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Anti-cellulite products are big business – but here’s what the science says

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rebecca-shepherd-423135">Rebecca Shepherd</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-bristol-1211">University of Bristol</a></em></p> <p>Although <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jocd.14815">90% of women have cellulite</a>, we’re yet to see it represented as a normal anatomical characteristic in popular culture. In Greta Gerwig’s 2023 Hollywood blockbuster, for instance, Stereotypical Barbie, played by Margot Robbie, develops dimples on her upper thigh as part of her existential crisis – along with other human faults such as halitosis, flat feet and irrepressible thoughts of death.</p> <p>When Stereotypical Barbie asks doll sage Weird Barbie what the dimples are, she explains: “That’s cellulite. That’s going to spread everywhere. Then you’re going to start getting sad and mushy and complicated.” Barbie’s perfect smooth plastic perfection is marred.</p> <p>Despite its prevalence, then, cellulite has been constructed as a flaw in need of correction. Consumers, it seems, agree, especially when fed a diet of the <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21604851.2021.1913827">photoshop smoothed skin</a> of models, social media influencers – and Hollywood stars.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rmThigh1i8s?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><figcaption><span class="caption">“NO!” Barbie shouts when Weird Barbie tells her she has cellulite.</span></figcaption></figure> <p>Cellulite’s usually found in areas that have greater amounts of subcutaneous fat, when fat deposits push through the connective tissue beneath the skin, leading to a lumpy appearance. It is common, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0738081X1300076X?via%3Dihub">usually painless</a> and harmless.</p> <p>The human skin is the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-skin-is-a-very-important-and-our-largest-organ-what-does-it-do-91515">body’s largest organ</a>, made up of three layers. At the surface, the epidermis acts as our first line of defence against the environment. This outermost, impermeable layer is made up of cells that are constantly renewed and shed, protecting our body from external elements.</p> <p>Beneath the epidermis lies the dermis, a robust layer containing fibroblasts, the cells responsible for producing essential proteins such as collagen and elastin. These proteins provide structure and elasticity, contributing to the skin’s strength and flexibility.</p> <p>Deeper still is the hypodermis, also known as the subcutaneous layer. This layer is rich in adipose tissue – mostly made up of fat, which plays a crucial role in cushioning and insulating the body, as well as storing fat that can be used when needed. Beneath these three layers of skin, there is muscle. Running from the muscle to the dermis are <a href="https://journals.lww.com/amjdermatopathology/fulltext/2000/02000/cellulite__from_standing_fat_herniation_to.7.aspx">bands of connective tissue</a>, that holds the adipose tissue in “pockets”.</p> <p>Cellulite does not affect health, although some people report that it affects their <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07853890.2018.1561731">self-esteem and body image</a> but that’s more to do with the social pressure on women to be physically perfect – or spend money, time and energy trying to be as close to perfect as possible.</p> <p>Cellulite, then, has become big business for the beauty industry. In the lead up to summer especially, companies will promote <a href="https://www.asa.org.uk/advice-online/weight-control-cellulite.html">all manner of products</a> from creams and serums to gadgets and pills, all aimed at creating perfectly smooth limbs. The most popular question seems to be, “Do these treatments work?” but as an anatomist I think the more pressing question is, “Why are healthy women’s bodies considered something to treat, cure or correct?”</p> <p>The beauty and wellness industry has long capitalised on societal standards of beauty. The idea that cellulite is undesirable and <a href="https://journals.lww.com/dermatologicsurgery/abstract/1978/03000/So_Called_Cellulite.9.aspx">should be corrected</a> has been perpetuated since Vogue magazine was the <a href="https://archive.vogue.com/article/1968/4/cellulite-the-new-word-for-fat-you-couldnt-lose-before">first English language magazine</a> to use the term “cellulite”, introducing the concept to thousands of women. This marketing strategy taps into the insecurities of consumers, particularly women, and promotes an endless pursuit of “perfection” for bodies that have normal anatomical variation.</p> <p>By framing cellulite as a condition that needs treatment, companies can sell a wide range of products and services, bolstered by celebrity endorsements, which lend credibility and aspirational value to pseudo-medical “smoothing” products. However, there is limited scientific evidence supporting the effectiveness of these supplements in treating cellulite. In fact, the <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1524-4725.1978.tb00416.x">first scientific paper</a> on cellulite, published in 1978, referred to it as “so called cellulite: the invented disease”.</p> <p>Recent product launches include, <a href="https://lemmelive.com/en-gb/products/lemme-smooth-capsules?variant=45597048111318">Lemme Smooth</a>, Kourtney Kardashian-Barker’s latest addition to her vitamin and supplement range. The product’s promotional materials claim that the capsule “visibly reduces cellulite in 28 days”. But what does the science tell us?</p> <p>Supplements like Lemme Smooth claim to improve skin texture and reduce cellulite from within. Kardashian-Barker’s supplement contains a mixture of <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10298-015-0977-4">french cantaloupe melon</a>, hyaluronic acid, chromium and vitamin C among other ingredients. The body’s ability to absorb and utilise these ingredients in a way that would impact cellulite is still a subject of debate.</p> <p>There is evidence that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110621/#:%7E:text=In%20a%20randomized%2C%20double%2Dblind,in%20part%2C%20to%20the%20skin.">ingested hyaluronic acid</a> can migrate into the skin, stimulating the production of collagens within the dermis – and vitamin C has been shown to <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-72704-1">thicken the surface layer</a> of the skin. However, the lack of standardisation in testing for the use of these ingredients in the treatment of cellulite means it’s still not clear if they will have a <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-2494.2006.00318.x">significant effect</a>.</p> <p>Other products marketed to reduce the appearance of cellulite include topical creams and lotions, containing ingredients like <a href="https://karger.com/books/book/763/chapter-abstract/5600478/Specific-Use-Cosmeceuticals-for-Body-Skin-Texture?redirectedFrom=fulltext">caffeine, retinol, and herbal extracts</a>. Cosmetic products are not able to penetrate the epidermis enough to significantly affect the underlying fat deposits and connective tissue.</p> <p>Some invasive treatments, such as <a href="https://www.aad.org/public/cosmetic/fat-removal/cellulite-treatments-what-really-works">laser therapy, subcision, and acoustic wave therapy</a> can offer more promising results. These procedures work by breaking down the connective tissue bands that cause dimpling and stimulating collagen production in the dermis to improve skin elasticity. While these methods <a href="https://www.aad.org/public/cosmetic/fat-removal/cellulite-treatments-what-really-works">may be more effective</a>, they are often expensive, require multiple sessions to achieve results – and aren’t without risk.</p> <p>Maintaining a healthy diet, drinking lots of water, and regular physical activity can help improve the overall appearance of the skin and reduce the visibility of cellulite. Losing weight and strengthening the muscles in the legs, buttocks and abdomen may make cellulite less noticeable, but it won’t make it <a href="https://jndc-chemistryarticles.info/ijn/article/318">disappear altogether</a>.</p> <p>The bottom line, though, is that cellulite does not need to be treated. It’s a normal anatomical variation that’s been transformed into a condition driving a lucrative market for cures <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40257-015-0129-5">that don’t exist</a>.</p> <p>My top expert advice in the run up to summer? Be wary of claims from cosmetic companies and save your money.</p> <hr /> <p><em>The Conversation has approached the Lemme Live brand for comment.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/232318/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rebecca-shepherd-423135">Rebecca Shepherd</a>, Senior Lecturer in Human Anatomy, School of Anatomy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-bristol-1211">University of Bristol</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/anti-cellulite-products-are-big-business-but-heres-what-the-science-says-232318">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Body

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4 anti-ageing mistakes most women make

<p>While there’s no denying it, wrinkles are just part of the natural ageing process, there are some mistakes we all make that will speed up the ageing process. So if you want to keep your youthful glow for longer, be sure to avoid these beauty blunders. </p> <p><strong>Skipping sunscreen</strong></p> <p>READ CAREFULLY: Sunscreen IS THE ultimate anti-ageing tool. Even when it’s not beach-worthy weather outside, but the sun’s UV rays can still damage your skin. This is namely photoageing, the wrinkling, spotting and loss of elasticity caused by exposure to sun. So as part of your daily routine, make sure you slip, slap, slop. </p> <p><strong>Rubbing tired eyes</strong></p> <p>While we’re all guilty of this seemingly harmful action, did you know that simply rubbing your eyes will stretch delicate skin and may cause it to slacken? The skin around our eyes and on our eyelids is the most sensitive and least elastic on our face and the most vulnerable... so keep your fingers away.</p> <p><strong>Skimping on sunglasses</strong></p> <p>As well as being a fashionable accessory, sunglasses also do wonders to minimize lines around your eyes. Shading your eyes from the sun’s glare prevents squinting and crow's feet wrinkles, of course, but it also shields delicate skin from the destructive onslaught of UV rays. Make sure you opt for a pair with UV protection.</p> <p><strong>Neglecting your neck, chest and hands</strong></p> <p>The delicate skin of these areas lack the oil glands of other areas of skin, which results in dryness and accelerated aging. Plus, these areas are often fraught with sunscreen neglect. As well as remembering to apply sunscreen to these areas you should also pay attention to them by applying an anti-ageing serum. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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5 sneaky beauty tricks that take a decade off your look

<p>What if we told you there were five super simple turn-back-the-clock tricks that could brighten the face, open up the eyes, improve plumpness and give you enviably shiny hair? Well, that’s exactly what we’re telling you. And these tips don’t require and expensive trip to a beauty salon and can be done in your very own bathroom. </p> <p>When it comes to your skin, just one super-charged anti-ager will instantly boost your beauty routine—and deliver the kind of results we’d all be happy to see in the mirror. Here are five tricks you should definitely try today.</p> <p><strong>Try a Sleeping Beauty elixir</strong><br />They don’t call it beauty sleep for no good reason. While you’re head is on the pillow, it’s the perfect time to slather on an overnight face and neck cream that uses skin brightening ingredients such as vitamin C, algae extract and anti-oxidants. You will wake up more supple, radiant and bright – and in some cases, with firmer skin.</p> <p><strong>Go for bold lip</strong><br />A bold yet fresh lip will instantly brighten and lift the face. The trick is to go one or two shades brighter than you usually do – without option for a blast of neon. Diffuse bright edges with a cotton bud to stop hard lines.</p> <p><strong>Shake the magic wand</strong><br />Eyelashes have the ability to really open up your eyes and thus give you a more youthful look instantly. So everyone, get acquainted with the eyelash curler. A must for opening up tired, droopy eyelids before applying mascara – it works every time. </p> <p><strong>Attempt a gravity-defying mini massage</strong><br />As massages stimulate circulation, cells and collagen, everyone should be giving themself a daily morning face massage using small circular motions. Focus on your forehead, cheeks, chin, and gently pat under eyes to help with firmness and reduce bloating.</p> <p><strong>Let your hair shine on</strong><br />Shiny, healthy hair makes everyone look better – and it one of the easiest beauty tricks to master. Try mashed-up avocado mixed with olive oil as a hair mask – it’s cheap, natural and really effective.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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What is minoxidil, the anti-balding hair growth treatment? Here’s what the science says

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jacinta-l-johnson-1441348">Jacinta L. Johnson</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kirsten-staff-1494356">Kirsten Staff</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p>Hair loss (also known as alopecia) often affects the scalp but can occur anywhere on the body. It’s very common and usually nothing to worry about; about <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022202X15525840">half of Australian men</a> show signs of visible baldness at age 50 and <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022202X15525840">over a quarter of Australian women</a> report hair thinning by the same age. It’s often genetic.</p> <p>But if you’ve noticed hair loss and are worried by it, see a GP or dermatologist for a diagnosis before trying any treatments. Products claiming to reverse hair loss are everywhere, but few have been scientifically tested for how well they work.</p> <p>One group of products that have actually been scientifically tested, however, are known as topical minoxidil products. These include products such as Regaine®.</p> <p>So, do they work? Here’s what the research evidence says, what you can realistically expect and what you need to know if you’re considering this treatment.</p> <h2>What is minoxidil – and does it work?</h2> <p>Topical minoxidil usually comes as a kind of foam or serum you apply to your scalp.</p> <p>It’s been approved by the <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/">Therapeutic Goods Administration</a>, Australia’s regulatory authority for therapeutic goods, for the treatment of hereditary hair loss in males and females. Minoxidil is also available in tablet form, but this isn’t currently approved for hair loss (more on that later).</p> <p>So, is topical minoxidil effective? In short – yes, but the results vary widely from person to person, and it needs to be used consistently over several months to see results.</p> <p>Scientists don’t know exactly how minoxidil works. It may affect the different phases of the hair life cycle, thereby encouraging growth. It also <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09546634.2021.1945527?casa_token=KhIM_u0u8nwAAAAA:5njp_XE5cHhip454ycvU1p9p_t0VVzpjRu0ozDZ9YqNb04fmhmngWzYeiowZcG5UugLQkTVIzCcj7A">opens up blood vessels</a> near hair follicles.</p> <p>This increases blood flow, which in turn delivers more oxygen and nutrients to the hair.</p> <p>While minoxidil is unlikely to restore a full head of thick, lush, hair, it can slow down hair loss and can <a href="https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD007628.pub4/full?highlightAbstract=minoxidil">stimulate regrowth</a>.</p> <p>It is the over-the-counter option with the most evidence. Two strengths are available: 5% and 2%.</p> <p>An analysis of randomised controlled trials found minoxidil applied to the scalp twice a day increased the number of hairs per square centimetre by <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28396101/">eight to 15 hairs</a>, with the higher strength treatment having a slightly greater effect.</p> <h2>Can I use it for non-genetic balding?</h2> <p>There are many causes of hair loss. The main cause in both males and females is a hereditary condition called androgenic alopecia.</p> <p>Although topical minoxidil is only approved for use in Australia for androgenic alopecia, there is some evidence it can also help in other conditions that cause hair loss.</p> <p>For example, it may hasten hair regrowth in patients who have lost hair due to <a href="https://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(96)90500-9/abstract">chemotherapy</a>.</p> <p>Unfortunately, minoxidil is not effective when the hair follicle is gone, like after a burn injury.</p> <p>Although small studies have found promising results using minoxidil to promote hair growth on the face (for <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/1346-8138.13312">beard</a> or <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24471459/">eyebrow</a> enhancement), topical minoxidil products are not currently approved for this use. More research is required.</p> <h2>What else do I need to know?</h2> <p>Minoxidil won’t work well for everyone. Early in treatment you might notice a temporary increase in <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22409453/">hair shedding</a>, as it alters the hair cycle to make way for new growth. Minoxidil needs to be trialled for three to six months to determine if it’s effective.</p> <p>And as it doesn’t cure hair loss, you must <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdv.14624?casa_token=P-zW7kDNRs8AAAAA%3AaUgUzxU7lbwBpg1BYPajOfXFhpb_mU5g_ounZ6GtjsLLkHO_AdVQ2Kf-8zZkW80ykBj3N_sOsyn392uc">continue</a> to use it each day to maintain the effect. If you stop, you will start losing the new hair growth <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/assets/medicines/1f8127a5-2a98-4013-a7c3-a53300feb0e5-reduced.pdf">within three to four months</a>.</p> <p>Minoxidil products may not be suitable for everyone. If you have any medical conditions or take any medications, you should speak with your doctor or pharmacist before using minoxidil products.</p> <p>It has not been tested for safety in <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/assets/medicines/1f8127a5-2a98-4013-a7c3-a53300feb0e5-reduced.pdf">people under 18, over 65, or those who are pregnant</a>.</p> <p>You can read the <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/medicine-finder/regaine-for-men-regular-strength-application">consumer medicines information sheet</a> for more information about using over-the-counter minoxidil products.</p> <p>Many people do not like to use minoxidil solution or foams long-term because they need to be applied everyday day, which can be inconvenient. Or they may notice side effects, such as scalp irritation and changes to hair texture.</p> <p>Some people <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdv.14624?casa_token=P-zW7kDNRs8AAAAA%3AaUgUzxU7lbwBpg1BYPajOfXFhpb_mU5g_ounZ6GtjsLLkHO_AdVQ2Kf-8zZkW80ykBj3N_sOsyn392uc">tolerate the foam products better</a> than the solution, as the solution contains more of a compound called propylene glycol (which can irritate the skin).</p> <h2>What about the oral tablet form of minoxidil?</h2> <p>Minoxidil is also available on prescription as an oral tablet. While traditionally used for high blood pressure, it has also been used as a treatment for hair loss.</p> <p>In 2020, a <a href="https://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(20)32109-5/abstract">systematic review</a> identified 17 studies involving 634 patients using oral minoxidil for various hair loss conditions.</p> <p>The authors found oral minoxidil was effective and generally well tolerated in healthy people who were having trouble using the topical products.</p> <p>The review noted oral minoxidil may increase hair growth over the whole body and may cause heart-related side effects in some patients. More research is required.</p> <p>In Australia, oral minoxidil is available under the trade name <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/assets/medicines/df29e16f-6464-4652-ba1f-a53300fed275.pdf">Loniten</a>®. However, it is currently only approved for use in high blood pressure.</p> <p>When people seek a prescription treatment for a non-approved purpose, this is called “off-label” prescribing. Off-label prescribing of oral minoxidil, potentially for use in alopecia, may have contributed to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10170338/">shortages</a> of Loniten® tablets in recent years. This can reduce availability of this medicine for people who need it for high blood pressure.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/223736/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jacinta-l-johnson-1441348">Jacinta L. Johnson</a>, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacy Practice, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kirsten-staff-1494356">Kirsten Staff</a>, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacy, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-south-australia-1180">University of South Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-is-minoxidil-the-anti-balding-hair-growth-treatment-heres-what-the-science-says-223736">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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9 signs you have inflammation in your body. Could an anti-inflammatory diet help?

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-ball-14718">Lauren Ball</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emily-burch-438717">Emily Burch</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/southern-cross-university-1160">Southern Cross University</a></em></p> <p>There is a lot of health buzz around the term “inflammation” right now. From new scientific <a href="https://medicalxpress.com/news/2023-07-inflammation-discovery-aging-age-related-diseases.html">discoveries</a> to <a href="https://people.com/health/gwyneth-paltrow-addresses-backlash-anti-inflammatory-diet/">celebrities</a> and social media influencers, it seems like everyone is talking about this important bodily process and its potential impact on our health.</p> <p>“<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41574-018-0059-4">Inflammaging</a>” is a specific term you may also have seen. It’s an age-related increase in persistent, low-grade inflammation in blood and tissue, which is a strong risk factor for many conditions and diseases.</p> <p>So, can an anti-inflammatory diet help reduce inflammation? Let’s take a look.</p> <h2>What is inflammation?</h2> <p>When our body becomes injured or encounters an infection, it activates defence mechanisms to protect itself. It does this by instructing our cells to fight off the invader. This fighting process <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0675-0#citeas">causes inflammation</a>, which often presents as swelling, redness and pain.</p> <p>In the short-term, inflammation is a sign your body is healing, whether from a grazed knee or a cold.</p> <p>If inflammation persists for a longer time it’s called “chronic”. That can indicate a <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05800-6">health problem</a> such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3638313/">arthritis</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6719998/#B2-ijms-20-03879">heart disease</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6523054/">diabetes</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3390758/">dementia</a> or other autoimmune disorders.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/">signs and symptoms</a> of chronic inflammation may be present from several months to years and include:</p> <ol> <li>persistent pain</li> <li>chronic fatigue or insomnia</li> <li>joint stiffness</li> <li>skin problems</li> <li>elevated blood markers (such as <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/c-reactive-protein-CRP-blood-test">C-reactive protein</a>)</li> <li>gastrointestinal issues (constipation, diarrhoea, acid reflux)</li> <li>depression, anxiety and mood disorders</li> <li>unintended weight gain or loss</li> <li>frequent colds or flu.</li> </ol> <h2>What role does diet play?</h2> <p>The relationship between food and inflammation is <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0735109706013350">well recognised</a>. Overall, some food components may activate the immune system by producing pro-inflammatory cytokines (small proteins important in cell signaling) or reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.</p> <p>A “<a href="https://theconversation.com/clear-evidence-for-a-link-between-pro-inflammatory-diets-and-27-chronic-diseases-heres-how-you-can-eat-better-158451">pro-inflammatory diet</a>” may increase inflammation in the body over the long term. Such diets are usually low in fresh produce like fruits, vegetables and wholegrains, and high in commercially baked goods, fried foods, added sugars and red and processed meats.</p> <p>In contrast, an “<a href="https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/80/4/1029/4690355">anti-inflammatory</a>” diet is associated with less inflammation in the body. There is no single anti-inflammatory diet. Two well-recognised, evidence-backed examples are the Mediterranean diet and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.</p> <p>Anti-inflammatory diets typically include the following elements:</p> <p><strong>1. high in antioxidants.</strong> These compounds help the body fight free radicals or unstable atoms, that in high quantities are linked to illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. The best way to consume antioxidants is by eating lots of fruits and vegetables. Research shows frozen, dried and canned fruits and vegetables can be <a href="https://theconversation.com/frozen-and-tinned-foods-can-be-just-as-nutritious-as-fresh-produce-heres-how-201740">just as good as fresh</a></p> <p><strong>2. high in “healthy”, unsaturated fatty acids.</strong> Monounsaturated fats and omega-3-fatty acids are found in fish (sardines, mackerel, salmon and tuna), seeds, nuts, and plant-based oils (olive oil and flaxseed oil)</p> <p><strong>3. high in fibre and prebiotics.</strong> Carrots, cauliflower, broccoli and leafy greens are good sources of fibre. Prebiotics promote the growth of beneficial microorganisms in our intestines and can come from onions, leeks, asparagus, garlic, bananas, lentils and legumes</p> <p><strong>4. low in processed foods.</strong> These contain refined carbohydrates (pastries, pies, sugar-sweetened beverages, deep-fried foods and processed meats).</p> <h2>Rheumatoid arthritis, dementia, depression</h2> <p>There is mixed evidence for the role of anti-inflammatory diets in rheumatoid arthritis pain management. A recent <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8706441/">2021 systematic review</a> (where researchers carefully group and examine the available evidence on a topic) found eating an anti-inflammatory diet likely leads to significantly lower pain in people with rheumatoid arthritis when compared with other diets.</p> <p>However, the 12 studies included in the review had a high risk of bias – likely because people knew they were eating healthy foods – so the confidence in the evidence was low.</p> <p>Inflammation is strongly implicated in the development of neurodegenerative diseases like <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6486891/">Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia</a> and evidence suggests anti-inflammatory diets might help to protect the brain.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5015034/">2016 review</a> showed an anti-inflammatory diet may be protective against cognitive impairment and dementia, but that further large randomised controlled trials are needed. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8673721/">2021 study</a> followed 1,059 people for three years and observed their diet. They reported those with a greater pro-inflammatory diet had an increased risk of developing dementia.</p> <p>Inflammation has also been linked with mental health, with people eating a pro-inflammatory diet reporting more symptoms of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31152670/">depression</a>. Diet is the fundamental element of <a href="https://www1.racgp.org.au/ajgp/2019/october/lifestyle-interventions-for-mental-health">lifestyle approaches</a> to managing anxiety and mental health.</p> <p>More broadly, a <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2227-9059/9/8/922">2021 review paper</a> examined recent research related to anti-inflammatory diets and their effect on reducing inflammation associated with ageing. It found compounds commonly found in anti-inflammatory diets could help alleviate the inflammatory process derived from diseases and unhealthy diets.</p> <h2>What about turmeric?</h2> <p>A favourite on social media and vitamin shelves, turmeric is promoted as having anti-inflammatory benefits. These are linked to a specific compound called <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5388087/#:%7E:text=Curcuminoids%20are%20phenolic%20compounds%20commonly,several%20important%20functions%20of%20curcuminoids.">curcumin</a>, which gives turmeric its distinctive yellow colour.</p> <p>Research suggests curcumin might act as an anti-inflammatory agent in the body but high-quality clinical trials in humans are <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/16/6/4567">lacking</a>. Most of the <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/16/6/4567">existing studies</a> have been conducted in <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jcp.27360">lab settings</a> using cells or in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4608712/">animals</a>. So it’s unclear how much curcumin is needed to see anti-inflammatory benefits or how well <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5664031/">we absorb it</a>.</p> <p>Overall, adding turmeric to your food may provide your body with some health benefits, but don’t rely on it to prevent or treat disease on its own.</p> <h2>Safe eating</h2> <p>Inflammation is a major factor in the link between diet and many health conditions.</p> <p>Eating an anti-inflammatory diet is considered safe, likely to support health and to prevent future chronic conditions. If you are looking for tailored dietary advice or an anti-inflammatory meal plan, it’s best to speak with an <a href="https://member.dietitiansaustralia.org.au/Portal/Portal/Search-Directories/Find-a-Dietitian.aspx">accredited practising dietitian</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/210468/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-ball-14718">Lauren Ball</a>, Professor of Community Health and Wellbeing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emily-burch-438717">Emily Burch</a>, Dietitian, Researcher &amp; Lecturer, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/southern-cross-university-1160">Southern Cross University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/9-signs-you-have-inflammation-in-your-body-could-an-anti-inflammatory-diet-help-210468">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

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Anti-vegan chef launches clothing line against activist

<p dir="ltr">Chef John Mountain has taken his feud with vegan activist Tash Peterson to the next level by unveiling a clothing line that names and shames her and her animal rights beliefs. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Perth chef, who has taken legal action against Ms Peterson after the pair tussled during protests at his restaurant Fyre, showed off the provocative range of tank-tops, t-shirts and hoodies on his new merchandise website.</p> <p dir="ltr">The merch page, which was launched on Saturday, promises customers will love the clothing “hopefully more than Tash loves chef”.</p> <p dir="ltr">It is now selling clothing that carries the restaurant's branding and slogans such as “Pleased to meat stew”, “no animals were harmed in the making of this shirt” and “all they have done is added fuel to the Fyre”.</p> <p dir="ltr">One t-shirt design features a half-star Google-style review graphic with the words: “Absolutely f***ing chaotic Tash Peterson”, which makes fun of Ms Peterson's description of a protest and the flood of Fyre reviews posted by vegans.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another design asks. “What's the difference between a vegan and a heroin addict? The vegan keeps it to themselves.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The clothing line comes after John Mountain announced all vegans would be banned from his restaurant due to “mental health reasons”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mountain and Peterson have clashed several times at the Perth eatery, with Peterson’s latest demonstration resulting in legal action being taken against the staunch vegan and animal rights activist. </p> <p dir="ltr">After Peterson <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/furious-chef-lets-loose-after-clash-with-vegan-protestors" target="_blank" rel="noopener">stormed</a> his booked-out restaurant with other activists in tow, they stood outside with a megaphone, while shouting and playing sounds of squealing pigs, moments before the altercation was caught on camera.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mountain and Peterson came to physical blows as he wrestled them out of the restaurant, as he defended his choice to retaliate against the protestors, saying he chose to stand up to the bullies to "protect my business". </p> <p dir="ltr">"Bullies come in all different shapes and sizes and these lot just happen to be the vegans."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: A Current Affair / Fyre</em></p>

Legal

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Who’s taking COVID antivirals like Paxlovid? Hint: it helps if you’re rich

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicole-allard-1349026">Nicole Allard</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-peter-doherty-institute-for-infection-and-immunity-2255">The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity</a></em></p> <p>When it comes to COVID, people living in disadvantaged communities are hit with a triple whammy. First, they’re <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-data/health-conditions-disability-deaths/covid-19/overview">more likely</a> to get infected, and when sick, are more likely to have serious disease. Second, they’re <a href="https://theconversation.com/first-covid-hit-disadvantaged-communities-harder-now-long-covid-delivers-them-a-further-blow-183908">more likely</a> to develop long COVID. Third, our <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2023/218/10/access-oral-covid-19-antivirals-community-are-eligibility-criteria-and-systems">recent research</a> suggests they’re less likely to get antivirals and when they do, it’s on average later.</p> <p>We’ve just <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2023/218/10/access-oral-covid-19-antivirals-community-are-eligibility-criteria-and-systems">published the data</a> to map how disadvantage is linked with access to COVID antiviral drugs you can take at home.</p> <p>Here’s why our findings matter and what we can do to level the playing field for this critical part of Australia’s COVID response.</p> <h2>What we did and what we found</h2> <p>Our team looked at Victorian and national prescribing data trends for the oral antiviral medications eligible Australians can take at home – Paxlovid (nirmatrelvir/ritonavir) and Lagevrio (molnupiravir).</p> <p>My health department colleagues linked data from the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme with information from the Victorian health department’s COVID surveillance database. They then matched levels of socioeconomic disadvantage by postcode, according to criteria from the Australian Bureau of Statistics.</p> <p>Their analysis showed people living in the most disadvantaged postcodes were 15% less likely to receive oral antivirals compared with those in the most advantaged postcodes.</p> <p>Those in the most disadvantaged postcodes were supplied with the antivirals on average a day later (three days versus two days) than those in the most advantaged postcodes.</p> <p>There are some limitations to our analysis. Not everyone who tests for COVID reports their positive result. And we suspect there may be more under-reporting of infections in disadvantaged areas.</p> <p>Nevertheless, our findings about the influence of disadvantage on antiviral supply are not surprising. In the United States, there have been <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7125e1.htm?utm">similar results</a>.</p> <h2>Why has this happened?</h2> <p>We know <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/health-alerts/covid-19/treatments/eligibility">early access to antivirals</a>, within the first five days of symptoms starting, is important to reduce the chances of severe disease and hospitalisation in those at risk.</p> <p>So why are people in disadvantaged areas less likely to have access to COVID antivirals? The answers are multiple and complex.</p> <p>Some relate to <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11069-019-03584-6/tables/1">disadvantage</a> that existed before the pandemic – for instance, poverty, homelessness, lower levels of English or formal education, and being less likely to have a regular GP.</p> <p>Some factors relate specifically to antivirals. For instance, to access antivirals, you first have to know they exist and whether you might be eligible, then know how to access them and when. There may be out-of-pocket costs to see a GP to be assessed, then there’s the cost of filling the prescription, even with a concession card.</p> <h2>How can we address this?</h2> <p>We have an opportunity to address this inequity, whether that’s by addressing social determinants of health more broadly, or specifically related to antivirals access.</p> <p>Equity depends on continuing to address the structural inequalities in our health system that create barriers to people accessing primary health services, and tailoring responses to communities.</p> <p>For instance, earlier in the pandemic we saw funding to house homeless people, provide COVID-related health care to non-English speaking communities, and for people isolated at home. These initiatives need to continue.</p> <p>Other countries have also recognised the need for more equitable access to COVID antivirals. Initiatives have included:</p> <ul> <li> <p>COVID medicine <a href="https://phlgroup.co.uk/our-services/cmdu/">delivery units</a> in the United Kingdom. These identify, triage and arrange for high-risk people to receive antivirals at home</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://covid19.govt.nz/testing-and-isolation/if-you-have-covid-19/medicines-to-treat-covid-19">pharmacists prescribing antivirals</a> in New Zealand, and</p> </li> <li> <p>“<a href="https://aspr.hhs.gov/TestToTreat/Pages/default.aspx#:%7E:text=To%20find%20a%20participating%20Test%20to%20Treat%20site%20near%20you%3A&amp;text=Call%20the%20Centers%20for%20Disease,more%20than%20150%20other%20languages.">test to treat</a>” services in the US. This is where people can get tested, assessed and access antivirals in one spot, in one visit.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>What needs to happen next?</h2> <p>As <a href="https://theconversation.com/were-in-another-covid-wave-but-its-not-like-the-others-206493">COVID waves continue</a>, we must focus on reducing deaths and hospitalisations. Antiviral treatments are part of our armour and equity must drive our response.</p> <p>Our ongoing COVID response should be designed with consumer input, supported by an adequately funded public health system and be data driven. Here’s what needs to happen next:</p> <ul> <li> <p>encourage a tired public to see COVID testing as an important first step to accessing antiviral treatment, and why they should consider treatment</p> </li> <li> <p>address the health care inequality in primary care (for instance, boosting timely access to a GP people can afford to visit) by increasing resourcing in areas where we know there are gaps</p> </li> <li> <p>provide culturally safe health care, delivered in community languages, co-designed with community input</p> </li> <li> <p>evaluate current and future antiviral medications</p> </li> <li> <p>communicate up-to-date information to the public and health professionals about antivirals, particularity GPs</p> </li> <li> <p>access more data on the coverage and equity of antiviral COVID treatments, to help direct us to the gaps in the health system that need to be plugged.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>Why this matters now</h2> <p>For many of us in the past year, COVID has become another “cold” we encounter and may not even bother testing. Yet, we continue to see <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/health-alerts/covid-19/weekly-reporting">deaths and hospitalisations</a> across the country.</p> <p>Serious COVID infections continue to affect our most vulnerable people. These include elderly people, especially those over 80, First Nations people, people living with a disability and people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged.</p> <p>We have a chance to ensure antivirals are used to reduce existing disparities in hospitalisation and death – not to make them worse.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/207822/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicole-allard-1349026">Nicole Allard</a>, Post doctoral researcher and medical epidemiologist, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-peter-doherty-institute-for-infection-and-immunity-2255">The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/whos-taking-covid-antivirals-like-paxlovid-hint-it-helps-if-youre-rich-207822">original article</a>.</em></p>

Caring

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"I'm glad you're resigning": Kochie's run-in with a heckler

<p>David Koch has shared the details of a nasty altercation he had with a stranger after announcing his departure from <em>Sunrise</em>. </p> <p>Kochie <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/news/news/the-world-s-best-job-kochie-quits-sunrise" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announced</a> on Monday that he would be leaving the Channel Seven breakfast show after 20 years in the hosting chair. </p> <p>The response to his shock resignation has been mostly positive and supportive, as famous friends and loyal viewers have flooded online spaces with well wishes for the veteran TV presenter. </p> <p>However, Kochie shared that after taping had finished for Monday morning's show, he was approached by a heckler on the street while walking with his wife, Libby.</p> <p>“In all of that lovely euphoria, this is just life, I’m walking to lunch with Lib and walked by a bloke and he goes, ‘I’m glad you’re resigning, you are just a paid mouthpiece for Big Pharma’,” Koch said.</p> <p>“An anti-vaxxer. He started yelling at me across the road. Lib’s going ‘What the hell?’.”</p> <p>Koch’s co-host Natalie Barr said, “We take the good with the bad, and we know that.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Kochie has thanked all the well-wishers who responded to the news he is leaving Sunrise, before revealing one random heckler gave him a send-off to forget! <a href="https://twitter.com/kochie_online?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@kochie_online</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/kochie?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#kochie</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sunriseon7?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#sunriseon7</a> <a href="https://t.co/uhUhxONeNN">pic.twitter.com/uhUhxONeNN</a></p> <p>— Sunrise (@sunriseon7) <a href="https://twitter.com/sunriseon7/status/1663321697208918018?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 29, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/morning-shows/david-koch-reveals-he-was-brutally-sledged-in-street-after-quitting-sunrise/news-story/551069985f00f3a4909a32502b4aae91" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>news.com.au</em></a>, Koch said that after decades in the game, he was okay with not pleasing everybody.</p> <p>“Yes, we all have faults. I’ve stuffed up and people love me or hate me, but what they see is what they get, and I think they respect that even if they disagree with your views,” he said.</p> <p>“It’s a really intimate relationship with the viewers.”</p> <p>Despite the heckler, Kochie went on to say he had received a lot of kind messages, with one of the nicest tributes coming form his breakfast TV show rival Karl Stefanovic. </p> <p>“A wonderful, classy, respectful [message] from Karl Stefanovic was so nice, really adored that one,” he said on-air.</p> <p>“But so many great messages.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Sunrise</em></p> <div class="media image" style="caret-color: #000000; color: #000000; font-style: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration: none; box-sizing: inherit; display: flex; flex-direction: column; align-items: center; width: 705.202209px; margin-bottom: 24px; max-width: 100%;"> </div>

TV

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The best anti-ageing secrets dermatologists won’t tell you for free

<p><strong>The best tips from top dermatologists </strong></p> <p>A wide array of over-the-counter anti-ageing skincare products aim to improve the signs of ageing, such as skin spots, fine lines, wrinkles, and boost collagen. Yet, most of these products are more hype – it’s important for consumers to understand when a product is a cosmetic, drug, or both to evaluate the validity of these claims. So, which products can actually deliver results that improve the signs of ageing?</p> <p>We spoke with medical experts who told us the best anti-ageing secrets for better skin health.</p> <p><strong>Opt for sunscreen to fight ageing skin</strong></p> <p>Sunscreen is one of the best weapons when it comes to protecting your skin against skin cancer, and it’s also one of the best ways to keep your skin looking younger and healthier. “The sun emits ultraviolet radiation that damages skin, both the overlying epidermis and the underlying dermis,” explains dermatologist, Dr Jerome Garden. “In addition to increasing your risk of skin cancer, the sun causes brown spots, red spots, and wrinkles.”</p> <p><strong>Expensive products are not always more effective</strong></p> <p>It may be tempting to splurge on a skin-care item that promises to yield worthy results, but pricey doesn’t always equal quality. There are some great inexpensive products that can produce great results, according to dermatologist, Dr Dendy Engelman. “A higher price tag can mean better quality ingredients or a higher concentration of an ingredient, but the ingredients list is always more important than the brand selling the product,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Don't buy generic skincare</strong></p> <p>You don’t need to spend a fortune to get a high-quality skincare product, but there is a difference between a brand name product and a generic one, according to dermatologist, Dr Joshua Zeichner.</p> <p>“Many generic products are packaged to look similar to the original, and may even have the same ingredients list, however, the difference is the quality of the ingredients and how they are actually formulated,” he says.</p> <p><strong>Skimp on a fancy cleanser</strong></p> <p>No matter what an expensive cleanser may cost, it’s not going to work any more magic than most lower-cost competitors, according to dermatologists. “The goal of a cleanser is to remove dirt, oil, makeup and pollution from the skin without disrupting the outer skin layer – and the ingredients used to create a product that can do this are not expensive,” says Dr Zeichner. “In fact, some of the best quality cleansers are actually among the least expensive products on the market.”</p> <p><strong>Opt for a serum</strong></p> <p>Serums, which are meant to be layered underneath your daily and nightly moisturiser, often are the first skincare products to be skipped. But, they actually play an important role in your daily routine. “Serums contain a high concentration of active ingredients and are lightweight, so they penetrate deeper into your skin to provide maximum benefits,” says dermatologist, Dr Whitney Bowe.</p> <p>She recommends looking for serums that contain ceramides and amino acids, which help to bolster the skin’s natural barrier, and antioxidants, which protect skin from sun damage and free radicals.</p> <p><strong>Don't trust anti-wrinkle face cream claims </strong></p> <p>“We develop fine lines because of repeated folding of the skin from underlying muscles,” explains Dr Zeichner. “Young, healthy skin has a strong foundation that resists folding and bounces back to its original shape, but, with age, that skin foundation gets weaker.”</p> <p>While topical creams will certainly help keep the skin barrier strong, the only way to truly reduce wrinkles is to relax the muscles underneath the skin, according to Dr Zeichner.</p> <p><strong>Wear sunscreen year-round</strong></p> <p>It’s true that even on the cloudiest or snowiest of days, sunscreen should be a part of your daily skincare routine. “Incidental sun exposure for only 10 to 15 minutes a day adds up over time and can cause significant sun damage and accelerated photoaging,” says Dr Engelman.</p> <p>In order to keep skin looking its youngest and healthiest, she recommends applying sunscreen every single day of the year, as brief sun exposures throughout the year can add up to significant damage (think driving with the sunroof open or walking around outdoor shopping centres during peak sun hours).</p> <p><strong>Use retinol - it really works</strong></p> <p>According to dermatologist, Dr Hadley King, topical retinoids are the most effective topical anti-ageing products (after sun protection). “There is great data that supports their effectiveness and safety,” she says. “While prescription retinoids are the most effective, there are now plenty of over-the-counter products that contain retinol and work well, especially on those with sensitive skin.”</p> <p><strong>Invest in laser treatments</strong></p> <p>If you’re looking for fast results without the use of creams, Dr Garden recommends laser treatments, which he specialises in. “We have lasers for brown spots, red spots, blood vessels and wrinkles,” he says. “Newer devices called fractionated lasers can produce impressive results with less downtime than before.” Although they’re on the pricier side, he says that these treatments can offer results far superior to creams.</p> <p>But the only caveat is that these machines are powerful and, in many states, can be operated by unqualified individuals who are not even physicians. He recommends making sure that your laser treatments are being performed by a board-certified dermatologist to avoid complications.</p> <p><strong>Try collagen supplements </strong></p> <p>Collagen is a protein that’s a building block for our hair, skin and nails. “Supplemental collagen is fragmented pieces of amino acids and peptides that connect in the bloodstream with enzymes that trigger the production of collagen,” explains Dr Engelman. “In a collagen-deficient system, this will support and increase collagen production.” It’s important, however, that you choose the right type of collagen, since 16 different strains exist.</p> <p>“For oral supplements, hydrolysed collagen is easiest to digest, as it is broken down into the smallest forms of peptides and amino acids,” she says. “I like pills and powders because they are easy to incorporate no matter what your lifestyle.”</p> <p><strong>Don't fall for 'trendy' products</strong></p> <p>The latest and greatest products on the market might be eye-catching, but their popularity doesn’t mean that they’re effective. “Just because something is ‘hot’ right now in the beauty industry, does not mean that you should run out to purchase it,” says Dr Bowe. “I always encourage my patients to look for scientific studies and statistics which prove that products deliver the results they promise.”</p> <p><strong>Follow a healthy diet</strong></p> <p>No matter how much time, energy and money you spend on your skincare regimen, if you’re not supplementing it with a healthy diet, you’re wasting your efforts, according to experts. “Your skin is a reflection of your overall health and wellness and your diet absolutely impacts the appearance and health of your skin,” says Dr Bowe.</p> <p>“For example, sugar in any form causes multiple changes in our body, from our cellular membranes and our arteries to our hormones, immune systems, gut, and even microbiome – the microbes in our intestines that affect our biology all the way out to our skin.”</p> <p><strong>Allergy pill and a nap may reduce dark circles and puffy eyes</strong></p> <p>There are other causes of dark circles that are unrelated to your skin, such as seasonal allergies or lack of sleep. Dermatologist, Dr Joel Schlessinger recommends trying Clarityne or Zyrtec, drinking more water, or heading to bed an hour earlier to clock in more sleep. If your dark circles and puffiness aren’t improved by any of those suggestions, then he says a well-formulated and hydrating eye cream could help.</p> <p><strong>Avoid sleeping on your side</strong></p> <p>Believe it or not, the way you sleep does have an effect on the smoothness of your skin. “Sleeping on your side presses your cheek into the pillow and causes the skin on your chest to be scrunched, creating new or reinforcing existing wrinkles,” warns Dr Schlessinger. “Train yourself to sleep on your back as much as you can – it will keep skin as flat and smooth as possible.”</p> <p><strong>Don't wait until it's too late too start Botox</strong></p> <p>Some fine lines and wrinkles are caused by repetitive movements, so starting these treatments early, even in your late 20s and early 30s, may potentially help prevent them or slow their progression, according to cosmetic dermatologist, Dr Sejal Shah.</p> <p>“People are often afraid of injectables because they don’t want to look ‘frozen’ or overdone, but many neurotoxins (Botox, Dysport, Xeomin, and Jeuveau) can look very natural when appropriately placed.” Just be sure to seek treatment from trained individuals, such as a board-certified dermatologist.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/beauty/the-best-anti-ageing-secrets-dermatologists-wont-tell-you-for-free?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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“Putrid cookers”: Anti-vaxxers slammed for spreading lies about Jock Zonfrillo’s death

<p dir="ltr">Just hours after MasterChef judge Jock Zonfrillo’s sudden death, heartless anti-vaxxers took to social media to spread disinformation.</p> <p dir="ltr">Zonfrillo died in Melbourne on May 1. While the cause of death has not been publicly announced, police said that his death was not being treated as suspicious, and a report was made for the coroner.</p> <p dir="ltr">The anti-vaxxers took this as a chance to spread disinformation online, implying that his death was linked to the Covid vaccine.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Did Jock Zonfrillo get the Pfizer or Moderna RNA vaccine?” one person tweeted the day after his death.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another commented on the way that his death was described as “sudden” with no confirmed cause- completely ignoring the fact that Zonfrillo’s family have not released that information.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The mainstream media has been reporting countless such ‘sudden deaths’ with ‘no cause of death given’,” wrote the anti-vaxxer on Facebook on May 2.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Since when are death reports being provided with no cause given?</p> <p dir="ltr">“I know since when: since they rolled out those experimental Covid vaccines, which are dropping people faster than they can clue in that it is murdering them. The mainstream media and medical establishment will never admit it – they omit the REAL reason someone died by saying ‘no immediate cause of death was given’,” wrote another.</p> <p dir="ltr">The ill-informed comments have attracted significant backlash from Aussies who slammed the “cookers” for taking advantage of the tragedy to spread disinformation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Of course the putrid cookers have already come out, saying it was the Covid vaccine that killed Jock Zonfrillo. They really are opportunistic scum. RIP Jock,” one person tweeted in response to the lies.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Of course the putrid cookers have already come out, saying it was the covid vaccine that killed Jock Zonfrillo. <br />They really are opportunistic scum.<br />RIP Jock. <a href="https://t.co/t7jxe9QX1P">pic.twitter.com/t7jxe9QX1P</a></p> <p>— JayJay (@JayJay91341991) <a href="https://twitter.com/JayJay91341991/status/1653215630768865281?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 2, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“I’m always unsurprised at the amount of cookers that come out of the woodwork when a celebrity dies. Shame on anyone who is using Jock Zonfrillo’s death to push their anti-vax vile rhetoric,” tweeted another.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">I’m always unsurprised at the amount of cookers that come out of the woodwork when a celebrity dies. Shame on anyone who is using Jock Zonfrillo’s death to push their anti-vax vile rhetoric.</p> <p>— MrDreeps (@MrDreepy) <a href="https://twitter.com/MrDreepy/status/1652947746419281921?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 1, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“Distance yourself from people who impulsively attribute the death of a celebrity to the Covid-19 Vaccine.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It demonstrates extreme congruence bias, and a profound lack of empathy. #jockzonfrillo,” wrote a third.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Distance yourself from people who impulsively attribute the death of a celebrity to the Covid-19 Vaccine. </p> <p>It demonstrates extreme congruence bias, and a profound lack of empathy. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/jockzonfrillo?src=hash&ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#jockzonfrillo</a></p> <p>— Nick Holt (@realnickholt) <a href="https://twitter.com/realnickholt/status/1652919969926254592?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 1, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p>

News

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"Stay away!": City forced into bizarre anti-travel campaign

<p>Amsterdam has taken desperate measures in the fight to keep the city safe from “messy” tourists determined to cause chaos and call it a night out. </p> <p>The Dutch capital’s new online campaign sets out to primarily tackle the problem of young British men, warning them against their plans to “let loose” while they’re visiting. </p> <p>Hopeful British tourists - between the ages of 18 and 35 - who google things like “stag party Amsterdam”, “pub crawl Amsterdam”, and “cheap hotel Amsterdam” will be made to view short videos that stress the consequences that come with “[causing] nuisance and excessive alcohol and drug use”, according to a statement from the city’s local authorities. </p> <p>One of said videos shows an intoxicated young man being arrested after insulting police officers, with text reading: “Coming to Amsterdam for a messy night + getting trashed = €140 fine + criminal record = fewer prospects.” </p> <p>From there comes the firm and to-the-point statement: “So coming to Amsterdam for a messy night? Stay away.”</p> <p>In another of the campaign’s videos, an unconscious individual can be seen in an ambulance as it rushes to hospital, this time with text that reads: “Coming to Amsterdam to take drugs + lose control = hospital trip + permanent health damage = worried family.” </p> <p>It concludes with the same message as the other. </p> <p>Amsterdam welcomes approximately 20 million tourists each year, and is well known for its red light district. It’s this same hotspot that has played a major role in establishing the city as the place to party in Europe. </p> <p>However, local residents have voiced their displeasure for years, fed up with the chaos that drunken tourists bring their way, and prevent them from enjoying their own city as they want to. </p> <p>“Visitors will remain welcome, but not if they misbehave and cause nuisance. In that case we as a city will say: rather not, stay away,” Amsterdam’s deputy mayor Sofyan Mbarki said.</p> <p>“Amsterdam is already taking lots of measures against excessive tourism and nuisance, and we are taking more measures than other large cities in Europe. But we have to do even more [in] the coming years if we want to give tourism a sustainable place in our city.”</p> <p>From there, he went on to note that in order to keep their city a liveable place, they had to turn their attention to “restriction instead of irresponsible growth.” </p> <p>This isn’t the only - or even first - step city officials have taken towards achieving their goal, having just passed new regulations that make it illegal for anyone to smoke cannabis while in the red light district. </p> <p>The video campaign may yet expand to include visitors from beyond the UK, authorities have suggested. They also plan to launch another campaign called “How to Amsterdam”, which aims to reign in tourists already visiting. This campaign will utilise social media and street signs, with warnings about everything from drunkenness to noise, drugs, and urinating in public. </p> <p>Providers who offer bachelor party experiences have reportedly been contacted by the council as well, in the hope that they can reduce - and prevent - trouble in the city’s centre, while they also await the results of research into a potential tourist tax. </p> <p><em>Images: YouTube</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Tech millionaire’s “creepy” $100k offer sparks wave of backlash

<p>US tech millionaire and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Steve Kirsch has been slammed for making a “creepy” offer towards a female passenger who was travelling on the same plane.</p> <p>In a tweet, Kirsch claimed that he offered the stranger $US100,000 to remove her face mask for the flight.</p> <p>"I am on board a Delta flight right now. The person sitting next to me in first-class refused $100,000 to remove her mask for the entire flight. No joke," he tweeted.</p> <p>Kirsch, who became infamous for spreading misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines throughout the pandemic, said that he "explained" to his seatmate that masks "don’t work".</p> <p>He also claims that the woman worked for a pharmaceutical company, and he started by offering her $US100 but worked his way up.</p> <p>She rejected his offer, but Kirsch persisted and said that if she removed the mask to eat and drink she "she could be infected with one breath".</p> <p>Many have slammed the entrepreneur for his actions.</p> <p>“Ew. Do you make a habit of offering money to random women to remove coverings from their bodies mid-air?" posted Jess Piper, a former Democrat state representative nominee, in her response to Kirsch's post.</p> <p>“Stop bugging people who are minding their own business with your creepy nonsense,” commented Alastair McAlpine, an infectious disease expert.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">I am on board a Delta flight right now. The person sitting next to me in first class refused $100,000 to remove her mask for the entire flight. No joke. This was after I explained they don’t work. She works for a pharma company. <a href="https://t.co/Q8Hwzhkmxf">pic.twitter.com/Q8Hwzhkmxf</a></p> <p>— Steve Kirsch (@stkirsch) <a href="https://twitter.com/stkirsch/status/1634189428150390785?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 10, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>"This is wildly creepy, you get that, right? Every part of this. From the request, to the expression, to the fact you decided to tweet this!" commented one user.</p> <p>“All you’re doing here is admitting you patronised and harassed a woman who made a decision she thought was best for her,” wrote another.</p> <p>Last week, Kirsch tried to pull the same stunt on a different flight.</p> <p>He tweeted that he offered his seatmates $US10,000 to remove their masks for the flight, but they also declined his offer.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">I asked the people sitting next to me on the plane if I paid them $10,000 would they remove their mask for the duration of the flight? Both declined the offer. </p> <p>Maybe I should offer $100,000 next time? This can quantify the amount of brainwashing. <a href="https://t.co/VLlymusmcq">pic.twitter.com/VLlymusmcq</a></p> <p>— Steve Kirsch (@stkirsch) <a href="https://twitter.com/stkirsch/status/1633166204054675456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 7, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>"Maybe I should offer $100,000 next time? This can quantify the amount of brainwashing," he added.</p> <p>Delta airlines have said that masks are optional for both domestic and international travel unless required by “applicable governments”.</p> <p>American federal law no longer requires masks be worn in airports or on planes, but certain cities and states may still make it a requirement at their airports.</p> <p><em>Image: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Researchers puzzled by results of anti-inflammatory medications for osteoarthritis

<p>Researchers in the US are calling for a re-evaluation of the way some well known painkillers are prescribed after research showed they may actually lead to a worsening of inflammation over time in osteoarthritis-affected knee joints.</p> <p>NSAIDs (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) such as ibuprofen and naproxen are designed to reduce inflammation for the estimated 2.2 million Australians suffering from the sometimes debilitating effects of osteoarthritis.</p> <p>Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition affecting joints in the body – most commonly hips, knees, ankles, spine and hands – which results from the degradation of cartilage on the ends of bones within the joints. As the cartilage wears away, the bones rub together resulting in swelling, pain and restricted movement.</p> <p>To combat this pain and swelling, NSAIDs are commonly prescribed, however the long-term impact of this type of medication is unclear, including its effect on the progression of the condition.</p> <p>“To date, no curative therapy has been approved to cure or reduce the progression of knee osteoarthritis,” said the study’s lead author, Johanna Luitjens, from the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California, San Francisco. “NSAIDs are frequently used to treat pain, but it is still an open discussion of how NSAID use influences outcomes for osteoarthritis patients.</p> <p>Surprisingly the report says: “…the impact of NSAIDs on synovitis, or the inflammation of the membrane lining the joint, has never been analysed using MRI-based structural biomarkers.”</p> <p>The study compared 793 participants with moderate to severe osteoarthritis of the knee who did not use NSAIDs, with 277 patients who received sustained treatment with NSAIDs for more than a year. Each patient underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of the joint, which were then repeated after four years.</p> <p>The researchers were able to assess the images for indications of inflammation and arthritis progression including cartilage thickness and composition.</p> <p>The data showed the group using NSAIDs, had worse joint inflammation and cartilage quality than those not using NSAIDs, at the time of the initial MRI scan. And the follow-up imaging showed the conditions had worsened for the NSAID group.</p> <p>“In this large group of participants, we were able to show that there were no protective mechanisms from NSAIDs in reducing inflammation or slowing down progression of osteoarthritis of the knee joint,” said Luitjens.</p> <p>According to Luitjens, the common practice of prescribing NSAIDs for osteoarthritis should be revisited as there doesn’t appear to be any evidence they have a positive impact on joint inflammation nor do they slow or prevent synovitis or degenerative changes in the joint.</p> <p>There is also a possibility that NSAIDs simply mask the pain. Despite adjusting the study’s model for individual levels of patient physical activity, “patients who have synovitis and are taking pain-relieving medications may be physically more active due to pain relief, which could potentially lead to worsening of synovitis,” said Luitjens.</p> <p>Luitjens hopes future studies will better characterise NSAIDs and their impact on osteoarthritic inflammation. With one in three people over the age of 75 in Australia suffering from osteoarthritis and an estimated one in 10 women and one in 16 men set to develop it in the future, unlocking treatment options for this crippling condition is an imperative.</p> <p><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/science/osteoarthritis-puzzled-antiinflammatory/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Clare Kenyon.</strong></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Body

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Victorian man’s anti-Dan Andrews plates deemed “offensive” by government

<p dir="ltr">A Victorian man could lose his personalised number plates referencing Premier Daniel Andrews after the state government’s transport body said they had deemed them to be “offensive” and “inappropriate”.</p> <p dir="ltr">In September, Peter Dunlevie received plates that read, “DANOUT”, from VicRoads and attached them to his 2003 Commodore ahead of the state election on November 23.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Well, I want Andrews gone,” he told <em>7NEWS</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m just sick of him.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-907adc51-7fff-b3f2-85a0-ade8c73e54ba"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The plates are accompanied by other anti-Andrews messages, including stickers reading, “Save Victoria” and “SACK ANDREWS”.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/11/danout1.jpg" alt="" width="880" height="495" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Peter Dunlevie attached plates reading ‘DANOUT’ to his white Commodore. Image: 7NEWS</em></p> <p dir="ltr">However, VicRoads has since written to the Gippsland man and told him to return the plates, writing that the plates are “negative”, “offensive” and “inappropriate”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“A review of our records has identified that the combination ‘DANOUT’ has specific negative references, and may be considered offensive by the broader community,” the letter read.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dunlevie has questioned VicRoads’ assessment of the plates, telling the news outlet that it’s just “a bit of fun”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“What’s offensive about them?” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This is just an old bloke having a bit of fun.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While VicRoads has the authority to cancel personalised plates, Dunlevie said he felt like the transport authority was “trying to gag me”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Following the letter from VicRoads, the state’s Department of Transport has begun a review into the decision to remove the plates from Dunlevie.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2976ccdd-7fff-1b07-2086-9bc20f7378ca"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: 7NEWS</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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National Day of Mourning brings anti-monarchy activists to the streets

<p>While many Australians were mourning the death of Queen Elizabeth on the specially appointed public holiday, anti-monarchy activists took to the streets to celebrate the end of her reign.</p> <p>With protests taking place in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide, activists declared "I'm glad the b**** is dead" just hours after Prime Minister Anthony Albanese paid affectionate tribute to the deceased monarch on the country’s National Day of Mourning.</p> <p>Several hundred demonstrators gathered on the steps of Sydney's Town Hall to protest the institution of the royal family and call for an Australian republic, Indigenous sovereignty, a treaty with Aboriginal Australians, and reparations for past wrongs.</p> <p>Under heavy police presence, speakers listed demands and grievances against British monarchs going back to Queen Victoria.</p> <p>Many of the speeches were heavily laced with profanity and declarations such as “f*** the royal family.”</p> <p>One speaker enthusiastically sang, “If you’re happy that she’s dead, clap your hands!”</p> <p>Signs reading “Sovereignty never ceded” and “It’s Aboriginal land” were seen throughout the crowd.</p> <p>Despite the strong anti-monarchy rhetoric, a small group of counter-protestors showed up to show their support for the late Queen and the monarchy.</p> <p>While their counter was peaceful, they were asked to move by police who said they feared inflaming a “tense situation”.</p> <p>Dana Pham, 34, a self-described constitutional monarchist whose parents emigrated as refugees from Vietnam, stood to one side holding a portrait of the late Queen.</p> <p>“I like everyone else want to see the gap closed,” she said.</p> <p>“Obviously there are a lot of issues affecting Aboriginal communities, but … the twisting of history does nobody any favours,” she said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

News

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M*A*S*H, 50 years on: the anti-war sitcom was a product of its time, yet its themes are timeless

<p>MASH, stylised as M*A*S*H, is the story of a rag-tag bunch of medical misfits of the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital thrown together against the horrors of the Korean war in the 1950s. The series endured for 11 seasons, from September 1972 to the final episode in 1983.</p> <p>Originally it was centred on two army surgeons, the wisecracking but empathetic Benjamin “Hawkeye” Pierce, played by Alan Alda, and the deadpan “Trapper” John McIntyre, played by Wayne Rogers.</p> <p>The show had an ensemble cast and different episodes would often focus on one of the featured characters.</p> <p>There was the meek Corporal “Radar” O'Reilly, cross-dressing Corporal Klinger, the easy-going Lieutenant Colonel Henry Blake and pious Father Mulcahy. The antagonists, conniving Major Frank Burns and Major Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan, were foils for Hawkeye and Trapper but occasionally were central characters in some episodes too.</p> <div data-id="17"> </div> <p>Based on the 1970 movie, itself based on a novel, MASH was designed as a “black comedy” set during the Korean War.</p> <p>It was really a thinly veiled critique of the war in Vietnam raging at the time.</p> <p>The creators of the show knew they wouldn’t get away with making a Vietnam war comedy. Uncensored news broadcasts showing the viciousness of Vietnam were transmitted straight to the American public who were, by now, growing jaded of the increasingly brutal war.</p> <p>Setting the series 20 years earlier allowed the creators to mask their criticisms behind a historical perspective – but most viewers realised the true context.</p> <h2>An anti-war sitcom</h2> <p>What started as a criticism of the Vietnam war soon evolved into one for all wars.</p> <p>In many episodes, audiences would be reminded of the horrors of lives lost in the fighting on the line, and the angst and trauma faced by those behind the line.</p> <p>It didn’t matter which war this was, MASH was saying all wars are the same, full of shattered lives.</p> <p>Cloaking this message in comedy was the way the creators were able to make it palatable to a wide audience.</p> <p>The early seasons have a distinctive sitcom feel to them, mostly as a result of the series co-creators, Larry Gelbart and Gene Reynolds, who were from a comedy background.</p> <p>When both creatives left by the end of season five the show took a more dramatic turn.</p> <p>In particular, Alda became more involved in the writing and took it into a more dramatic direction, toning down the comedic elements. This was also reflected in the change of many of the secondary characters.</p> <p>The philandering, practical joker Trapper was replaced by the moral and professional BJ Hunnicutt, the snivelling Frank Burns by the pretentious Charles Winchester, the laconic Henry Blake with the officious Sherman Potter, and the complete absence of Radar after season eight. The voice of the series took on a noticeably Hawkeye focus.</p> <p>As the Vietnam war ended in 1975, the tone of the show also changed. It became less political and focused more on the dilemmas of the individual characters. The laugh track was toned down. But this did not make the show any less popular.</p> <p>Audiences responded strongly to the anarchic anti-authoritarianism of Hawkeye and Trapper/BJ.</p> <p>Almost all the characters are anti-war, reflecting the growing antagonism the American public was feeling towards the Vietnam war and war fatigue in general, post-Vietnam.</p> <p>Even Frank and Hot Lips, the most patriotic characters, sometimes questioned if the war was worth all the suffering and death. And the series reminded people the humour used was not meant to disrespect those fighting but as a coping mechanism of the trauma by those involved.</p> <h2>A timeless classic</h2> <p>That’s not to say there aren’t issues with the show when looked at with modern sensibilities.</p> <p>Contemporary audiences would find problems with some of the representations of characters and issues addressed in the series. Corporal Klinger would today be seen as contentious. His penchant for dressing in women’s clothes was not because he was trans or interested in drag, but because he was trying to get a “Section 8”, or mental health, discharge.</p> <p>Many of the female characters were also relegated to little more than two-dimensional romantic interests or background characters.</p> <p>The only woman who starred with a significant recurring role was “Hot Lips” Houlihan but, as the nickname implies, she was often the butt of sexualised humour.</p> <p>This has not stopped the show maintaining its popularity in the continual re-runs it gets on cable and streaming services.</p> <p>MASH was a product of its time, yet its themes on the absurdity of war are universal. It became more than a TV show: a shared cathartic experience for war-weary audiences.</p> <p>At its heart is the eclectic mix of dysfunctional characters who use humour to laugh in the face of adversity. This is what makes MASH a timeless classic.</p> <p><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/m-a-s-h-50-years-on-the-anti-war-sitcom-was-a-product-of-its-time-yet-its-themes-are-timeless-190422" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Image: YouTube</em></p>

TV

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Do these three popular anti-ageing skincare ingredients work? Here’s what the evidence says

<p>For people looking to press pause on ageing, it hasn’t always been as easy as it is today. Throughout history people have used all sorts of outlandish anti-ageing skincare techniques – such as <a href="https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/science-science-everywhere-you-asked/why-did-cleopatra-supposedly-bathe-sour-donkey-milk">bathing in donkey’s milk</a> as Cleopatra supposedly did, or <a href="https://thedermreview.com/elizabethan-beauty-and-skin-care/">applying mercury</a> directly to the skin, as the Elizabethans did.</p> <p>While the modern era has certainly seen its fair share of bizarre anti-ageing skincare methods – such as <a href="https://www.marieclaire.com/beauty/news/a14382/anti-aging-beauty-through-history/">placenta and vampire facials</a> – the latest trend in anti-ageing skincare is using science.</p> <p>But with ingredients such as peptides, antioxidants and acids now commonplace in ingredients lists, it can be difficult for someone without a background in biology or chemistry to know if what they’re putting in their basket really is backed by science – or if it’s just clever marketing hype. </p> <p>Here, we take a look at three of the most popular ingredients currently found in many anti-ageing products – and whether there’s any evidence they do what they claim.</p> <h2>Vitamin C</h2> <p>Products containing vitamin C often claim that it “brightens” the skin’s appearance and encourages collagen production. The middle layer of our skin (the dermis) produces both collagen and elastin, which work together to give the skin its <a href="https://parjournal.net/article/view/3863">stiffness and elasticity</a>. But as we get older, the skin produces less collagen and elastin – which is why we develop wrinkles.</p> <p>Vitamin C is a bit tricky to deliver to the skin. This is because the outermost layer of the skin, the epidermis, acts as a barrier to water. Since vitamin C is water soluble, this can make it difficult to develop a product that is able to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5579659/">get vitamin C into the skin</a>. </p> <p>But some research does suggest that concentrations above 5% of vitamin C may work on the skin. For example, one study found that in ten women aged 50-60, applying a cream containing 5% vitamin C to the forearms daily for six months showed an <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022202X15412564">increase in collagen production</a> in the skin. </p> <p><a href="https://jcadonline.com/february-2019-vitamin-c/">Other research</a> also suggests that vitamin C applied to the skin daily can noticeably reduce hyperpigmentation (patches of skin that are slightly darker) caused by sun damage. In multiple studies, creams with and without vitamin C were applied to different areas of skin on each person. It was found that people who used vitamin C creams for a total of 47 days saw a noticeable difference in the colour of their skin after 12 days of use. However, there was little further change after the first 12 days.</p> <p>However, it’s unknown if the results persisted after the study was finished.</p> <h2>Hyaluronic acid</h2> <p>Hyaluronic acid is a natural substance that our body makes. It’s usually found in the fluids in the eyes and between the joints and tissues. Many skincare products now include hyaluronic acid, claiming it’s a good skin moisturiser which may help reduce wrinkles. </p> <p>A 2011 study, which looked at 76 women aged between 30 and 60, found that using creams containing 0.1% of hyaluronic acid twice daily for two months improved <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22052267/">skin hydration and elasticity</a>. But improvements to the appearance of wrinkles and skin roughness was only seen in creams where the hyaluronic acid molecules were smaller in size. This is because hyaluronic acid molecules that are larger can be <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/srt.12228">more difficult for the skin to absorb</a>. </p> <p>But many high street skin creams containing hyaluronic acid don’t tell you the exact size of the molecules used in the product – making purchasing decisions difficult. It’s worth reading the label and taking note of the type and/ or concentration of hyaluronic acid it contains.</p> <p>Reassuringly, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014181301833770X?via%3Dihub">other studies</a> have shown that many hyaluronic acid products (from creams and serums to injectables) can help increase skin hydration and reduce wrinkles – including a <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13555-021-00566-0">2021 study</a>, which showed a significant increase in skin hydration and reduction in fine lines in participants. But it’s worth noting this study used a commercial product that contained a blend of niacinamide, ceramides and hyaluronic acid applied twice a day, alongside daily sunscreen use. This makes it difficult to know if the results were solely because of hyaluronic acid. </p> <h2>Retinol</h2> <p>Retinol-based products are popular these days, often promoted for their ability to reduce the effects of long-term sun damage to the skin (photoageing) – including hyperpigmentation and wrinkling. </p> <p>Retinol is a derivative of vitamin A. It’s converted to retinoic acid once it’s absorbed into the skin. Once absorbed, it helps increase collagen production and increases cell turnover. All of these effects combined help plump out the appearance of wrinkles and decrease hyperpigmentation. </p> <p>Studies in <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8757759/">humans cells</a>, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9517919/">skin samples</a> and humans all suggest products containing retinol can have an effect on the skin’s appearance. For example, one study in humans showed using a product with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17515510/">at least 0.4% retinol</a> three times a week for six months did decrease the appearance of wrinkles. <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27332694/">Previous studies</a> have shown even products containing 0.04% retinol can have this effect when used for at least 12 weeks.</p> <p>While the effects will not be as pronounced when compared to other prescription-grade retinoid products, commercial products containing at least 0.04% retinol should be able to reduce the appearance of fine wrinkles with continued used over a period of months especially when combined with <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/seasonal-health/sunscreen-and-sun-safety/">sun protection</a>. </p> <h2>What to look for</h2> <p>If you’re considering buying an anti-ageing skincare product, there are a few things to think about.</p> <p>First, consider whether you may be allergic to any of the ingredients in the product and whether it’s suitable for your skintype. For example, if you have dry, sensitive skin, retinol may not be suitable for you as it can increase your skin’s sensitivity to sunlight and irritate it further. You should also take note of the concentration of the active ingredient within the product and follow the recommended use advised by the manufacturer. This will be stated on the label.</p> <p>Of course, you also need to remember the product you have bought is not a cure-all. It’s equally important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, eat a balanced diet and get adequate rest to maintain visibly healthy skin.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/do-these-three-popular-anti-ageing-skincare-ingredients-work-heres-what-the-evidence-says-182200" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Does Red Wine Really Help Us to Live Longer?

<p>When we think about living longer, we might imagine a life of strict ‘diets’, exhausting and rigorous exercise regimes, and getting up at 6am to a health shake and hot yoga. But what if the key to living longer was in a delicious glass of red wine? It might seem too good to be true, but more and more research is suggesting a glass of red could bring more to the table than we think.</p> <p><strong>Red wine and antioxidants</strong></p> <p>Grapes are delicious little bundles of flavour, colour, and antioxidants that have been linked to an impressive list of health benefits. One of the key compound players found in grape skins is ‘resveratrol’ which has anti-inflammatory properties, may help reduce blood sugar levels, promote good cardiovascular health, and is linked to lowering blood pressure through relaxing the blood vessels (and your mind after a long day at work). In the winemaking process, red wine is usually fermented for a longer period than white wine, so the resveratrol levels in red wine are much higher making red the colour of choice.</p> <p>The other potential health-boosting compounds found in grape skin and seeds are known as ‘procyanidins’ which produce the levels of acidity in wine, otherwise known as ‘tannins’ to wine buffs at cellar doors. Procyanidins have been linked to good cardiovascular and blood vessel health that may be contributors to living longer.</p> <p><strong>Red wine and stress-related ageing</strong></p> <p>Stress and aging can go hand in hand, and sometimes life can seem like an endless bombardment of stressful situations flying at you from all angles. When we have high levels of stress, the body can go into a state of long-term ‘oxidative stress’. Long-term oxidative stress happens when there is a prolonged imbalance of ‘free radicals’ in the body which are molecules produced as a byproduct in the body’s natural metabolic process that can cause inflammation and cell degeneration and may contribute to the body aging when there is an excess. The natural remedy for balancing out oxidative stress and reducing the free radicals in your body is a healthy dose of antioxidants (hello, red wine!) to help limit the effects of inflammation and protect cells from breaking down.</p> <p><strong>Red wine and the ‘Mediterranean diet’</strong></p> <p>The Mediterranean diet has long been known for its link to a long and healthy life through its abundance of fruits, vegetables, healthy fats, seafood, and a nice glass of red with lunch or dinner. Pairing red wine with a lot of the nutrient-dense foods common in the Mediterranean diet can strengthen the effect of resveratrol – the antioxidant linked to improved blood flow, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, and a natural anti-inflammatory.</p> <p>For centuries, red wine has been a staple part of the Mediterranean diet in good moderation.</p> <p><strong>Red wine and moderation</strong></p> <p>It’s easy to get swept up in the tantalizingly long list of pros to making red wine part of your daily health routine. But before you go out and buy a few dozen of your favourite reds, let’s look at a quick list of downfalls associated with alcohol consumption when it stops being moderate and starts becoming a risky ritual.</p> <p>· It’s full of sugar and contains phytoestrogen which promotes fat storage and decreases muscle growth</p> <p>· It’s a toxin your body must dedicate all its energy to processing which diverts its attention away from processing food, stopping your body from burning fat</p> <p>· It’s high in calories, it can make you hungrier, and loosens your inhibitions so you’re more at risk of making poor food choices; and</p> <p>· High alcohol consumption is linked to long-term health effects that will ultimately reduce your lifespan and quality of life</p> <p>Red wine as a part of a healthy lifestyle could bring a lot of benefits to your table but take care not to indulge in too much of a good thing. The key to unlocking its potentially life-extending benefits is through moderation. Enjoy a glass, savor each sip, and know when to pop the top back on.</p> <p>Lyndal Linkin, author of ‘To Age or Not to Age’, is a 56-year-old anti-aging expert who has spent her lifetime learning about anti-aging solutions. A successful entrepreneur, corporate leader, and mother, she uses her years of research and personal experience to explain the most effective methods so you can look and feel younger. Find out more at www.lyndallinkin.com.au or Instagram: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/lyndallinkin/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@lyndallinkin</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Not without my dog! Man wins anti-discrimination case against pet chihuahua

<p>Queensland pet owner Raymond Matthews has won an anti-discrimination claim against his local pub after his assistance chihuahua, Coo-ee, was denied entry.</p> <p>Matthews' favourite watering hole was The Woombye Pub, a stone's throw from his home on the Sunshine Coast. “I’d go up there for a chicken parmi and a beer, maybe once or twice a week,” he told <a href="https://7news.com.au/sunrise/sunshine-coast-man-wins-8000-discrimination-claim-after-pub-refused-entry-to-his-assistance-chihuahua--c-8079310" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7 News</a>.</p> <p>However, that all came to an end in 2017 when new management started refusing entry to Coo-ee.</p> <p>“(The) dog almost got run over one night, having had to stay outside. I went back inside and got directed out and barred for a month and made out to be the bad guy - that I’d intimidated people.”</p> <p>Three years of consistent refusal-of-entry to The Woombye then caused Matthews to say enough was enough and seek legal recourse.</p> <p>In a case opened against the pub, the tribunal found the venue broke anti-discrimination laws and awarded Matthews $8000 in compensation.</p> <p>Matthews said he tried to explain the significance of Coo-ee to the new owners but they wouldn’t listen.</p> <p>“The more I tried to convince them, the more I sounded like a broken record,” he said. “I’d been to the doctor to get the dog signed off as an assistant.</p> <p>“What she does is she introduces me to myriad people - the amount of hurdles I’ve got over because of the dog, just breaking the barriers down that normally exist with bureaucracy.</p> <p>“I take the dog with me and it just brings people down to a level playing field and you can speak with them, you can get along with them, you’ve got a common denominator and the dog, I feel, is the one that does it.”</p> <p>In a happy ending – certainly for Coo-ee at any rate – Matthews and the pup have now been welcomed into the venue.</p> <p><em>Image: Sunrise</em></p>

Family & Pets

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The best anti-ageing sunscreens

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to sun protection, it's no secret that the shelves are flooded with options for different skin types and different levels of protection from a million different brands. </p> <p dir="ltr">It’s widely known that using sunscreen everyday can help reduce visible signs of ageing, with a groundbreaking study finding that people who use broad-spectrum sunscreen on a daily basis experience 24% less skin ageing than those who use sunscreen only intermittently. </p> <p dir="ltr">The study, published in the influential Annals of Internal Medicine, found that especially people over the age of 50 saw drastically reduced visible signs of ageing over a four year period of using regular sunscreen. </p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re feeling overwhelmed by choice when hitting the skincare aisles, the <a href="https://www.beautydirectory.com.au/news/beauty/anti-ageing-sunscreens?utm_source=Sailthru&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=Monday%20August22_Media&amp;utm_term=list_beautydirectory_media_newsletter">Beauty Directory</a> has rounded up the best sunscreens to keep your skin glowing with eternal youth.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.chemistwarehouse.com.au/buy/78374/dermaveen-daily-nourish-body-moisturiser-spf-50-200g?gclid=CjwKCAjwmJeYBhAwEiwAXlg0AXqRQRPWDQaSNoqwXJSnvVrv1NzlDebEHoVfQTyUuCOrtkCqXp6m0BoCDaYQAvD_BwE&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds">DermaVeen Daily Nourish Body Moisturiser SPF 50+</a> is a moisturiser formulated for extra dry or sensitive skin. </p> <p dir="ltr">It helps protect from skin ageing and UVA and UVB rays, while helping to repair skin dryness. The rich formula is easy to apply and absorbs into the skin.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/COBx4cRBfo9/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/COBx4cRBfo9/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by DermaVeen Australia (@dermaveen)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.priceline.com.au/invisible-zinc-spf-50-4hr-water-resistant-lotion-50-ml?gclid=CjwKCAjwmJeYBhAwEiwAXlg0AT-_Sr6yTk8OtCqnOTys0k-LmpjfmqjGR0dUe5AllZYIilbQ4NloVhoCT3QQAvD_BwE&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds">Invisible Zinc Sport 4HR Water Resistant Sunscreen SPF50+</a> UVA-UVB is a sunscreen with SPF 50 protection. </p> <p dir="ltr">The sunscreen has been formulated with natural zinc oxide that is ideal for sport and outdoor use, as the higher protection doesn’t sweat off during exercise or sweating.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CWcFjUZLY80/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CWcFjUZLY80/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by INVISIBLE ZINC (@invisiblezincau)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.pharmacydirect.com.au/ego-sunsense-performance-spf50-50ml?gclid=CjwKCAjwmJeYBhAwEiwAXlg0ATcNWm06SfnThgkR_GkM4Ol1Pd0Us4Y_8iVfQ4VBN-lZx7a5YoLC3xoCm4UQAvD_BwE">SunSense Performance SPF 50+</a> that helps protect your skin. It has a light and non-greasy formula, and is suitable for the face and body. It contains Vitamin B3 to moisturise the skin while it protects</p> <p dir="ltr">Fragrance-free and water resistant for four hours, it has been dermatologically tested and is Australian made and owned.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMTfLPJrtLg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMTfLPJrtLg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by SunSense Sunscreen (@sunsenseaus)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.priceline.com.au/plunketts-superfade-super-screen-spf-50-50-g?gclid=CjwKCAjwmJeYBhAwEiwAXlg0AVCB0KZ-0Emo3lln9L_QQyt3Z5agAC49EumeWDztYGi8ccJQgUd5pBoCkhMQAvD_BwE&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds">John Plunkett’s SuperFade Super Screen SPF 50+</a> is an everyday facial sunscreen cream with hydrating aloe vera and vitamin E. </p> <p dir="ltr">It is broad spectrum UVA + UVB and is a high protection sunscreen that helps prevent sun damage and premature ageing.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZJYaUIFp6H/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZJYaUIFp6H/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Plunkett Pharmaceuticals (@plunkettsskin)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.priceline.com.au/bondi-sands-sunny-daze-spf-50-moisturiser-50-g?gclid=CjwKCAjwmJeYBhAwEiwAXlg0AZxjtwj_wRJYARmhc3pLRtyBGUSV0LIHNM-DYUmC7cbACOD929iHVRoCddUQAvD_BwE&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds">Bondi Sands Everyday Skincare - Sunny Daze SPF 50 Moistursier</a> is a hydrating moisturiser with SPF that is essential in protecting your face against UVA &amp; UVB sun exposure. </p> <p dir="ltr">Bondi Sands Sunny Daze SPF 50 Moisturiser is non-ghosting and enriched with Vitamin E, Hibiscus Sabdariffa Fruit Extract and Zinc Oxide to provide up to 72 hours of hydration, whilst helping to protect your skin.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CesAw5WIKqb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CesAw5WIKqb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Everyday Skincare (@bondisandsskincare)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c47555d0-7fff-8fb7-cdac-921d52a7156b">Image credits: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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