kitchen benchtops</strong></p> <p>Most modern kitchen benchtops will not stain due to the materials they are made from. However, anyone with a kitchen knows they still require constant cleaning in order to stay hygienic.</p> <p>Use a cleaning cloth and vinegar to keep benchtops sanitised. You can use bi-carb anytime if something more abrasive is needed. This could be useful for things like dried cereal or food stains. If the vinegar smell becomes too much, deodorise with lemon juice.</p> <p><strong>Concrete and garage floors</strong></p> <p>The same ingredients can be used to make a powerful degreaser. This will clean any oil or scuff stains from concrete and other robust surfaces. Simply add one cup of vinegar to a few teaspoons of bi-carb, along with a drop or two of liquid soap. Add this to a spray bottle and fill to the top with warm water. Shake to combine the ingredients.</p> <p>Use the spray bottle to apply the mixture to any stubborn stain you wish to remove. For the best results, apply liberally and wait several minutes before scrubbing with a hard bristled brush. If you have one available you might also wish to use a pressure washer.</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Brooke. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.domain.com.au" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Domain.com.au</span></strong></a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Home Hints & Tips

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The rich are pouring millions into life extension research – but does it have any ethical value?

<p>Sam Altman, the chief executive of OpenAI, <a href="https://www.technologyreview.com/2023/03/08/1069523/sam-altman-investment-180-million-retro-biosciences-longevity-death/">recently invested</a> US$180 million into Retro Biosciences – a company seeking to extend human lifespans by <a href="https://retro.bio/announcement/">ten healthy years</a>.</p> <p>One way it plans to achieve this is by “rejuvenating” blood. This idea is based on studies that found old mice <a href="https://www.science.org/content/article/young-blood-renews-old-mice">showed signs of reversed ageing</a> when given the blood of young mice.</p> <p>Altman isn’t the only Silicon Valley entrepreneur supporting life extension efforts. PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and Google cofounder Larry Page have <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/feb/17/if-they-could-turn-back-time-how-tech-billionaires-are-trying-to-reverse-the-ageing-process">poured millions</a> into projects that could profoundly affect how we live our lives.</p> <p>The first question raised is scientific: could these technologies work? On this front the jury is still out, and there are grounds for both <a href="https://newseu.cgtn.com/news/2021-01-14/How-close-are-we-to-radical-life-extension-and-is-it-a-good-idea--X03UFbnMWs/index.html">optimism</a> and scepticism.</p> <p>The second question is just as important: even if lifespan extension is feasible, would it be ethical?</p> <p>We explain why some common ethical arguments against lifespan extension aren’t as solid as they might seem – and put forth another, somewhat overlooked explanation for why trying to live forever might not be worth it.</p> <h2>Is it worth it if you still die anyway?</h2> <p>One might argue lifespan extension merely pushes back the inevitable: that we will die. However, the problem with this view is that any life saved will only be saved temporarily.</p> <p>A lifespan extension of ten years is akin to saving a drowning swimmer, only for them to die in a traffic accident ten years later. Although we might be sad about their eventual death, we’d still be glad we saved them.</p> <p>The same is true of conventional medicine. If a doctor cures my pneumonia, I will eventually die of something else, but that doesn’t mean the doctor or I will regret my being saved.</p> <p>It’s also worth taking a longer view of where lifespan extension research could lead us. In the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC423155/">most optimistic scenarios</a> put forth by experts, even modest short-term gains could help people add centuries to their life, since the benefits of each intervention could cascade. For example, each extra year of life would increase the likelihood of surviving until the next big breakthrough.</p> <h2>Is it worth it if immortality could get boring?</h2> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0277953604004691">Many</a> <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0890406510000757">have argued</a> against lifespan extension on ethical grounds, saying they wouldn’t use these technologies. Why might somebody be opposed?</p> <p>One worry is that a very long life might be undesirable. Philosopher <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/abs/problems-of-the-self/makropulos-case-reflections-on-the-tedium-of-immortality/9180185912980E017EE675254B2F4169">Bernard Williams</a> said life is made valuable through the satisfaction of what he calls “categorical desires”: desires that give us reason to want to live.</p> <p>Williams expects these desires relate to major life projects, such as raising a child, or writing a novel. He worries that, given a long enough life, we will run out of such projects. If so, immortality would become tedious.</p> <p>It’s unclear whether Williams is right. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09672559.2012.713383">Some philosophers</a> point out human memories are fallible, and certain desires could resurface as we forget earlier experiences.</p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10892-015-9203-8">Others</a> emphasise that our categorical desires evolve as our life experiences reshape our interests – and might continue to do so over the course of a very long life.</p> <p>In either case, our categorical desires, and hence our reason for living, would not be exhausted over a very long life.</p> <p>Even if immortality did get tedious, this wouldn’t count against modest lifespan extensions. Many would argue 80-something years isn’t enough time to explore one’s potential. Personally, we’d welcome another 20 or even 50 years to write a novel, or start a career as a DJ.</p> <h2>Is it worth it if poor people miss out?</h2> <p>Another worry regarding lifespan extension technologies is egalitarian.</p> <p>These technologies will be expensive; it seems unjust for Silicon Valley billionaires to celebrate their 150th birthdays while the rest of us mostly die in our 70s and 80s.</p> <p>This objection seems convincing. Most people welcome interventions that promote health equality, which is reflected in broader societal demands for universal healthcare.</p> <p>But there’s important nuance to consider here. Consider that universal healthcare systems promote equality by improving the situation of those who aren’t well off. On the other hand, preventing the development of lifespan extension technologies will worsen the situation of those who are well off.</p> <p>The ethical desirability of equality based on “<a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-9329.00041">levelling down</a>” is unclear. The poorest Australians are <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-poorest-australians-are-twice-as-likely-to-die-before-age-75-as-the-richest-and-the-gap-is-widening-139201">twice as likely</a> to die before age 75 than the richest. Yet few people would argue we should stop developing technologies to improve the health of those aged over 75.</p> <p>Moreover, the price of lifespan extension technologies would eventually likely come down.</p> <h2>The real problem</h2> <p>However, we think there’s one serious ethical objection that applies to extreme cases of life extension. If humans routinely lived very long lives, this could reduce how adaptable our populations are, and lead to social stagnation.</p> <p>Even modest increases in life expectancy would radically increase population size. To avoid overpopulation, we’d need to <a href="https://theconversation.com/thinking-of-having-a-baby-as-the-planet-collapses-first-ask-yourself-5-big-ethical-questions-196388">reduce birth rates</a>, which would drastically slow generational turnover.</p> <p>As one of us (Chris) has explored in previous <a href="https://academic.oup.com/jmp/article/40/6/696/2747126">research</a>, this could be incredibly harmful to societal progress, because it may:</p> <ol> <li>increase our vulnerability to extinction threats</li> <li>jeopardise individual wellbeing, and</li> <li>impede moral advancement.</li> </ol> <p>Many fields benefit from a regular influx of young minds coming in and building on the work of predecessors.</p> <p>Even if the brains of older scientists remained sharp, their “confirmation bias” – a tendency to seek and interpret information in ways that confirm one’s prior beliefs – could slow the uptake of new scientific theories.</p> <p>Moral beliefs are also prone to <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10670-020-00252-1">confirmation bias</a>. In a world of extended lifespans, individuals whose moral views were set in their youth (perhaps more than 100 years ago) will remain in positions of power.</p> <p>It seems likely our society’s moral code is <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10677-015-9567-7">badly mistaken</a> in at least some respects. After all, we think past societies were catastrophically mistaken in theirs, such as when they endorsed slavery, or rendered homosexuality illegal.</p> <p>Slowing generational turnover could delay the point at which we recognise and fix our own moral catastrophes, especially those we can’t yet see.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-rich-are-pouring-millions-into-life-extension-research-but-does-it-have-any-ethical-value-201774" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

Caring

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"Any tips?": Bruce Willis’ wife posts heartfelt plea

<p dir="ltr">Bruce Willis’ wife, Emma Heming Willis has shared an emotional plea after the actor’s <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/cruel-disease-bruce-willis-given-heartbreaking-new-diagnosis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">devastating diagnosis</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Emma took to Instagram to ask families of dementia sufferers for advice on how to help their loved ones navigate the world safely.</p> <p dir="ltr">“To other caregivers or dementia care specialists navigating this world…. Any tips or advice on how to get your loved ones out in the world safely?” she captioned the post.</p> <p dir="ltr">Emma started off the video by raising awareness about dementia and how stressful it is as a caregiver to help their loved ones navigate this illness.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If you are someone who is looking after someone who has dementia, you know how difficult and how stressful it can be, just to get them out into the world and navigate them safely - even just to get a cup of coffee,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also called out the photographers trying to get exclusive images and video footage of Bruce while he was out.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s clear there’s still a lot of education that needs to be put forth,” she said in the video as a PSA.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bruce, 67, was spotted out and about last week, for the first time since his family shared that had been <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/cruel-disease-bruce-willis-given-heartbreaking-new-diagnosis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD)</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“To the photographers and video people that are trying to get those exclusives of my husband out and about, just keep your space. I know this is your job, but maybe just keep your space.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“For the video people, please don’t be yelling at my husband asking him how he’s doing, whatever, the woohoo-ing, the yippee ki yay’s, just don’t do it.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Give him the space. Allow for our family or whoever’s with him that day to be able to get him from point A to point B safely,” she pleaded.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CpX_DYdJuXb/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CpX_DYdJuXb/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Emma Heming Willis (@emmahemingwillis)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Many fans have shared their support and shared their own experiences.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My mom is newly struggling with dementia and everything is confusing and scary. I can’t understand photographers/reporters behaving in that way around someone struggling with this disease. Shame on them,” one commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Remember to not take anything to heart that he may say or do. When he gets stuck on one rant, redirect the conversation. Please don’t try to do this on your own. It’s ok to cry, cuz this is a tough ride,” commented another fan.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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"I can't imagine being any happier": Kyle's adorable new pic with son

<p dir="ltr">Kyle Sandilands has shared a heartwarming photo of himself and his newborn son Otto, whom he shares with fiancée Tegan Kynaston.</p> <p dir="ltr">The loved up couple welcomed baby Otto on August 11 which saw the radio shock jock leave The Kyle and Jackie O Show live on air after Tegan went into labor.</p> <p dir="ltr">Almost a month since Otto’s birth, the excited father has shared a beautiful photo of him holding Otto on the show’s official Instagram page with the caption, “Kyle’s little bear”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Baby Otto is seen wearing a little black suit with a teddy bear print on it, as a proud Kyle smiles at the camera.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cjee7kyPXHh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cjee7kyPXHh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Kyle and Jackie O (@kyleandjackieo)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The 51-year-old father has since opened up about how Otto has changed his lifestyle completely from partying to doting dad.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I used to watch hours and hours of TV, and now I just sit there looking at him and he's really been a joy,” he told Daily Mail Australia.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I've just been sitting at home the whole time which I've enjoyed. I'm at home now more than I was with lockdowns, so we're loving every second of it.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm pretty happy actually. I can't imagine being any happier.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Qantas, the trying kangaroo: why things won’t get better any time soon

<p>Unlike many airlines, Australia’s flag carrier Qantas has survived the pandemic. But its return to normal service – and profitability – is proving to be a bumpy ride. It could well get worse before it gets better.</p> <p>As domestic and international travel picks up, the airline is struggling to keep up – having laid off thousands of staff whose experience, it turns out, was quite valuable for running such a complex business. Cancelled flights, lost luggage, long delays at airports and low staff morale are pummelling its carefully cultivated reputation.</p> <p>Qantas engineers <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-08-25/qantas-engineers-strike-safety-annual-profit-result/101368062" target="_blank" rel="noopener">took industrial action</a> last month. This week there’s <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-09-05/qantas-staff-far-airlines-reputation-at-risk/101391324" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a strike by baggage handlers</a> employed by the contractor used since the airline retrenched almost 2,000 ground crew workers in 2020. (The Fair Work Commission has since ruled this outsourcing <a href="https://australianaviation.com.au/2022/05/qantas-loses-bid-to-overturn-illegal-outsourcing-ruling/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">was unlawful</a>.)</p> <p>Former staff have told the ABC’s <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-09-05/qantas-staff-far-airlines-reputation-at-risk/101391324" target="_blank" rel="noopener">4 Corners program</a> they fear the cutbacks will undermine the airline’s safety record.</p> <p>There is no quick or easy fix. These issues are tied to the airline’s profitability – or lack of it. Last financial year it reported an underlying loss before tax of <a href="https://cdn.theconversation.com/static_files/files/2281/q899.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A$1.89 billion</a>. Since 2020, total losses have been A$7 billion, with the shutdown of travel costing about <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-24/qantas-announces-share-buy-back-as-air-travel-demand-surges" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A$25 billion in revenue</a>, according to chief executive Alan Joyce.</p> <h2>A challenging industry</h2> <p>Qantas is by no means alone when it comes to the challenges of rebuilding after COVID. Even <a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/travel-logistics-and-infrastructure/our-insights/the-six-secrets-of-profitable-airlines" target="_blank" rel="noopener">in normal times</a>, airlines are notoriously hard businesses to keep in the black.</p> <p>The products they sell – seats – are highly perishable. Once a flight takes off, any empty seat becomes worthless. It is tempting to fill seats by discounting, but this can lead to competitors doing the same, and create a perception that leads customers to undervalue the product.</p> <p>There’s a reason so many national carriers are fully or partly <a href="https://gulfbusiness.com/gulf-carriers-spotlight-eu-addresses-unfair-airline-competition/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">government-owned</a> – including Air New Zealand, Emirates, Etihad, Garuda Indonesia, Malaysia Airlines and Singapore Airlines.</p> <p>It’s debatable how many of these airlines would be viable as standalone commercial operations. An airline regulated by a government with a vested interest in its prosperity may be assisted in a variety of ways, from bailouts and tax subsidies to policies that help protect it from competition on domestic routes.</p> <h2>How to cut costs?</h2> <p>Adding to these difficulties in 2022 are fuel prices, inflated since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. Fuel costs typically account for about a <a href="https://www.iata.org/en/iata-repository/pressroom/fact-sheets/fact-sheet---fuel/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">quarter of airline costs</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://simpleflying.com/what-is-fuel-hedging-and-why-do-airlines-do-it/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Hedging contracts</a> have protected Qantas from the full impact of these increases. Like other airlines, it has few options to cut fuel costs besides cutting routes or buying more fuel-efficient aircraft. (It is buying 12 new Airbus planes, but with the plan to offer long-haul flights without stopovers, which will <a href="https://theconversation.com/bucking-the-trend-is-there-a-future-for-ultra-long-haul-flights-in-a-net-zero-carbon-world-183212" target="_blank" rel="noopener">increase fuel consumption</a>.)</p> <p>So cutting staff costs has become the default option.</p> <p>Qantas has never shied away from this under Joyce, who was appointed chief executive in 2008.</p> <p>In 2011 he notoriously <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-10-29/qantas-locking-out-staff/3608250" target="_blank" rel="noopener">grounded the fleet</a> and locked out staff during “hardball” collective bargaining with three unions (the Australian and International Pilots Association, Australian Licenced Aircraft Engineers Association, and Transport Workers Union).</p> <p>But this combative stance on wages and conditions, and outsourcing so many key activities, has thinned corporate knowledge. Qantas’ problems with <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/brisbane-man-bag-destroyed-by-qantas-still-waiting-for-airline-to-resolve-his-2000-dollar-claim/2fdf9865-7350-4735-bc1a-b02201a3a7eb" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lost luggage</a> are clearly linked to sacking so many experienced staff and replacing them with contract workers who don’t necessarily understand how the airline’s <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/42e15d6d-bc05-4a5b-af16-c8c7f72af0fd" target="_blank" rel="noopener">complex systems work</a>.</p> <h2>A difficult outlook</h2> <p>It’s easy to look for scapegoats – there are mounting calls for Joyce to go, for example – but there are no easy solutions to the problems Qantas faces.</p> <p>In the short term it must to balance the cost-cutting required with the reality that further aggravating its workforce will lower customer service – and ultimately its reputation.</p> <p>Domestically it has the advantage of its major competitor, Virgin Australia, being in an even worse position. Virgin only survived the pandemic by being sold to US private equity giant Bain Capital. This should save Qantas from a domestic discounting war for the foreseeable future.</p> <p>But even with subdued domestic competition, the airline industry remains unattractive. For the flying kangaroo, the path back to profitability looks set to be one of many ups and downs.</p> <p><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/qantas-the-trying-kangaroo-why-things-wont-get-better-any-time-soon-189558" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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How to remove permanent marker from any surface

<p>There’s something heart-stoppingly terrible about seeing a pair of little hands drawing on your walls or floor. It just gets worse when you notice that they’re not using the kid safe textas you gave them – but the permanent marker they found goodness knows where. But never fear, there is a solution to this problem – here are ways to remove permanent marker from just about anything. Not so permanent anymore, is it?</p> <p><strong>Carpet</strong></p> <p>If you have a synthetic carpet, dampen a cloth with a solvent like acetone-free nail polish remover. Lightly dab the stain with this cloth and then leave for about 15 minutes. Then dab the stained area with warm, soapy water and wait for another quarter of an hour. Blot the area dry with a clean cloth or towel, and then blot once more with warm water. Dry again. If there’s still stain remaining, let it dry and repeat the process one more time.</p> <p>If your carpet is made of natural fibres, the process is very similar, but you need to use a consumer-grade dry-cleaning solvent. Make sure you read the instructions carefully before you begin.</p> <p><strong>Walls</strong></p> <p>Use warm, soapy water and your favourite all areas cleaning spray to have an initial pass at the stain. If that method doesn’t work, get out your trusty rubbing alcohol and dab the stain with a cotton ball or paper towel. Use a little water to clean the area once the stain is gone, and then pat dry with paper towel.</p> <p><strong>Ceramic tiles</strong></p> <p>You want to start by wiping the stained area with warm, soapy water and then apply some rubbing alcohol with paper towel or a cotton ball. Wipe the alcohol off with more soapy water, then rinse and dry the tile.</p> <p>If the stain persists, try drawing over it with a whiteboard marker and then rubbing it off.</p> <p><strong>Stainless steel</strong></p> <p>Just like with tiles, you can use a whiteboard marker to draw over the permanent marker before wiping it off with a soft, dry cloth. Failing that, use a little rubbing alcohol on a cotton ball or paper towel.</p> <p><strong>Cotton upholstery</strong></p> <p>If marker has stained your cotton upholstery, gently blot the affected area with rubbing alcohol until it has completely come up. Make sure to test the alcohol in an area that can’t be seen in case the colours of the fabric run.</p> <p><strong>Cotton fabric</strong></p> <p>Place the stain face down onto a couple of layered paper towels. Use a small sponge to apply rubbing alcohol to the back of the stain and you should see it leaching out onto the paper towel. Rinse the fabric with cold water when you’re done to make sure the residue from the marker and the alcohol is gone.</p> <p>Do you have a great cleaning tip for removing pesky stains? We’d love to hear about it in the comments.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Home Hints & Tips

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"She didn't add any smiley faces!" Woman fired for not using emojis

<p>A Queensland woman has won an unfair dismissal case, after the ex-wife of the business owner demanded she was fired immediately over sending a text message that didn’t include any smiley face emojis.</p> <p>According to the Fair Work Commission (FWC), Phoebe Wang who was overseeing her ex-husband’s Sens and Goya cafes on the Gold Coast had smashed her phone on the counter, jumped up and down while screaming “Kristen Gordon must be fired” immediately after receiving messages from her about a staffing issue.</p> <p>Ms Gordon had been employed by the business for about 14 months and was a casual working full-time hours. Part of her job included rostering staff and time sheets.</p> <p>Her colleague, who was there at the time of the incident, told the FWC she asked to see the messages to understand why Ms Wang was so angry however, she found the messages to be normal.</p> <p>Allegedly, Ms Wang said that Ms Gordon was arguing with her because there were no emojis included.</p> <p>Ms Gordon told the FWC that she had been told Ms Wang repeatedly stated she “didn’t add any smiley faces! There are no emotions!”.</p> <p>Ms Gordon went on to say she was unaware her “completely reasonable text message” had caused so much upset.</p> <p>The next day after working a full shift, Ms Gordon was told by a manager they were forced to dismiss her. Fair Work Commissioner Chris Simpson concluded that Ms Gordon was dismissed at this point, despite any attempts for it to appear otherwise.</p> <p>Commissioner Simpson ordered Sens Catering Group Pty Ltd to pay Ms Gordon $5357.80, plus 9.5% superannuation.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Legal

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Readers respond: If you could create any law, what would it be?

<p dir="ltr">We asked you what laws you would create if you had the power to, and we were flooded with answers.</p> <p dir="ltr">From addressing issues with the pension to targeting roundabouts and the weather, here are some of the laws you would create if you could.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Daphne Gardinier</strong> - Make the pension the same as the minimum wage.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Gwen Friend</strong> - That people learn how to use roundabouts!! Especially in regional areas!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Tony Beckett</strong> - To ban all fighting around the world and live in peace and quiet.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Kimberly Anne Taylor </strong>- Remove tax on food items. Politicians must pay for their own security after office. They also do not receive a pension until they are 65 or older.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Eileen Kennett</strong> - Make it harder to become a politician in this country.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Archie Kamaldien</strong> - Change the name of ‘Opposition Party’ to ‘Challenging Party’ so they don’t have to oppose everything the current party is doing BUT to challenge them to do a better job.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Geoff Little</strong> - One year compulsory imprisonment for illegal parking in a disabled parking space.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Alan Connelly</strong> - No feet hanging out your car when in traffic.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Frances Fitch</strong> - Well you can’t legislate against stupidity so I don’t think I’ll bother 😎</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Vera Rothwell</strong> - I’d ban winter!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Ray Smetzer</strong> - Football is illegal.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Greg McCafferty</strong> - No more stupid questions.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-08754050-7fff-9db3-6625-80156830aaf0"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

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7 hacks that will revive almost any plant

<p><strong>1. Look for signs of life</strong></p> <p>If your plant has turned brown and lost some leaves, don’t give up on it just yet. There is hope that you can revive a dead plant if the plant still has a few green leaves and pliable stems – buds are a sure sign too. Melinda Meyers, star and producer of Melinda’s Garden Moment TV and radio segments, says that reviving a plant takes patience (sometimes even years).</p> <p><strong>2. Think about the water</strong></p> <p>Plants that are over-watered appear wilted and may have brown or yellow leaves that make it look dead but with very moist soil. By contrast, if you have forgotten to water your plants,  the leaves will be brown but dried around the edges or curled up. Master gardener, Kristena LaMar, says that if you suspect over-watering is the cause of your plant’s demise, repot your plant in dry dirt. And if your plant is thirsty, water it! However, hold off on fertilising until the plant is in better health. Meyers warns that, “Fertilising a struggling plant can injure the tender roots of a recovering plant.”</p> <p><strong>3. Consider your lighting situation </strong></p> <p>If you recently moved your plant to a new spot, it’s possible it’s no longer getting enough light. Even if you didn’t move it, it’s possible its lighting situation changed. Did you recently buy heavier drapes? Plant a tree outside that’s now blocking the indoor sunlight? Try moving your plant to a sunnier window if it needs a lot of light. (Same goes with a plant that’s now getting too much sun; try a different location in your home.)</p> <p><strong>4. Find a humid spot </strong></p> <p>Plants absorb water through leaves as well as roots. So keep your plant in a humid spot that’s not too sunny and not too dry to help it recover.</p> <p><strong>5. Feed your plant carefully</strong></p> <p>People and pets aren’t the only things in your house that need food; plants can get malnourished, too. (Signs are discoloured leaves or slow or no growth.) Meyers recommends a fertiliser/nutritional supplement. Depending on the nutritional deficiency, providing the nutrition can help the plant recover nearly immediately within days. Other deficiencies may take longer – as in weeks – while others are chronic and may not ever fully recover, although these are rare with houseplants.</p> <p><strong>6. IV for plants </strong></p> <p>Another option for malnourished plants is a water-soluble fertiliser that will slowly release nutrients and is less likely to burn your plant’s roots. Add it to the watering can before watering plants. Only use fertiliser during the time when your plant should be growing. Over-fertilising or using the wrong fertiliser can burn the roots of the plant.</p> <p><strong>7. Compost</strong></p> <p>If you’ve tried everything, and your plant still can’t be revived, it might be time to let go. By composting your plants, the remains can be recycled as nutrient-rich dirt that can help your next houseplant thrive. Don’t beat yourself up – and next time buy a hearty, nearly kill-proof cactus.</p>

Home & Garden

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Any chilli fanatic knows no two chillies are the same

<p dir="ltr">As featured on Better Homes and Gardens, here is a complete guide to home-grown chilli. </p><h3>Heat scale</h3><p dir="ltr">The pith and seeds give chillies heat but even if you remove them, there will still be a kick in your food. The heat is measured in Scoville Heat Units (SHUs). Habanero is near the top while at the bottom is the humble capsicum with 1-100SHUs.</p><h3>Types of chillies</h3><p dir="ltr">Chillies don’t just have different levels of heat, they also have distinctive flavours – from sweet to citrus, apple to cucumber – and they also vary in colour and shape.</p><p dir="ltr">Here are some the most common types you'll find:</p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Capsicum annuum</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">Most well-known chilli and peppers are actually strains of capsicum. Some of these include jalapenos, bell peppers and chilli peppers.</p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Capsicum chinense</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">These are one of the hotter species of chilli and are used to <a href="https://www.bhg.com.au/spiced-tomato-chilli-soup-smoked-bacon">add more heat to a dish</a>, particularly stews and sauces. </p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Capsicum frutescens</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">This type is closely related to both Capsicum annuum and Capsicum chinense but grows a bit smaller. The most well-known are tabasco and Thai peppers.</p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Capsicum Baccatum</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">This unique type of chilli is notable for having citrus and fruity flavours and has only become popular in South American countries such as Peru and Brazil.</p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Capsicum pubescens</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">We’ve been eating this kind of purple pepper for so long that no-one knows what plant it comes from!</p><ul><li><h3 role="presentation">Rumba chilli</h3></li></ul><p dir="ltr">Rumble with this Rumba chilli, which is small but has a big impact. From the pretty purple flowers emerge passionate purple fruit that turns a fiery red, on your plant and on your tongue. It’s hot!</p><h3>Caring for chillies:</h3><ul><li><h4 role="presentation"><strong>Position</strong></h4></li></ul><p dir="ltr">Chillies like a tropical, warm temperate. If you want to get the most out of your chillies, you’ll find that growing them in a warm, sheltered spot will make for the best flavour. They love full sun but in a hot climate, too much sun can dry them out. While chilli can tolerate a little bit of shade, make sure you keep them out of the wind as its branches are brittle and leaves can be easily torn.</p><ul><li><h4 role="presentation">Soil</h4></li></ul><p dir="ltr">Chilli will be happy in most garden soils, however, any soil too heavy, damp or wet will stunt its growth. Best to go for a free-draining quality garden soil. If growing in a pot, use a premium organic potting mix.</p><ul><li><h4 role="presentation"><strong>Watering</strong></h4></li></ul><p dir="ltr">While the chilli is growing and fruit is developing, keep the plant moist but never wet. If growing in a pot, be sure to water regularly and avoid putting a saucer underneath. </p><ul><li><h4 role="presentation">Fertiliser</h4></li></ul><p dir="ltr">Feed your chilli with a controlled-release fertiliser at planting time or annually. Liquid fertiliser is great for potted seedlings, apply as per the label once a week or every ten days. </p><ul><li><h4 role="presentation">Pruning</h4></li></ul><p dir="ltr">At the start of the growing season – or especially if it’s in a shady spot – lightly tip prune new growth. After the last fruit has been picked and the plant is dropping leaves, you can prune it back quite a lot and trim any spindly branches.</p><p dir="ltr">Chilli is susceptible to several pests, but they are all easily treatable:</p><ul><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Snails leave holes and chew marks along leaf edges, so use a pet-friendly bail or homemade beer trap to keep them at bay.    </p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Aphids can attack new growth but all you need is a commercial spray or homemade soapy garlic spray to get rid of them.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Fruit flies and white flies are attracted to ripening fruit, so keep them away with sticky traps or neem oil.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Blossom end rot can be avoided by regularly and evenly watering the roots and applying dolomite lime.</p></li></ul><h3>How to grow chillies from seed</h3><ul><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Soak your seeds for about 24 hours before planting.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Chilli seedlings can suffer transplant shock, so consider sowing seeds in a peat pellet you can put directly in your garden or a container after seedlings emerge.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">The peat pellets come compressed and need to be soaked in water so they expand. The seed-raising mix is already inside.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Or, fill a seed-raising tray three quarters full with seed raising mix, sow seeds and cover with vermiculite to aid water and nutrient retention.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Put several seeds in the same cell to boost the chances of germination. </p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">In both cases, keep growing media warm and moist.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">When they are about 15-20cm tall, transfer to a container or garden bed with well-drained soil in a sunny position.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Feed with seaweed solution to help the roots develop.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Stake plants now, rather than when they are taller, so you don’t damage roots.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Mulch with sugar cane or pea straw to help retain moisture.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Keep soil moist but don’t overwater or the fruit will develop crack scars as the skin struggles to keep up with growth.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Don’t overfertilise as this encourages foliage growth at the expense of fruit. Nitrogen also reduces capsaicin (heat) levels.</p></li><li><p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Harvest when the colours peak and they have the richest flavour.</p></li></ul><p dir="ltr"><strong>Additional Tip</strong></p><p dir="ltr">You can sow seeds in summer, especially in tropical and subtropical areas, but the optimal time is in early spring after frosts have passed. Flowers start to appear in late spring and the fruit appears over summer until mid-autumn.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2e48d3b3-7fff-d25c-7a27-5b22285a4629"></span></p><p dir="ltr">Make the chilli corner of your vegie patch as pretty and colourful as your ornamental garden with different colours, shapes and sizes. Even the leaves add variety!</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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‘Don’t give my wife any more ideas’: Prince William jokes about not wanting any more children

<p dir="ltr">The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge recently visited the Clitheroe Community Hospital in the north of England, where they met new parents Trudi and Alastair Barrie and their newborn daughter, Anastasia.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kate had the opportunity to cradle Anastasia, prompting a loud ‘awww’ from her parents and other onlookers, while Prince William joked, “Don’t give my wife any more ideas!” After Kate carefully passed Anastasia back to her parents, William piped up again with, “Don’t take her with you”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">„Don’t give my wife any more ideas!“<br />„Don’t take her with you.“ <br /><br />😁 <br /><br />📸 <a href="https://twitter.com/john_deehan?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@john_deehan</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DukeandDuchessofCambridge?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DukeandDuchessofCambridge</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DuchessofCambridge?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DuchessofCambridge</a> <a href="https://t.co/2rbMebpMQO">pic.twitter.com/2rbMebpMQO</a></p> — ChristinZ (@ChristinsQueens) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChristinsQueens/status/1484227274257932290?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 20, 2022</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Prince William and Kate have three children together: Prince George, eight, Princess Charlotte, six, and Prince louis, three. In 2020, Kate hinted that William did not want any more children while meeting with fans in Yorkshire, telling one fan, “I don’t think William wants any more.”</p> <p dir="ltr">William has previously opened up about fatherhood, saying that having children made him “a lot more emotional than I used to be”, explaining, “I never used to get too wound up or worried about things. But now the smallest little things, you well up a little more, you get affected by the sort of things that happen around the world or whatever a lot more, I think, as a father.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Just because you realise how precious life is and it puts it all in perspective. The idea of not being around to see your children grow up [is horrible].”</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple had travelled to Lancashire on Thursday to meet with hospital staff and thank them for their work during the pandemic. While there, Kate also enjoyed a cuddle with 10-week-old cockapoo Alfie, who will be trained as a therapy dog.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: DANNY LAWSON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images</em></p>

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The four-letter word that can end any fight – no, not THAT word!

<p><span>It’s a familiar scene: An argument with your partner heats up, and old grudges start sneaking into the conversation. Your partner lashes out, bringing up that one thing that really pushes your buttons. Now you’ve gone from miffed to deeply insulted. Before lashing back out with your own cutting comment, though, respond with one simple word.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7846685/fight1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/024c7bdc7f4a46de81bfd5680e86af46" /></p> <p><em>Image: Reader's Digest</em></p> <p>Unlike using phrases that make arguments worse, saying “ouch” could put a heated fight on ice, says marriage and family therapist Hal Runkel.</p> <p>Your significant other probably knows you better than anyone else, including knowing the trigger words that cut deep. No doubt your partner still loves you, but the heat of the moment is bringing out words you’ll both regret later. That’s why you need to signal your partner that the conversation is getting nasty. Say: “Ouch. That one hurt. I don’t know if you were meaning to hurt me; I don’t know if that’s what you were going for; but that’s what you did,” Runkel tells Business Insider Australia.</p> <p>That simple word will make your partner – and you – pause before doling out more mean words. With a wake-up call that the argument could cause lasting damage, you can refresh back to the core issue.</p> <p>“That conversation – which was a very familiar path, that fight – is now a totally different path because one of you chose to actually get vulnerable,” Runkel says. “I am open enough to you that you can actually hurt me. So now how about we talk to each other as if we actually love each other?”</p> <p>Now that you remember how much words hurt and how much the relationship means to you, you can both move forward calmly.</p> <p>In a particularly fiery fight, there’s a good chance your partner will be able to whip out plenty of examples of harsh things you’ve said, too. Denying or glossing over that won’t solve anything, so acknowledge you hurt your partner and calmly apologise, says Runkel.</p> <p>If it doesn’t work and your partner continues being cruel, that dialogue could say a lot about the relationship. But you won’t know until you try making the change yourself.</p> <p><em><span>Written by Marissa Laliberte. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/the-four-letter-word-that-can-end-any-fight-no-not-that-word" target="_blank"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a><span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span>here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><em><span>Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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