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'It's a joke': Ban on backyard barbecue smoke dubbed un-Australian

<p>One state in Australia is receiving backlash after drafting laws that aims to reduce the smoke created by backyard barbecues.</p> <p>The Tasmanian Government has released draft smoke laws that include limiting the number of landholders allowed to burn vegetation and toughening standards around wood-heater emissions.</p> <p>The Tasmanian BBQ Society has spoken out against the changes, which have been labelled as ‘un-Australian’, in fear it will make it easier to fine people if their barbecues produce too much smoke.</p> <p>"When you're talking about the amounts of smoke that some of these permit and controlled burns give off, in comparison to what is an Australian way of life — the barbecue — it's a joke," president Rowan Peterson told the <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-19/barbecue-smoke-ban-dubbed-un-australian/10012644"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>ABC</strong></span></a>.</p> <p>The draft regulations state that barbeque smoke is unlawful it is:</p> <p><em>(a) visible for a continuous period of 10 minutes or more; and</em></p> <p><em>(b) during that continuous 10-minute period is visible for a continuous period of 30 seconds — (i) in the case of a heating appliance or fireplace in a building, or part of a building at a distance of 10 metres or more from the point on the building, or part of the building, where the smoke is emitted; or (ii) in the case of a heating appliance or outdoor heating or cooking appliance or fireplace that is not in a building, or part of a building — at a distance of 10 metres or more from the point where the smoke is emitted.</em></p> <p>Mr Peterson believes that these laws could be maliciously used in spats between neighbours.</p> <p>"If you have a nasty neighbour and/or a grumpy person that lives in your street, in my opinion it's just a tenuous argument that they can use to cause more issues," he said.</p> <p>While much of the Draft Smoke Act is rewording of the rules introduced in 2007, the consequences have ramped up.</p> <p>Under the new changes, barbecuing Tassies could be fined two penalty units if their fire breaks smoke rules. Magistrates will also be able to impose fines of up to $1,600 as a maximum penalty in courts.</p> <p>"There's so many forms of barbecue that relate to so many cultures in Australia," Mr Peterson said.</p> <p>"Not only does it affect your backyard bloke doing chops and snags, it'll affect anyone potentially who wants to cook outdoors."</p> <p>Fellow member of the Tasmanian BBQ Society, Rowan Armitage, said authorities should be "tackling the big end of town".</p> <p>"How much damage does 500 barbecues on a Sunday afternoon do compared to the huge forestry burn-offs?" he asked.</p> <p>On social media, many residents criticised the changes.</p> <p>"Bugger off fun police, a smoking BBQ keeps the mozzies away," Brendon Nowak said.</p> <p>"They can fine me all they like I'll be still having a nice smoking BBQ unless it's a total fire ban," added Quinton Turner.</p> <p>What are your thoughts on the smoke laws? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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10 more uses for Sunlight soap from the Over60 community

<p>Sunlight soap was the world’s first packaged and branded laundry soap, being introduced by the Lever Brothers in 1884. Since then, it has continued to impress customers with its quality and many uses. We shared with you <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/lifestyle/home-garden/2016/01/uses-for-sunlight-soap/" target="_blank">surprising uses for Sunlight soap</a></strong></span> and now, the Over60 community have shared 10 more ingenious uses for Sunlight soap.</p> <p><strong>1. Laundry</strong></p> <p>“I remember my Grandmother using this for laundry, cleaning and used it for the bath and washing dishes. Soap went into basket, locked it shut then as the water ran over it make suds… sunlight soap is amazing.” – Susan Lyzwa</p> <p><strong>2. Shampoo</strong></p> <p>“I always used it to wash hair when we were young... it was remarkable how soft it left our hair too… no conditioner in those days.” – Marlee Marley</p> <p><strong>3. Remove stains</strong></p> <p>“Fancy expensive stain removers are not necessary. Cold water and sunlight soap rubbed on any stains or marks, before placing item in the washing machine will do the trick.” – Fran Doyle</p> <p><strong>4. Discipline naughty children</strong></p> <p>“I remember having my mouth washed out with it for saying ‘bloody’. That was 55 years ago, and I never said it again in front of my Mum. I can still taste it!!” – Carolyn Korlaki</p> <p><strong>5. Remove splinters</strong></p> <p>“As a child I had a lot of splinters. My nan mixed grated sunlight soap and sugar to form a paste, place it on my finger then bandage it... later you would feel it drawing the splinter out, no tears.” – Lois Boon</p> <p><strong>6. Clean pets</strong></p> <p>“Old vet told me to use it on my dog years ago when he had some sort of mite rash on his skin. It fixed it.” -- Ellie Tarver </p> <p><strong>7. Treat grazes</strong></p> <p>“Very effective for those who get nasty grazes whilst playing various sports. Only 'treat' with sunlight soap and it will clear up very quickly!” -- Robyn Hern </p> <p><strong>8. Stop cramps</strong></p> <p>“Stops the cramps when you put it between the sheets, old wives’ tale but it works for me.” – Penny Button </p> <p>“Put a cake of sunlight soap under your pillow. Helps with pain, funny but true. Try it.” – Rhonda McWilliam</p> <p><strong>9. Treat boils</strong></p> <p>“Sunlight soap, little water and white sugar makes a paste. It fixes sores, boils and draws out splinters.” – Patti Cloake</p> <p><strong>10. Firelighter</strong></p> <p>“Nanna used to cut chunks of it to put into the wood fired copper.” – Maureen Snelson</p> <p>What are your favourite uses for Sunlight soap? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Mum’s clever $27 Kmart hack for gorgeous indoor hanging garden

<p>A mother with a love of greenery has shared her hack for transforming a $27 clothing rack from Kmart into a gorgeous indoor garden.</p> <p>Rebecca Grining, of Geelong, Victoria, rents her home which meant she had to find an inventive way to bring the garden into her home as drilling holes in the walls and ceiling was not allowed. So Rebecca turned to budget friendly retailer Kmart to help her find a solution. </p> <p>“When you rent and you will do anything to have hanging plants indoors!” she wrote on a post alongside an image she shared to social media. “Kmart clothes rack to the rescue! The obsession is real.”</p> <p>The photos show a tall, black, clothes rack with four plants hanging from the top rail.</p> <p><img width="399" height="499" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/07/10/00/4E12C11200000578-5935899-image-a-1_1531177363549.jpg" alt="As a renter, with a love of greenery, Rebecca Grining, of Geelong, reveals how a $27 rack from Kmart (pictured) could be transformed into a hanging garden " class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="i-9038343d1bfdf3d4"/></p> <p>Rebecca also revealed she had sourced the other pieces for her indoor garden from second-hand shops, making it a very budget-friendly creation.</p> <p>“The four-tiered hanger was in stock [at Kmart] last year, the middle is an op shopped cane basket with the Kmart macrame hanger, the black and grey hanger was from pillow talk,” she told <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://homes.nine.com.au/2018/07/09/14/29/renter-mum-hacks-27-dollar-kmart-item-to-create-indoor-hanging-garden" target="_blank">9Honey</a>.</strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><img width="391" height="393" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/07/10/00/4E12C11B00000578-5935899-image-m-3_1531177580248.jpg" alt=" Ms Grining explained she removed the fabric panel at the bottom of the rack (pictured) as this didn't serve a purpose " class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="i-3289a98b98960176"/></span></p> <p>Rebecca shared her hack to a popular mother's Facebook group where the post has been liked nearly 4,000 times.</p> <p>“I have one of those racks (full of clothes overflowing from small wardrobe), but am now thinking I need another to do this!” one mum wrote.</p> <p>Another added: “Deserves the Best Hack Award.”</p>

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Mum’s clever $27 Kmart hack for gorgeous indoor hanging garden

<p>A mother with a love of greenery has shared her hack for transforming a $27 clothing rack from Kmart into a gorgeous indoor garden.</p> <p>Rebecca Grining, of Geelong, Victoria, rents her home which meant she had to find an inventive way to bring the garden into her home as drilling holes in the walls and ceiling was not allowed. So Rebecca turned to budget friendly retailer Kmart to help her find a solution. </p> <p>“When you rent and you will do anything to have hanging plants indoors!” she wrote on a post alongside an image she shared to social media. “Kmart clothes rack to the rescue! The obsession is real.”</p> <p>The photos show a tall, black, clothes rack with four plants hanging from the top rail.</p> <p><img width="399" height="499" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/07/10/00/4E12C11200000578-5935899-image-a-1_1531177363549.jpg" alt="As a renter, with a love of greenery, Rebecca Grining, of Geelong, reveals how a $27 rack from Kmart (pictured) could be transformed into a hanging garden " class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="i-9038343d1bfdf3d4"/></p> <p>Rebecca also revealed she had sourced the other pieces for her indoor garden from second-hand shops, making it a very budget-friendly creation.</p> <p>“The four-tiered hanger was in stock [at Kmart] last year, the middle is an op shopped cane basket with the Kmart macrame hanger, the black and grey hanger was from pillow talk,” she told <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://homes.nine.com.au/2018/07/09/14/29/renter-mum-hacks-27-dollar-kmart-item-to-create-indoor-hanging-garden" target="_blank">9Honey</a>.</strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><img width="391" height="393" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/07/10/00/4E12C11B00000578-5935899-image-m-3_1531177580248.jpg" alt=" Ms Grining explained she removed the fabric panel at the bottom of the rack (pictured) as this didn't serve a purpose " class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" id="i-3289a98b98960176"/></span></p> <p>Rebecca shared her hack to a popular mother's Facebook group where the post has been liked nearly 4,000 times.</p> <p>“I have one of those racks (full of clothes overflowing from small wardrobe), but am now thinking I need another to do this!” one mum wrote.</p> <p>Another added: “Deserves the Best Hack Award.”</p>

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The Project’s Waleed Aly reveals the point everyone is missing about the plastic bag ban

<p><em>The Project</em>’s Waleed Aly has waded into the plastic bag debate that has raged ever since the nation’s most popular supermarkets – Woolworths and Coles – ditched single-use plastic bags last month.</p> <p>After airing a segment about the environmental benefits of the plastic bag ban on Friday’s episode of <em>The Project</em>, guest panellist Natarsha Belling said the ban should include all single use plastic in supermarkets.</p> <p>“I spoke to my local Woolworths lady about the plastic bag situation, now they’ve replaced it with the heavy duty plastic bags that next week they are going to charge 15 cents for each customer. Are they biodegradable?” she asked.</p> <p>“Does it matter?” Aly replied.</p> <p>“It does matter,” Belling countered, “because if we are going to go with no plastic, let’s get rid of all the packaging then on all the fruit and vegetables — what do you put your fruit and vegetables in?”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The plastic bag ban is here to stay. It’s also the right thing to do - let’s stop being a bunch of sooks and deal with it. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheProjectTV?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheProjectTV</a> <a href="https://t.co/i1jEUJMiPA">pic.twitter.com/i1jEUJMiPA</a></p> — The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1015164437165043713?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 6, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>But Aly argued that angry shoppers were missing the point about the plastic bag ban, arguing that the ban wasn’t about forcing customers to pay for reusable bags, but it was actually a move to try and get customers to stop using plastic altogether to avoid the charge.</p> <p>“Sure if you want to make that argument fine,” he said. “But the bags themselves that they sell — sure I get it would be better if they were selling biodegradable bags — but the point is not that.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>“The point is the charge, so that you stop buying them, so it’s designed that you stop buying them eventually.”</p>

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Prince Charles opens up his home to the public in rare TV appearance

<p>The Prince of Wales is to make a star appearance on UK’s Gardeners’ World, asking green thumbs to “do their bit” to save native trees.</p> <p>A fierce advocate of the natural world, Prince Charles will invite the public into his gardens at Highgrove and discuss his love of gardening, which started when he was a boy, according to <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/07/03/prince-charles-make-star-turn-gardeners-world-asking-viewers/">The Telegraph</a>.</strong></em></span></p> <p>The future King of England will implore gardeners to get their plants from reputable places, take measures to protect their own garden, and not bring back specimens from their holidays abroad – to prevent the spread of pests and disease.</p> <p>The Prince will be interviewed at Highgrove by presenter Adam Frost for a special episode focusing on trees.</p> <p><img width="424" height="266" src="https://imageresizer.static9.net.au/n0BeYOhQyns3AGQvyvuFG-7V4WA=/396x0/http%3A%2F%2Fprod.static9.net.au%2F_%2Fmedia%2F2018%2F07%2F05%2F08%2F24%2Fcharles2.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>It is believed Charles was inspired to help tackle the issue after visiting border force officials at Heathrow Airport earlier this year, where he learned more about how experts are preventing plant-borne diseases being brought into the country.</p> <p>For nearly 40 years, Prince Charles has worked to transform the gardens at Highgrove, revamping overgrown and neglected land.</p> <p>On the TV special, he will talk through the steps he is taking within the Duchy of Cornwall, which covers 53,000 hectares of land across 23 British counties, to avoid the spread of plant diseases and pests.</p> <p>The prince will also share personal experiences of managing diseases on his own estate, including Dutch Elm Disease and Ash Dieback.</p> <p><img width="421" height="260" src="/media/7819610/capture_421x260.jpg" alt="Capture (12)" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>He's previously spoken about his passion to save the trees, saying: "I have always been mortified by the loss of mature elm trees from almost every part of the countryside I knew and loved as a child, so I had high hopes for an American variety that appeared to be resistant to the disease.</p> <p>"I planted an avenue of them at Highgrove and then watched, miserably, as many of them succumbed just like the native variety.</p> <p>"The wider problem is that a great many more pests and diseases are now seriously threatening the health of all our native trees, yet public awareness of this situation seems to be frighteningly low."</p> <p> </p>

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The $1.95 Bunnings hack that will transform your home

<p>Bunnings customers are praising a new DIY hack that a Gold Coast decorator has shared, which uses a product from the store that only costs $1.95.</p> <p>Alicia Curtis’s budget decoration hacks have made her a following of nearly 30,000 people on her Instagram page ‘<a href="https://www.instagram.com/my.burleigh.reno/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">My Burleigh Reno</span></strong></a>’ – and now she has shared a hack that definitely doesn’t disappoint.</p> <p>The 42-year-old has shared how Bunnings customers can turn a $1.95 doormat into a trendy plant pot, only using a few tools.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkcSsDJhEQQ/" target="_blank">A post shared by My Burleigh Reno | Alicia (@my.burleigh.reno)</a> on Jun 25, 2018 at 2:08am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“These are made from seagrass door mats for $1.95 each,” the mother wrote on her Instagram.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“I have used six mats here in this pic, total cost of mats $11.70 for five different basket planters.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Alicia explained how others can replicate the stylish hack in their own homes.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“Simply roll or fold the mats together to form a planter cover for your pots,” Alicia wrote.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“These mats are joined by tied jute rope or twine (which can also be purchased from the rope or garden section of Bunnings. These can also be cut to size as they won't unravel.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“I have then decorated the planters by making tassels or plaited handles from the jute rope. You could also add shells, fringing or macramé.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“The hanging basket is folded in half and tied at the sides.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“Making tassels is easy, you can find lots of tutorials online or alternatively follow my steps found on an earlier post.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">The result is a cheap and trendy plant pot that can be placed indoors or in an outdoor entertaining area.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Alicia previously won over budget home-decorators after she explained how she transformed a Kmart shoe rack into a luxurious leather bench.</p> <p style="text-align: center;" class="mol-para-with-font"><img width="498" height="500" src="/media/7819543/1_498x500.jpg" alt="1 (164)"/></p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Alicia previously told <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5907653/How-turn-1-95-doormat-Bunnings-super-chic-plant-pot.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">FEMAIL</span></strong></em></a> that the secret to her budget home decorating hacks is being able to think “outside the square”.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">She said: “Before you get rid of something or discard buying something cheap simply because it's not right, think – can you alter or paint the item?</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“You can paint anything, from photo frames to garden pots, to give an item new life or adapt to new trends.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">Alicia said she scouts her local discount stores for different products she can use to decorate her home.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“I love being able to make and share inexpensive DIY hacks,” she added.</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">“A lot of households can't afford new things and these hacks actually provide a lot of satisfaction – both personally and for my community.”</p> <p class="mol-para-with-font">What is your best decorating hack? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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9 cost-effective ways to warm your home this winter

<p>Sick of hearing about the same old heating methods<a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/heating" target="_blank"></a> that never quite do the job? Try these nine unconventional heating hacks. </p> <p><strong>1. Preheat your pyjamas </strong></p> <p>While you shower, put your pyjamas in the dryer to ensure that you have toasty warm clothing to change into as soon as you leave the warmth of the bathroom. For a slightly more affordable version, wrap your PJs in a hot water bottle or heat bag, not only will it heat your clothes but it will make your bed toasty warm too, just be sure to remove the hot water bottle from your bed before you settle down to sleep for the night. </p> <p><strong>2. Join the fan club</strong></p> <p>It might seem counter-productive but turning a fan on at the lowest setting will help circulate heat throughout the room. Don't knock it until you try it!</p> <p><strong>3. Hottie in the car </strong></p> <p>Dreading your chilly morning commute to work? Make your early start a little easier to stomach by putting hand warmers into your pockets or heat up a hot water bottle with warm water or a heat bag and put it on your lap as you drive. </p> <p><strong>4. Utilise bubble wrap</strong></p> <p>For those whose home insulation isn't up to scratch, a budget-friendly trick is to use bubble wrap to insulate your windows from the inside. To create the DIY double glazing, simply get some bubble wrap and use a product like blue-tac to hold it in place on your windows.</p> <p><strong>5. Make use of your curtains</strong></p> <p>Keep your house warmer for longer by making use of your curtains and the limited winter sun. To do this, open all of your curtains on a sunny morning and allow the house to soak up as much heat as possible during the day. As night falls, let your curtains act as an additional piece of insulation by closing them at dusk and trapping heat inside the house.</p> <p><strong>6. Cuddle your pet</strong></p> <p>When in doubt, a great way to stay warm on a cold night is by sharing body heat. While snuggling up with your partner might make you a little bit warmer, cuddling a furry pet will heat you up a lot faster. The key to success with this hack is to cuddle up with the fluffiest animal possible, so try and find a friend with a Ragdoll cat or a St Bernard.</p> <p>7. Go camping… indoors</p> <p><strong>Just because it's winter does</strong>n't mean you can't go camping... well, as long as it's in the living room. For a warm night's sleep, fill up a tent with pillows and blankets, make sure it's all zipped up and settle down for the night. The enclosed space will heat up by trapping the air and using your body warmth to make the space nice and cosy.</p> <p><strong>8. Redecorate</strong></p> <p>Positioning your favourite seat in front of the heater might feel great when you're sitting in it, but when you put furniture too close to a heating source you're actually stopping the hot air from circulating throughout the rest of the room. Fix this problem by repositioning your furniture and allowing the hot air to fill the whole room, rather than just absorbing it all up in one spot.</p> <p><strong>9. Get in the kitchen</strong></p> <p>There's nothing like a good soup or a roast to make you feel better on a cold winter’s night. Cooking is an easy way to warm up the air in your home, while also providing you with something warm to eat at the same time. </p> <p>What is your best tip for keeping your home warm in winter? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span></strong></a>.</em></p>

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Selling Houses Australia host Andrew Winter: Inside my Gold Coast home renovations

<p><em>Selling Houses Australia</em> host Andrew Winter has revealed the outcome of his own renovation labours at his Gold Coast home.</p> <p>The English-born presenter revealed that the home took one year to complete – with his family living across the road from the property.</p> <p>As an expert in assessing properties both inside and out on his show, Andrew told <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/entertainment/television/gold-logie-nominee-andrew-winter-reveal-amazing-renovation/news-story/4ca0352e0f6ab5b66664cfad07a29e36" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">News Corp</span> </strong></a>that this renovation focused on the exterior spaces.</p> <p>“We’ve never quite spent so much time focusing on the outside areas,” Andrew explained. </p> <p>The host revealed that he was drawn to the property because it has a pool in the centre of the house, rather than the backyard, which would allow him to experiment with design possibilities.</p> <p>“Every single bedroom has direct access to the courtyard and pool so it’s really unusual in that respect,” he said.</p> <p>While they left much of the interior layout unchanged, Andrew said he pushed the boundaries with features such as a black kitchen ceiling and a marble-look entry door.</p> <p>“It's a solid door but it's cut in porcelain,” Andrew said.</p> <p>“We were trying to push a few boundaries.”</p> <p>This weekend, Andrew Winter will attend the 60th Logies Awards in the Gold Coast, where he has been nominated for the Gold Logie. Andrew is up against <em>Love Child</em>’s Jessica Marais, <em>A Current Affair’</em>s Tracy Grimshaw, <em>Family Feud</em>’s Grant Denyer and <em>Doctor Doctor’</em>s Rodger Corser.</p> <p>Andrew is also in the running for the Most Popular Presenter award alongside Carrie Bickmore, Amanda Keller, Grant Denyer and Tracy Grimshaw.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Andrew Winter missed the Logies nomination festivities as he suffered a bout of Bell’s Palsy.</p> <p>“I was shocked to see that my eye was watering for some unknown reason, I then looked in the mirror and saw that my eyelid was closed on one side – like I was winking to myself,” Andrew told<em> TV Week</em>.</p> <p>He revealed that the doctors dismissed the “scary stuff” and diagnosed him with the condition, which causes temporary weakness or paralysis to the muscles on one side of the face.  </p>

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7 creative uses for wallpaper around the home

<p>Wallpaper has been back en vogue for years but interior design lovers are still pushing the boundaries of what you can do with it far past the standard feature wall.</p> <p>From covering the stairs to using it as art, here are seven creative things you can do with with wallpaper. </p> <p><strong>1. On the stairs </strong></p> <p>Take your entryway to the next level by installing wallpaper on your stairs. Either install a variety of geometric patterns or transform your stairway into a piece of art by choosing a pattern that is revealed to be a floral or abstract image from a distance.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://static3.stuff.co.nz/img-4774-copyjpg-97cdd145.jpg"/></p> <p><strong>2. Upcycle old furniture</strong></p> <p>Wallpaper can be used to upcycle tired and old furniture. All you need to do is wallpaper the back of a cabinet, bookshelf or even a set of shelves and voila. </p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://static3.stuff.co.nz/17-rod-house12jpg-fa88f1d0.jpg"/></p> <p><strong>3. As a piece of art </strong></p> <p>Interior designer Daniella Norling created a unique piece of artwork in her living room by installing a bold piece of wallpaper - Kanchou by Brunschwig &amp; Fils - in a circular frame. </p> <p>Norling isn't the only one who has begun to think of wallpaper as art.</p> <p>"The lines have become blurred between art work and wallpaper art, which is often large-scaled art, such as a mural," Annabel Taylor of The Paper Room said. "A bold wallpaper or mural can make a great design statement that completely transforms a space. The key is not to have the design elements in your room fighting each other; rather they should be in harmony in terms of colour and pattern."</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://static3.stuff.co.nz/47726882726407f6da94cc45a5905c6d-c014787b.jpg"/></p> <p><strong>4. On a fireplace </strong></p> <p>Make your fireplace the focal point of a room, even when it isn't in use, by wrapping it in bold wallpaper. For a modern touch, opt for a geometric pattern.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"> </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BgeSX-gH2K2/" target="_blank">A post shared by Lime Lace (@lime_lace)</a> on Mar 18, 2018 at 10:38am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>5. As a kitchen splashback </strong></p> <p>Renters rejoice. Give a tired kitchen a spruce without having to make any costly or permanent changes by installing removable stickers that resemble a tiled splashback.</p> <p>If you're looking for a more permanent solution, you could install wallpaper behind a piece of glass, but the experts say that this won't last in the long-run.</p> <p>"Sticking up wallpaper behind a piece of glass may look okay to begin with, but often moisture will get in behind the glass, bubble and create issues," Lucy Gauntlett of Lucy G Splashbacks <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/kitchen/95676466/how-to-make-a-splash-with-your-splashback" target="_blank">t<span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>old NZ House &amp; Garden</strong></span></a>.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"> </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BYr8Q1gBWAE/" target="_blank">A post shared by 🔲Lover Of Luxe Homewares (@sartorialinteriors)</a> on Sep 5, 2017 at 9:43pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>6. On the ceiling </strong></p> <p>Give any room a dose of wow-factor by installing wallpaper on the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/homed/ceiling" target="_blank">ceiling.</a></strong></span> </p> <p>Wellington-based accountant and <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home-property/91135726/statement-ceilings-transform-your-space-with-a-bespoke-fifth-wall" target="_blank">statement ceiling fan</a></strong></span>, Nicola Koptisch, said giving your your fifth wall some TLC is the perfect way to give a dull room an eye catching transformation.</p> <p>"I believe ceilings are just as important as the walls and furniture. A stunning ceiling can completely transform a space," Koptisch said. </p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="https://static3.stuff.co.nz/26d2aab55c2587a9782ba37cc0f38694-01ea8e29.jpg"/></p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><strong>7. As an alternative headboard </strong></p> <p>Not a big fan of headboards but don't want to be stuck with a plain wall behind your bed? Install a framed piece of wallpaper behind your bed instead. Opt for removable wallpaper as this will allow you to switch to a different style of paper without causing any damage.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz.</span></strong></a></em></p>

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How regularly you should be washing your bed sheets

<p>A leading microbiologist from New York has advised people to wash their <a href="https://shop.oversixty.com.au/collections/sheets?utm_source=Over60&amp;utm_medium=in-article-link-sheets&amp;utm_campaign=Over60Shop&amp;utm_content=over60-shop" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>bed sheets</strong></span></a> once a week to avoid illness.</p> <p>Philip Tierno from New York University told Business Insider that microscopic life can build up over time and within a week gunk becomes “significant”.</p> <p>Tierno explained that not washing your bedding for two weeks will leave you with a build-up that can leave you with a scratch throat especially if you suffer from allergies.</p> <p>Unwashed bedding can also make you sneeze and sniffle more as the microbes are near your face, meaning you are more susceptible to breathing them in.</p> <p>"Even if you don't have allergies per se, you can have an allergic response," Tierno said.</p> <p>In a recent study, researchers found that a test sample of feather and synthetic pillows that were more than 11.5 -20 years old contained up to 16 species of fungus each.</p> <p>Mary Malone from about.com explained that leaving bedsheets unchanged can lead to health complications such as infected wounds and athlete’s foot.</p> <p>“It is possible to find saliva, urine, genital fluids and faecal matter in the fibres,” she told ATTN.</p> <p>“Infrequent cleaning of sheets and pillowcases allows the fluids to seep into the pillows and mattresses, and those are much more difficult to clean than tossing sheets in the washer,” she said.</p> <p>As well as your own microbial life, you can also find pollen, soil, lint, dust mite debris and faeces and finishing agents in your bedding.</p> <p>"If you touched dog poo in the street, you'd want to wash your hands," Tierno said. "Consider that analogous to your bedding. If you saw what was there — but of course you don't see it — after a while you have to say to yourself, 'Do I want to sleep in that?'"</p> <p>How often do you wash your bedding? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em><strong> </strong></em></p>

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7 cleaning myths you need to stop believing

<p class="first-para">Belief is a funny thing. When we hear something that sounds plausible it’s rare that we’ll go looking for further evidence to validate it.</p> <p>And this is particularly true when it comes to cleaning tips. There are dozens of old wives tales that keep being perpetuated. Many of which are completely false.</p> <p>Below I’ve outlined seven of the most commonly held cleaning myths. Have a read and you may find some of your long-held beliefs aren’t true after all.</p> <p><strong>Myth one: Kills 99 per cent of germs</strong></p> <p>Nearly every cleaning product touts some version of this in their advertising. The truth? It’s no more than a great sounding marketing gimmick.</p> <p>It only means the product killed 99 per cent of germs it was tested on. This doesn’t mean 99 per cent of all germs or even dangerous germs. On top of that, <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/health/talkinghealth/factbuster/stories/2010/09/16/3013695.htm" target="_blank">studies have shown</a></strong></span> that water and soap does just as good a job of eradicating germs.</p> <p><strong>Myth two: Vinegar will clean everything</strong></p> <p>I’m a huge fan of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.domain.com.au/living/ditch-the-dish-soap-40-surprising-uses-for-white-vinegar-20161116-gsq97a/" target="_parent">cleaning with vinegar</a></strong></span> and use it nearly every day. That being said, vinegar won’t actually do the best job on all surfaces.</p> <p>Specifically, vinegar is great for tiles, walls and bathrooms but not as beneficial on stone, granite or wooden finishes.</p> <p><strong>Myth three: Vacuuming too often ruins carpets</strong></p> <p>I first heard this as a kid growing up in the 1980s and, like all the myths in this list, the truth isn’t so simple.</p> <p>You should avoid vacuuming wool or non-synthetic rugs too often. However, it’s perfectly fine to clean more modern carpets multiple times a week if you like. Modern synthetic rugs are made of strong stuff and no amount of vacuuming will wear them down to a noticeable level.</p> <p><strong>Myth four: Natural cleaning products are safe</strong></p> <p>The term “natural” is used so often in marketing that it almost means nothing anymore. Just because a product is labelled “natural” doesn’t mean it’s safe.</p> <p>Case in point; ammonia is completely natural and consists of the elements nitrogen and hydrogen. It’s also completely hazardous to your health if used in anything higher than a trace amount.</p> <p><strong>Myth five: Bleach is the ultimate cleaner</strong></p> <p>Contrary to popular belief, bleach is a disinfectant and not a cleaner. It does a great job of killing everything in its path, but a terrible job of cleaning stains while doing it.</p> <p>Most people flat out refuse to believe this. Citing evidence of how clean their bathroom is after using bleach. In reality, it’s the bleach combined with soap scum that’s doing the cleaning. So minimise the amount of bleach you’re using. It isn’t helping your health or your cleanliness.</p> <p><strong>Myth six: Newspaper cleans glass</strong></p> <p>Sure, if you wipe glass for long enough with newspaper it’ll get clean. But that would be the case if you used Christmas paper as well.</p> <p>You’re better off using an abrasive or absorbent cloth. Both will do a better job than newspaper, and in less time.</p> <p><strong>Myth seven: Febreze helps to clean</strong></p> <p>This couldn’t be more wrong! Febreze doesn’t clean or sanitise much of anything. All it does is reward your brain after cleaning with a nice smell. That way, you think things are cleaner than they actually are. The marketing geniuses behind this deserve a raise.</p> <p>Keeping all this in mind, if you really love to clean windows with newspaper then, by all means, keep doing it. However, if I’ve created a bit of scepticism then take a moment to challenge your own beliefs. It may just make your life easier.</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Brooke. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.domain.com.au" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Domain.com.au.</span></strong></a></em></p>

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The Queen’s extravagant wedding gift to Harry and Meghan revealed

<p>The Queen has gifted one of her many estates to Prince Harry and his new wife Meghan Markle, following their May 19 nuptials.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been given a country home in Norfolk, the <em>Metro</em> has reported. </p> <p>The extravagant royal property called York Cottage is located at Sandringham Estate, a 20,000-acre estate, approximately 180 kilometres northeast of Kensington Palace.</p> <p>The residence is said to resemble "three Merrie England pubs joined together, oozing charm and character", the <em>Metro</em> stated. </p> <p>The estate has been in the royal family for hundreds of years, dating back four British monarchs to 1862, the estate's official website declares. </p> <p>Queen Elizabeth II inherited the large parcel of land when her father King George VI passed away in 1952. </p> <p>Formerly known as Bachelor's Cottage, York Cottage was once home to many of the Queen's relatives, including her grandparents King George V and Queen Mary. </p> <p>When Prince William and Kate Middleton wed in 2013, the Queen gave the newlywed couple Anmer Hall on the Norfolk estate. However it took two years before the couple moved in, just before Prince George was born.</p> <p>"Her Majesty gifted William and Kate Anmer Hall," royal expert and <em>DailyBreak</em> managing editor <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/life/926519/prince-harry-meghan-markle-wedding-news-latest" target="_blank">Kelly Lynch said</a></strong></span>.</p> <p>In the leadup to the royal wedding on May 19, Lynch predicted: "I'm not certain how many other homes are on the Sandringham Estate but I wouldn't be surprised if one was gifted to Harry and Meghan. Especially given the fact that the royals spend Christmas at Sandringham."</p> <p>As Prince Harry and Prince William are very close, Lynch believes the two Dukes may opt to live next to each other and have their children grow up together.</p> <p>Lynch also said it's possible that the Queen would give the couple a home in Windsor as it's where Prince Harry and Meghan tied the knot.</p> <p>"I wouldn't rule out any available homes in Windsor, as that will be where Harry and Meghan will wed," she said at the time. </p>

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Is it disgusting to keep these two items in your bedroom?

<p class="first-para">I err on the germ-phobic side. I like to wash my hands. I shower twice a day. </p> <p>The thought of banning from my bedroom handbags, shoes, and clothes that have been made unclean by the outside world, was first put into my head by a colleague.</p> <p>I don’t remember who it was. Only that when I came home that night I went to lower my bag onto the end of the bed, and stopped mid-air, vaguely shivering.</p> <p>I walk down a main road each evening to get to the bus that takes me home. Looking at my bag dangling there, it was like all the miscreants from my journey, which I had put in my headphones to compartmentalise from, had followed me to bed. </p> <p>The coughing uni student, the loitering sweaty guy, the snotty child, the years of rubbish and vomit and urine and spilt drinks and god knows what else that builds on that party street like a lacquer.</p> <p>The dirt of the glorified cattle truck that is the bus (are they ever vacuumed?), the people who go to the bathroom and don’t wash their hands (someone told me they exist) and then go out into the world and get on the bus, my bus, and touch things. Ew.</p> <p>My neurotic misgivings weren’t totally unfounded. A <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513311/" target="_blank">2015 study</a></strong></span> found that 145 out of 180 handbags swabbed positive for bacteria such as micrococcus, staphylococcus and bacillus.</p> <p>A friend told me she wipes the bottom of her handbag with a disinfectant every week. I treated myself to this activity yesterday and felt a strange wave of perverse calm washing over me.</p> <p>Our perceived precautions come down to layman assumptions about germs, cooties, nasties; otherwise known as bacteria or microbes.</p> <p>But apparently, the bugs have already won. We ourselves are covered in bacteria, said Associate Professor Siouxsie Wiles of the Bioluminescent Superbugs Lab at the University of Auckland. </p> <p>“The reality is, microbes are everywhere and on pretty much everything. Do you put your mobile phone on the bed? Do you have pets that jump or sleep on your bed? Hell, you sleep in your bed and you are covered in bacteria,” said Wiles.</p> <p>“Being frightened of the microbes on your shoes and handbag is completely misplaced. We will be the biggest source of microbes in our bedrooms – we are covered in them.”</p> <p>“And some of those will have the ability to make us sick. But that doesn’t mean they will. The riskiest behaviour people get up to in the bedroom in terms of picking up a bacterial disease is having sex without a condom.”</p> <p>I suppose she knows what she’s talking about (she was nominated for New Zealander of the Year after all). But still, gross.</p> <p>It’s a thought that none of us really like to have – the reality of the microorganisms which call our bodies home. According to <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-human-microbiome-project-defines-normal-bacterial-makeup-body" target="_blank">a study</a></strong></span> by the American National Institute of Health, the human body contains trillions of microorganisms, so many that they outnumber our actual human cells by ten to one.</p> <p>(An uncomfortable concept for those who, like me, never paid attention in Science. Or Maths.)</p> <p>Wiles said the bacteria present on our shoes, for example, will be a mixture of the bacteria found on our skin (from putting them on and off) and those found in the environment. </p> <p>“There will probably be the coliforms found in faecal matter, if walking on surfaces that have had dogs pooing on them,” Wiles said. “And definitely if you’ve managed to step in poo.”</p> <p>The probability of coliforms on your handbag is about the same as shoes, if they’ve been placed on the floor. Otherwise, any bacteria on your purse would likely come from your own body, meaning they’re harmless.</p> <p>“Coliforms can make you sick – they are the reason everyone should wash and dry their hands after going to the toilet,” said Wiles.</p> <p>(See you disgusting non-handwashers flouting the rules, I know you’re out there somewhere…)</p> <p>So the yes or no to bags and shoes is more personal preference than actual hygiene imperative. This could be considered fortunate.</p> <p>But a <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4364.0.55.004Chapter5002011-12" target="_blank">2013 study</a></strong></span> in Australia found that adults take an average of 7400 steps per day, which considering all the surfaces we cross on a daily basis, is an awful lot of opportunities to step in poo, if you ask me. Or to lean your bag in it.</p> <p>At least now science has given me something to meditate on. Wiles has affirmed I have no need to be frightened of putting my purse or shoes in the bedroom, or sitting on the bed in the same clothes I wore on the bus.</p> <p>“I’m a microbiologist and I keep my shoes and handbags in my bedroom,” she said. “I tend not to put shoes on the bed, but that’s more because they might have mud or dirt on them, not because of microbes.”</p> <p><em>Written by Anabela Rea. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.domain.com.au" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Domain.com.au.</span></strong></a></em></p>

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Inside Johanna Griggs' $3.6 million beach house transformation

<p><em>House Rules</em> and <em>Better Homes and Gardens</em> presenter Johanna Griggs has sold her Sydney home with her builder husband Todd Huggins.</p> <p>The couple sold the Collaroy home on the northern beaches for $3.6 million, according to realestate.com.au.</p> <p>The sale was off market and kept secret until Johanna posted a video to Instagram where she farewelled the home.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi3p83jHAbF/" target="_blank">A post shared by Johanna Griggs (@johgriggs7)</a> on May 17, 2018 at 12:13am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Said goodbye to our beautiful home today before I flew out. It’s been the most wonderful place to live in for the past 5 years. We hope the new owners are as happy as were in it. It was just the best place to entertain in! Onto the next project...:),” she wrote.</p> <p><span>The couple paid $1.15 million in 2011 for a three-bedroom brick home (pictured below), which hadn’t been listed in 35 years.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="500" height="333" src="/media/7818911/1_500x333.jpg" alt="1 (146)"/></p> <p>Todd undertook the rebuild through his construction company Collaroy Constructions to build the modern five-bedroom property.</p> <p>The home, which has ocean views, features open plan living, a pool, ground level alfresco entertaining and a top floor terrace,</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>The couple have revealed that they are already on to their next project, which is reportedly another home in Collaroy.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Johanna Grigg’s incredible property makeover.</p> <p>What do you think of the couple’s transformation of the home? Let us know in the comments below. What would you score it out of 10? </p>

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Inside the $46 million London mansion Julie Andrews once owned

<p>The London home, formerly occupied by actress Julie Andrews and her late husband Blake Edward in the 1970s, is now for sale.</p> <p>The townhouse mansion has since been restored and has six bedrooms, six bathrooms, three reception rooms, a media room, gym and spa.</p> <p>The home, which is walking distance from Buckingham Palace and Hyde Park, has hosted the likes of Peter Sellars, Herbert Lom and Omar Sharif, according to listing agent Becky Fatemi.</p> <p>The house also has three terraces, six fireplaces and a 12.8sqm large wine cellar.</p> <p>The elevator holds up to seven people and there is underfloor heating and air conditioning throughout the property.</p> <p>The home’s breakfast nook is particularly luxurious, with a built-in plush seat that wraps around the corner of the room.</p> <p>The front of the house opens to a balcony, which has views of the garden square. At the back of the house, French doors open onto a garden terrace.</p> <p>“The front of the house faces north and opens up to Chester Square. You have uninterrupted green views, which is beautiful to look out onto,” said Becky.</p> <p>“There is a lift that runs on the back of the house, with doors on both sides so you literally float from the main house into the mews into that gorgeous TV room.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see inside Julie Andrew’s former home.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Rokstone</em></p>

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Prince Harry and Meghan return $12 million worth of wedding gifts

<p>Prince Harry and Meghan are returning $12 million worth of wedding gifts they have received.</p> <p>The Palace has reportedly been overrun with a plethora of gifts boxes and packages for the newlyweds from generous celebrities and companies.</p> <p>However, royal aides are ensuring the companies that have sent gifts to the couple do not receive any free publicity from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.</p> <p>It’s believed one company that makes personalised his and hers swimwear sent Prince Harry and Meghan a matching bikini and swim shorts in the hopes they would take them on honeymoon and wear them, according to <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/966881/meghan-markle-prince-harry-royal-wedding-2018-gift-present-duke-and-duchess-sussex">The Express</a>.</p> <p>Kensington Palace has strict rules when it comes to receiving free gifts from businesses.</p> <p>“When gifts are accepted, the consent of the Member of the Royal Family should be contingent upon the enterprise undertaking not to exploit the gift for commercial purposes,” the official guidelines state.</p> <p>“Gifts offered by private individuals living in the UK not personally known to the Member of the Royal Family should be refused where there are concerns about the propriety or motives of the donor or the gift itself,” the royal guidelines continue.</p> <p>Prince Harry and Meghan did specifically request well-wishers, who wanted to give the royal couple a wedding gift, donate to one of their favourite charities that champion issues that are close to their hearts.</p> <p>Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau donated $50,000 to Jumpstart, a youth charity, on the day of the wedding.</p> <p>Trudeau issued a statement that said: “Today, Canadians joined in celebration as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle married. To celebrate their union, Canada will donate $50,000 to Jumpstart, a Canadian charity dedicated to making play and sports more accessible to children from disadvantaged backgrounds.”</p> <p>New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Arden also announced on behalf of her country that it was making a $5000 donation to a charity called Pillars, which supports children and families of prisoners.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Australian Prime Minster Malcolm Turnbull said the country will gift Harry and Meghan a donation to the Invictus Games, which will be taking place in Sydney later this year.</p>

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