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Still fab after 60 years: how The Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night made pop cinema history

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267">Alison Blair</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p>I first saw A Hard Day’s Night at a film festival over 20 years ago, at the insistence of my mum. By then, it was already decades old, but I remember being enthralled by its high-spirited energy.</p> <p>A Beatles fan, mum had introduced me to the band’s records in my childhood. At home, we listened to Please Please Me, the band’s 1963 single, and the Rubber Soul album from 1965, which I loved.</p> <p>Television regularly showed old black-and-white scenes of Beatlemania that, to a ten-year-old in the neon-lit 1980s, seemed like ancient history. But then, I’d never seen a full-length Beatles film. I had no idea what I was in for.</p> <p>When the lights went down at Dunedin’s Regent Theatre, the opening chord of the film’s title song announced its intentions: an explosion of youthful vitality, rhythmic visuals, comical high jinks and the electrifying thrill of Beatlemania in 1964.</p> <p>This time, it didn’t seem ancient at all.</p> <p>Since that first viewing, I’ve returned to A Hard Day’s Night again and again. I now show it to my students as a historically significant example of pop music film making – visually inventive cinema, emblematic of a fresh era in youth culture, popular music and fandom.</p> <h2>Beatlemania on celluloid</h2> <p>A musical comedy depicting a chaotic 36 hours in the life of the Beatles, A Hard Day’s Night has now reached its 60th anniversary.</p> <p>Directed by <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0504513/">Richard Lester</a>, the film premiered in London on July 6 1964, with its first public screening a day later (incidentally, also Ringo Starr’s birthday), and the <a href="https://www.discogs.com/master/24003-The-Beatles-A-Hard-Days-Night">album of the same name</a> released on July 10.</p> <p>The band’s popularity was by then reaching dizzying heights of hysteria, all reflected in the film. The Beatles are chased by hordes of fans, take a train trip, appear on TV, run from the police in a Keystone Cops-style sequence, and play a televised concert in front of screaming real-life Beatles fans.</p> <p>Side one of the album provides the soundtrack, and the film inspired pop music film and video from then on, from the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060010/">Monkees TV series</a> (1966–68) to the Spice Girls’ <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120185/">Spice World</a> (1997) and music videos as we know them today.</p> <h2>The original music video</h2> <p>Postwar teen culture and consumerism had been on the rise since the 1950s. In 1960s Britain, youth music TV programmes, notably <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0196287/">Ready Steady Go!</a> (1963–66), meant pop music now had a developing visual culture.</p> <p>The youthful zest and vitality of ‘60s London was reflected in the pop-cultural sensibility, modern satirical humour and crisp visual impact of A Hard Day’s Night.</p> <p>Influenced by <a href="https://nofilmschool.com/french-new-wave-cinema">French New Wave</a> film making, and particularly the early 1960s work of <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000419/">Jean-Luc Godard</a>, A Hard Day’s Night employs <em><a href="https://indiefilmhustle.com/cinema-verite/">cinéma vérité</a></em>-style hand-held cinematography, brisk jump cuts, unusual framing and dynamic angles, high-spirited action, and a self-referential nonchalance.</p> <p>The film also breaks the “fourth wall”, with characters directly addressing the audience in closeup, and reveals the apparatus of the visual performance of music: cameras and TV monitors are all part of the frame.</p> <p>Cutting the shots to the beat of the music – as in the Can’t Buy Me Love sequence – lends a visual rhythm that would later become the norm in music video editing. Lester developed this technique further in the second Beatles film, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059260/">Help!</a> (1965).</p> <p>The closing sequence of A Hard Day’s Night is possibly the film’s most dynamic: photographic images of the band edited to the beat in the style of stop-motion animation. Sixty years on, it still feels fresh, especially as so much contemporary film making remains hidebound by formulaic Hollywood rules.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/604790/original/file-20240704-17-ov77mn.jpg?ixlib=rb-4.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A Hard Day's Night movie poster" /><figcaption><span class="caption">A new pop aesthetic: original film poster for A Hard Day’s Night.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Getty Images</span></span></figcaption></figure> <h2>Slapstick and class awareness</h2> <p>As with much popular culture from the past, the humour in A Hard Day’s Night doesn’t always doesn’t land the way it would have in 1964. And yet, there are moments that seem surprisingly modern in their razor-sharp irony.</p> <p>In particular, the band’s Liverpudlian working-class-lad jibes and chaotic energy contrast brilliantly with the film’s upper-class characters. Actor Victor Spinetti’s comically over-anxious TV director, constantly hand-wringing over the boys’ rebelliousness, underscores the era-defining change the Beatles represented.</p> <p>Corporate pop-culture consumerism is also satirised. John Lennon “snorts” from a Coca-Cola bottle, a moment so knowingly silly it registers as more contemporary than it really is. George Harrison deflects a journalist’s banal questions with scathingly witty answers, and cuts a fashion company down to size by describing their shirt designs as “grotesque”.</p> <p>And there is Paul McCartney’s running joke that his grandfather – played by Wilfred Brambell from groundbreaking sitcom <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0057785/">Steptoe and Son</a> (1962–74) – is “very clean”.</p> <p>Even the film’s old-fashioned visual slapstick still holds up in 2024. Showing the film to this year’s students, I didn’t expect quite as much laughter when Ringo’s attempts to be chivalrous result in a fall-down-a-hole mishap.</p> <p>In 2022, the <a href="https://www.criterion.com/">Criterion Collection</a> released a high-resolution restoration of the film, so today A Hard Day’s Night can be seen in all its fresh, black-and-white, youthful vigour.</p> <p>Happy 60th, A Hard Day’s Night. And happy 84th, Ringo. Both still as lively and energetic as ever.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/228598/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alison-blair-223267"><em>Alison Blair</em></a><em>, Teaching Fellow in Music, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-otago-1304">University of Otago</a></em></p> <p><em>Image </em><em>credits: THA/Shutterstock Editorial </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/still-fab-after-60-years-how-the-beatles-a-hard-days-night-made-pop-cinema-history-228598">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Movies

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‘Screaming, chanting, struggling teenagers’: the enduring legacy of the Beatles tour of Australia, 60 years on

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michelle-arrow-45">Michelle Arrow</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></em></p> <p>The Beatles began their first and only tour of Australia 60 years ago this week. It remains a landmark event in our social and cultural history.</p> <p>The Beatles spent almost three weeks in Australia and New Zealand. Touching down in a wet and cold Sydney on Thursday June 11 1964, they played 32 concerts in eight cities: first Adelaide (where drummer Ringo Starr, suffering from tonsillitis and pharyngitis, was replaced by Jimmie Nicol), then Melbourne (with Starr again), Sydney, Wellington, Auckland, Dunedin, Christchurch and two final shows in Brisbane on June 29 and 30.</p> <p>Charming and irreverent as they were, The Beatles themselves were only part of the reason the tour was so memorable.</p> <p>It was the hordes of screaming fans who followed their every move that astonished onlookers.</p> <h2>The rise of Beatlemania</h2> <p>By 1964, Australian teenagers had access to a global youth culture. As the feminist author Anne Summers, then an Adelaide teenager, recalled in her memoir Ducks on the Pond: "It was rare for world-famous pop stars to come to Adelaide and unheard of for a group at the height of their celebrity."</p> <p>That Australian teenagers had the opportunity to see The Beatles in person in 1964 was due to a stroke of luck for tour promoter <a href="https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/brodziak-kenneth-leo-kenn-32165">Kenn Brodziak</a>. In late 1963, Brodziak secured the then up-and-coming Beatles for a three-week tour of Australia at a bargain rate.</p> <p>By the time the tour took place, the Beatles were the biggest band in the world.</p> <p>Their popularity had skyrocketed throughout 1964. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jenWdylTtzs">I Want To Hold Your Hand</a> went to number one on the Australian charts in mid-January and the top six singles that year were <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_top_25_singles_for_1964_in_Australia">all by The Beatles</a>.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iUCl9FWLzgM?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>So when the band arrived here, Beatlemania was the predictable result: crowds of surging, screaming young people, who turned out in massive numbers wherever the Beatles appeared.</p> <p>While the earliest rock ‘n’ roll fans (and even performers) in the late 1950s were often labelled <a href="https://eprints.qut.edu.au/633/1/moore_keith.pdf">juvenile delinquents</a>, there were too many teenagers swept up in Beatlemania for them to be dismissed in the same way. The crowds became a spectacle in themselves.</p> <h2>‘A chanting mass of humanity’</h2> <p>Beatlemaniacs were loud and unruly. The Daily Telegraph reported: "50,000 screaming, chanting, struggling teenagers crowded outside Melbourne’s Southern Cross Hotel this afternoon to give the Beatles the wildest reception of their careers."</p> <p>It was a similar story in Adelaide. The Advertiser described: "police, their arms locked together and forming a tight circle around the car carrying the Beatles, had to force a path through the surging, screaming crowd […] Police said they had never seen anything like it."</p> <p>The crowds overwhelmed observers with their sheer size – a “solid, swaying, chanting mass of humanity”, according to The Age – and noise. The Daily Telegraph consulted an acoustics expert to conclude “Beatles fans scream like [a] jet in flight”.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2MOFBmxPUCs?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Beatlemania was visible (and noisy) evidence of a growing teenage consumer market and the assimilation of rock music, dancing and youth culture into the leisure practices of middle-class youth. It was proof (if anyone still needed it) the youth market was highly developed and extremely lucrative.</p> <p>The speed with which companies found a ready audience for Beatles merchandise (wigs, souvenirs, magazines) demonstrated the relative affluence of the youthful consumer in mid-1960s Australia. This market would continue to grow throughout the decade.</p> <h2>A new idea of youth</h2> <p>Perhaps the most remarkable characteristic of Beatlemania was its femaleness. While not all Beatles fans were girls, it was the crying, screaming girls who attracted the most media comment.</p> <p>The Daily Telegraph described them this way: "It was the girls, the nymphets of 1964 in their uniform of black slacks and duffle coats and purple sweaters – who showed the orgiastic devotion due to the young men from the damp and foggy dead end of England […] the girls wept, screamed, grimaced, fainted, fell over, threw things, stamped, jumped and shouted […] [The Beatles] were the high priests of pop culture, taking due homage from a captive, hypnotised hysterical congregation."</p> <p>The references to “nymphets” with their “orgiastic devotion” tells us many Australians thought these young women were transgressing the norms expected for their era. Young women in the early 1960s were still expected to be demure and responsible. Beatles fans were breaking these rules, and helping to rewrite the meanings of youth and gender in 1960s Australia.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wyrs5uR-nwc?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Beatlemania was an expression of female desire. The Beatles were powerful objects of fantasy for many fans in a world where sexual mores were slowly changing but where women were still expected to police male desire, stopping young men from “going too far”. A fantasy relationship with a Beatle became a way for young women to dream about their ideal relationship.</p> <p>Screaming, chasing a Beatle down the street: these were acts of rebellion and joy that prefigured the rise of women’s liberation, with its embrace of rebellious femininity.</p> <p>Beatlemania reminds us that, even if women were not always behind the microphone or playing the guitar, they have been important to the history of rock ‘n’ roll music as fans and audience members.</p> <p>Beatlemania marked the ascendancy of a new idea of youth: these young people weren’t mere replicas of their parents, but they were not juvenile delinquents, either. The Beatles tour drew young Australians more closely into a transnational youth culture, fostering the development of a distinctively Australian variant here.</p> <p>Beatlemania also demonstrated the massed power of youth. By the end of the 1960s, many Australian teenagers were gathering on the streets to protest, rather than celebrate, and to make political demands, rather than to scream.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/227680/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michelle-arrow-45"><em>Michelle Arrow</em></a><em>, Professor of History, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Granger/Shutterstock Editorial</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/screaming-chanting-struggling-teenagers-the-enduring-legacy-of-the-beatles-tour-of-australia-60-years-on-227680">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

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"Completely in shock": Beloved actor dies suddenly at age 60

<p>Adrian Schiller has passed away suddenly at the age of 60, with his family and friends sharing their devastation over the unexpected loss. </p> <p>The British actor's agency Scott Marshall Partners confirmed he had died unexpectedly earlier this week in a statement to multiple outlets.</p> <div> <div id="adspot-mobile-mobile-3-above"></div> </div> <p>"It is with the heaviest and saddest hearts that we announce the death of our beloved client, Adrian Schiller, on Wednesday 3rd April," the representatives told <em><a title="People" href="https://people.com/adrian-schiller-dead-60-8624756" target="" rel="">People</a></em>.</p> <p>"He has died far too soon, and we, his family and close friends are devastated by the loss," the statement continued.</p> <p>"His death was sudden and unexpected and no further details around its cause are yet available," they concluded."</p> <p>Schiller's career spanned four decades and saw him make waves in TV, film and theatre roles around the world.</p> <p>The actor made his screen debut in the 1992 film <em>Prime Suspect</em>, and later became known for his role as Aethelhelm in the historical drama series <em>The Last Kingdom</em>.</p> <p>The statement provided by Schiller's agency also shared that he had been in Australia just before his death, reprising his role in <em>The Lehman Trilogy</em> play. </p> <p>"A prodigiously talented actor, he had just returned from Sydney, where he had been appearing in The Lehman Trilogy and was looking forward to continuing the international tour in San Francisco," the statement confirmed.</p> <p>Across his career, Schiller also appeared in <em>Victoria</em>, <em>Death In Paradise</em>, a 2014 film adaption of <em>The Crucible</em>, <em>Beauty and the Beast,</em> <em>Doctor Who</em> and <em>The Danish Girl</em>.</p> <p>Schiller's <em>Victoria</em> co-star Tilly Steele remembered the late actor as being "remarkable."</p> <p>"I cannot believe that Adrian Schiller has died. He was a remarkable actor and person. I'm completely in shock and I'm thinking of everyone who knew him and was close to him," she wrote on social media. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Caring

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Why Mary Poppins has received a new rating 60 years on

<p dir="ltr">Almost 60 years after <em>Mary Poppins</em> was first released, the classic film has been given a new rating by the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC). </p> <p dir="ltr">The BBFC, which regulates films and video content in the country, changed the rating of the 1964 Disney musical last week from U (Universal) to PG (Parental Guidance) because it features a racial slur once used by white Europeans to refer to the native peoples of southern Africa.</p> <p dir="ltr">"<em>Mary Poppins</em> (1964) includes two uses of the discriminatory term 'hottentots'," a BBFC spokesperson said in a statement to CNN.</p> <p dir="ltr">"While <em>Mary Poppins</em> has a historical context, the use of discriminatory language is not condemned, and ultimately exceeds our guidelines for acceptable language at U."</p> <p dir="ltr">The approaching 60th anniversary of the film is what prompted the BBFC to reexamine the film, as it is set to return to UK cinemas in celebration of the milestone. </p> <p dir="ltr">Even as <em>Mary Poppins</em> remains a treasured part of UK culture, the film has long been criticised for the use of blackface. It's partly in this context that the discriminatory language referenced by BBFC appears in the film.</p> <p dir="ltr">In one scene, the eccentric Admiral Boom asks one of the Banks children if he is going on an adventure to "defeat hottentots." </p> <p dir="ltr">Later in the film, as Admiral Boom sees chimney sweeps with soot-blackened faces dancing in the distance, he shouts, "We're being attacked by hottentots!" and orders a cannon to be fired in their direction.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Hottentot" is a derogatory term used by European settlers to refer to Khoikhoi peoples of South Africa and Namibia, according to the Oxford Dictionary reference.</p> <p dir="ltr">Per the new film rating, children of any age can still watch without an adult present, but parents should consider whether the content might upset younger or more sensitive children, a BBFC spokesperson said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Disney</em></p>

Movies

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Demi Moore flaunts stunning bikini body at 60

<p>Fans have been wowed by Demi Moore's latest Instagram post, after the 60-year-old actress flaunted her bikini body in a series of photos documenting her recent “nature immersion” trip.</p> <p>“Sharing a few precious moments from my recent adventure with @tilliewaltonofficial and @nash2o on #TilliesRiverTrip,”  she captioned the post. </p> <p>"Back in September, I had the opportunity to journey through the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River alongside so many beautiful souls. </p> <p>"We laughed, cried and formed lifelong bonds that I will hold close to my heart forever. I will never truly be able to describe the many ways that this recent nature immersion has impacted me," she added. </p> <p>The star shared a photo of her in a black bikini standing under a waterfall, with her arms in the air. </p> <p>"Standing on the banks of the Colorado River as we all took in its magnificence and beauty, I was reminded of the urgent need to preserve and protect this vital lifeline," she wrote before urging her followers to “be the change we want to see.”</p> <p>She added a few other photos and a video of her with some fellow travellers while on their nature immersion trip. </p> <p>Fans praised the  <em>G.I. Jane</em> star for raising awareness and her timeless beauty. </p> <p>“And this Ladies and Gentlemen’s is what 60 year old looks like. Insane," wrote one fan. </p> <p>“You get better with age,” agreed another. </p> <p>“Demi looks amazing! If I look that good at her age I’ll be happy," commented a third. </p> <p>“Yes … had the honour to join @tilliewaltonofficial on a Grand Canyon trip and it’s LIFE CHANGING,” journalist Frank Elaridi wrote, adding, “Thank you for raising awareness to protect rivers ️.”</p> <p>"So much gratitude for dropping deep into nature with you. Your radiant wisdom and effervescence rocks my world!" added one of the travellers she went with. </p> <p>"Incredible Demi what's your secret to staying so young and beautiful 😍" commented another. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Body

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93-year-old widower with dementia to get kicked out of his home of 60 years

<p>A widower with dementia has been told to pack up his belongings and leave his Brisbane home of 60 years to make way for a school drop-off zone. </p> <p>Trevor Connolly, 93, had no plans on leaving his Coorparoo home in Brisbane's south-east, until a notification of resumption, also known as a compulsory acquisition letter, arrived in his mailbox in October with notice he needs to leave before Christmas.</p> <p>The letter notified Connolly of the Department of Education's plans to forcibly acquire their home and build a new school. </p> <p>The movement of the school is a knock-on effect of Brisbane's expansion plans to accommodate the hosting the 2032 Olympics. </p> <p>The expansion is resulting in the demolition of the heritage-listed East Brisbane State School, which is being rebuilt on the site of the Coorparoo Secondary College.</p> <p>Mr Connolly's home is the last domino to fall in the construction plans, having been designated to be demolished and turned into a drop-off zone for the new school.</p> <p>The 93-year-old widower described the state's decision to acquire his home as "lunacy" and "madness", saying there are numerous other properties they could have chosen.</p> <p>"You feel so useless, what can you do about it?" Connolly told <em>7News</em>.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CynVcsMpiiW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CynVcsMpiiW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by 7NEWS Queensland (@7newsqueensland)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"There's no need to knock the house down, there's plenty of room next door."</p> <p>He said the idea of moving out of the house he has called home for over half-a-century as "a heck of a change to even think about". </p> <p>His daughter, Anne, didn't mince words when speaking about the state's Department of Education's plans, describing them as "quite brutal really, and insensitive".</p> <p>Mr Connolly and the department are yet to enter negotiations into compensation for the widower's property, while a spokesperson for the Queensland Department of Education said, "Decisions to acquire land are not taken lightly."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Seven</em></p>

Legal

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7 simple wealth creation ideas for over 60s

<p>In today's world of rising costs and economic uncertainties, building wealth after the age of 60 might seem like a daunting task. However, it's essential to remember that it's never too late to take control of your financial future and explore innovative ways to boost your income and savings.</p> <p>The latest Retirement Standard from the super industry body ASFA reveals that singles aged 65-84 need an annual income of approximately $50,207 for a 'comfortable lifestyle' in retirement, while couples require a combined income of $70,806 per year. With the full age pension often falling short of these numbers, many seniors are seeking alternative ways to supplement their income during retirement.</p> <p>Let’s delve into some practical and achievable wealth creation ideas tailored to older Australians who are looking to secure their financial well-being in their golden years.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Intentional Spending</strong></li> </ol> <p>Cutting down on non-essential spending is a powerful way to save money. Review your discretionary expenses and identify areas where you can make reductions. For instance, consider cooking at home instead of dining out, exploring free or low-cost local activities for entertainment, and delaying the purchase of luxury items. Prioritise experiences that provide value without straining your budget.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Pressure Test Your Retirement Strategy</strong></li> </ol> <p>It's essential to regularly review your retirement plan, taking into account the evolving financial landscape, legislative changes, and opportunities to minimise costs. By doing so, you can maximise the funds under your control and make informed decisions that align with your retirement goals. Keep in mind that the financial world is dynamic, and staying proactive in managing your retirement assets can lead to a more secure and comfortable retirement.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Get rid of things you don't need by selling online</strong></li> </ol> <p>Embrace the digital age and leverage online marketplaces to turn your unneeded possessions into cash. If you're not tech-savvy, don't hesitate to enlist the help of your grandchildren or any trusted youngster who can guide you through the process. Selling items online not only declutters your living space but also opens up opportunities to supplement your retirement income. Embracing technology can be empowering and profitable at any age!</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Part-Time Job Opportunities in the Gig Economy</strong></li> </ol> <p>Embrace the gig economy by exploring part-time job opportunities. Various platforms offer flexible work arrangements suitable for seniors, such as rideshare driving or food delivery services. These roles allow you to set your own hours and supplement your retirement income.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Freelancing or Consulting</strong></li> </ol> <p>Your years of experience and expertise are valuable assets. Consider venturing into part-time freelancing or consulting opportunities within your field. Many businesses are eager to hire experienced professionals for specific projects or advisory roles, providing an opportunity to boost your income without a full-time commitment.</p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong>Renting Out a Spare Room</strong></li> </ol> <p>If you have extra space in your home, consider renting out a spare room to short-term guests. Websites like Airbnb make it easy to find renters, providing a consistent source of income and helping to cover housing costs.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong>Compare and Save</strong></li> </ol> <p>Once you've reviewed your spending habits, identify areas where you can potentially save money by shopping around and obtaining comparison quotes. Renegotiating bills and subscriptions can also yield significant savings. Don't forget to review your insurance policies, adjusting the coverage and excess to potentially reduce premiums.</p> <p>Creating wealth in your golden years may seem challenging, but with the right approach and determination, it's entirely achievable. By exploring these simple and practical ideas, older Australians can take steps toward securing their financial future and enjoying a comfortable retirement. Remember that every financial decision should align with your individual circumstances and objectives. </p> <p>However, it's crucial to note that earning extra income during retirement can impact age pension payments. It can be worth seeking financial advice about the best way to increase income during retirement without compromising any other entitlements, so consider seeking professional guidance to make informed choices on your path to financial security, ensuring a comfortable and worry-free retirement.</p> <p><em><strong>Amanda Thompson, author of Financially Fit Women, is a sought-after speaker and qualified financial adviser.  As the founder of Endurance Financial, Amanda is driven to renew personal and confidence by providing the financial knowledge and guidance to have a great relationship with money allowing you to become your own CFO (Confident, Focussed &amp; On top of your Finances). For more information visit <a href="http://www.endurancefinancial.com.au">www.endurancefinancial.com.au</a></strong></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><span style="color: #0b4cb4;"> </span></p>

Retirement Income

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Lisa Rinna’s totally nude update at 60

<p dir="ltr">Lisa Rinna wasn't afraid to flaunt her birthday suit in her latest Instagram update.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 60-year-old<em> Days of Our Lives</em> star bared it all in an homage to Catherine O'Hara’s iconic character Moira Rose on <em>Schitt’s Creek</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Moira Rose says you should take as many naked pics of yourself while you still can and celebrate it,” Rinna captioned the photo posted on her Instagram stories.</p> <p dir="ltr">“OK Moira,” she added with a selfie of herself posing proudly in her birthday suit with brown hearts barely censoring her private parts.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also added a “happy Sunday” GIF in the bottom corner of her photo.</p> <p dir="ltr">She continues to make waves as she shared a more recent update of her posing in a latex outfit as part of her new Rinna Beauty campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">“A little Latex hand modelling ,” she captioned the video as she confidently posed for the cameras.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvJIbAAxqK3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvJIbAAxqK3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by L I S A R I N N A (@lisarinna)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Fans took to the comments to praise the Melrose Place actress, with many of them commenting multiple fire emojis.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Glamorous!!! ♥️♦️” wrote one fan.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Iconic,” commented another.</p> <p dir="ltr">“How is it you look the same as you did on Days and Melrose Place?! You are still stunning and fabulous 🔥💜” commented a third.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p>

Beauty & Style

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Maccas aren’t lovin’ the over 60s

<p dir="ltr">A McDonald’s in Auckland Central has landed itself in hot water after posting a job ad that wanted nothing to do with the over 60 workforce. </p> <p dir="ltr">The post, shared to the establishment’s Facebook page and since removed, sought new staff to cover the 10pm to 6am ‘graveyard’ shift. The usual benefits and various position criteria were listed, but it was one line at the bottom that caught the attention - and ire - of the masses.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Any age from 16 to 60,” the listing read.</p> <p dir="ltr">Feedback came fast and furious, with many outraged by the blatant ageism the fast food giant was peddling. And while McDonald’s tried to pass it off as the fault of a franchisee, the store’s manager instead said that their head office was at fault.</p> <p dir="ltr">Social media users were vocal about what they thought of the ad, and it wasn’t long before legal experts and union representatives got involved in the ongoing uproar - and even the big wigs over at McDonald’s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We’ve been made aware that a job ad by one of our franchisees has created some debate on social media like Reddit, as it references an age range of 16-60,” company spokesperson Simon Kenny said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The reference in the copy was intended to illustrate that people of all ages are welcome. We’ve asked the franchisee to update the copy to avoid any potential confusion.”</p> <p dir="ltr">As Joe Carolan from New Zealand’s Unite Union told the <em>New Zealand Herald</em>, “contrary to the myth that most McDonald’s jobs are [ideal for] part-time students, improvements made by the union throughout the years have seen many workers stay in these jobs into their 50s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Older workers bring experience, stability and maturity to a workplace and we call on McDonald's to end this discriminatory ageism.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Employment law expert Max Whitehead added that the pay - $22.80 per hour - combined with the age restrictions, were a “blatant” breach of the Human Rights Act. </p> <p dir="ltr">And for those who thought the line had just been an ill-advised marketing move, Whitehead noted “if it really is to get a catchy cliche going, it’s a stupid thing to do.” </p> <p dir="ltr">Whitehead’s fellow expert, Professor Bill Hodge, had more to say on the matter of ageism too, noting that The Human Rights Act actually bans discrimination against people over the age of 60, though he saw no issue with the teenage half of the equation. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We discriminate against people 14 or 15 all the time and it’s justifiable to say ‘no, you can’t drive a car, you can’t leave school’,” he said. “On the face of it I see no obvious requirement that would exclude people over 60.”</p> <p dir="ltr">As a spokesperson for the Humans Right Campaign informed the <em>New Zealand Herald</em>, The Human Rights Act 1993 had rendered it unlawful for people to be treated differently for their age during the employment process. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It is unlawful to discriminate against employees, job applicants, voluntary workers, people seeking work through an employment agency and contract workers because of age,” the spokesperson explained. “The only exception is where, for reasons of authenticity, being of a particular age is a genuine occupational qualification for the position or employment.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Shutterstock, Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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60-plus women are ditching the hair dye

<p><em><strong>Susan Krauss Whitbourne is a professor of Psychology and Brain Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She writes the Fulfilment at Any Age blog for Psychology Today.</strong></em></p> <p>If you’re tired of those monthly visits to the salon, or even your own sessions over the sink, you’re not alone. <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/23/fashion/shes-done-with-washing-it-away.html?_r=0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Leah Rozen</a></span></strong>, writing in the <em>New York Times</em>, announced to the world that she’s grey, 57, and loving it, proudly announcing that “Blondes may have more fun, but we grey gals have it made in our shade.”</p> <p>How about you? Are you battling those tell-tale roots, or revelling in the glory of your own grey locks? If so, perhaps you share Rozen’s feeling of liberation. If not, you might ask yourself whether looking young is really worth all that expense and effort.</p> <p>There are plenty of reasons to cover up our signs of a maturing scalp. In fact, as Rozen herself acknowledges, she’s definitely got the “old lady” look going for her. In our youth-oriented society, showing your age may preclude you from certain opportunities. Despite legislation, ageism still exists and can take many forms, ranging from biases against the abilities of older workers to stereotyped beliefs about their personalities and work attitudes. As their self-image and abilities change, older workers can begin to doubt their self-efficacy. A self-fulfilling prophecy can develop, resulting in their further losing the ability to perform up to par. To prevent this outcome, many older women and men take the preventative action of keeping up their youthful personas.</p> <p>Ageism may take many forms outside the workplace. One way is for younger adults just to avoid you altogether. They may not be openly hostile but instead make older adults “invisible” — that is, not worthy of any attention at all. Perhaps they’re afraid of being tainted by the aging vibes you give off.</p> <p>Risking the wrath, visible or not, of ageism can make going grey a dangerous proposition. However, thinking about how and why you’re trying to maintain your youthful image for as long as possible can give you important insights into understanding yourself and your feelings about life changes.</p> <p>You might ask yourself to what lengths you go, and are willing to go, to remain young-looking. Of course it would be ludicrous to suggest that women, and men should give up all attempts to look good. But looking good doesn’t have to mean looking young. You can get out of the youth trap and still feel great about the persona you present to the world, if not your own inner sense of self.</p> <p>Take an honest look at yourself right now. What is working and what isn’t? Which aspects of your hair, makeup and clothing reflect how you really feel about yourself, and which reflect your desire to blend in with the young crowd? If you don’t trust yourself to give the right answer, you might want to consult someone who’s objective to get a second opinion (NOT your children). It’s hard to find someone whose opinion you can trust, because virtually anyone working in clothing, makeup counters or hair salons benefits from selling you their youth-oriented products. (Just think about how much those skin creams are costing you.) If you feel that these people aren’t being honest, you might consider talking to a friend, co-worker or family member (again, not the children) who pulls off an age-appropriate look.</p> <p>Thinking about the image you try to present to the world can give you great insight into your own identity and feelings about how you are changing -and improving- over time. As we cross each aging threshold, including the changes in our hair, skin and bodily functions and appearance, there’s an opportunity to reflect on the deeper meaning of these changes to our sense of who we are. Many people try to put off the inevitable as long as possible, but eventually bounce back as they incorporate this new view of themselves into their identities. Whether grey or not, by bringing your outer image in line with your inner self, you’ll be better prepared to negotiate whatever changes come your way in the years ahead.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Secret to couple’s 60-year marriage

<p>Geoff Yeend's aim was to marry a girl whose family had a television set. He wanted to watch the Queen's coronation but says he "slipped up". His now wife Maureen's parents never had a TV.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Maureen has four brothers and has always said Geoff married her for her brothers because he was an only child.</p> <p>Geoff lived one side of the railway tracks while Maureen lived on the "good side". The couple grew up within five kilometres of each other on the outskirts of London but didn't meet until at a dance when Geoff was 20 and Maureen 16.</p> <p>Maureen turned up to the dance with one of her brothers. Maureen says the next morning she and her brother were talking, calling between bedrooms. "He said Geoff had said 'bring your sister next week'. I said 'well, who's Geoff?' and he said 'oh, the little fella'.</p> <p>The Matamata couple met in 1953 and were married on October 22, 1955.</p> <p>While the early days were challenging, raising two children and emigrating to New Zealand in 1973 and then to North Hollywood in 1978, the couple have had many happy years together.</p> <p><img width="238" height="286" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/16761/geoff-and-maureen-yeend-body.jpg" alt="Geoff And Maureen Yeend Body"/></p> <p>They've been on a sheep farm, Geoff has worked as a newspaper printer and the pair were in the movie advertising industry in America in the 70s and 80s.</p> <p>They returned to New Zealand in 1989 and bought the Daltons farm in Matamata. They sold this in 2009 before buying a section in town.</p> <p>Geoff and Maureen celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a week spent on Norfolk Island. "We're still stopped together," Maureen says.</p> <p>The couple have a passion for travelling and have visited a number of exotic places around the world, although Maureen isn't able to travel much these days. Geoff still gets out and about including a recent trip to South Africa, Botswana and Zambia.</p> <p>And do the couple have any advice for a long and happy marriage? "I always say give and take. I give and Maureen takes," Geoff jokes.</p> <p>But in all honesty, they say a married couple needs to live within their means, be realistic and learn to do things together.</p> <p><em>Written by Teresa Hattan. First appeared on </em><a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span><span style="text-decoration: underline;">.</span></strong></em></a> </p> <p>Looking for love – or perhaps you just want to meet some new people? <strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://ad.doubleclick.net/ddm/clk/301420739;128433504;u%20" target="_blank">Why not sign up at RSVP today by clicking here… You never know who is just around the corner.</a></span></em></strong></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2016/01/how-to-make-love-last/">The secret to make love last</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2016/01/science-behind-couples-who-die-together/">There’s a science behind couple that die close together</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/relationships/2015/12/soulpancake-what-is-love-video/">People aged 0 to 100 define what is love</a></strong></em></span></p>

Relationships

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Salon owner loses $40,000 from one $60 deposit

<p dir="ltr">When beautician Thuy Le received a call from a supposed customer’s ‘husband’ regarding an accidental payment, she could never have foreseen the devastating turn her life would take from that point on. </p> <p dir="ltr">The mother of two, whose husband is living with Parkinsons and unable to work, recounted how her harrowing ordeal started with that one phone call, and the man on the other end requesting she return the $60 his wife had ‘accidentally’ paid. </p> <p dir="ltr">Le checked her bank statements to verify his story, and after noting one deposit that matched, she transferred the funds into the account he provided. </p> <p dir="ltr">She did not provide any of her own personal information, her passwords, or any critical numbers for her accounts. And yet, in the time to follow, Le could only watch in horror as more withdrawals were made from her account, into the very same one owned by the customer’s ‘husband’. </p> <p dir="ltr">The withdrawals totalled a devastating $41,600 stolen from Le’s life savings. </p> <p dir="ltr">Le also recounted how she was refused access to her business account, and that she got in touch with her bank as soon as she realised what had happened, suspecting she had been scammed. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her quest for support in her time of need was cut short, with the financial institution placing the blame solely on Le and ruling that they were not liable for the losses she had endured - this was despite the suspicious withdrawals raising no alarm with the bank, and the lack of personal information involved in the scam. </p> <p dir="ltr">Of their questionable red flag system, the bank claimed that it is “nearly impossible for an unauthorised third party to guess”, referencing the way that the logins for the costly transaction all succeeded on the very first try. </p> <p dir="ltr">Furthermore, as stated in a letter to Le, they declared that “the only reasonable explanation for these logins would be that your online banking credentials were known to the unauthorised third party, which would be in breach of the passcode security requirements.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I am in financial hardship,” Le admitted of her dire situation, and the need to have the funds returned for her family and her husband’s crucial medication. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I have two little kids, I have a husband with Parkinson’s disease, he cannot work,” she continued. “We are still in the process of applying for government help and I have carried the financial burden on my shoulders.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While Le’s bank offered $200 to resolve her complaint, she was offered no further assistance, and took matters to the Australian Financial Complaints Authority, hoping to have her money returned to her. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I can’t sleep,” she confessed. “I want to know why this happened to me and how it happened to me.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m not a liar, not a criminal, not a fraud.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Supplied to 7News, Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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60-year-old influencer hits back at claims she’s “dressing inappropriately”

<p dir="ltr">A fashion influencer from Montreal, Canada, has taken on the trolls who see fit to tear her down for shamelessly embracing her style in her 60s. </p> <p dir="ltr">Roslyn Griner has had a passion for fashion for as long as she can remember - she credits her late mother, a seamstress who would often make Roslyn items to wear, with developing her love for the fashion world.</p> <p dir="ltr">Nowadays, she shares her style journey with over 11k followers on social media. She embraces chic looks, current trends, and dons pieces most commonly marketed to younger generations - and stuns in every single one of them. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cosy3rUJG3g/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cosy3rUJG3g/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And while the majority of her comments are positive, with many praising Roslyn for her bold choices, it hasn’t stopped the outspoken few from sharing their distaste.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Roslyn won’t be stopped quite so easily, and has spoken out against her haters, putting an end to the idea that anyone has to stop dressing the way that makes them happy just because they’ve celebrated another birthday. </p> <p dir="ltr">“People say I am dressing inappropriately,” Roslyn said, “but it's about your style, not your age number.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“We become this invisible minority when we hit a certain age and are known as mothers and grandmothers,” she continued, “but you can be sexy and all these things. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You don't lose the zest for life.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She went on to speak of her desire to inspire women, and show them that they “don’t have to stop dressing a certain way just because you’re 50 or 60.” </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoanFoAJmnq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CoanFoAJmnq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And when it comes to the inspiration for her looks, Roslyn noted that she loves music, and that it has the power to help keep people youthful. As well as that, she’s an avid gym goer, and uses her fashion to highlight some of the things she likes most about herself. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m showcasing how I like to dress,” she said. “I wear mini-skirts, I like my legs, so I’m going to show them off.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My style of dressing isn’t for everyone,” she added, “but I don’t address the negative comments anymore. </p> <p dir="ltr">“You can be conservative in your 30s or trendy in your 50s. I'm showing young girls that it is not scary to age. It's cool to be my age.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl1CdRbuVof/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cl1CdRbuVof/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Roslyn Griner (@howrosdoesit)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">For those struggling with their confidence, Roslyn admitted that she herself “didn’t come into myself until my late 30s”, and that she wrestled with being shy and feeling unattractive for most of her 20s. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I feel I'm much more confident now. As you go down the path of life you care less about everyone's opinions,” she explained. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm transparent and I have had Botox. Exercise keeps me ageless. I never feel like my age.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I'm not creaky, I'm dynamic. I'm living in the present.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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"We’re all f***ed if that happens": 60 Minutes' stunning f-bombshell

<p><em>60 Minutes</em> reporter Tom Steinfort spoke for Australians all across the nation when he swore at Treasurer Jim Chalmers in an interview on interest rates.</p> <p>The exchange transpired as homeowners brace for a 10th consecutive rate rise, with the move expected to produce the highest interest rates Australians have seen in the past decade. </p> <p>“Do you see similarities between now and what happened in the early ‘90s?” Steinfort asked the treasurer, referencing a difficult period of recession for Australia.</p> <p>“There’s absolutely no chance that interest rates will get to the level that they were at in the early 1990s. I wanna make that clear,” Chalmers responded. </p> <p>And while the treasurer had wasted no time in giving his answer, it wasn’t enough to stop Steinfort from scoffing, “yeah, well, we’re all f***ed if that happens.”</p> <p>In January 1990, interest rates peaked - or hit rock bottom - at a record high of 17.5 per cent. </p> <p>And now, the RBA is set to deliver more bad news - passing on another 0.25 per cent interest rate rise - with homeowners already feeling their wallet strings tightening when faced with the disparity between house prices and annual wages. </p> <p>Australia’s inflation rate of 7.8 per cent marks the highest level since the early 1990s and is over twice that of the RBA’s 2-3 per cent inflation target - one they adopted in 1993. - the RBA took on its inflation target in 1993.</p> <p>Experts fear that further interest rate hikes will see Australia face its first recession since 1991, a concern that Steinfort clearly shares. </p> <p>Elsewhere in the interview, Steinfort wanted to know if Chalmers believed Australians had seen the worst of the inflation crisis, asking, “do you think we’ve hit the inflation peak?” </p> <p>“That’s our expectation, yeah,” Chalmers said. “We think that’s most likely, uh, that inflation peaked at Christmas time and has started to moderate. But we won’t know until we get that next set of data.”</p> <p>“You think we might be through the worst of it?” Steinfort pressed. </p> <p>“Well, I think inflation is starting to come off,” Chalmers responded, before adding that despite his optimism, Australians shouldn’t expect for things to get easier overnight, “but even as it moderates we can’t be complacent about it, because it’s still going to be a challenge in ‘23, just like it was in ‘22.” </p> <p>“You paint a picture that we’ve turned a bit of a corner and that there are better times ahead, but the people we’re speaking to - I mean, even when I look at my home mortgage bill - we’re not feeling it,” a sceptical Steinfort pointed out. </p> <p>To which a smiling Chalmers answered, “yeah, I understand, and I think that certainly the prime minister understands, and that the government understands, that people are under real pressure now. </p> <p>“We’re doing what we can to deal with it within the constraints of a responsible budget.” </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Federal treasurer Jim Chalmers believes we’ve already seen the worst of Australia’s inflation problem. However he says 2023 will still be a challenging time for many families.</p> <p>Watch <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/60Mins?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#60Mins</a> on <a href="https://twitter.com/9Now?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@9Now</a> <a href="https://t.co/4G5tZZO3fU">pic.twitter.com/4G5tZZO3fU</a></p> <p>— 60 Minutes Australia (@60Mins) <a href="https://twitter.com/60Mins/status/1632322412959215617?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 5, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p><em>Images: 60 Minutes</em></p>

Money & Banking

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6 ways to make friends when you’re 60-plus

<p>When you’re a kid, it’s so easy to make friends. Basically you see another person your age and walk up to them and start playing. But once you reach a certain age, it’s not so easy to just walk up to people you don’t know and form a friendship.</p> <p>Things can be especially difficult if you’ve had a partner for a long time and then later find yourself left on your own. The idea of putting yourself out there to make new pals seems daunting and a little scary.</p> <p>But before you get so desperate for someone to see a movie with that you resort to putting an ad in the local paper, try some of our ideas below. Who knows, you might just meet your new best mate.</p> <p><strong>1. Group travel</strong></p> <p>Organised group travel is a great way to meet like-minded individuals who have a passion for travel. It’s also a terrific way to see the world, as you have your accommodation and transport already organised – plus there’s no worry about missing any of the great attractions.</p> <p>Whether you jump on a bus, a boat or a train, you are sure to find some people that you click with. Once the tour is over, offer to trade email addresses or phone numbers to keep in touch with those people that you hit it off with. You could even suggest ideas for the next adventure.</p> <p><strong>2. Volunteering</strong></p> <p>Another great way to meet people is to offer your time to a charity or an organisation that you feel passionate about. It could be a one-off event (such as handing out flyers for a political party) or even just a day a month where you help out in a soup kitchen.  Start with something as simple as “Have you been volunteering here for long?” and let the conversation flow naturally.</p> <p><strong>3. Wine tours</strong></p> <p>If you are passionate about wine, or just keen to learn more, sign up for an organised winery tour. It could be one winery or a whole region, but either way there are generally small to medium sized groups that you can join for a day or a weekend.</p> <p>Sharing an experience like this where you are learning new skills is a great conversation starter. Asking something as simple as “Do you prefer the pinot or the shiraz?” can really get the ball rolling with a fellow wine fan.</p> <p><strong>4. Photography Courses</strong></p> <p>Whether you’re improving your skills with your digital SLR camera, or just wanting to learn how to take better snaps on your Smartphone – there really are so many options for photography classes these days.</p> <p>Often photography classes are held outdoors, in a park or by the sea, so it is a great way to learn and meet new people in a natural environment. Why not suggest to someone interesting that you meet for a photo shoot at another location next time such as a lighthouse or rainforest.</p> <p><strong>5. Book clubs</strong></p> <p>What better way to connect with new people than by discussing a book that you have all read. Even if people have different ideas, it’s a great way to get an insight into whether you have common tastes and interests depending on how they felt about the novel.</p> <p>The next step is to suggest meeting someone that you’re keen to talk to more for a coffee after the class.</p> <p><strong>6. Cooking classes</strong></p> <p>Even the great cooks among us can still learn a lot from a one-off cooking class. It could be to brush up on your baking skills or to learn the basics of a new cuisine such as Mexican or Thai. Sharing a kitchen with people and then sitting down to eat is a great icebreaker.</p> <p>You’ve got so much to talk about – the process of cooking, any issues you had, any advice you might need to perfect your soufflé for next time, and then of course the food itself. If you really hit it off with someone you could invite them over for afternoon tea or a casual meal one evening.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Caring

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Favourite film stars from the 60s

<p>They just don’t make movies stars like they used to, do they? Here are five of our favourite film stars from the 60s.</p> <p><strong>1. John Wayne</strong></p> <p>John Wayne, born Marion Robert Morrison, grew up in southern California. As a child, he had a dog named "Duke" (which would later become his own nickname. He had a summer job doing props for a film company, and eventually landed a few bit parts thanks to his friendship with the director. He hit the big time when he was cast in <em>Stagecoach</em> in 1939, and was billed as John Wayne. He appeared in almost 250 movies.</p> <p><strong>Best known for:</strong></p> <p><em>Rio Grande</em> (1950)</p> <p><em>The Alamo</em> (1960)</p> <p><em>True Grit</em> (1969)</p> <p><strong>Famous quotes:</strong></p> <p>“Young fella, if you’re looking; for trouble I’ll accommodate ya.”</p> <p><em>True Grit</em> (1969)</p> <p>“I wouldn’t make it a habit of calling me that son.”</p> <p><em>The Cowboys</em> (1972)</p> <p><strong>2. Cary Grant</strong></p> <p>Cary Grant, born Archibald Alexander Leach, spent his childhood in Bristol, England. He left school at age 14 and joined a troupe of comedians, learning pantomime and acrobatics. He was selected to go to the United States and had a show on Broadway called <em>Good Times</em>.</p> <p>He stayed in America, and ended up starring with Grace Kelly in 1955’s <em>To Catch a Thief</em>.</p> <p><strong>Best known for:</strong></p> <p><em>An Affair To Remember</em> (1957)</p> <p><em>North By Northwest</em> (1959)</p> <p><strong>Famous quotes:</strong></p> <p>“Everybody wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant.”</p> <p>Cary Grant</p> <p>“My formula for living is quite simple. I get up in the morning and I go to bed at night. In between, I occupy myself as best I can.”</p> <p>Cary Grant</p> <p><strong>3. Paul Newman</strong></p> <p>The blue-eyed legend of the silver screen, Newman was born in Ohio and started acting in high school plays before he attended Yale University's School of Drama. Talent scouts in Ohio, who encouraged him to move to New York City to be a professional actor, spotted Grant. After a few small parts he hit the big time playing boxer Rocky Graziano in <em>Somebody Up There Likes Me</em> (1956).</p> <p><strong>Best known for</strong>:</p> <p><em>Cat on a Hot Tin Roof</em> (1958)</p> <p><em>Cool Hand Luke</em> (1967)</p> <p><em>Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid</em> (1969)</p> <p><strong>Famous quotes:</strong></p> <p>“Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.”</p> <p>The Color of Money (1986)</p> <p>“The embarrassing thing is that my salad dressing is out-grossing my films.”</p> <p>Paul Newman (2008)</p> <p><strong>4. Julie Andrews</strong></p> <p>The English actress was born Julia Elizabeth Wells and began working as a singer from an early age. She shot to fame on Broadway in the role of</p> <p>Eliza Doolittle in the 1956 hit <em>My Fair Lady</em>. She followed this up with <em>Cinderella</em> (1957) and <em>Camelot</em> (1960) but it was Mary Poppins in 1964 that saw her become a household name.</p> <p><strong>Best known for:</strong></p> <p><em>Mary Poppins</em> (1964)</p> <p><em>The Sound of Music</em> (1965)</p> <p><em>10</em> (1979)</p> <p><strong>Famous quotes:</strong></p> <p>“In every job that must be done, there is an element of fun. You find the fun, and – SNAP – the job's a game!”</p> <p>Mary Poppins (1964)</p> <p>“The hills are alive with the sound of music. With songs they have sung for a thousand years.”</p> <p>The Sound of Music (1965)</p> <p><strong>5. Sean Connery</strong></p> <p>Thomas Sean Connery was born in Edinburgh and had many jobs (including coffin polisher) before getting into acting. He starred in several TV movies, TV series and small films before his big break playing James Bond in <em>Dr. No</em> (1962). He went on to play Bond six more times and continued making films in the 70s to the present day.</p> <p><strong>Best known for:</strong></p> <p><em>Dr. No</em> (1962)</p> <p><em>The Untouchables</em> (1987)</p> <p><em>Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade</em> (1989)</p> <p><em>The Hunt for Red October</em> (1990)</p> <p><strong>Famous quotes:</strong></p> <p>“Bond. James Bond.”</p> <p><em>Dr. No</em> (1962)</p> <p>“I like women. I don't understand them, but I like them.”</p> <p>Sean Connery (1957)</p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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“Absolute lie": Furious Charlie Teo hits back at 60 Minutes piece

<p dir="ltr">Neurosurgeon Dr Charlie Teo has slammed <em>60 Minutes </em>for claims that he charged hefty prices for futile operations that left patients severely injured and families with false hope.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a one-on-one interview with <em>A Current Affair</em>’s Tracy Grimshaw, Dr Teo responded to a “comprehensive” story aired by the program last weekend, in which multiple families shared their upset about the large financial burdens placed on them and feeling that they had been given false hope by the acclaimed surgeon.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dr Teo dubbed the report as “abhorrent and disgusting”, and while he admitted he had made mistakes in his career, he said the idea that he was simply in it for the money was false.</p> <p dir="ltr">“For some outsiders not sitting in the room with you having a discussion with the patient, it‘s so wrong for them to judge you on what’s going on in the room,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If someone is trying to portray me as some money-hungry bastard that was operating and hurting children based on money, that’s what I want to correct. It’s not that case.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The surgeon, who is currently under investigation by the Health Care Complaints Commission, told <em>2GB </em>host Ben Fordham on Wednesday that he does have regrets about mistakes he’s made.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But I deny the accusation that it means nothing to me,” Dr Teo said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I treat all my patients like a member of my own family.”</p> <p dir="ltr">When asked if he was sorry about the mistakes he’s made, Dr Teo said he was and that “you would have to be a sociopath” not to be sorry.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You’d have to be a sociopath not to be sorry because every mistake means some sort of bad outcome for the patient which means quality of life issues, sometimes even death, or paralysis, inability to speak,” he added.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I mean, if that didn’t affect you, you’d be like Dr Death, you’d be some sort of a psychopath.”</p> <p dir="ltr">During his 60 Minutes interview, Dr Teo responded to the case of one patient who lost their vision, explaining that he never gave 100 percent certainty that the procedure wouldn’t result in blindness.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If I had guaranteed that there was no chance of blindness, that is me saying the wrong thing, that’s misinformation,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I don’t do that, you can’t do that and not get sued, someone will sue you one day and after 11,000 cases, you don’t think if I have set out to a handful of patients I’d be sued by those patients?</p> <p dir="ltr">“In that case, I thought the chance of blindness was almost zero, but I never give a guarantee. They are claiming I said that I guarantee you won’t be blind, that is absolute lie, I did not say that I would never say that you be foolish to say that.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Dr Teo revealed that he has photos of his patients on his phone to remind him of the importance of his job, saying that he carried the devastation of failed operations with him every day.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There is a French vascular surgeon who wrote a book on the philosophy of surgery, and I don’t think you can put in any better words when he said ‘every surgeon carries with himself a small cemetery’,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My cemetery is not small, it’s a significant sized cemetery. (I have) pictures of my patients on my phone to remind me every day I’ve got to do it better.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While some of his former patients have been critical of the neurosurgeon, others have leapt to his defence, including 24-year-old Monica Lopresti.</p> <p dir="ltr">After she began to lose her memory in early 2021 but her blood tests returned normal results, it wasn’t until she received the results of an MRI in 2022 that it was discovered that she had a benign cystic tumour in the middle of her brain.</p> <p dir="ltr">Seven neurosurgeons turned her away, but Dr Teo agreed to perform surgery on her.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Lopresti said Dr Teo explained the risks, which included death, paralysis and being left in a vegetative state, and that she agreed to proceed with the knowledge of the risks.</p> <p dir="ltr">She added that “it just isn’t true” that the surgeon gave people false hope.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I wasn’t living a life. I was always calling in sick and I wasn’t having the quality of life that I wanted,” she told <em>news.com.au</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Since August 2021, Dr Teo has been banned from performing operations in Australia but still receives daily requests for help, telling the podcast <em>The Soda Room </em>that he estimates that nine patients a week are left without lifesaving care as a result.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So the sadness of the situation is that my entire practice was mostly taking out tumours that other people called inoperable, so that was 90 per cent of my practice,” he said.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d0234247-7fff-3076-f61d-8fd3339b1f0e"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“That’s 10 tumours a week. So that means, quite conceivably, that there are nine patients a week, who are missing out on either extension of life or cure from a condition that I know that I can help. Now that’s sad.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: A Current Affair</em></p>

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Short shift: Fashion week research on how the ’60s and ’70s rocked Australia’s clothing industry

<div class="copy"> <p>It was the dress that shocked a nation and signalled an industrial revolution.</p> <p>When sixties model Jean Shrimpton attended the 1965 Melbourne Cup dressed in a simple white shift hemmed well above the knee – with no gloves or stockings – the outfit immediately sparked scandal.</p> <p>The moment encapsulates a series of cultural, social, economic and technological shifts underway in Australia which led to the unravelling of the local clothing manufacturing industry.</p> <p>It was this iconic photo, depicting nonchalant Shrimpton on the lawns of Flemington Racecourse, which inspired Pauline Hastings PhD research at Monash University into the history of Australia’s textiles and clothing industry from the 1960s on.</p> <p>Hastings is <a href="https://mfw.melbourne.vic.gov.au/event/miniskirts-the-unravelling-rag-trade/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">presenting her research</a> as part of Melbourne Fashion Week.</p> <p>A lesser-known detail about ‘that dress’: Shrimpton was sponsored to attend Derby Day by industrial chemical and fossil fuel company Du Pont, to promote the company’s new synthetic fabric, Orlon. </p> <p>Cheap, mostly imported synthetic fabrics (made from fossil fuels) were one of several factors contributing to a major shift in Australian clothing manufacturing and consumption, Hastings says.</p> <p>Hastings says, there is a clear thread linking the rise of synthetic fabrics like Orlon, Dacron, Rayon (… anything ending with an ‘on’), which had a throwaway quality to them, and today’s <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/earth/sustainability/fast-fashion-part-one/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">fast fashion addiction</a>. Australia is the second largest consumer of textiles globally, buying on average <a href="https://www.monash.edu/msdi/news-and-events/news/articles/2022/urgent-call-to-reduce-australias-sizeable-fashion-footprint-and-its-impact-on-planetary-and-human-health" target="_blank" rel="noopener">56 new items of clothing </a>per person, per year.</p> <p>Post war immigration and the rise of the ‘baby boomers’ led to a greater emphasis on youth culture and individualism. </p> <p>This, together with the rise of advertising and mass marketing helped drive a cultural shift away from the ‘make do and mend’ era where fabrics and clothing were often unpicked and re-sewn into new garments. </p> <p>Hastings says the removal and reduction of tariff protections was another contributing factor to the demise of local manufacturing.</p> <p>Before the post-war era, “everyday clothes weren’t imported. They were manufactured here … made for local consumption,” she says.</p> <p>“Imports on mass were kept out by tariff protection. So, very high tariffs on anything important [which] meant that if they did come in, imports were sort of priced considerably higher in the marketplace than our local product. And our local product was not overly cheap from what I can gather, because it was pretty,  labor intensive and Australian wages at the time were quite high.”</p> <p>Interwoven, these different factors – the commodification of youth culture, the reduction in tariff protections by the Whitlam government, and the rise of new synthetic fabrics – all contributed to the demise of Australia’s local clothing manufacturing industry.</p> <p>Today, 97% of Australia’s clothing is imported.</p> <p>By sharing her research, Hastings says, she hopes we can learn from history.</p> <p>“It’s how culturally we can shift. Because, we did a major shift from the post war era of what I call ‘thrift and making do.’ We did a major shift then to a sort of a ‘purchase everything we can possibly see throwaway society’ when it comes to fashion, in a couple of decades.” </p> <p>She says, history shows, if we really wanted to, we could learn again, to value things, recycle, upcycle and cultivate a culture of sustainability.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=217818&amp;title=Short+shift%3A+Fashion+week+research+on+how+the+%26%238217%3B60s+and+%26%238217%3B70s+rocked+Australia%26%238217%3Bs+clothing+industry" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></em></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/how-the-60s-rocked-australian-fashion/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Petra Stock. </em></p> </div>

Beauty & Style

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Fabulous at 40, fit at 50 and sexy at 60 – age does not define your health

<p>It’s quite natural to feel a twinge of jealously when you see celebrities like Cher and Jennifer Lopez looking gorgeous and glamourous at red carpet events.</p> <p>After all, Cher is 76 and J-Lo 53 – how do they look so good when many of us at the same age are either struggling with the horrors of menopause or ailments we put down to our increasing age?</p> <p>The secret is it’s much more than the way they look. It’s their confidence, vibrance and calm sense of knowing about good health that gives them that extra glow.</p> <p>And the great news is you can do the same – you can absolutely be healthy at any age – and, like Cher and J-Lo, enjoy the glow and confidence which comes with it.</p> <p>Accepting sore joints, an aching back, fatigue and extra kilos as inevitable in your forties, fifties and sixties is the first mistake.</p> <p>Some ailments are common but they’re not normal. We place limitations on ourselves because of our age – which, after all, is just a number - missing a lot of opportunities in life.</p> <p>Sure, there are plenty of physical changes that start to develop in those middle years but they can be minimised with extra diligence.</p> <p>I’m proud to say that I haven’t gained any weight since I first began working in the health and fitness industry 30 years ago.</p> <p>I don’t spend countless hours in the gym, or starve and deprive myself. But I do make sure I exercise, do strength conditioning and have a healthy diet.</p> <p>Should you walk an average of 8000 steps a day? Yes, at any age. Should you do strength training three times a week? Yes, for bone density and muscle tissue – and it can be as simple as doing a body weight workout at home, going to the gym or playing a game of tennis. The trick to exercise is being consistent – you’re not training for a marathon, just keeping your body healthy!</p> <p>You also need to be diligent about including a good source of protein with every meal, more in fact than what you ate when you were younger. Protein helps repair cells in our body which in turn facilitates muscle repair and improves our skin. (That helps give you that enviable celebrity glow!)</p> <p>I’m not saying these years aren’t without challenges such as arthritis, menopause, high cholesterol, and blood pressure that often start to emerge in the 40s and continue through the ensuing decades.</p> <p>But the answer is to not blame age for everything. Maybe you’re drinking too much alcohol, not being as active as you should be and choosing to let your diet slide. You need to be honest with yourself.</p> <p>Take some of that hard earned wisdom that we love about getting older and use it maintain your best, vibrant self. You can do it!</p> <p><em>This article was written by Donna Aston. Donna is one of Australia’s top nutritionists. She developed the popular AstonRX Metabolic Fat Loss Program, Gut Rehab Program and Quick Start Program. Find out more at AstonRX.com.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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5 secrets for a healthy heart after 60

<p><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.drrosswalker.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Dr Ross Walker</a></span> is a leading integrative cardiologist, endocrinologist and author, specialising in the field of preventative cardiology.</em></strong></p> <p>Newsflash: new research released by the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.aihw.gov.au/deaths/leading-causes-of-death/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Institute of Health and Welfare</a></strong></span> has found that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is still the leading cause of death of Australians above the age of 44.</p> <p>And while you may certainly not feel “senior” (after all, age is nothing but a number, right?), the fact of the matter is that once you pass the age of 60, your risk for cardiovascular disease dramatically increases.</p> <p>Here’s another interesting statistic; at least one in three deaths from cardiovascular disease is preventable. This is a staggering statistic, but drives home the importance of leading the most heart-friendly life possible.</p> <p>Here are five secrets to keeping your heart healthy well past your sixties.</p> <p><strong>1. Know your risk factors</strong></p> <p>One in two women and one in three men possess at least one risk factor for heart disease, so regular check-ups with your doctor are absolutely essential. Even if you are feeling fine, it is important to catch up with your GP every six months. This way, if your blood pressure or cholesterol starts to become dangerously high, you can begin to treat this right away. The earlier you begin to treat these symptoms, the better. It’s important that you start making a commitment to check-ups with your GP every six months, particularly after the age of 60, because research shows that this is the age when your likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease significantly increases.</p> <p><strong>2. Omega-3 fatty acids should be a regular part of your diet</strong></p> <p>Omega-3s are found in foods like fatty fish. Our body needs omega-3’s in order to function, but can’t produce them on its own- which is why it is essential that we include omega-3s in our diet. You can try to include two to three serves of fatty fish into your diet each week, but many Australians (particularly those living inland) struggle to do this, and prefer to look for a high-quality fish oil supplement. Although there has been controversy surrounding the efficacy of fish oil supplementation, extensive research still shows that it may aid in converting LDL (aka ‘bad’) cholesterol to HDL (aka ‘good’) cholesterol and benefit a number of cardiac functions. For many years I have recommended that patients above the age of 40 supplement with fish oil daily, for the rest of their lives, to benefit both their cardiovascular and overall health.</p> <p><strong>3. Antioxidants are the key to fighting inflammation</strong></p> <p>Inflammation is a serious issue for many individuals, caused in part by ‘free radicals’. These free radicals are caused by oxidation in the body, which is a process in which our molecules lose electrons and float through the body, causing inflammation and damage to our cells. Free radicals and inflammation are thought to potentially contribute to further health complications such as cardiovascular disease. The good news is that antioxidants can reverse the oxidation process and neutralize free radicals, resulting in reduced inflammation. Heart friendly antioxidants to look out for include blueberries, supplements containing bergamot orange, and Ubiquinol, the active form of Coenzyme Q10.</p> <p><strong>4. Exercise is a non-negotiable</strong></p> <p>Only 60% of Australians regularly exercise and it’s been shown that the older we get, the less active we become. However, we actually be making more of an effort as we get older to clock in 30 minutes of physical activity a day. In fact, many Doctor’s now say that exercise is one of the most effective ‘prescriptions’ that can be given to patients experiencing illness, including cardiovascular disease. Exercise has the ability to not only strengthen our heart but lower our blood pressure, both of which will have benefits for your heart.</p> <p><strong>5. Low fat is not the answer</strong></p> <p>For years, the low fat message has been drilled into all of us, leaving us to think that a higher fat diet significantly increases our risk for heart disease. However, after decades spent eating a low fat diet, our population isn’t getting any healthier. Now we’re seeing more and more evidence that healthy fats are essential in the diet, and a low carb, high fat diet is a safe way of losing weight and preventing heart disease. The fats to avoid are processed trans fats, found in junk foods (such as commercial pies, biscuits and cakes), and the fats to fill up on are those found in foods like avocados, seeds, nuts, cheese and eggs.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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