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Deborra-Lee Furness reflects on life as a single woman

<p>Deborra-Lee Furness has reflected on her life after her high-profile divorce from Hugh Jackman. </p> <p>Eight months on from the split, the 68-year-old actress has opened up about her life as a single woman, sharing what she has learned about herself through the emotional process. </p> <p>Jackman and Furness shocked the world when they announced their divorce after 27 years of marriage last September, but Furness told <a href="https://people.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>People</em></a> magazine that she has rediscovered parts of herself through the journey. </p> <p>“[I learned] that I’m strong and resilient,” Furness said. </p> <p>She also told<em> <a href="https://pagesix.com/entertainment/"><span id="U8341706792141mG">Page Six</span></a></em> at the screening for her new movie that she’s been “learning a lot about myself and I’m embracing evolution and growth.”</p> <p>The actress told the publication that it’s been a “year of evolution” for her that has been “scary” and “every other adjective.”</p> <p>However, Furness also told the outlet she was “grateful” that the last few months, although they have been difficult, presented her an opportunity for personal growth.</p> <p>She also revealed that she’s had close friends to lean on for support as she explores life as a single woman again. </p> <p>“I say this to all women — your girlfriends are a necessity in life,” Furness said before adding that her children have also been “very supportive”.</p> <p>Furness and Jackman announced their split in a joint statement shared with <span id="U834170679214oEC">People Magazine.</span></p> <p>“We have been blessed to share almost three decades together as husband and wife in a wonderful, loving marriage,” they said. “Our journey now is shifting, and we have decided to separate to pursue our individual growth.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Relationships

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50 years on, Advance Australia Fair no longer reflects the values of many. What could replace it?

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/wendy-hargreaves-1373285">Wendy Hargreaves</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-southern-queensland-1069">University of Southern Queensland</a></em></p> <p>On April 8 1974, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam announced to parliament the nation’s new national anthem: <a href="https://www.pmc.gov.au/honours-and-symbols/australian-national-symbols/australian-national-anthem">Advance Australia Fair</a>.</p> <p>Australia was growing up. We could stop saving “<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_Save_the_King">our gracious Queen</a>” and rejoice in being “young” and “girt”.</p> <p>Finding a new anthem hadn’t been easy. There were unsuccessful <a href="https://www.naa.gov.au/help-your-research/fact-sheets/australias-national-anthem">songwriting competitions</a> and an unconvincing opinion poll. Finally, we landed on rebooting an Australian favourite from 1878.</p> <p>After Whitlam’s announcement, Australians argued, state officials declined the change and the next government reinstated the British anthem in part. It took another ten years, another poll and an official proclamation in 1984 to adopt the new anthem uniformly and get on with looking grown-up.</p> <p>Advance Australia Fair was never the ideal answer to “what shall we sing?”. The original lyrics ignored First Nations people and overlooked women. Like a grunting teenager, it both answered the question and left a lot out.</p> <p>On its 50th anniversary, it’s time to consider whether we got it right. Advance Australia Fair may have helped Australia transition through the 1970s, but in 2024, has it outstayed its welcome?</p> <h2>How do you pick a national anthem?</h2> <p>A national anthem is a government-authorised song performed at official occasions and celebrations. It unifies people and reinforces national identity. Often, governments nominate a tune by searching through historical patriotic songs to find a <a href="https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/golden-oldie">golden oldie</a> with known public appeal.</p> <p>For example, the lyrics of the Japanese anthem <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kimigayo">Kimigayo</a> came from pre-10th-century poetry. Germany’s anthem <a href="https://www.britannica.com/topic/Deutschlandlied">Deutschlandlied</a> adopted a 1797 melody from renowned composer <a href="https://www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Haydn">Joseph Haydn</a>. An enduring song or text offers star quality, proven popularity and the prestige of age.</p> <p>In the 1970s, Australia’s attempt at finding a golden oldie was flawed. In that era, many believed Australia’s birth occurred at the arrival of explorer <a href="https://www.britannica.com/biography/James-Cook">James Cook</a> in 1770. Hence, we narrowed our search to hymns, marches and fanfares from our colonial history for possible anthems.</p> <p>With 2020s hindsight (pun intended), <a href="https://theconversation.com/our-national-anthem-is-non-inclusive-indigenous-australians-shouldnt-have-to-sing-it-118177">expecting First Nations</a> people to sing Advance Australia Fair was hypocritical. We wanted to raise Australia’s visibility internationally, yet the custodians of the lands and waterways were unseen by our country’s eyes. We championed “history’s page” with a 19th-century song that participated in racial discrimination.</p> <h2>Changing anthems</h2> <p>With a half-century on the scoreboard, are we locked in to singing Advance Australia Fair forever? No.</p> <p>Anthems can change. Just ask <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Morrison_(jazz_musician)">James Morrison</a>. In 2003, the Australian trumpeter played the Spanish national anthem beautifully at the <a href="https://www.daviscup.com/en/home.aspx">Davis Cup</a> tennis final. Unfortunately, he <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2003-11-28/spanish-angry-over-anthem-mix-up/1516684">played the old anthem</a> that heralded civil war.</p> <p>Morrison’s accidental performance incited a fist-shaking dignitary and an enraged Spanish team who temporarily refused to play. Morrison did, however, to his embarrassment, later receive some excited fan mail from Spanish revolutionists.</p> <p>If we want to change our anthem, where could we begin? We could start by revisiting the golden-oldie approach with a more inclusive ear. Perhaps there’s a song from contemporary First Nations musicians we could consider, or a song from their enduring oral tradition that they deem appropriate (and grant permission to use).</p> <p>If we have learnt anything from Australian history, it’s that we must include and ask – not exclude and take.</p> <p>We could also consider Bruce Woodley and Dobe Newton’s 1987 song <a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/collection/curated/asset/101146-i-am-australian-various">I Am Australian</a>, which reached golden-oldie status last year when the <a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/slip-slop-slap-i-am-australian-join-sounds-australia">National Film and Sound Archive</a> added it to their registry. The lyrics show the acknowledgement and respect of First Nations people that our current anthem lacks. The line “we are one, but we are many” captures the inclusivity with diversity we now value.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KrLTe1_9zso?wmode=transparent&start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>I Am Australian wouldn’t be a problem-free choice. Musically, the style is a “light rock” song, not a grand “hymn”, which could be a plus or minus depending on your view. Lyrically, romanticising convicted killer <a href="https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/kelly-edward-ned-3933">Ned Kelly</a> is controversial, and mispronouncing “Australians” could be considered inauthentic (fair dinkum Aussies say “Au-strail-yins”, not “Au-stray-lee-uhns”).</p> <p>That said, Australians are quite experienced at patching holes in our anthem. Advance Australia Fair required many adjustments.</p> <p>If the golden-oldie approach fails again, how about composing a new anthem? We could adopt <a href="https://nationalanthems.info/ke.htm">Kenya’s approach</a> of commissioning an anthem, or could revive the good ol’ songwriting competition. Our past competitions weren’t fruitful, but surely our many talented musicians and poets today can meet the challenge.</p> <h2>It’s time to ask</h2> <p>Fifty years on, we acknowledge Advance Australia Fair as the anthem that moved our nation forward. That was the first and hardest step. Today, if Australians choose, we can retire the song gracefully and try again with a clearer voice.</p> <p>Changing our anthem begins with asking whether the current song really declares who we are. Have our values, our perspectives and our identity changed in half a century?</p> <p>Australia, it’s your song. Are you happy to sing Advance Australia Fair for another 50 years? <img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/226737/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/wendy-hargreaves-1373285">Wendy Hargreaves</a>, Senior Learning Advisor, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-southern-queensland-1069">University of Southern Queensland</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/50-years-on-advance-australia-fair-no-longer-reflects-the-values-of-many-what-could-replace-it-226737">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Images: Shutterstock | Wikimedia Commons</em></p>

Music

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Christchurch attack victims' families reflect on tragedy five years on

<p>It's been five years since 51 men, women and children, were murdered in a terror attack when a white supremacist opened fire at Al Noor and Linwood mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.</p> <p>Now, the victims' families have reflected on the tragic day, and commemorated their loved ones on the five-year anniversary of the attacks.</p> <p>Dr Maysoon Salama, who lost her son Atta Elayyan, 33, relives the grief of losing her son every day.</p> <p>“The pain is still fresh,” she told <em>7NEWS</em>.</p> <p>Five years on, the good memories she shared with her son still play back in her mind.</p> <p>“Atta was an amazing son,” she said. “He’s touched the lives of so many people.”</p> <p>Despite the tragedy, Dr Salama remains strong and finds herself healing through her granddaughter Aya.</p> <p>“I feel like I see her father when I see her,” she said.</p> <p>“It’s a really hard journey ... but she has always been my focus.”</p> <p>Aya was two when she lost her father, and Dr Salama was faced with the heartbreaking task of helping her granddaughter adjust to a life without her father.</p> <p>“When I look her in the eyes and she will ask, ‘Where is my dad?’, what am I going to tell her?” she recalled thinking.</p> <p>“How are we going to tell her when she’s so attached to her daddy? She loved him so much.”</p> <p>Dr Salama's husband, Mohammad Alayan, was among the dozens of people hospitalised following the attack, with doctors at the time saying he was “lucky to survive”.</p> <p>“He had been shot twice. One in his head and it affected his vision and one in his shoulder and she said it was just a few millimetres away from his heart,” Maysoon said.</p> <p>The couple run a Muslim childcare centre An-Nur, and have worked together to help children navigate New Zealand's darkest days.</p> <p>She recalled the sinking feeling when she first heard of the attacks while at work, and how her husband's first instinct was to tell her to protect herself and everyone at the childcare centre.</p> <p>“I got a call from my husband and he told me he was in hospital and that I have a big responsibility to protect the children and the teachers and lock down, close the doors because he was afraid the shooter would also come to our place because we are a Muslim childcare centre,” she said.</p> <p>“More families who were distressed started coming to pick up their children, and some of them even had blood on their shirts, some of them witnessed the thing.</p> <p>“It was really an awful situation.”</p> <p>Not long after, she learned that her own son had also been injured, but at the time had no idea of the reality of it all.</p> <p>Aya Al-Umari lost her brother, Hussein, on the fateful day.</p> <p>“It happened so suddenly, I had no time to grieve,” she said.</p> <p>Hussein spent the last moments of his life protecting other people, and even though Aya misses his hugs more than anything, she takes comfort in knowing that her brother's legacy will live on.</p> <p>“He had the opportunity to escape, but he didn’t,” she said.</p> <p>“He was running towards the terrorist.</p> <p>“It really goes to show, especially in his last moments, he was always a giver.”</p> <p>Both Aya and Dr Salama both take comfort in the belief that their loved ones died as as a Shahid – a true martyr who died in the name of their faith in Islam.</p> <p>Dr Salama hopes that the findings from last year’s coronial inquest, expected to be handed down this year, will provide a sense of closure to the victims' families.</p> <p>She also hopes that people will use the fifth anniversary of the shootings to reflect on the work that is yet to be done and call for more action in fighting Islamophobia and extremism.</p> <p>“We can fight Islamophobia by challenging the biases and educating ourselves also and intervening against discrimination.</p> <p>“See something, say something.”</p> <p>Canterbury's Muslim community will also gather today to honour the victims with a commemoration service at Masjid Annur in the evening, according to<em> <a href="https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/511744/muslims-mark-5th-anniversary-of-christchurch-mosque-terror-attacks" target="_blank" rel="noopener">RNZ</a></em>.</p> <p>Brenton Tarrant, who was behind the terror attacks, was sentenced to life in jail without parole – the first person in New Zealand's history to receive the sentence because his actions were deemed "so wicked".</p> <p><em>Images: 7News</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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"My heart exploded": Larry Emdur reflects on his daughter's wedding day

<p>Larry Emdur has opened up about his daughter's wedding day, reflecting on the moment he walked her down the aisle. </p> <p>On <em>The Morning Show</em>, the proud dad shared the details of the day with his co-host Kylie Gillies, while telling the stories behind the charming photos of the big day. </p> <p>Emdur's daughter Tia, 24, tied the knot with her long-term boyfriend Rowell Jauco at Sydney's St Mary's Cathedral on Saturday. </p> <p>“Tia got married — I got to walk her down the aisle,” Larry said on the show, becoming clearly emotional. </p> <p>“At the end of the aisle, I had to put her hand in Rohan’s hand."</p> <p>“It was a magnificent day — so much love, and it was special — my heart exploded.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C28i_qDL7gr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C28i_qDL7gr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by The Morning Show On 7 (@morningshowon7)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Larry joked that years of walking down the red carpet at the Logies set him up for walking his beautiful daughter down the aisle.</p> <p>“You look for moments, one thing after another — It was a beautiful day.”</p> <p>“(Tia) was pretty happy. She said on the day ‘I get to marry my best friend’ so it was special."</p> <p>“The speeches were lovely, coming together with the family. It was everything — I’m sure when other people get married, it’s the same."</p> <p>He went on to joke about how emotional he was all day, saying he needed “Five boxes of Kleenexes.”</p> <p>Larry shared photos and a sweet video from the big day to his Instagram on Sunday, showing a clip from his father-daughter dance with Tia, in which they danced to Lean On Me which was performed by Guy Sebastian. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram / The Morning Show</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Matt Shirvington reflects on becoming a father

<p>Matt Shirvington has reflected on the moment he knew he was going to become a father, and the "life-changing" decision he had to make about his future. </p> <p>The <em>Sunrise</em> co-host recalled when his wife Jessica told him she was pregnant 18 years ago with the couple's first child when they were living abroad in London. </p> <p>The couple then had to decide if they would stay in the UK when their first child was born, or return home to Australia. </p> <p>Chatting with <a href="https://7news.com.au/sunrise/sunrise-star-matt-shirvington-opens-up-on-family-and-fatherhood-c-11769794" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>7Life</em></a>, Shirvo said, “We were living in London doing our own thing and we’d always planned to have a family but it was just an amazing surprise.”</p> <p>“It was a game changer for us because we were living in London and, although we had kind of had family come and go over there, we were away from home.”</p> <p>Ultimately, Matt and Jess chose to stay in London to welcome their elder daughter, Sienna, and remained there until Jess was expecting their second child.</p> <p>“Sienna was about two years old and Jess was actually pregnant when we came home and we had our second baby here in Australia,” Shirvo explains.</p> <p>The proud parents now have three children, Sienna, 17, Winnie, 15 and Lincoln, five.</p> <p>Acknowledging the age gap with their youngest, Shirvo says it’s a “different dynamic in our family, but a great one”.</p> <p>Now a seasoned dad celebrating his 17th Father's Day, Shirvo said the arrival of his first child changed his life "completely". </p> <p>He explained that they went “from being a couple to having someone else in your life that you have to look after”.</p> <p>“After that it’s kind of like, ‘Well, we’ve done this before we can do it again’... It’s pretty special.”</p> <p>Reflecting on his years of fatherhood, Shirvo says watching his kids grow up and finding their life passions has been what he loves most.</p> <p>“I’ve watched my kids grow up and see them have a passion for something and invest themselves and love something so much,” he shares.</p> <p>“As a parent, you’d do anything to allow them to do it and allow that to blossom."</p> <p>“That’s the bit that really gets me.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Family & Pets

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Olivia Newton-John's daughter reflects on her mother's life, one year after her death

<p>Olivia Newton-John's daughter has opened up about her grief journey on the one year anniversary of her mother's death. </p> <p>Chloe Lattanzi spoke candidly with <a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/stellar/world-exclusive-chloe-lattanzi-on-the-first-anniversary-of-olivia-newtonjohns-death/news-story/9fcd4dccc2113fabbbe508e9c92520ee" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Stellar</em></a> magazine about what the last year has looked like for her and her family, as they still struggle with the reality of losing a loved one. </p> <p>Since Olivia's death last year, Chloe and her husband James moved into Olivia's ranch in California, where Chloe says she still feels the healing presence of her late mother. </p> <p>"I feel like she’s still alive," she said. "Even though I feel her around me in spirit, it’s a tangible place where I feel my mother."</p> <p>"I can walk on the soil and be like, her foot was here. I can sit on her favourite seat and know that she sat there a thousand times, and visualise sitting on her lap. It’s the last place she lived, where she crossed and I held her hand. She’s still alive there for me.”</p> <p>Chloe shared that the outpouring of love after Olivia's passing was overwhelming, as fans from around the world sent their thoughts and messages of love. </p> <p>“I got absolute oceans of love and support and connection. I’m kind of isolated on the ranch, and I’d have fans reaching out: ‘If you ever need anything, anyone to talk to… we love you so much.’"</p> <p>"It was the lifeboat, and beautiful in a way, all these people sending so much love to our family and loving my mother. They really lifted me out of dark places."</p> <p>Chloe is determined to carry on her mother's philanthropic work through the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness &amp; Research Centre at Melbourne’s Austin Hospital, and the annual Walk for Wellness event, which will be celebrating 10 years in October. </p> <p>Since her mother's passing, Chloe and her family have worked tirelessly to continue her mother's legacy, and encourage others to get involved in the cause.</p> <p>“It means everything. [Olivia] said, ‘You’re going to carry the torch for me, darling, but you’re going to shine your own unique light.’ I want to rally and encourage everyone to get together, like my mum did."</p> <p>On the anniversary of Olivia's death, Chloe said she is sure she will feel "shattered", but will surround herself with loved ones and bask in happy memories of her mother. </p> <p>“I’m going to be spending the day with a mother figure, going to do the things that my mum liked to do. When I think about the day, it quite honestly just shatters me. That’s the truth. It shatters me. But I know that she’s guiding me and she’s with me."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Family & Pets

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Kate Ritchie reflects on special moment with John Farnham

<p>Kate Ritchie has recalled the moment she met John Farnham on the set of <em>Home &amp; Away</em>, in a moment that made her feel like "the luckiest little girl in Australia”.</p> <p>The former Aussie soap star shared the touching tribute as part of <em>7NEWS Spotlight’s The Lost Tapes of John Farnham</em>, as she revealed how much the iconic singer means to her. </p> <p>Ritchie first met Farnham in 1998, as the pair filmed a special episode of <em>Home &amp; Away</em> in which Ritchie, who played nine-year-old Sally Fletcher, was lucky enough to meet her idol, during what was to become an iconic Australian TV moment.</p> <p>“I think we forget how big John Farnham was,” Ritchie told <em>Spotlight’s</em> Michael Usher. “Not only was he an incredible talent and so likeable, I feel as though he represented what Australia was all about."</p> <p>“Not only was he our soundtrack, but he was the guy you wanted to be friends with.”</p> <p>Since filming the episode with Farnham 25 years ago, Ritchie says he’s touched her life in a very special way.</p> <p>“I remember I was the luckiest little girl in Australia,” she said. “The story was that Sally Fletcher won tickets to see Johnny perform but at the last minute she got an awful case of the chicken pox and because he is such a great guy ... he decided to come back to Summer Bay and visit Sally Fletcher in her pyjamas.”</p> <p>After the two filmed the special episode together, Ritchie said she has never forgotten that moment.</p> <p>“He made the child that I was feel like I was the important person on set that day,” she said. “It was like he had come to see me and he needed my help.”</p> <p>Even now, 25 years later, Ritchie is still one of the country’s biggest Farnham fans.</p> <p>“It’s really nice to talk about it,” she said. “I’ve bored my family over the years and (his 1990 hit) <em>Burn For You</em> is a bit of a favourite.</p> <p>“I think that if you’re celebrating the nation we live in ... and you’re not playing John Farnham, you’re not doing it correctly.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: 7News Spotlight</em></p>

Music

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“I stepped away from my life”: Emma Watson’s candid birthday admission

<p dir="ltr">Emma Watson has shared an honest admission about the last few years of her life in the wake of her 33rd birthday. </p> <p dir="ltr">The <em>Harry Potter</em> star took to Instagram to share a series of portraits, as she returned to the public eye to share what she had been up to in her personal life. </p> <p dir="ltr">Watson’s last acting credit dates back to 2019 when she starred in Greta Gerwig’s adaptation of <em>Little Women</em>, and ever since Watson has taken a step back from Hollywood. </p> <p dir="ltr">The British actress admitted she had wanted to extend her “Covid cocoon” after sharing why she “stepped away” from her life. </p> <p dir="ltr">“This is 33. Holy moly. Before 29 I hadn’t even heard of a Saturn Return as a concept. Let’s just say that now I am well acquainted,” she wrote on Monday night.</p> <p dir="ltr">In astrology, the term “Saturn return” refers to when the planet Saturn has moved all the way through the zodiac back to the place where it was at the time of a person’s birth.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CrEw26NP9zE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CrEw26NP9zE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Emma Watson (@emmawatson)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Getting candid about the highs and lows of the past couple of years, Watson said she learned to surf “badly,” rode horses, has done “a lot of therapy”, filmed the <em>Harry Potter</em> reunion, and “said goodbye to my Grandma and Grandpa.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She went on to say she “felt really sad and really p***ed off about a lot of things.” </p> <p dir="ltr">“I learned more about love and being a woman. It took me three years but I have finally figured out a daily practice and can actually keep it for more than a few days in a row.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“These pictures were actually taken on my birthday last year, but I wasn’t ready to come out of my COVID Cocoon. Today I feel 🦋🦋🦋🦋.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Watson signed off by showing her gratitude to her loved ones who have supported her recent journey of self-discovery. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Thank you to the witches in my coven who were so pivotal in helping me arrive at where and who I am now,” she wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You are my Avengers and you inspire me and kick ass. It takes a village, don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While Watson’s previous Instagram post was in December 2022, she previously kept her personal life away from the platform, only posting as an ambassador for Prada or sharing updates on her short film.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Caring

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"I still don't know what I did wrong": Susan Sarandon reflects on breaking royal protocol

<p dir="ltr">Susan Sarandon has opened up her brush with royalty, and how she was slammed for "breaking royal protocol". </p> <p dir="ltr">The 76-year-old actress recalled attending the Royal Windsor Cup at Guards Polo Club with her youngest son in 2018, where she met Queen Elizabeth. </p> <p dir="ltr">Sarandon said she was given conflicting advice about what to do when she came face-to-face with Her Majesty, as she explains in the documentary Portrait of the Queen.</p> <p dir="ltr">"[When] I got to to England and my friends were like, 'do not bow, whatever you do don't bow, that is so passe'," Sarandon recalled.</p> <p dir="ltr">"You know, there's this push and pull about whether and how much respect you're going to give to the royal family and whatever. They said to me 'don't bow. Do not bow' and I thought, 'well, I'm going to be respectful'."</p> <p dir="ltr">When the day arrived, Sarandon and her son Miles were seated in a different section, where she received a briefing from a royal aide before the Queen arrived for their meeting. </p> <p dir="ltr">"They said: 'Don't ask her any questions. [If] she talks to you, it's okay but don't ask her anything. And this is what you have to do, you know, bow when she comes'," Sarandon recalls.</p> <p dir="ltr">"So I'm all stressed out, I think, 'am I going to bow or am I not going to bow?'</p> <p dir="ltr">"So anyway, the moment came when they finally said: 'Okay, it's your turn to meet the Queen'. And here is what happened - she was sitting down!</p> <p dir="ltr">"So of course, I had to bend over to shake her hand and so it looked like a curtsy. So, at the end of the day, I kind of did bow and the headlines still said after all of that, that I had gone against protocol somehow. I still don't know what I did wrong."</p> <p dir="ltr">At the time, the British press condemned the actress for breaking royal protocol by initiating a handshake with the Queen. </p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the semantics of their meeting, Sarandon said her brief encounter with Her Majesty was perfectly pleasant. </p> <p dir="ltr">"She was lovely to me," Sarandon says.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I don't think we had a very long conversation. I think it was kind of just 'Oh, it's so nice to meet you'. And, and I said 'it's so nice to meet you'. And I remembered that you can't ask her anything."</p> <p dir="ltr">"So that definitely puts a damper on your conversation because she has to be in charge of everything."</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 4pt;"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Do emoji reflect our emotions, or are we just putting on a brave face?

<p>As if human communications weren’t complicated enough. Researchers are saying people also use emoji to reflect or mask their internal emotional state, depending on the context and accepted social rules <a href="https://emojipedia.org/confused-face/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😕</a></p> <p>As we all know, in face-to-face communication, a person may choose to “mask” their true internal feelings in certain situations, like receiving an unwanted gift. They might smile, or display positive facial expressions, contradicting their true feelings. And such displays are often governed by expected social norms and differ according to culture <a href="https://emojipedia.org/face-in-clouds/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😶‍🌫️</a>. </p> <p>Moyu Liu from the University of Tokyo was curious about whether emoji used in online communications – on social media, texting or email – work the same way <a href="https://emojipedia.org/thinking-face/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">🤔</a>.</p> <p>Just like facial expressions, emoji can represent or mask emotions, <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1035742/full" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Liu’s study found</a>.  However negative emoji are more likely to represent a persons true feelings.</p> <p>Liu says “with online socializing becoming ever more prevalent, it is important to consider whether it is causing us to become more detached from our true emotions.” </p> <p>“Do people require a ‘shelter’ to express their genuine emotions, and is it possible to break free from pretence and share our true selves in online settings?”</p> <p>More than 1,200 Japanese participants were recruited for the study, aged 10 – 29 years, and all users of a popular downloaded emoji keyboard<a href="https://emojipedia.org/keyboard/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">⌨️</a> in Japan called Simeji.</p> <p>Particpants were asked to respond as they normally would to a set of private and public messages, while also rating the intensity of their emotions.</p> <p>The study shows people use emoji in a similar way to facial expressions.</p> <p>Positive faces <a href="https://emojipedia.org/hugging-face/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">🤗</a><a href="https://emojipedia.org/grinning-face-with-big-eyes/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😃</a><a href="https://emojipedia.org/smiling-face-with-smiling-eyes/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😊</a> were used in both positive contexts, and negative contexts where the user wanted to cover their true emotional state.</p> <p>However, negative emoji strongly reflected intense negative emotions <a href="https://emojipedia.org/pouting-face/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😡</a><a href="https://emojipedia.org/face-with-steam-from-nose/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">😤</a>.</p> <p>People were more likely to truly express their emotions using emoji in private, rather than public communication.</p> <p>And they were more likely to use masking emoji – not matching their emotions – when dealing with high status individuals. And in general, were less likely to use emoji in these contexts <a href="https://emojipedia.org/zipper-mouth-face/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">🤐</a>.</p> <p>Liu emphasized that the study should be expanded in the future to include a broader span of demographics and consider different cultural contexts. The Simeji keyboard is extremely popular among young women, which skewed the sample towards women and younger participants. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=238355&amp;title=Do+emoji+reflect+our+emotions%2C+or+are+we+just+putting+on+a+brave+face%3F" width="1" height="1" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></em></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/do-emoji-reflect-our-emotions/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Petra Stock. </em></p> </div>

Technology

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"An extraordinary experience": Daryl Braithwaite reflects on Harry Styles concert

<p>Daryl Braithwaite has shared what it was like sharing the stage with Harry Styles during his sold-out Australian tour. </p> <p>The Aussie music icon<a href="https://oversixty.com.au/entertainment/music/daryl-braithwaite-joins-harry-styles-on-stage-for-a-show-stopping-performance" target="_blank" rel="noopener"> joined Styles on stage</a> during his final show in Australia, at Sydney's Accor Stadium, where the pair performed a duet of Daryl's 1990 cover of <em>The Horses</em> in front of 70,000 people. </p> <p>Braithwaite took to Facebook to recount the experience, as he described the performance as "extraordinary". </p> <p>"This all started in Perth on Monday 20th February, 21 days ago. During that time I have had such an extraordinary experience," he said.</p> <p>"My thanks to all the people that have passed on such lovely comments to me over that period. Thank you Harry for the great thrill and pleasure that it gave me and your lovely army to sing <em>The Horses</em> with you."</p> <p><iframe style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDarylBraithwaite%2Fposts%2Fpfbid02n3RPgqahuBKWbUgotb182kLk2C3YVYn3TfGgwPw1nuHr8jGPazLYnS4zE7bricgRl&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=500" width="500" height="684" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>The post prompted an outpouring of love from fans of both Braithwaite and Styles, as many called for the duo to collaborate again. </p> <p>“Great that Harry got to meet one of Australia’s top music legends,” one fan wrote.</p> <p>“Still love you Daryl, as I did from when I was 14.”</p> <p>"I’d love to hear and see the pair of you sitting down with just a guitar singing some sweet tunes," wrote another.</p> <p>Another fan said, “Such a pleasure to watch you on stage with Harry, such joy you shared and we all felt it, thank you.”</p> <div class="embed" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; width: 610px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7206678993213426945&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40yourislandgyalmb%2Fvideo%2F7206678993213426945%3Fembed_source%3D121331973%252C120811592%252C120810756%253Bnull%253Bembed_name%26refer%3Dembed%26referer_url%3Dcdn.embedly.com%252Fwidgets%252Fmedia.html%253Fsrc%253Dhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.tiktok.com%25252Fembed%25252Fv2%25252F7206678993213426945%2526display_name%253Dtiktok%2526url%253Dhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.tiktok.com%25252F%252540yourislandgyalmb%25252Fvideo%25252F7206678993213426945%2526image%253Dhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%25252Fobj%25252Ftos-alisg-p-0037%25252F15d698da8fda4e8e9aea6713dcd8c6bf_1677935718%25253Fx-expires%25253D1678075200%252526x-signature%25253Dn3BzCrm7n9lxLVMnztJiIKKoiTA%2525253D%2526key%253D59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203%2526type%253Dtext%25252Fhtml%2526schema%253Dtiktok%26referer_video_id%3D7206678993213426945&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2F15d698da8fda4e8e9aea6713dcd8c6bf_1677935718%3Fx-expires%3D1678860000%26x-signature%3DRRxbHXrpFr9%252Fo64W7ZEtImKNGZg%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p>Many noted that in his Sherbet days, Braithwaite was as much a teen icon as Styles is now.</p> <div> <p>“Daryl, I remember a time when you got the same attention as Harry does,” one fan noted, adding heart-eye emojis.</p> <p>“If only Harry knew and appreciated that YOU were the heart throb of my teens,” another noted.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook</em></p> </div>

Music

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Aussie survivors reflect on the Bali bombings 20 years on

<p>On October 12th 2002, three bombs were detonated in two Bali hotspots which resulted in the death of 202 people, 88 of whom were Australian.</p> <p>It was the single largest loss of Australian life due to an act of terror.</p> <p>Now, 20 years on from the tragedy, survivors told <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/bali-bombings-20-year-anniversary-survivors-rescuers-victims-stories/8f6a1661-e377-4ce9-aa17-204d67ca065c" target="_blank" rel="noopener">9News</a> their inspirational yet harrowing stories of survival, and how their lives have changed since since that fateful day two decades ago. </p> <p><strong>Therese</strong></p> <p>After suffering devastating burns to 85 percent of her body, Therese Fox has fought valiantly through hundreds of skin grafts, life-threatening infections and agonising physiotherapy.</p> <p>Therese spent a year in hospital and defied doctor's expectations to survive, only to be confronted with the reality of survivor's guilt. </p> <p>Two decades on, she is still haunted by the loss of her good friend Bronwyn Cartwright and dozens of others.</p> <p>"I could go through my burns a hundred times over. The guilt of survival is the hardest thing to live with," Fox said, before breaking down in the face of the overwhelming emotion of her first return to Bali.</p> <p><strong>Ashleigh</strong></p> <p>When Ashleigh Airlie was just 14-years-old, she was faced with the trauma of losing her mother Gayle, who was killed in the terror attack. </p> <p>Four other mothers were holidaying in Bali with their teenage daughters, who were in the back of the Sari Club when the second bomb went off. </p> <p>It was just two days before Ashleigh's 15th birthday when she was buried under the collapsing roof and leaving her grasping for strangers' legs to make it out to the street.</p> <p>"When I think about it, that's the last place I had a good time with my mum," Ashleigh, now 34, told 9News.</p> <p>"It was the last place we had fun and she was having the time of her life."</p> <p><strong>Peter</strong></p> <p>When Peter Hughes was interviewed from his hospital bed, he unknowingly became the Australian face of the Bali bombing tragedy, which left him feeling "a little bit embarrassed about it all".</p> <p>"I was dying at the time and I knew that," he said, describing the interview as a chance to show his son Leigh that he was ok, even though he knew he wasn't.</p> <p>"I was just hanging on back then."</p> <p>While appearing on TV, Peter was swollen and barely able to breathe, but seemed unconcerned about his injuries. </p> <p>He slipped into a coma days later with burns to more than half his body. </p> <p>Now, he still struggled with the physical and mental effects of surviving the attack, but that doesn't stop him from returning to Bali several times a year. </p> <p><strong>Andrew</strong></p> <p>While Andrew Csabi was laying in the street dying outside the smoking ruins of the Sari Club, he gave himself the last rites. </p> <p>"I looked down, I said, 'my leg's blown off' and I couldn't believe it," he said.</p> <p>"I laid there quietly and I issued myself last rights."</p> <p><strong>Natalie and Nicole</strong></p> <p>Nicole McLean and Natalie Goold were just 23 when the bombs went off in Bali. </p> <p>After Nicole lost her right arm and suffered horrific leg injuries in the attack, Natalie fought to save the life of her friend in an act that saw her <span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant-caps: inherit; caret-color: #333333; color: #333333;">became one of only four people awarded the Star of Courage medal in the </span>Bali honours list.</p> <p>"She was just a force to be reckoned with. She knew where we had to go, where we had to be, and she wasn't leaving my side," McLean said.</p> <p>"She was ripping people's t-shirts off them and shoving them in my leg to stop the blood."</p> <p>Nicole McLean had survived the horror of the Sari Club and made it onto an RAAF jet that could get her back to Australia within hours.</p> <p><em>Image credits: 9News</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Julia Gillard reflects on her famous misogyny speech 10 years on

<p>On October 9th 2012, former Prime Minister Julia Gillard confronted then Liberal leader Tony Abbott on sexism in the government after two years of unrelenting misogyny. </p> <p>Standing before her opposition in the House of Representatives, Gillard's misogyny speech made waves around the world, and became a battle cry for women everywhere to not accept sexism at the hands of powerful men in the workplace. </p> <p>On that day 10 years ago, she told Abbott in front of parliament, “I will not be lectured about sexism and misogyny by this man, I will not." </p> <p>“If he wants to know what misogyny looks like in modern Australia he doesn’t need a motion in the House of Representatives, he needs a mirror."</p> <p>“The leader of the opposition should think seriously about the role of women in public life and in Australian society because we are entitled to a better standard than this.”</p> <p>Ms Gillard has now reflected on her famous speech after a decade, telling Lisa Wilkinson on <em>The Project </em>that the speech "almost never happened". </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">It's been 10 years since then-Prime Minister Julia Gillard's misogyny-blasting speech made waves around the world. <a href="https://twitter.com/JuliaGillard?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@JuliaGillard</a> joins us to tell us what's changed since then and what more needs to be done in politics. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheProjectTV?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheProjectTV</a> <a href="https://t.co/7LomRPxY1u">pic.twitter.com/7LomRPxY1u</a></p> <p>— The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1579021560798908416?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 9, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>She came to this revelation while writing her book, titled <em>Not Now, Not Ever</em>, in which she discusses the book and what need to be done to end misogyny. </p> <p>“I always thought that I’d remembered every moment of that day because it was obviously a big one and I’d been asked about it so many times."</p> <p>“But when I was putting the <em>Not Now, Not Ever</em> book together I consulted my then chief of staff Ben Hubbard who reminded me that when Tony Abbott leapt to his feet to speak to the motion I wandered over to the adviser’s box and said to Ben and the other advisers there, ‘I’m going to take the reply’ and they said, ‘Oh really are you going to do that?’ </p> <p>“Because normally I kind of held myself above these day to day political tactics and I sort of thought about it, considered not doing it and then decided I would because I was sick of all the ... I will use the word nonsense. All the nonsense.”</p> <p>“Use the real word,” one of the show’s hosts interjected.</p> <p>“I will get beeped. I don’t want to get beeped on TV,” Ms Gillard joked.</p> <p>The “nonsense”, as she put it, included such comments as those made about her by radio broadcaster Alan Jones that “her father died of shame” and she “should be put in a chaff bag and thrown into sea”.</p> <p>In the years since her misogyny speech, Gillard believes Australia is finally calling out sexism and misogyny, and not tolerating inequality between men and women anymore. </p> <p>“I think what we are doing better is naming and shaming when we see sexism and misogyny,” she said.</p> <p>“I think it’s impossible to imagine that a woman in parliament could be called the things I was without there being an uproar and political consequences.</p> <p>“I think women’s voices, women’s issues are much more shaping of federal politics.” </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

TV

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Kate Bush reflects on hit song revival

<p dir="ltr">British singer-songwriter Kate Bush has reflected on a new generation of fans discovering her music that was made popular in the 1980s. </p> <p dir="ltr">After appearing in the highly-anticipated new season of the Netflix series <em>Stranger Things</em>, Bush’s 1985 hit song <em>Running Up That Hill</em> has found itself back in the top 10 of the international music charts. </p> <p dir="ltr">In a rare interview, the singer told <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007qlvb">BBC’s Woman’s Hour</a> radio show how wonderful it has been to have a new legion of younger fans. </p> <p dir="ltr">She said, “Well it’s just extraordinary. I mean, you know, it’s such a great series, I thought that the track would get some attention. But I just never imagined that it would be anything like this. It’s so exciting. But it’s quite shocking really, isn’t it? I mean, the whole world’s gone mad.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She added, “What’s really wonderful I think is this is a whole new audience who, in a lot of cases, they’ve never heard of me and I love that. The thought of all these really young people hearing the song for the first time and discovering it is, well, I think it’s very special.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Bush also discussed the meaning of the song and how it has been reinterpreted by the show, giving the track a new life. </p> <p dir="ltr">She said, “I really like people to hear a song and take from it what they want. But originally it was written as the idea of a man and a woman swapping with each other. Just to feel what it was like, from the other side.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She also revealed that the show led her to listen to <em>Running Up That Hill</em> for the first time in a long while, admitting “I never listen to my old stuff.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“But then you know, when things like this come along, I’m normally involved in something like you know, maybe doing an edit or revisiting the track for some kind of other reason, I’m working on it. So yeah, I hadn’t heard it for a really long time.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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“I am one of the group”: Francis Coppola reflects as ‘The Godfather’ turns 50

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">American writer and director Francis Ford Coppola has made dozens of films and gone on to win five Academy Awards and six Golden Globes, but </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Godfather</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> may just be his crowning achievement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the first film in the trilogy celebrating its 50th anniversary, the acclaimed director shared the dramatic effects its success had on his life in an exclusive interview with </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.empireonline.com/movies/news/francis-ford-coppola-godfather-at-50-changed-my-life-exclusive/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Empire</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> magazine.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Well, it’s odd, of course. To think that 50 years has gone by since the adventure of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Godfather</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and when that changed my life so dramatically,” he told the publication. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Because now the Coppola family is considered synonymous with [the film by] many people, [but] when I came to LA, to UCLA Film School, I just dreamed to get a peek inside a studio.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Movies were an exotic fairyland.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While making the film and in the leadup to its initial release, Coppola was under financial pressure to support his wife and kids. But, its debut in 1972 - prompting lengthy queues just to buy tickets - saw Coppola’s fortunes change drastically.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I went from having zero money at all and a family to support, to having several million dollars, which was astonishing,” he recalled. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“No one in my family had that kind of money. I went from being unknown and poor with a lot of family responsibilities - I was married young and I loved my kids and my family - to having some money and acclaim. I was famous, everyone knew about </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Godfather</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and everyone knew about me.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Godfather</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> certainly provided Coppola with fame and wealth, the 82-year-old says it gave him something else he had always wanted: a sense of belonging.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The way I look at it, I always wanted to be one of the group,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As first, I was an outsider, and I wasn’t included in the group because I was a new kid, or I was poor. Then I became famous, and a success, so I still wasn’t one of the group.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In my heart, all I ever really wanted was to be considered one of the group, which I am now because when they talk about all the big directors of the ‘70s, they say George Lucas and Francis Coppola and Marty Scorsese and Steven Spielberg and Brian De Palma and Paul Schrader.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“So I have what I want - I am one of the group.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Trailer for the 50th anniversary of Francis Ford Coppola's masterpiece ‘The Godfather’, which will be released in select theatres on February 25 <a href="https://t.co/7vgsBADsF1">pic.twitter.com/7vgsBADsF1</a></p> — Lost In Film (@LostInFilm) <a href="https://twitter.com/LostInFilm/status/1481648113307701259?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 13, 2022</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To celebrate the film’s milestone, Paramount Pictures and Coppola’s production company American Zoetrope have restored the trilogy - which will be released in 4K Ultra HD for the first time in March this year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We felt privileged to restore these films and a little in awe every day we worked on them,” </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://thelatch.com.au/the-godfather-50th-anniversary-australia/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Andrea Kalas, the senior vice president of Paramount Archives.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We were able to witness first-hand how the brilliant cinematography, score, production design, costume design, editing, performances, and, of course, screenwriting and direction became famously more than the sum of their parts.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was our commitment to honour all of the filmmakers’ exceptional work.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Godfather 50th Anniversary</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will be released in select cinemas from February 25, 2022.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Vivien Killilea (Getty Images) / Silver Screen Collection (Getty Images)</span></em></p>

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“No space for self-doubt”: Rehana reflects on Making It to the final five

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This week’s episode of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Making It Australia</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> saw our remaining five crafters continue to make things on a huge scale. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But only four would make it through to the next series of challenges, and Rehana was the next Maker to exit the show.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She sat down with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">OverSixty</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> to answer our crafty questions and tell us about her transition into starting her own creative business.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: What was the highlight of being a Maker?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Honestly, the highlight was everybody on set, from the makers to the cameraman to the producers to the wardrobe ladies. I think the highlight of the show was just stepping on set and feeling like I've met my people. We just connected so instantly that it sort of baffled me a little bit. I'm like, “Oh my gosh, how do I love every single one of you within five minutes of meeting you?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I guess when you’re on a set for two months, you’re away from your family and everything, but you know, they become your family. You just get through so much. And you experience so many things together you can't help but love one another. </span></p> <p><strong>O60: What surprised you most about your <em>Making It</em> experience?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The fact that I could get things done in eight hours. Eight hours is not a lot of time for crafting!</span></p> <p>O60: The last few episodes of Making It have involved crafting on a HUGE scale in a limited amount of time. Could you tell us a bit more about what that experience was like? </p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I'm a graphic designer, so I'm used to doing most of my work on a computer. All my crafting experience comes from like a lot of Pinterest tutorials and watching YouTube and Tik Tok and that sort of thing. And, you know, I had to force myself to start just making decisions. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I tend to think that maybe something's not good enough or I don't really know what I'm doing. But when you're under that eight-hour pressure, you have no choice but to commit and just believe in yourself. There's no space for self doubt. There's no space for thinking you're not going to be able to do it. You’ve just got to get it done.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845220/making-it-rehana1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5ffd148ac4594520baf92c957138ed1e" /></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Supplied</span></em></p> <p><strong>O60: What’s next for you after <em>Making It</em>?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So since leaving the show, I quit my job [and went] into my own business! </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I come from a really traditional background where you either become a doctor, an engineer, an accountant or a housewife. And so when I told my parents I wanted to be an artist or a creative, they were like, “Oh, are you sure you'd be able to make a living out of that?” then I'm like, “I'm not entirely sure I can!” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So graphic design to me was a nice medium where I could be creative in my work but also it paid the bills. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">[And] when I went on the show, I didn't think I'd go past the first week. I'm like, “I'm surrounded by people who do this for a living, I'm just a hobby crafter.” Sure, I do graphic design, but even then I don't really consider myself a great graphic designer. And you know, I learned that was wrong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So getting to be in the top four was honestly a surprise [so] if I look really shocked throughout the series it’s because I'm genuinely shocked that I'm still there. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">[And] even once they told me I was going home, I remember telling one of the judges that I felt like I'd already won, like I'd already proven to myself that I could do this and that I could impress people and I had people who thought the things that I was producing were worthy and of value. And that gave me the push that I needed to go full time into my </span><a href="https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/DayNightDusk"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Day Night Dusk</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> business and into my little design business. I ended up buying a laser cutter, I've ended up releasing two collections since we wrapped up filming on the show and in fact Christmas is coming up and I'm about to release a lovely little earring stand to commemorate coming off the show. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the end of the day I've been so fortunate to have the opportunity to realise that I am who I am and that's good enough. And that's valuable enough to launch myself into a career where I can support myself, being creative and enjoying the work that I do.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: <em>Making It</em> posed challenges that saw you use a whole range of different skills and techniques. Has it changed how you have gone about your creative practice since leaving the show?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Totally. I've been given a whole new I guess confidence in trying a lot of new things, and a lot of support as well. I mean, George's workshop is in Sydney, and she's been telling me she'll teach me how to weld for a while… I can’t wait to go to her workshop, she's got all these wacky machines that I can play with! </span></p> <p><strong>O60: Last but not least, if you had the chance, would you do it again?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Oh absolutely, a thousand times yes! </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It was such a great experience. And I remember when I first applied I'm like, “Oh, I don't think this is going to go anywhere.” And then when they did call me back to come for a moment, I was tempted to say no, because my son was 14 months, so he was still quite young. And my husband sat with me on the steps and I was like, “I don't think I'm gonna do it.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And he said to me, “If you don't do it, do you think you’d regret it?” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And I said, “Yes. I think I’ll regret it if I don't do this.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And I'm so glad that I went ahead and did it and I would encourage anyone else who’s interested to just give it a crack and see where it takes them.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVWPYnFhjoo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVWPYnFhjoo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by DayNightDusk by Rehana Badat (@day_night_dusk)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the finale draws ever closer, the remaining contestants will return to craft their hearts out on Saturday from 7pm.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Supplied</span></em></p>

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Maker Russell reflects on Making It experience

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Episode two of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Making It Australia</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> saw competitors embrace their inner child in two creative challenges.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the first-ever Team Challenge, the Makers came together to make functional billycarts, with Russell, Rehana, Dan, and Denise winning with their Beelycart.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT4MDN7Nbt0/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT4MDN7Nbt0/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Making It Australia (@makingitau)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rizaldy took out the Main Challenge with his magical forest cubby house.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, another person had to go, and this time it was Russell.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They sat down with </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">OverSixty</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and revealed their highlights of being on the show, as well as an insight into the show's unusual elimination process.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: What was the highlight of being a Maker?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I would say that the biggest highlight was the other Makers. To be with such talented people, it was such an experience, like, the creative energy when we were all together.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And we all got along so well, like we were all so different yet all so similar at the same time.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I don’t know how to explain it, it was as if we’ve known each other for years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We would have dinners and hang out together while we’re not filming. And it was so good because we got to talk about art, we got to talk about film, about music, and it just [had] so much positive energy.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: What surprised you most about your <em>Making It</em> experience?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The thing that probably surprised me the most [that] I could do more than what I thought I could.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sometimes when you look at someone else who’s talented or who’s really good at something, and you’re like, I can’t do that. But I realised when I got there … everyone was sort of positive and encouraging … and it made you want to try stuff.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And so I found out that I actually could do a lot of things that I didn’t think I could do.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: On the show you told Susie and Harvey that crafting is a way of representing your identity as a non-binary person. Could you tell us more about that and how it felt representing the queer community on the show?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yes of course. One of the reasons why I went on the show was I wanted to be a good representation for the queer community and to be someone that people can look to, because when I was younger, there wasn’t a lot of role models, as such, to look to. … you know, if there was someone like me when I was younger, maybe I could’ve got a better understanding of myself a little earlier than I had in life.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I have been contacted by quite a few people on social media with just all these kind words and comments of support and admiration of some sort.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It makes the whole experience even greater to be able to bring happiness and joy to the people that I’ve never even met.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: What’s next for you after <em>Making It</em>?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Well, at the moment I’m in lockdown, but I have started a YouTube channel, and I want to base it around crafting. It’s called </span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFDW0TRqu0_LRhgtC6leVpA/featured"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Procrastinating with Russell</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> [and] I want to base it around being a creative and someone who deals with mental health.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I feel as if there is a big stigma around mental health and it has… definitely increased during COVID and lockdown, and it’s become very noticeable with everyday people. So if I make relatable content … it will be a positive influence to people.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like being creative, you just can’t help but smile and have fun. And, you know, you don’t have to be a fine artist of any sort. And anyone can do it as well, be it a four year old or a sixty year old.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: We love the way the show seems to be trying to do away with the idea of eliminations. You and Kat seem to still be there in some capacity. What’s the deal?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Well, we pretty much stayed at the farm. Kat [has been] hanging out the washing and I’m sewing up a storm.</span></p> <p><strong>O60: Last but not least, if you had the chance, would you do it again?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a heartbeat. Definitely, I would. It’s the greatest thing I’ve done so far.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT4VuhGP7cL/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT4VuhGP7cL/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Russell Zorino-Brown (@luckyfellow)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Making It Australia </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">returns next Wednesday and Thursday on Channel 10.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Channel 10</span></em></p>

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“This is what I remember”: Turia Pitt reflects 10 years after fateful day

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 years on from the moment that changed her life, Turia Pitt is looking back on what happened that fateful day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While competing in a 100km ultra-marathon in September 2011, Turia was trapped in a grassfire.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The mining engineer suffered “full-thickness burns to 65 percent” of her body, had to undergo 200 medical procedures, lost seven fingers, and spent “two gruelling years” recovering.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taking to Instagram, Turia shared a photo of herself and her family, as well as an image of her and her partner, Michael Hoskin, taken prior to her accident.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ten years on from the fire, this is what I remember…,” she began in her caption.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In September 2011, I was trapped by a grassfire during an ultramarathon.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember the hot Kimberly sun beating down, burning my already burnt skin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember accidentally sitting on a bull ant nest. Staring in confusion as the ants started swarming across my legs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember trying to drink some water but spitting it out because it was boiling hot.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember seeing bits of my skin stuck to the rocks and spinifex.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember the small group of us, banded together. The guys trying to construct some shade for Kate and I, a parasol of fluoro material lit up against the sky.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTwmYSVJ1nG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTwmYSVJ1nG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Turia (@turiapitt)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Turia continued to recount how she felt that the hours “dragged on” and how she thought about her partner.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember telling myself, ‘Think of his warm face, think of his honey voice, think of his golden skin. Keep thinking about Michael’.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember the bubbling feeling of panic as the hours dragged on. Wanting to be rescued. Needing someone to tell me everything was going to be okay.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember the sun starting to set, the heat starting to dissipate, the breeze becoming cold.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I remember saying ‘I don’t know if I can stay much longer’.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Turia continued, recalling the moment she was rescued by a helicopter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And then, I remember salvation. The tch-tch-tch-tch of a helicopter racing across the sky.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since that day, the 34-year-old has gone on to see success as a motivational speaker and author.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She and her husband have two children, Hakavai and Rahiti.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: turiapitt / Instagram</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p>

Beauty & Style

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“End of an era”: Richard Wilkins reflects on Ellen’s legacy

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Following on from Ellen’ DeGeneres’ announcement that she will be ending her talk show after almost two decades, Richard Wilkins </span><a href="https://celebrity.nine.com.au/latest/richard-wilkins-reflects-ellen-degeneres-legacy-ends-talk-show/5fd290da-6fc5-40c5-b2b7-6253b459489c"><span style="font-weight: 400;">shared his experience</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> working with her and watching her career grow over the years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Commenting on the “swag of accolades” </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Ellen DeGeneres Show</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has brought in - including three Emmys, 20 People’s Choice Awards, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom - Wilkins says the effort was “not bad for a gal from Louisiana, who found comedy as a way to escape complicated teen years”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wilkins goes on to describe the first time he interviewed the star about “a decade or so ago”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was the coldest studio I’ve ever been in - figuratively and literally. It wasn’t just the temperature, which was freezing. I couldn’t work out whether it was to counteract the heat generated by the huge screens with the lighting, or just to keep everyone on their toes. But, man, it was cold,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was the weirdest of interviews,” he recalled. “Immediately after the credits rolled and the hysterical applause, a voiceover guy announced, ‘Please stay seated. Ellen’s going to be interviewed by Richard Wilkins from Australia. Come down, Richard - you’re on.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wilkins admits that the interview “was quite intimidating” as audiences watched Ellen “being grilled mercilessly by some bloke they’d never heard of before.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And I think it’s fair to say Ellen likes asking questions more than she likes answering them.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As he recounted the two other moments he was face-to-face with the talk-show queen, Wilkins shared his shock over the claims surrounding the show but that he was “not really surprised”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“She clearly knows what she wants and she doesn’t suffer fools badly,” he said. “And I imagine she was pretty tough on her staff. In a situation like that, I would assume where there’s smoke, there’s certainly a bit of fire about.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the hit in popularity due to the controversies and additional challenges from the pandemic, Wilkins said he “will be sad to see Ellen disappear from the screen” and that she deserved praise for making the show a success for so long.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, he found it “kind of strange” that she would be looking for “a new challenge” when “making tomorrow’s show better than today’s show would be an ongoing challenge.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Either way, he remarked that the end of the show will mark “the end of an era”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I wonder what we'll be doing at midday from now on when Ellen leaves a big hole in Nine's telecast schedule in a year's time. Congratulations to Ellen — we'll be interested to see what she comes up with next,” he concluded.</span></p>

TV

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"Moved beyond words": Prince Charles reflects on UK COVID pandemic

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Prince Charles has been "moved beyond words" as he released a video message marking the National Day of Reflection in the UK.</p> <p>The National Day of Reflection marks one year since the first COVID-19 lockdown started in the UK and honours the 126,000 lives lost since the start of the pandemic with a minute silence at midday UK time.</p> <p>The Prince of Wales has battled coronavirus himself in April and paid tribute to the communities across the UK that have banded together and sacrificed for others.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">One year on since the UK went into lockdown, The Prince of Wales, as Patron of <a href="https://twitter.com/mariecurieuk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@mariecurieuk</a>, shares a message to mark this <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DayOfReflection?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DayOfReflection</a>. 🌼 <a href="https://t.co/sRY7Ba6Czy">pic.twitter.com/sRY7Ba6Czy</a></p> — The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall (@ClarenceHouse) <a href="https://twitter.com/ClarenceHouse/status/1374283438434443267?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 23, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>"We have all been inspired by the resourcefulness we have witnessed, humbled by the dedication shown by so many, and moved, beyond words, by the sacrifices we have seen," he said in the clip.</p> <p>"Whatever our faith or philosophy may be, let us take a moment together to remember those who have been lost, to give thanks for their lives, and to acknowledge the inexpressible pain of parting.</p> <p>"In their memory, let us resolve to work for a future inspired by our highest values, that have been displayed so clearly by the people of this country through this most challenging of times."</p> <p>The video message was recorded on behalf of the Marie Curie Foundation where Prince Charles is the royal patron.</p> <p>The charity estimates six million people have been bereaved since the beginning of the pandemic.</p> <p>"Many people who are grieving say the support they receive from their friends and family is one of the things that helps them get through," the charity said, adding: "Don't be afraid to reach out."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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