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Huge move to bring down cost of groceries

<p>Federal Treasurer Jim Chalmers has announced a series of new measures to help bring down grocery prices  ahead of the release of a wide-ranging review into the Grocery Code of Conduct.</p> <p>According to the treasurer, increasing competition among supermarket giants is key to placing “downward pressure on prices”, while also enforcing multibillion-dollar fines on retailers that fail to comply with the mandatory code of conduct.</p> <p>This code is set to dictate how supermarkets like Woolworths, Coles, Aldi and IGA’s parent company Metcash deals with producers and farmers, which will in turn see a reduction of prices for everyday shoppers. </p> <p>While Dr Chalmers stopped short of saying how far prices could drop, he told <em>Sunrise’s</em> Natalie Barr that a more competitive system would create “better outcomes for consumers,” and reduce grocery prices over time. </p> <p>“If it is more competitive, more transparent and people are getting a fair go, better outcomes will be seen at the supermarket checkout,” he said.</p> <p>The Treasurer said this would deliver a “fair go” for families, consumers and producers. </p> <p>“We recognise that the supply chains need to be better for farmers, growers and producers,” he said. </p> <p>“By doing that and making sure the supermarket sector is more competitive we can get better outcome for consumers.”</p> <p>Although the Albanese government has affirmed its support for the review, conducted by former Labor minister Craig Emerson, the final report rejected calls to expand the reforms to non-supermarkets like Bunnings, Chemist Warehouse, and Dan Murphy’s. </p> <p>“The review considers that the code should not be extended beyond supermarkets to cover other retailers,” the inquiry’s final report said.</p> <p>“This is not to say that these markets are functioning well for all players in those markets.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: MICK TSIKAS/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Editorial/Shutterstock</em></p>

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Kochie reveals the simple way to halve your grocery bill

<p>David Koch has revealed the simple trick to help you save big bucks at the supermarket as the cost of living crisis continues to hit hard. </p> <p>Kochie, who is the Compare the Market's economic director, calculated that Aussies can save up to $100 per trip to the grocery shop by making the switch to home brands. </p> <p>According to research of major Australian supermarkets, the average household can save big bucks by choosing not to buy well-known brands, which can lead to a saving of $5,000 per year. </p> <p>"So, when you're doing your supermarket shop, what's in a brand name? Well, let me tell you - plenty," Kochie said in a video posted to the Compare the Market Instagram account. </p> <p>"You are paying plenty more for that loyalty to a brand that you love."</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C57UwVrvSZ5/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C57UwVrvSZ5/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Compare the Market AU (@comparethemarket_aus)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Compare the Market took to a major supermarket and bought 25 items from big name brands, and another 25 similar items from a challenger supermarket selling cheaper home brands.</p> <p>Based on substituting big-brand products for lesser-known labels, grocery bills would fall from $201.19 a week to $103.51, taking the weekly saving up to $97.68.</p> <p>"Now, multiply that weekly shop over a whole year and that's a saving of over $5,000."</p> <p>"Almost three return economy airfares to London."</p> <p>Everyday Aussies are continuing to struggle with the rising cost of groceries, with the price of bread and cereal increasing by 7.3 per cent in the year to March, an official monthly measure of inflation showed. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

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Trying to spend less on food? Following the dietary guidelines might save you $160 a fortnight

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emily-burch-438717">Emily Burch</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/southern-cross-university-1160">Southern Cross University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-ball-14718">Lauren Ball</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a></em></p> <p>A rise in the <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/BriefingBook47p/CostOfLiving#:%7E:text=Consumer%20Price%20Index%20over%20time,but%205.1%25%20in%20the%20second">cost of living</a> has led many households to look for ways to save money.</p> <p>New research suggests maintaining a healthy diet, in line with the <a href="https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/guidelines/guidelines">Australian Dietary Guidelines</a>, is cheaper than an unhealthy diet and <a href="https://southwesthealthcare.com.au/wp-content/uploads/SWH-HP-Healthy-Diets-ASAP-Protocol-Warrnambool-Report-2023.pdf">could save A$160</a> off a family of four’s fortnightly shopping bill.</p> <p>Poor diet is the most common preventable risk factor contributing to chronic disease in <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)30752-2/fulltext">Australia</a>. So improving your diet can also be an important way to reduce the chance of developing chronic disease.</p> <h2>First, what are the dietary guidelines?</h2> <p>The guidelines provide information on the quantity and types of foods most Australians should consume to promote overall health and wellbeing.</p> <p>Recommendations include eating a wide variety of nutritious foods from the main five food groups:</p> <ul> <li>vegetables and legumes</li> <li>fruit</li> <li>grains</li> <li>lean meats and meat alternatives such as tofu, nuts and legumes</li> <li>dairy products.</li> </ul> <p>The guidelines recommend limiting our intake of foods high in saturated fat, added salt, added sugars and alcohol.</p> <h2>What are Australians eating?</h2> <p>Fewer than <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/health-conditions-and-risks/dietary-behaviour/latest-release">7%</a> of Australians eat sufficient vegetables, in line with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. In fact, Australians have an average healthy diet score of <a href="https://www.csiro.au/-/media/News-releases/2023/Total-Wellbeing-Diet-Health-Score/Diet-score-2023-Report_September.pdf">55 out of 100</a> – barely passing.</p> <p>Foods that aren’t part of a food group are known as “discretionary” items, which includes alcohol, cakes, biscuits, chocolate and confectionery and most takeaway foods. Because they’re typically high in kilojoules, saturated fat, sodium and added sugars, the Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend they only be eaten occasionally and in small amounts (ideally zero serves).</p> <p>For many households, discretionary items make up a big portion of their grocery shop. Australians consume an average of <a href="https://www.csiro.au/-/media/News-releases/2023/Total-Wellbeing-Diet-Health-Score/Diet-score-2023-Report_September.pdf">28 serves</a> of discretionary choices per week (equal to 28 doughnuts, 28 slices of cake, or 28 cans of soft drink or beer). This is an increase of ten serves since 2015.</p> <p>One recent <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12966-022-01389-8">study</a> estimated 55% of Australians’ total energy intake was from discretionary items.</p> <h2>What did the researchers find?</h2> <p>Researchers from the Health Promotion Team at South West Healthcare <a href="https://southwesthealthcare.com.au/wp-content/uploads/SWH-HP-Healthy-Diets-ASAP-Protocol-Warrnambool-Report-2023.pdf">recently</a> visited four local supermarkets and takeaway stores in Warrnambool, Victoria, and purchased two baskets of groceries.</p> <p>One basket met the Australian Dietary Guidelines (basket one), the other aligned with the typical dietary intake of Australians (basket two).</p> <p>They compared prices between the two and found basket one would cost approximately $167 less per fortnight for a family of four at the most affordable supermarket. That’s equal to $4,342 a year.</p> <p>Basket one was sufficient to supply a family of four for a fortnight, and aligned with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. It cost $724 and included:</p> <ol> <li>fruit and vegetables (made up 31% of the fortnightly shop)</li> <li>grains and cereals (oats, cornflakes, bread, rice, pasta, Weet-bix)</li> <li>lean meats and alternatives (mince, steak, chicken, tuna, eggs, nuts)</li> <li>milk, yoghurt and cheese</li> <li>oils and spreads (olive oil).</li> </ol> <p>Basket two reflected the current average Australian fortnightly shop for a family of four.</p> <p>In the project, the team spent over half of the fortnightly shop on processed and packaged foods, of which 21% was spent on take-away. This is based on actual dietary intake of the general population reported in the 2011-2012 <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/health-conditions-and-risks/australian-health-survey-nutrition-first-results-foods-and-nutrients/latest-release#:%7E:text=Food%20consumption,across%20the%20major%20food%20groups.">Australian Health Survey</a>.</p> <p>Basket two cost $891 and included:</p> <ol> <li>fruit and vegetables (made up 13% of the fortnightly shop)</li> <li>grains and cereals (oats, cornflakes, bread, rice, pasta, Weet-bix)</li> <li>lean meats and alternatives (mince, steak, chicken, tuna, eggs, nuts)</li> <li>milk, yogurt and cheese</li> <li>oils and spreads (olive oil, butter)</li> <li>drinks (soft drink, fruit juice)</li> <li>desserts and snacks (muffins, sweet biscuits, chocolate, ice cream, potato chips, muesli bars)</li> <li>processed meats (sausages, ham)</li> <li>convenience meals</li> <li>fast food (pizza, meat pie, hamburger, fish and chips)</li> <li>alcohol (beer, wine).</li> </ol> <h2>But a healthy basket is still unaffordable for many</h2> <p>While this piece of work, and other <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/11/2469">research</a>, suggests a healthy diet is less expensive than an unhealthy diet, affordability is still a challenge for many families.</p> <p>The Warrnambool research found basket one (which aligned with guidelines) was still costly, requiring approximately 25% of a median household income.</p> <p>This is unaffordable for many. For a household reliant on welfare, basket one would require allocating 26%-38% of their income. This highlights how the rising cost of living crisis is affecting those already facing financial difficulties.</p> <p>Around 3.7 <a href="https://reports.foodbank.org.au/foodbank-hunger-report-2023/">million</a> Australian households did not have access to enough food to meet their basic needs at some point in the last 12 months.</p> <p>Policy action is needed from the Australian government to make recommended diets more affordable for low socioeconomic groups. This means lowering the costs of healthy foods and ensuring household incomes are sufficient.</p> <h2>What else can you do to cut your spending?</h2> <p>To help reduce food costs and support your health, reducing discretionary foods could be a good idea.</p> <p>Other ways to reduce your grocery bill and keep your food healthy and fresh include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>planning for some meatless meals each week. Pulses (beans, lentils and legumes) are nutritious and cheap (a can is <a href="https://coles.com.au/product/coles-chick-peas-420g-8075852?uztq=46abcbb7e16253b0cdc3e6c5bbe6a3f0&amp;cid=col_cpc_Generic%7cColesSupermarkets%7cPLA%7cCatchAll%7cAustralia%7cBroad&amp;s_kwcid=AL!12693!3!675842378376!!!g!326304616489!&amp;gad_source=1&amp;gclid=CjwKCAjwkY2qBhBDEiwAoQXK5SceYhU2VtKepNLXWN218GH8Cp8Vs9cnYynCBwRqQPaW3UYNX2SVIBoC_6EQAvD_BwE&amp;gclsrc=aw.ds">less than $1.50</a>. Here are some great pulse recipes to <a href="https://nomoneynotime.com.au/healthy-easy-recipes/filter/keywords--vegetarian/p2">try</a></p> </li> <li> <p>checking the specials and buy in bulk (to store or freeze) when items are cheaper</p> </li> <li> <p>making big batches of meals and freezing them. Single-serve portions can help save time for lunches at work, saving on takeaway</p> </li> <li> <p>Australian supermarkets are <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/datablog/2023/jul/27/cost-of-living-grocery-store-price-rises-cheapest-fresh-produce-australia-woolworths-coles#:%7E:text=The%20results%20showed%20independent%20and,best%20place%20for%20affordable%20groceries">almost never</a> the cheapest place for fresh produce, so shop around for farmers markets or smaller local grocery shops</p> </li> <li> <p>buying generic brands when possible, as they are <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/streamlined-datagathering-techniques-to-estimate-the-price-and-affordability-of-healthy-and-unhealthy-diets-under-different-pricing-scenarios/872EA6396533166E0C6FA94C809D9CAC#r">notably cheaper</a>. Supermarkets usually <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-science-that-makes-us-spend-more-in-supermarkets-and-feel-good-while-we-do-it-23857">promote</a> the items they want you to buy at eye-level, so check the shelves above and below for cheaper alternatives.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/216749/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> </li> </ul> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/emily-burch-438717">Emily Burch</a>, Dietitian &amp; Academic, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/southern-cross-university-1160">Southern Cross University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-ball-14718">Lauren Ball</a>, Professor of Community Health and Wellbeing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty </em><em>Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/trying-to-spend-less-on-food-following-the-dietary-guidelines-might-save-you-160-a-fortnight-216749">original article</a>.</em></p>

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These 10 smart grocery swaps can help reverse diabetes

<p><strong>Diagnosis diabetes</strong></p> <p>It can feel daunting to be faced with the need to make a major lifestyle change. You enjoy food, and you should. At Reader’s Digest, we like to think nature designed nutrition to taste delicious so it can be a source of pleasure in your day that’s fun to look forward to.</p> <p>If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes, this diagnosis doesn’t have to take over your whole identity and all the things that bring you joy. There are ways to adapt some of your favourite foods so you can still have them!</p> <p>Registered dietitian Jackie Newgent lists interesting meal swaps you can make so that classic dishes can be healthier, while still plenty pleasurable.</p> <p>With some wisdom and dedication, it can be possible to turn your condition around and feel great for good.</p> <p><strong>Pair starchy with non-starchy veggies</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one kilo potatoes</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> 500g kilo potatoes plus 500g cauliflower</p> <p>This mashed potato hack keeps your total carbs in check without forgoing flavour. Whip equal parts boiled potatoes together with roasted or boiled cauliflower.</p> <p>The results of this dynamic duo may help you better manage your blood glucose, since they’re carb-friendlier than a huge bowl of mashed potatoes alone: 100 grams of cooked potatoes without skin provides 22 grams of total carbohydrates, versus 13 grams total carbohydrate in the 100 gram combination of cooked potatoes and cauliflower.</p> <p><strong>Pick fruit you can chew</strong></p> <div> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one litre apple juice</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one bag of apples</p> <p>Enjoy whole fruit rather than just the juice whenever possible to get all the fibre of the naturally sweet fruit with its edible peel…plus chewing satisfaction. One medium apple contains 4.4 grams of fibre while a 200ml glass or juice box of 100-percent apple juice has 0.4 grams of fibre.</p> <p>The soluble fibre in apples can help slow down absorption of sugars. Polyphenols in apples may have powerful antioxidant properties.</p> <p><strong>Grill a better burger</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> 500g 85% lean ground beef patties</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> 500g ground chicken breast</p> <p>Gram for gram, chicken breast has significantly less saturated fat than the marbly beef of classic burgers. Specifically, an 85g cooked 85% lean ground beef patty has five grams of saturated fat compared to 0.6 grams of saturated fat for a cooked patty made from 85g of chicken breast meat.</p> <p>Keeping saturated fat intake low is especially important when you have diabetes to help keep your heart healthy. Pro-tip: make chicken burgers juicier and tastier by combining ground chicken breast with a little plain yogurt, rolled oats, and herbs and spices before cooking.</p> <p><strong>Look for live cultures in the dairy section</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one container regular cottage cheese</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one container plain low-fat Greek yogurt or cultured cottage cheese</p> <p>Probiotics are “good” bacteria that help keep your gut healthy. For people with type 2 diabetes, research published in Advances in Nutrition suggested that probiotics may also have glucose-lowering potential. So, pop products with live active cultures (probiotics) into your cart while strolling by the dairy aisle. Choose plain low-fat Greek yogurt or cultured cottage cheese.</p> <p>Be sure to read the nutrition labels, since probiotics aren’t in all dairy foods. And, for the lower-sodium pick, stick with yogurt.</p> <p><strong>Choose healthier-sized grain portions </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> 1/2 dozen bakery-style plain bagels</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one package of wholegrain English muffins</p> <p>Swapping wholegrain in place of refined grain products helps kick up fibre and other plant nutrients. Studies suggests this is linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Also, opting for healthier-sized varieties, such as wholegrain English muffins rather than big bakery-style plain bagels helps cut kilojoules (and carbs) – not enjoyment – while promoting a healthier weight. In fact, you’ll slash over 1000 kilojoules by enjoying a whole-wheat English muffin instead of that oversized 140g bagel.</p> <p><strong>Get your munchies with benefits </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one bag of potato chips</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one jar or bulk-bin container of roasted peanuts</p> <p>It’s a no-brainer: a small handful of nuts is a better bet than potato chips. Peanuts, for instance, offer a triple whammy of dietary fibre, plant protein and healthy fat, which can boost satiety. Greater satisfaction means a greater chance you’ll keep mealtime portions right-sized.</p> <p>When peanuts or other nuts are eaten along with carb-rich foods, they can help slow down the blood sugar response. Plus, a Mediterranean study found that higher nut consumption may be associated with better metabolic status.</p> <p><strong>Dress a salad smartly </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one bottle of fat-free salad dressing</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one small bottle olive oil plus one small bottle balsamic or red wine vinegar</p> <p>Some bottled salad dressings can trick you. For instance, “fat-free” salad dressing may be loaded with added sugars. (For reference: four grams of sugar is equal to one teaspoon.)</p> <p>So, read salad dressing labels carefully for sneaky ingredients, especially excess salt (over 250 milligrams of sodium per two-tablespoon serving) or added sugars (more than five grams added sugars per two-tablespoon serving). Better yet, keep it simple and make your own vinaigrette using 2-3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar.</p> <p><strong>Select less salty soup</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one can/carton of vegetable- or bean-based soup</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one can/carton of low-sodium vegetable- or bean-based soup</p> <p>When compared to people without diabetes, sodium levels were higher in patients with type 2 diabetes, based on a meta-analysis published in European Journal of Nutrition. Curbing sodium intake is beneficial for people with diabetes since too much may increase your risk for high blood pressure.</p> <p>So, slurp up soup that’s low in sodium. And kick up flavour with a splash of cider vinegar, grated citrus zest, herbs, spices, or a dash of hot sauce.</p> <p><strong>Go for "naked" fish</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> Breaded fish sticks</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> Frozen salmon fillets</p> <p>Cut salmon into large cubes, season, and grill on skewers. Or make fish sticks by simply cutting into skinny fillets, season and roast. Why? Research published in Diabetes Care finds that eating oily fish may be associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Non-oily fish, like the whitefish in fish sticks, didn’t show this link.</p> <p>Salmon is an oily fish and a major source of omega-3 fatty acids, a heart-friendly fat. Plus: when you make your own salmon skewers or sticks, you won’t have extra carbs from breading.</p> <p><strong>Do dip with a punch of protein</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Instead of:</em></span> one container of sour cream &amp; onion dip</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Buy:</em></span> one container of pulse-based dip, like hummus</p> <p>Wise snacking can be helpful for managing blood glucose. It can also be delicious. Dunk veggies or wholegrain pita wedges into pulse-based dip, like hummus, black bean dip, or lentil dip.</p> <p>Check this out: one-quarter cup (that’s 60 grams) of onion dip has 870 kiljoules, five grams of saturated fat, 1.2 grams of protein, and 0.1 grams of fibre, while one-quarter cup hummus has 590 kilojoules, 1.5 grams of saturated fat, 4.7 grams of protein, and 3.3 grams of fibre. Hummus clearly wins!</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/diabetes/reverse-diabetes-10-smart-grocery-swaps?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p> </div> <div class="slide-image" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 16px; font-style: inherit; box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; margin: 0px; outline: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> </div>

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"That's insane": Vintage Woolies receipt shines a light on cheaper days

<p dir="ltr">One mum has gotten more than she bargained for while cleaning out her wardrobe, stumbling across an old Woolworths receipt from 2011. </p> <p dir="ltr">While the item itself wasn’t so exciting - and most would immediately toss it away upon discovery - she looked a little further, and one thing stood out to her: the prices. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm currently going through my wardrobe and I found this receipt in a coat pocket," Tegan explained in a video posted to her TikTok, where she displays the receipt for everyone’s inspection. “It's from 2011, very vintage, and I was a new mum."</p> <p dir="ltr">Her purchases can be seen in the clip, highlighting the size and prices of the various items she picked up that year - the likes of baby formula, spinach, chocolate, capsicum, avocado, and lamb cutlets, totalling the sum of just $49.59. </p> <p dir="ltr">As she noted, the price of meat was her main point of interest, as it was “so cheap” at just $13.50 in 2011. Meanwhile, in 2023, anything under $20 is considered something of a bargain. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, for those in the comments, the chocolate was the true upset. And as many pointed out, it hadn’t just gotten more expensive, it had also gotten a lot smaller. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Lol that Cadbury is now 180g and $5.50,” one wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“That’s what I looked up,” Tegan agreed. “Less for more”. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Block of dairy milk was 200g too,” another chimed in to add, “now it's 180g”.</p> <p dir="ltr">And another simply declared, “omg that's insaaane how much the price has changed!!”</p> <p dir="ltr">For those whose priority is the baby formula, it was painful, with one pointing out that their brand had almost doubled in price - it had been $23.99 for Tegan back then, and marketed at $40 in present times. </p> <p dir="ltr">“A weekly essential for some parents,” Tegan noted, “would blow out my budget these days.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“My baby drinks the same formula it costs me $36,” another shared. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Gosh I feel for you,” Tegan said in response, before adding, “we went through so many tins.”</p> <p dir="ltr">One had a suggestion to properly compare the prices over the years, telling Tegan she should “buy it all again and put the two together.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Tegan, however, already had a suspicion, responding that “it’d probably be over $100”. </p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 620.262px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7222124774753914113&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40iknowtegan%2Fvideo%2F7222124774753914113&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2Fo8NV61AAAAAhBcwAO5z9oyIDHEzIgJIMRfJCsZ%3Fx-expires%3D1681808400%26x-signature%3DLWrE8R7Hek5U6KPv29JqPD2%252FH7c%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

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Groceries option even cheaper than ALDI

<p>With the cost of living crisis many Aussies are struggling to put dinner on the table, so they’re turning away from big chains like IGA and Coles and heading over to supersize store Costco.</p> <p>Originally an American chain, there are only 15 Costcos across the country, but with inflation rising to seven per cent and interest rates sitting above six per cent, Aussies are rethinking where and how they shop.</p> <p>Costco is being boasted as a lifesaver and worth the drive if you don’t live near one of the stores.</p> <p>Many Aussie parents have turned to Costco to help their families through the tough times, but it’s not your ordinary grocery store.</p> <p>Costco required you pay a $60 annual membership fee to shop there. The fee entitles members to exclusive access to its petrol stations as well.</p> <p>Although an upfront fee may leave shoppers hesitant, plenty of Aussies have shared online that it’s worth the money.</p> <p>Costco differs from other grocery stores because it’s a wholesaler, so you can only buy things in bulk.</p> <p>The idea is that shoppers spend more to begin with, but it ends up costing them less in the long run. It’s very much suited to large households.</p> <p>An Aussie mum posted on Facebook to share that popping her “Costco cherry”, saved her over $500.</p> <p>“I did a bit of maths, if I did the same shop at Woolies/Coles, I would have spent $1160. If I shopped at Aldi, I would have spent $985. If you can afford to buy in bulk, I highly recommend it will save you in the long run,” she wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>She shared exactly what she bought to have that much cash left over, and believes she managed to buy enough snacks to last an entire school term.</p> <p>“School lunch snacks x3 kids, will last the whole of next term (I do a three snack rule and put them in a zip lock bag, to grab and go, chips – vege chips, smith’s or jumpys, tiny teddy’s or panda Bickies and some muesli bar/fruit stick) then I just have to add a sandwich, fruit and popper.”</p> <p>The mum also bought some everyday items like, “Toilet paper, poppers and water,” and stocked up on meat to last a good while.</p> <p>“Mince, pork, beef, all divided up into 1kg lots and frozen,” she explained.</p> <p>She also stocked up on hand wash, cheese and fruit and veg, but shared that some of the most significant savings came from buying pantry basics.</p> <p>“Spices and sauces, Big savings here if you use a lot, like I do, as I cook most things from scratch,” she said.</p> <p>She added she thinks the membership is worth it if shoppers are savvy in their approach.</p> <p>“Everyone says the $60 membership isn’t worth it; well, if you shop smart, it’s well worth it; I’m going to aim to go 4 times a year,” she shared.</p> <p>She’s no outlier when it comes to Aussie mum’s shopping at Costco.</p> <p>One mum shared that with three kids in high school, the savings are worth it.</p> <p>“The snacks are so much cheaper than at supermarkets,” she revealed, adding that she heads over to Costo every few months to stock up.</p> <p>“I spend a few hundred every two or three months, and it saves me on buying expensive snacks every week.”</p> <p>Another mum chimed in, agreeing that it was a lifesaver for snacks and cheap meat options.</p> <p>“It is good for meat products and lunch box items,” the woman said.</p> <p>Another shared that it is worth the investment, particularly to find affordable options for school lunches.</p> <p>“If you have kids at school! 100 per cent I recommend it. I got a month’s worth of school stuff for what I was spending a fortnight,” she shared.</p> <p>While another revealed that Costo has helped keep her budget down during these tough times.</p> <p>“Costco saves us so much money on school snacks and meat alone!”</p> <p>Plenty of shoppers have been referred to ALDI if their regular shop is proving too costly, but Costco can save you the big bucks.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

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“Budget queen”: Mother shares insane shopping hack

<p>A Sydney mother has caught the attention of the internet after sharing her grocery haul for her family of nine.</p> <p>The mother spent under $250 on her shop from Woolworths and Aldi.</p> <p>She claims it will provide a total of 12 dinners and “a bunch” of snacks for school over the next fortnight.</p> <p>She mentioned that a year ago the same grocery shop would have cost significantly less as the cost of living crisis continues to soar.</p> <p>“So we are a family of nine, two adults, two teenage girls (19 and 13) four boys (11, nine, six and four) and a nearly four month old who will be starting on puree food next week,” she said.</p> <p>“Only a year ago this would have been around $175. This will make 12 dinners and a bunch of school snacks.</p> <p>“Normally I also buy around three to four packs of winter vegetables from Aldi, but they have sold out. I also normally go to Hunter and Gather to buy all our fresh fruit and vegetables. We buy milk when needed.</p> <p>“We buy bulk items like toilet rolls and laundry powder at Costco twice a year, which a 60pk of toilet paper would last around five months and the laundry powder around seven months.”</p> <p>The mother is currently on maternity leave, which in turn has her feeling the pinch even more, and she aims to keep her family’s “bellies fuller for longer”.</p> <p>“We try to keep to foods that are healthy and will keep our bellies fuller for longer. If I can hide veggies in it, it's a bonus.”</p> <p>She plans to use the ingredients to make meals that will last a fortnight such as devilled sausages, supergreen spaghetti, Irish stew and flaxseed chicken wraps.</p> <p>The kids’ school lunches include ham, cheese and a wrap with hummus. Lunchbox snacks vary from oat brownies to apple sauce muffins and lemon and almond meal cake, with fruit also.</p> <p>“The school snacks are a deal breaker. oats are so cheap and you can make so much with them and they are a real hunger tamer. I’ve always been a huge fan of baking because of my mum, so I make all my kids snacks.”</p> <p>The online community praised her price-cutting hacks, with one user labelling her the “budget queen”.</p> <p>A second commented, “Wow, wow, wow, I spend well over that a week for a family of four”.</p> <p>And a third said, “I’m taking note! We have two adults, two children under five and a dog and I spend $220 a week. I’m so impressed!”</p> <p>“That’s a well planned shop” another said. “Good on you for making it work at that price for that many people. Sadly in my house we are 2x dairy allergy and 2x lactose intolerant so I can only dream of that budget.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Facebook</em></p>

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Prices to drop for everyday grocery favourites

<p>Aussie households struggling to keep up with the cost of living will be happy to know the low prices they’re paying for some grocery items will continue to drop further this year, with some farmers reporting a bumper crop.</p> <p>Industry experts have said price falls will include meat, poultry and grain, while some fruit and vegetable costs will remain low.</p> <p>The National Farmers Federation said there has been a strong supply of berries, lettuce and avocados to markets, and the prices will not increase further.</p> <p>“It’s great news for consumers,” NFF Horticulture Council executive officer Richard Shannon said.</p> <p>“Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen dramatic increases to the cost of production. That’s a result of disrupted supply chains,” Shannon explained, in reference to the Queensland floods as well as increased prices for fertiliser, packaging and farm labour.</p> <p>“Some of those supply chains are starting to open up again,” he continued.</p> <p>Avocados Australia’s weekly supermarket report saw the price of a single avocado being about $1.80 to $3, depending on the variety.</p> <p>CEO John Tyas said customers could expect prices to stay that low, with avocado supply up 10 per cent for the May season.</p> <p>“We’re expecting pretty steady supply through to the end of the year,” he said.</p> <p>Lettuce was four times its usual price mid-2022, being sold at $12 a head.</p> <p>It is now priced at $3.50 at various stores.</p> <p>A spokesperson for the peak body representing vegetable growers, AusVeg, said the cost of winter vegetables such as carrots, lettuce, celebrity, pumpkin and beans would also see a drop in price as they come into season due to a strong supply.</p> <p>Other retail experts predict the price of meat and poultry will come down after having peaked in 2022.</p> <p>QUT Business School Professor of Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Gary Mortimer told Sunrise, “With growing conditions improving, we’ll start to see more supply into the market, and accordingly, prices will fall,” "I think we’ll see some price relief in some of the other fresh departments, including meat, particularly poultry and grain.”</p> <p>Mortimer also said as farmers, particularly in central NSW, recovered from two years of drought, there was more grain to feed their livestock.</p> <p>The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences’ latest forecast for sheep and lamb prices confirmed meat prices would fall because “farmers had rebuilt their flocks” and there were more animals available for slaughter.</p> <p>According to BARES' latest agricultural snapshot, “industry production and export values are forecast to hit record levels in 2022-23, with broadacre and dairy farm cash incomes remaining well above historical benchmarks”.</p> <p>Executive director Dr Jared Greenville said the good performance would likely continue into the foreseeable future, with weather partners expected to return to normal after several years of severe rainfall in some regions.</p> <p>“Despite the deteriorating conditions, strong soil moisture, full water storages and the rebuilding of our herds and flocks will provide a buffer for overall production, giving us another year in the high country,” he said.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Savvy mum shares little-known tip to save big bucks at Woolworths

<p>A savvy mother-of-five has shared a valuable hack that has seen her save up to $80 in her Woolworths grocery shop. </p> <p>Posting a video on TikTok sharing the little-known tip, Kate revealed how two simple steps can shave 14 per cent off the monthly grocery bill.</p> <p>The mum explained the steps saved her $80 on her most recent shopping trip, and how they can be repeated “every single month”.</p> <p>In her video, Kate explains how buying a Woolworths mobile SIM card gives you a 10 per cent discount to use each month.</p> <p>She goes on to explain that buying Woolworths gift cards on the supermarket’s app gives you an extra 4 per cent discount, with the gift cards themselves able to be spent on groceries.</p> <p>“I saved a fortune on my groceries today, and I’m going to give you a couple of little hacky hacks and tell you how because it’s f****** expensive out there,” she said.</p> <p>“Step one, you’re going to grab yourself a Woolworths mobile SIM card. Not only is it going to save you money because it’s not a s**** plan that has crappy inclusions - it’s actually really decent and pay-as-you-go, so you’re not going to put yourself in debt."</p> <p>“What this also does is give you a code every single month for 10 per cent off your grocery totals."</p> <p>“So, if you save that code for a week when you do a big pantry top-up - grab your nappies, grab those extra cleaning products, whatever it might be, use that 10 per cent off code. It works."</p> <p>“I mean, they say up to $500 but I just did one slightly over $500 and it still gave me the full 10 per cent off.”</p> <p>The mum then shared how buying Woolworths gift cards through the supermarket’s app can also help you save.</p> <p>“Once you have that grocery total, after your 10 per cent offer’s been taken off, you’re then going to log back into your Woolworths mobile account because that’s going to give you access to discounted gift cards,” she continued.</p> <p>“You can grab a Woolworths gift card for 4 per cent off and then pay for your groceries using that discounted gift card. That gives you a further saving of 4 per cent, making your total 14 per cent - before you’ve even shopped specials, you’ve saved some money.”</p> <p>She hoped that by sharing the tips she could help struggling Aussie families save some money on essentials going into the festive season. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Ground-breaking change coming to grocery stores

<p>While Australians are still copping the effects of supply chain issues in supermarkets, many shoppers are faced with the frustration of empty shelves at their local grocer. </p> <p>But now, a ground-breaking initiative could solve those issues for good.</p> <p>IGA's Local Grocer initiative will allow customers to actually decide what is in stores, in what is the biggest brand rollout in the country. </p> <p>With the use of technology, supermarket data and old school customer interaction, a bespoke offering will be created for locals, with no two Local Grocers will be the same, and each of the 400 stores set to open within months will cater to the specific wants and needs of their community.</p> <p>IGA’s flagship Local Grocer store has just opened in the Sydney northwest suburb of Epping, and the concept is already a hit with local shoppers.</p> <p>Run by brothers Antoine and Richard Rizk under the Mint Fresh banner, the Epping store is the pair’s fifth venture after working in the sector for more than a decade.</p> <p>Antoine told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/massive-changes-coming-to-hundreds-of-australian-supermarkets/news-story/0e07af390f34ed331689ee607ee31d55" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a> it was designed so that “locals can get pretty much everything they need in one place”, and he said they had even chosen not to install self-service checkouts “so that we can truly get to know our local shoppers”.</p> <p>He explained they had used an app and focus group to get feedback about the types of products customers wanted to see in store before the launch.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of customisation for the local Asian community, and we have quite a big range in the grocery, dairy, freezer and fruit and vegetable aisles,” he said.</p> <p>“Being locals within the geographical area, we spoke to a lot of people and looked at a lot of competitors, and we also used an app … to recruit customers for a focus group."</p> <p>“The survey provided us with a bunch of feedback about how frequently they cook and what kinds of products they require."</p> <p>“We’ve had customers come in nearly every day since we opened, and that’s a good sign. Our customisation is a huge point of difference and it gives us a competitive advantage. Having that local knowledge is critical."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Floods, pandemics, wars and market forces: what’s driving up the price of milk

<p>At the end of 2021, the cost of a litre of home-brand milk in an Australian supermarket <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2021-11-25/dairy-farmers-welcome-woolworths-milk-price-lift/100650118" target="_blank" rel="noopener">was about $1.30</a>. It’s now about $1.60.</p> <p>What will it cost at the end of 2022? That depends on the continued effect of flooding on prime dairy-production regions in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, as well as on global economic conditions.</p> <p>The Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Science has projected <a href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/research-topics/agricultural-outlook/dairy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">a 28% increase</a> in the farm-gate milk price in 2022-23 – to 72.5 cents per litre, a record high. With less milk being produced, it could be even more.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Australia’s dairy regions</strong></p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=464&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=464&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=464&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=583&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=583&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/490779/original/file-20221020-19-64n8np.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=583&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/research-topics/surveys/dairy#financial-performance" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABARES</a>, <a class="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">CC BY-NC-ND</a></span></figcaption></figure> <hr /> <p>It’s a case of higher demand and lower supply. Production has been declining since 2014. In the first half of 2022, ABARES says milk production was about 7% lower than the same period in 2021:</p> <blockquote> <p>This was driven by extreme weather events: a drier than average start of the year in southern Victoria and northwest Tasmania, flooding in regions of Queensland and northern New South Wales. Also, with export prices for Australian dairy products increasing substantially at the start of 2022, less milk was available to the domestic market.</p> </blockquote> <p>Obviously, things aren’t all rosy. Some dairy farmers face the devastation of natural disasters. All face the same post-COVID challenges as other primary producers. Russia’s war on Ukraine has help drive up <a href="https://www.austrade.gov.au/news/insights/insight-farm-food-costs-rise-due-to-higher-energy-prices" target="_blank" rel="noopener">costs of inputs</a>, from fertilisers to <a href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/data/weekly-commodity-price-update/australian-agricultural-prices" target="_blank" rel="noopener">feed</a>. Labour is <a href="https://www.reuters.com/business/australia-needs-workers-million-are-stuck-door-2022-08-31" target="_blank" rel="noopener">hard to find</a>.</p> <p>But for all that, the record high farm-gate price is good news for an industry where the number of farmers has declined by a quarter in the past decade (from <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/DocumentStore.ashx?id=b16a172f-6300-4ee0-918a-b235cf9da725">about 7,500</a> in 2011 to <a href="https://www.dairy.com.au/our-industry-and-people/our-regions">about 5,700</a> now).</p> <p><strong>Deregulation stirs the pot</strong></p> <p>Until 2000, farm-gate milk prices were regulated. State and territory governments set minimum farm-gate prices that maintained farmer income.</p> <p>This was abandoned in July 2000. With deregulation, farmers, processors and supermarkets were set free to negotiate prices.</p> <p>In economic theory, free trade works fine when you have a large number of buyers and sellers, all with the same amount of information about what is happening in the market.</p> <p>But in the milk industry, thousands of producers sell to a handful of milk processors, who then sell to even fewer retailers. The major supermarkets control almost <a href="https://milkvalue.com.au/australian-dairy-market/sales-trends/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">60% of total milk sales</a>.</p> <p>This is not always such a problem. It is not often you hear fresh producers screaming at supermarkets, in what is a very similar arrangement. But with the dairy industry, as noted in a <a href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/review-report-dairy-industry-code.docx" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2021 report</a> from the Department of Agriculture, Waters and the Environment, there is a “perceived market failure”.</p> <p>Why? It has to do with how supermarkets have used their power.</p> <p><strong>Waging the milk price war</strong></p> <p>To give time for the market to find an equilibrium, the Howard government introduced a “Dairy Adjustment Levy” of 11 cents per litre to support farmers through deregulation. This levy remained in place until 2008, when it was abolished by the Rudd government.</p> <p>Then, in 2011, the “milk war” broke out. Coles had the idea of luring shoppers from Woolworths by selling milk <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/milk-wars-leave-sour-taste-in-farmers-mouths-20120120-1q9st.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">at $1 a litre</a>. Woolworths responded. Aldi joined the move. And the war kept prices artificially low for almost a decade.</p> <p>Supermarkets put the squeeze on processors, who had little option but to accept what was offered for crucial supermarket contracts. Processors then put the squeeze on farmers.</p> <hr /> <p><iframe id="5TukM" class="tc-infographic-datawrapper" style="border: none;" src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/5TukM/1/" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <hr /> <p>Many decided the effort was not worth it, and quit farming. Milk production peaked in 2014 then declined.</p> <p>Supermarkets finally abandoned $1/litre milk in 2019, under considerable public and <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-23/milk-wars-whats-at-the-heart-of-dairys-battles/10838390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">political pressure</a> to acknowledge that, after eight years with no increase, some rebalancing was needed.</p> <p>During this time, overseas demand for dairy products has also been increasing, especially in Asia. Now <a href="https://www.dairyaustralia.com.au/westvic-dairy/industry-statistics/industry-reports/australian-dairy-industry-in-focus#.YzA0_nZByM9" target="_blank" rel="noopener">about 32%</a> of Australian dairy production is exported – not as fresh milk, but as cheese, butter and other dairy products. (It takes about 10 litres of milk to make <a href="https://www.dairysafe.vic.gov.au/consumers/dairy-foods/cheese" target="_blank" rel="noopener">1 kilogram of cheese</a>, and 20 litres to make <a href="https://www.dairysafe.vic.gov.au/consumers/dairy-foods/butter" target="_blank" rel="noopener">1kg of butter</a>.)</p> <p>On top of that, lately US and European dairy farmers have had a hard time <a href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/research-topics/agricultural-outlook/dairy#milk-production-to-increase-but-export-volumes-to-fall" target="_blank" rel="noopener">with drought</a>, increasing international prices. The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization’s Dairy Price Index increased by more <a href="https://www.fao.org/3/cc1189en/cc1189en.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">than 17%</a> from 2020 to 2021, and is expected to rise another 15% by the end of this year.</p> <hr /> <p><strong>Australian milk production and farm-gate price</strong></p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=350&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=350&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=350&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/486429/original/file-20220926-15788-17niif.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=440&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /><figcaption><span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/sites/default/files/images/ac-sept-2022-dairy-fig-1-2.png">ABARES; Dairy Australia</a></span></figcaption></figure> <hr /> <p>The projected 28% rise in farm-gate milk prices in 2022-23 will bring the value of the Australian dairy production to a record <a href="https://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/research-topics/agricultural-outlook/dairy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">$6.2 billion</a>.</p> <p>Which is good news for the long term sustainability of dairy farming in Australia. You might not appreciate it, but to keep dairy farmers in business, a fair price must be payed for your fresh milk.</p> <p><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><em><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/191064/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" />Writen by Flavio Macau. Republished with permission from <a href="https://theconversation.com/floods-pandemics-wars-and-market-forces-whats-driving-up-the-price-of-milk-191064" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Seven ways to save money on your groceries

<p>Buying groceries can take a large chunk out of your budget, so follow these tricks to slash those costs today!</p> <p>Grocery shopping can be expensive. But, as we all have to eat, it becomes a matter of outsmarting the supermarket. Can it be done, helping you save money in the process? Yes! Here’s some ideas.</p> <p><strong>Plan your meals for the week</strong><br />This tip is not only good for your hip pocket, but your waistline. By planning your meals and snacks in advance, you’re being disciplined about the fuel that’s powering your body. Plus, you won’t be tempted to buy baked goodies or other sweets that you see on sale, which is always strategically placed when you first enter the supermarket.</p> <p>Plan out your meals and write down what you need on a shopping list. Take this with you and stick to it! Everyone is guilty of making a shopping list and then adding to it while they’re browsing the aisles. This is a sure-fire way to buy treats or snacks you wouldn’t normally have planned for and to blow out your weekly grocery budget.</p> <p><strong>Make a list and stick to it</strong><br />Once you’ve planned out your meals, write down what you need on a shopping list. Take this with you and stick to it! Everyone is guilty of making a shopping list and then adding to it while they’re browsing the aisles. This is a sure-fire way to buy treats or snacks you wouldn’t normally have planned for and to blow out your weekly grocery budget.</p> <p><strong>Have a weekly clean-out of the fridge and cabinets</strong><br />Have you ever tried to find an ingredient, like the Worchester sauce, only to have to take out half the pantry because it’s at the back and the shelves are packed to the rafters? Over time, non-perishable items, such as sauces, baking goods, cooking oils, pasta, spices and other cooking essentials that don’t expire in the short term, accumulate in the kitchen pantry and surrounding cupboards – just like old crockery you don’t use anymore.</p> <p>By scheduling in a weekly review or clean-out, you can keep on top of what is in the pantry so you’re not doubling up in your grocery shop and ensuring that you’re using everything purchased until it’s completely empty.</p> <p><strong>Sign up for supermarket loyalty programs</strong><br />Free to join and easy to use, supermarket loyalty programs are a good way to save a few bucks here or there. While each differ with what rewards they offer their customers, it’s a good idea to sign up to all of your local supermarkets.</p> <p>Keep them handy and use them whenever you purchase groceries. While some loyalty programs will try to advertise certain products for a special price, if this a product you don’t normally buy, then avoid buying it now. This rule should apply to products purchase in-store that are advertised as “on special”.</p> <p><strong>Know what discounts your local supermarket offers</strong><br />Some supermarkets or local fruit and veg stores will offer their own special discounts for people over-60 for certain days. You may need to hold a Seniors Card to get the discount, so if you’re eligible consider getting a card. This can be done through your state government’s human services department.</p> <p><strong>Buy supermarket brands over established names</strong><br />A few years ago, home brand items in supermarkets carried a certain stigma around them. Now, however, with the competition considerably warmed up between supermarket giants, home brands have a revamped image. Most people today don’t have a problem buying supermarket-branded items, with many of these products taking over from traditional “name” brands.</p> <p>Price has become the biggest motivating factor for buying supermarket brands. If you’re not too fussy or loyal to any of the established brands, why not try a supermarket item? It could save you considerably at the checkout without affecting your tastebuds too much.</p> <p><strong>Don’t shop hungry!</strong><br />Did you know that hungry people are more likely to spend more at the supermarket and have bigger waistlines? While the advice to avoid grocery shopping when your stomach is grumbling for food has been around for a while, a 2013 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed just how much it can influence what you buy in a supermarket.</p> <p>Researchers gave a group of people a snack before sending them off to shop while another group was given no snack. While both groups bought a similar amount of food, the group of people who hadn’t eaten first bought more food with higher calories. Shopping while you’re hungry will also see your nose turn and your mouth start to salivate towards the whiff of freshly baked bread or roast chicken, perhaps even buying one of these when it wasn’t on the shopping list. If you’re hungry, you’re more likely to succumb to the delicious smells wafting in the air.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Savvy shopper reveals how to score free groceries at Coles and Woolies

<p>An Australian mum has shared her tips on snagging free groceries at the till. </p> <p>The woman from Sydney's north shore took to Facebook to reveal her secrets which managed to bag her a one kilogram tin of Milo and a roast chicken for free last week.</p> <p>“Is everyone aware of the Code of Scanning Practice 1984 at supermarkets?” she asked.</p> <p>“If the price on the shelf is lower than the price the item scans, you get it free."</p> <p>“Check your receipts before leaving [the] shop ladies. They have to refund [you] and give you [the] item."</p> <p>“I usually find two to three items every week!”</p> <p>The Scanning Code of Practice is a voluntary code that many supermarkets have signed up to, including Woolies, Coles, and some IGA and Aldi stores.</p> <p>Under the policy, if an item scans higher than what the shelf price says, the customer is entitled to receive the first item for free.</p> <p>Any subsequent item will be charged at the lower price.</p> <p>The code however, does exclude alcohol, tobacco and items without a barcode, while purchases disputed must be under $50. </p> <p>The policy is well detailed on Coles' website as part of its "promise on price scanning". </p> <div> <p>“If a single item scans at a higher price than the advertised or ticket shelf price for that item, we will give you that item free,” it says.</p> <p>Many people shared their experiences of utilising the policy on the Facebook post, while others shared times they have still been charged full price. </p> <p>“A lot of the time they think people don’t know this, and they will try to just change it to the shelf price,” someone said.</p> <p>“At the service desk, they have a Code of Scanning Practice brochure,” another wrote. “ If they try to argue, I whip it out of my purse.”</p> <p>“I never used to bother saying anything but got sick of getting ripped off at every shop,” someone else added.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> </div>

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Grocery do-gooder finally unmasked

<p dir="ltr">A mystery supermarket do-gooder has been unmasked and revealed to be a retired businessman who says he never wants to grow up.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dean Graham, the son of late rich-lister Neil Graham, came forward and identified himself as the one paying for people’s groceries or restaurant bills, which he says he does on a weekly basis around New Zealand, per the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/mystery-supermarket-angel-paying-for-peoples-groceries-in-canterbury/3FIF2AYHKUZPOUCM5NUGD2MP3Y/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s just giving people something to put a smile on their face really,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“These days it’s a lot of doom and gloom, and things are tough for a lot of people.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Last month, the 56-year-old left more than $200 cash with a checkout operator at a Lincoln New World store to pay for the groceries of the family behind him in line.</p> <p dir="ltr">Jen Stewart, the mum who received his act of kindness, told Star News she and her young family had just been through a difficult period recovering from Covid and that Graham’s gift left her “speechless”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This person didn’t know how grateful I was on that very week that he would pay for my shopping,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">After using $100 to pay for her groceries, she gave the remainder to another grateful single mum to use for her bill.</p> <p dir="ltr">Graham said he first started his random acts of kindness two years ago, after seeing an elderly couple struggle to pay for their lunch at a local sandwich shop.</p> <p dir="ltr">When he went back to the store two months later, one of the staff memebrs told him the couple had begun doing the same for others.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I thought to myself, ‘If I can do that and change the way people think, I think it’s a good thing’,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I care, and I can help, I do want to change people’s lives.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I just think life is so short, I just want to put it out there to believe we all are for other human beings.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Graham has given even more generous gifts to his friends, including a $100,000 truck for a friend’s birthday and eight of his own motorbikes, but he isn’t worried about his generosity being taken advantage of.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Friends don’t hang around me for that, because they knew me from when I had nothing,” Graham said.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said he started at the bottom of Mainfreight, the trucking company his father co-founded, pinching pennies with flatmates while working as a storeman.</p> <p dir="ltr">His life has been anything but uneventful either, having been married twice, been a solo father of five for eight years, and now living with his partner and in the process of building his very own man cave.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-05599472-7fff-a929-aec1-4e935c8fe6f3"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Dean Graham (Facebook)</em></p>

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Cheaper in Oz: One Kiwi shopper’s savvy way to save on groceries

<p dir="ltr">A New Zealand woman has shared the unusual way that she saved 35 percent on her usual grocery bill - and it involves and it even comes with free shipping.</p> <p dir="ltr">The woman, who asked not to be identified, told the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/kiwi-shopper-saves-35-per-cent-ordering-groceries-from-australia/BL3RATPOZGLJQASWDRVY3DC4O4/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em> that purchasing her usual groceries from Australia and shipping them to New Zealand ended up being significantly cheaper than shopping at her local supermarket.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Otago woman ordered 13 items from the neighbouring country, including pasta, nuts, dried fruit, rolled oats, toothbrushes, shampoo and hair dye, via Amazon.</p> <p dir="ltr">She told the publication she received her goods within five days, having paid just $AUD 93.30 ($NZD 100.59).</p> <p dir="ltr">“I only bought items that were included in a free shipping promotion, so I wasn’t charged for shipping. According to the receipt, shipping would have added $15,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">When she compared prices using the Countdown online shopping app, she found that the same items would have cost her an upwards of $30 more, totalling $NZD 139.96 ($AUD 129.82).</p> <p dir="ltr">She found the best deal was on toothpaste, which she paid $AUD 2.50 ($NZD2.69) for.</p> <p dir="ltr">“All the items were long-shelf life items. I don’t think ordering from Australia would work for fresh food,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though she made a significant saving, the savvy shopper says she might not repeat her “crazy little experiment” due to the carbon footprint that came with it.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-baad06f1-7fff-9595-6d01-0b32442ccaaf"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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"Inflation by stealth": How you're paying more without realising it

<p dir="ltr">The saying usually goes “get more bang for your buck” but this has not been the case in recent years.</p> <p dir="ltr">Aussies have been paying a lot more for products that are shrinking in size while prices remain the same.</p> <p dir="ltr">Companies have been changing the size of their products while making the packaging a bit smaller, making it difficult for customers to see the difference.</p> <p dir="ltr">Described by experts as “shrinkflation”, Aussies are paying too much for what should have decreased in price.</p> <p dir="ltr">"You don't notice that you're paying more," InvestSMART's Evan Lucas told <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/shrinkflation-sneaky-way-companies-australia-increase-grocery-price/2a030dc9-ed6c-4bf2-83d3-08ca9873c862" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Nine News</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">"So it's actually inflation by stealth."</p> <p dir="ltr">Smiths chips, Kellogs cereal and Cadbury chocolate are obvious products that have fallen for the shrinkflation.</p> <p dir="ltr">Original Tim Tams come with 11 biscuits in the packet, but that is not the case for other flavours such as Chewy Caramel, Choc Mint, Double Coat, which only have nine and cost the same as the original.</p> <p dir="ltr">The delicious Pringle tubes, which have been commended for not selling air, has gone from 165g of chips to just 134g.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s expected that retailers will take advantage of upping their prices as petrol soars to more than $2 a litre, labour shortages and global supply chain issues.</p> <p dir="ltr">Queensland University of Technology retail expert Dr Gary Mortimer predicts inflated grocery prices over the next few months.</p> <p dir="ltr">“What we’re going to see in the next 12 to 18 months is slightly inflated food and grocery prices, somewhere between three and five per cent,” he told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/consumer-frustration-set-to-peak-as-supermarket-shrinkflation-rises/news-story/63cecb0bc9164d93e88811684356624f" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Shrinkflation is probably one strategy that we will see become more readily applied so that it doesn’t have a significant hit on the household bottom dollar.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Dr Mortimer said many consumers would see shrinkflation as not fair, but retailers were aware of families doing it tough.</p> <p dir="ltr">“By giving you a little less, maybe 25 or 50 grams, you can still essentially get the majority of the product [while not paying any extra].”</p> <p dir="ltr">Customers are advised to compare the “price per 100 grams” labels before purchasing a product.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Drones are now delivering groceries in Canberra – how does it work?

<p>Major Australian supermarket Coles yesterday announced <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7641084/supermarket-to-offer-drone-delivery-for-grocery-items-in-canberra/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" data-type="URL" data-id="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7641084/supermarket-to-offer-drone-delivery-for-grocery-items-in-canberra/">the launch of its partnership</a> with drone delivery service <a href="https://wing.com/en_au/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" data-type="URL" data-id="https://wing.com/en_au/">Wing</a> to bring drone-delivered groceries to customers in Canberra.</p> <p>The battery-powered <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/robotics/drones-for-good/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" data-type="URL" data-id="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/robotics/drones-for-good/">drones</a> have a one-metre wingspan, weigh about 4.8 kilograms, and are equipped with both fixed wings and hover propellers, allowing them to behave as miniature versions of both aeroplanes and helicopters. They can travel at speeds of more than 110 km/h and carry packages of up to 1.2 kilograms.</p> <p>According to Simon Rossi, General Manager at Wing Australia, the drones typically require less energy to make a delivery than a kettle does to boil. </p> <p><strong>So how does drone delivery work? </strong></p> <p>Products can be ordered using the Wing app. Coles is currently offering delivery of more than 250 of its most popular grocery items, including bread, fresh produce, healthcare items, and toilet paper. </p> <p>When the order is received, the products are packed and loaded onto a drone, which ascends to its flying altitude of about 45 metres above ground and sets off for the delivery location. The drone will follow a route planned by Wing’s unmanned traffic management (UTM) software. </p> <p>“The aircraft automatically monitors its systems to make sure it is safe to fly and will prevent take-off or automatically take contingency actions if a problem is detected,” Rossi explains.  </p> <p>“Our trained remote aircraft pilots oversee everything to make sure the system is operating smoothly.” </p> <p>Once arrived, the drone descends to its delivery height of about seven metres above ground and hovers as it lowers the package to the ground on a tether. The package is automatically released, and the drone returns to the delivery facility. </p> <p>Customers can track the progress of their delivery on the Wing app. According to Wing, the company’s fastest delivery time to date is two minutes and 47 seconds from order to delivery. </p> <figure class="wp-block-embed is-type-video is-provider-youtube wp-block-embed-youtube wp-embed-aspect-16-9 wp-has-aspect-ratio"> <div class="wp-block-embed__wrapper"> <div class="entry-content-asset"> <div class="embed-wrapper"> <div class="inner"><iframe title="Wing's drone delivery service in action in Australia" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4xrCuPACmq8?feature=oembed" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> </div> </div> </div> </figure> <p><strong>Is drone delivery catching on?</strong></p> <p>Wing has existing drone delivery partnerships with several businesses in both Canberra and Logan, Queensland. The service also has a presence in the US and Finland. </p> <p>According to Rossi, the company completed more than 100,000 drone deliveries in Australia in 2021, and 30,000 in the first two months of 2022. </p> <p>Early feedback from customers on the partnership with Coles in Canberra has been positive, he says. </p> <p>“Customers are ordering a range of items including pantry staples like bread, eggs, and milk, fresh produce and convenience meals, as well as health care items like over-the-counter cough medicine and bandages.”</p> <p><strong>Are there any risks to drone delivery? </strong></p> <p>Adding large numbers of unmanned flying machines to the air would seem to have the potential to be disruptive. </p> <div class="newsletter-box"> <div id="wpcf7-f6-p183733-o1" class="wpcf7" dir="ltr" lang="en-US" role="form"> <form class="wpcf7-form mailchimp-ext-0.5.56 resetting spai-bg-prepared" action="/technology/robotics/drone-delivery-groceries-canberra/#wpcf7-f6-p183733-o1" method="post" novalidate="novalidate" data-status="resetting"> <p style="display: none !important;"><span class="wpcf7-form-control-wrap referer-page"><input class="wpcf7-form-control wpcf7-text referer-page spai-bg-prepared" name="referer-page" type="hidden" value="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/robotics/drone-delivery-groceries-canberra/" data-value="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/robotics/drone-delivery-groceries-canberra/" aria-invalid="false" /></span></p> <p><!-- Chimpmail extension by Renzo Johnson --></form> </div> </div> <p>“Perhaps Wing’s most interesting feature is its airspace integration and deconfliction,” says Pauline Pounds, an associate professor in information technology and electrical engineering at the University of Queensland. </p> <p>“Balancing the needs of CASA [the Civil Aviation Safety Authority], commercial aviation operators and other drone operators requires some care.”</p> <p>Because they fly in a zone between ‘ground clutter’ and manned aviation traffic, the drones are likely to remain comparatively safe. This also helps explain why flying drones are increasingly integrated into our everyday lives, while driverless cars languish on the sidelines. </p> <p>“It’s far easier to build a robot to fly in clear air where obstacles are rare, rather than on roads where pedestrians and human drivers may behave erratically,” says Pounds. </p> <p>However, the drones’ airspace won’t be completely risk-free. </p> <p>“A collision between a drone and a bird is unlikely to be a pleasant experience for either,” Pounds admits. </p> <p><strong>Is drone delivery the future of grocery shopping?</strong></p> <p>Unfortunately, a drone can’t yet do your entire weekly grocery shop for you, and Rossi emphasises that this isn’t the service’s intention. </p> <p>“Rather, it is to enable customers to quickly order small grocery and convenience items, coffees, and snacks which they may need in a hurry,” he says. </p> <p>But could it be done one day?</p> <p>“Scaling drones to carry heavier payloads is a fundamental challenge: the more the drone carries, the shorter its flight will be,” says Pounds. </p> <p>“Drones are optimised for specific payload-range characteristics. Improving performance requires more energy-dense batteries, more efficient propulsion systems; the same limitations that hold back flying cars. </p> <p>“However, a distributed network of mini-aerodromes allowing packages to make many short hops – like a drone ‘Pony Express’ – could allow these systems to scale without limit, much like mobile phone base station cells.” </p> <p>Coles frames the new partnership with Wing as part of its strategy to become Australia’s most sustainable supermarket, as drone delivery options could reduce the need for cars and trucks. </p> <p>Wing also emphasise their green credentials, describing drone delivery as “one of the fastest, safest and most environmentally friendly modes of delivering goods when compared to a truck or car”. </p> <p>But with the drones only able to carry a kilo or two, would environmentally-conscious supermarkets be better off investing in electric cars and trucks instead? </p> <p>“Flying is innately energy-intensive and will always be more demanding than a comparable electric vehicle rolling the same distance, but drones fly directly point to point and do not require detours or stop at traffic lights,” says Pounds. </p> <p>“However, both drones and wheeled electric vehicles also have differing manufacturing, maintenance and disposal costs; whether autonomous cars or drones turn out to be more energy efficient over their lifetimes has yet to be seen.”</p> <p><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --></p> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=183733&amp;title=Drones+are+now+delivering+groceries+in+Canberra+%E2%80%93+how+does+it+work%3F" width="1" height="1" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /></p> <p><!-- End of tracking content syndication --></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/robotics/drone-delivery-groceries-canberra/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/matilda-handlsey-davis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Matilda Handsley-Davis</a>. Matilda is a science writer at Cosmos. She holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science (Honours) from the University of Adelaide.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Wing (Facebook)</em></p> </div>

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