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Woman loses $60,000 to romantic scammer on online game Words With Friends

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">A new wave of romantic scammers are targeting victims on the online game Words With Friends, leaving one Kiwi woman $60,000 out of pocket. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The game, owned by American social game developer Zynga, is similar to Scrabble in that players build words in a crossword-style against an opponent online. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Once signed up as a member, a player can send game requests and accept them from others around the world and players can chat to one another. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">But that messaging feature is now being used by scammers posing behind fake profiles, who attempt to woo players in the hope they will eventually send them money. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>The Sydney Morning Herald</em><span> </span><a href="http://www.smh.com.au/business/consumer-affairs/romance-scammers-prey-on-players-of-online-scrabble-like-word-game-20180731-p4zuof.html"><em>reported earlier this month</em></a><span> that a scammer using the name Richard Bricks was using a photo of Argentinian actor Juan Soler in his pursuits on Words with Friends. </span></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Manager of Fraud Education at the Commission for Financial Capability, Bronwyn Groot, said scammers often told their victims "lots of beautiful things" and sent links to love songs by artists including Celine Dion. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Their poetry is cut and paste, whether they take it from a Hallmark cards website - I don't know, but you put it into Google and it links it back to tonnes of scams."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The scammers call their victims 'dear' or 'darling', seldom using their first name.  </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Probably because they're running multiple scams and they don't want to get caught out," Groot said.  </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The scammers use a similar narrative; they are working on an oil rig overseas, or for the United Nations in places such as Afghanistan or Syria. Some have lost family members, or their wives have died and they are widowed.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Groot said one woman she dealt with, who couldn't be named, lost around $60,000 to a romantic scammer on the Words With Friends game.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"She got an invitation to accept someone's friendship and she didn't accept it, then they reached out again and she didn't accept it, then the third time they said 'why don't you wanna talk to me?' and she said, 'because I don't know you' and that was how the conversation started," Groot said.  </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It was only a few months, but it was a few months long enough for her to think he was legitimate and also send him lots of money." </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Once somebody gets caught up in a romantic scam it can be really difficult to get out of and often the victim will be in denial, Groot said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"The lady I was dealing with so desperately wanted to believe it was real," she said. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It is devastating ... she had sent the money and had no chance of getting it back, then had to face the reality of having lost someone she had a romantic connection with." </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It is unclear how many New Zealand Words With Friends players have been targeted, but the game's discussion forums are teeming with warnings and scam stories from players. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">One player wrote about her experience  of getting "involved" with another member.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We 'met' on WWF in April and he used all the sweet talk, when I questioned things, he always had the right answers that seemed to make sense at the time and he was so smooth at convincing me it was all in my head," she wrote.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I should have listened to my little voice but I am embarrassed to say I was convinced."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The profile which scammed $60,000 from the Kiwi woman is still active on the site and Groot had doubts about whether Zygna was adequately addressing the problem. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Groot's concerns were echoed on the Zygna discussion forums. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"It is disappointing that Zynga appears to do nothing to stop this. Every user I have reported is still active ... I even provided sources of information found," one player wrote. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Detective Senior Sergeant Greg Dalziel, of the High Tech Crime Group, said police regularly received reports of scams but their frequency and the way in which scammers operated varied. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Sadly there will always be some people who try to use online sites to scam and rip people off for money, and we advise that people always exercise caution when interacting online."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Anyone who believes they are the victim of a crime, in person or online, should report the matter to police, he added.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Zynga was approached<em> </em>for comment but said they were "unable to provide comment at this time". </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>HOW TO AVOID BEING FALLING VICTIM TO A ROMANTIC SCAM:</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">- Never send money to someone you've never met. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">- Run a reverse Google search of images you are sent to check for previous use. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">- Read forums on game sites to stay informed about current scams. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">- Be wary when people profess strong feelings for you early on.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Charlotte Carter. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/106254141/romantic-scammers-preying-on-players-of-online-game-words-with-friends">Stuff.co.nz</a>.</em></p>

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Have you been stung by this dodgy Coles supermarket scam?

<p>Aussies are being warned about the latest scam that is stinging supermarket shoppers.</p> <p>Coles shoppers have been sent a fake text message from the scammers, informing them that they have won $1000 credit cards.</p> <p>The ‘winners’ were then instructed to claim their prize within 24 hours by handing over personal details.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcoles%2Fposts%2F1977144675682871&amp;width=500" width="500" height="612" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>With many customers confused by the legitimacy of the text messages, the Coles Facebook page has been bombarded with screenshots of the scam asking if the texts are from the supermarket.</p> <p>“Hi Coles, I just got this message on my phone and it looks like a scam. Can you verify please?” wrote one person.</p> <p>"Take it this is a scam? And no, I didn’t put it under Coles in my phone that came up all by itself,” another added.</p> <p>Some savvy shoppers were able to see through the scam immediately by noticing various mistakes, such as the message being addressed to the wrong name.</p> <p>“If only my name was Anita,” wrote Jody Cookson after receiving the message.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcoles%2Fposts%2F1977172652346740&amp;width=500" width="500" height="594" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Coles posted on their Facebook page to remind customers to be “alert to potential scams via text messages, phone calls and emails".</p> <p>“Many scams use our logo, pretend to be representatives of Coles and promote Coles Gift Cards or other gift cards in an attempt to appear legitimate,” a spokesperson for the supermarket wrote.</p> <p>“Coles will never request personal or banking details in unsolicited communications and legitimate businesses or government agencies will never request payment in gift cards.”</p> <p>Have you been sent this text message scam? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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How the internet is changing the way we grieve

<p><strong><em>Jo Bell is a senior lecturer for the faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Hull. </em></strong></p> <p>People don’t die in the same way that they used to. In the past, a relative, friend, partner would pass away, and in time, all that would be left would be memories and a collection of photographs. These days the dead are now <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.ft.com/content/923bbd88-0225-11e6-ac98-3c15a1aa2e62">forever present online</a></strong></span> and digital encounters with someone who has passed away are becoming a common experience.</p> <p>Each one of us has a digital footprint – the accumulation of our online activity that chronicles a life lived online through blogs, pictures, games, web sites, networks, shared stories and experiences.</p> <p>When a person dies, their “<span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12124-012-9215-x">virtual selves</a></strong></span>” remain out there for people to see and interact with. These virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might find troubling – previously dead people were not present in this way.</p> <p>Yet for some, these spaces have become a valuable tool – especially so for the bereaved. An <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.psychology.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/Falconer1.pdf">emerging body of research</a></strong></span> is now looking at the ways the internet, including social media and memorial websites, are enabling new ways of grieving – that transcend traditional notions of “letting go” and “moving on”.</p> <h2>Forever online</h2> <p>A colleague and I first got interested in how deceased loved ones were being remembered online a few years ago. My particular interest at the time was in how suicides were being <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lpcuDwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT75&amp;lpg=PT75&amp;dq=Bell,+Bailey+and+Kennedy,+2015&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=aEQC1YFw-L&amp;sig=Lzxrm_VURsoMBAk2qNn6YsKh4DU&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwifxaSZjb_cAhVCPsAKHSPOCPEQ6AEwDHoECAQQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q=Bell%2C%20Bailey%20and%20Kennedy%2C%202015&amp;f=false">memorialised online</a> and what motivated people to do this. I also wanted to know how these online memorials impacted people’s grief and the trauma of being bereaved by suicide – as well as how these online spaces changed over time.</p> <p>Turning to social media for support when dealing with bereavement and the loss of a loved one helps mourners and others make sense of a death by talking about it. This helps to make it a much less isolating experience. It provides the bereaved with a “community of mourners”, or as <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13614568.2014.983554">one of our participants put it</a></strong></span>:</p> <p><em>I’ve got 67 people in my life who I can share my grief with … and they all understand where I’m coming from.</em></p> <p>For many mourners, the most important motivating factor seems to be the need to stay connected to the deceased and to “keep them alive”. And keeping a Facebook page going by actively maintaining the “in life” profile of the deceased, or creating a new “in memorial” profile, allows users to send private or public messages to the deceased and to publicly express their grief. In <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13576275.2015.1083693">our research</a></strong></span> accounts of talking to the deceased on Facebook were common:</p> <p><em>People go up [to his Facebook site] and put mementos on and they’ll say on Facebook, been to see you today Mark … yesterday I went up and I just chatted to him …</em></p> <p><em>Now more than three-and-a-half years on … they write and say really miss you Mark or I’m doing this and it reminded me of you … he’s still being included in what his friends are doing.</em></p> <p>The use of social media in this way goes some way towards answering the question of <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/coping-with-bereavement/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>where to put one’s feelings</strong></span></a> – such as love, grief, guilt – after a death. And many people turn to the same sites to promote awareness raising and fund raising for various charities in memory of their loved ones.</p> <h2>Virtual living</h2> <p>In this sense then, keeping the deceased alive on Facebook is a way of working against loss. It illustrates how social networking sites are replacing traditional mourning objects – such as items of jewellery, clothing or gravestones – that are imbued with particular emotional resonance and which subsequently take on additional significance after the death.</p> <p>Unlike sentimental objects, social media pages and online spaces allow people to explore grief with others from the comfort of their own home. Talking to people online can also help to free up some of the inhibitions that are otherwise felt when talking about loss – it enables forms of uncensored self-expression that are not comparable with face-to-face conversations.</p> <p>So although the physical bond to a loved one may be gone, a virtual presence remains and evolves after death. And in this way, online memorial sites and social networking spaces help the bereaved to see how events in the past can continue to have value and meaning in the present and the future.</p> <p><em>Written by Jo Bell. Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>The Conversation</strong></span></a>. </em></p> <p><img src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/100134/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p>

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These tech hacks will transform your life

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">The more time we spend on devices, the more important it is to learn how to use them well.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Most of us can do the basics but learning a few tricks can make your digital life more efficient.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The tips below will also hopefully help you enjoy your devices more, too.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Voice assistant</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Siri (Apple), Cortana (Microsoft), Google Now and Bixby (Samsung) are fun to use but can be frustrating as they don't always get it right.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">But that doesn't mean they're not worth using. I mainly use my voice assistant to make calls when driving so I can be hands-free. To do this say "call Bob on speakerphone". </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">That way you don't need to take your eyes off the road and it goes to speaker straight away.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It's also handy if you're busy at home or work and want to make a quick call without stopping what you're doing.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Get organised</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Putting all your smartphone apps on one screen will make it easier to find everything.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">First, put your three or four most-used apps in the dock at the bottom. Then put the next 12 most-important apps at the bottom of the home screen.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Everything else will live in folders in the spaces you have left. So you can group all your news or photo apps in one folder. Do the same for games, music, work, etc. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">If you take the time to do this you'll find it a lot quicker to locate apps.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Do not disturb</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">This is one of the best features on your smartphone. It allows you to silence notifications, calls and messages during certain times. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">You can set it up so your phone is quiet between 10pm and 7am so you and your partner aren't disrupted by pings and buzzes while you sleep. Of course, you need to set it up on your partner's phone, too.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">You can still allow calls from certain people so you don't miss anything urgent or important.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The feature is available on both iPhones and Android devices.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Downloading from YouTube</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Sometimes you may see a video on YouTube that you'd like to download. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">You can do this by typing "ss" before the "youtube" part of a video's web address. You can then select different file types and resolution. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The same can be done for music on YouTube videos. Do to this, just type "listento" before the "youtube" part of a video's web address.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Remember downloading copyrighted content is illegal.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Second email account</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Major sites are hacked all the time so an easy way to avoid being exposed is to have a second email account dedicated to social media and website logins.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">This ensures your main account is protected and your personal data won't be compromised if a certain site is hacked.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The other bonus is that your main account won't be flooded with newsletters and spam. The downside is that you have to remember two passwords and monitor two accounts.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Reading time</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">This website is handy for voracious readers or anyone worried their book won't be long enough for the flight they're about to take.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">You can search for any book on <a href="https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__howlongtoreadthis.com&amp;d=DwMFaQ&amp;c=N9aEhCy8U0rJkO1xCZf7rgM9fohfR5qe_N93viZd7O8&amp;r=ij_s0uePcCVv2WQwXK_RhjqihaBqIRA5o_4Yk3L1Cic&amp;m=sZ8GG2bnfyOwlyIqyyo5ZiIsExy-H9zbtlpJIKFa5Bo&amp;s=vjR3IjYep2RAzL5NquPhoxNsL4fjYlU0TncolZ78Yp8&amp;e=" title="">howlongtoreadthis.com</a> and it'll estimate the time it takes.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It's pretty accurate but it can be a bit depressing knowing that novel you've been wading through for the past few months should've only taken you eight hours to read!</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Closed tab shortcut</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">There are dozens of shortcuts built into computers and software. It's tricky to remember more than a few but one worth committing to memory is the re-opening a tab in your web browser that you've accidentally closed.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">If you press command+shift+T on a Mac or control+shift+T on Windows PC the tab will reopen and save you a bit of tech pain.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Email shortcut</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It can be a hassle typing out your email address on your smartphone several times a week when logging into accounts.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The best way around this is to create a keyboard shortcut so you can, for example, type "xo" and your email address appears. </p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">To do this on an iPhone, go to Settings, General, Keyboards and then Text Replacements. For Android devices, go to Settings, Language and Input, Keyboard and then Text Shortcuts.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><strong>Night lights</strong></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">With most people spending more time on devices, it is important to limit your exposure to blue light from screens.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Most devices now have settings to cut it out which helps reduce eye strain and improves sleep patterns.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">You need to go into your device's display settings and enable the feature which is called "night light" in Windows and Android devices and "night shift" in Apple devices.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Blayne Slabbert. Republished by permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/106158720/these-tech-hacks-will-transform-your-life">Stuff.co.nz</a>.</em></p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"> </p>

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WhatsApp scam that sends fake messages from you

<p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">A new bug discovered within popular messaging app WhatsApp allows hackers to infiltrate and message your contacts.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">Experts have warned that when the bug is combined with existing glitches, it allows hackers to send messages to your friends and family.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The bug, first identified by Check Point Research cybersecurity analysts, was created by vulnerabilities between WhatsApp for mobile and for web, where users must sync in order to send messages via desktop.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">On their website, Check Point said the bug could “allow threat actors to intercept and manipulate messages sent in both private and group conversations, giving attackers immense power to create and spread misinformation from what appear to be trusted sources.”</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">According to Check Point, hackers can manipulate users' messages and change the identity of a sender in the group conversation, even if that person is not a member of the group.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">Hackers can also send a private message to a group chat member, but when the targeted individual responds, everyone in the conversation can see it.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The bug will enable hackers to impersonate users and spread fake news.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The researchers who discovered the bug, believe it is of the “utmost importance” that WhatsApp fixes the problem immediately, however, the Facebook-owned company has “acknowledged” the flaws but said it was a part of the app’s “design framework”.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">In a recent blog post, WhatsApp wrote: “WhatsApp cares deeply about your safety.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">“We encourage you to think before sharing messages that were forwarded.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">“As a reminder, you can report spam or block a contact in one tap and can always reach out to WhatsApp directly for help.”</span></p>

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Princess Eugenie reveals that she was royally told off for breaking protocol

<p>The Queen’s granddaughter, Princess Eugenie, has revealed that Buckingham Palace’s strict photography rules aren’t just for tourists, but they also apply to the royal family.</p> <p>In an interview with the British edition of <a href="https://www.vogue.co.uk/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong style="font-style: inherit;"><em>Vogue</em></strong></span></a>, the 28-year-old royal shared that she had been in trouble for a photo she recently shared of her father, Prince Andrew, on Instagram.</p> <p>The daughter of Andrew and Sarah Ferguson had uploaded a photo of her dad standing in Buckingham Place in his Colonel of the Grenadier Guards uniform for the annual Trooping the Colour ceremony.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjzqLgHgTpq/?utm_source=ig_embed" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 62.5% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjzqLgHgTpq/?utm_source=ig_embed" target="_blank">A post shared by Princess Eugenie (@princesseugenie)</a> on Jun 9, 2018 at 7:24am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I recently got in trouble for posting a picture of Papa in a corridor of the palace that was off-limits to the public,” she <span style="font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit !important;">said</span>. </p> <p>The photo, which still remains on her Instagram account, shows her dad in a corridor lined with red carpet, marble busts and paintings.</p> <p>In the <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/princess-beatrice-and-eugenie-open-up-about-living-life-in-the-public-eye-it-s-hard-to-navigate/"><strong><u>joint interview</u></strong></a> between Eugenie and her sister, Princess Beatrice, the sisters said they found it hard growing up in the public eye and receiving criticism from the media.</p> <p>“We want to show people who we are as working, young, royal women, but also not to be afraid of putting ourselves out there,” said Eugenie.</p> <p>“Nowadays it’s so easy to recoil when you see a perfect image on Instagram – but it’s important that it’s real. We’re real.”</p> <p>The royals, who describe each other as their “rocks”, are also busily preparing for Eugenie’s wedding to Jack Brooksbank in October.</p> <p>Eugenie and Jack will marry in St George’s chapel, the same location as Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding, on October 12. </p>

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Meet the six-month-old baby with incredible hair

<p>Meet Baby Chanco, the toddled who’s amassed more than 40,000 Instagram followers thanks to her incredible mop of hair. <br /><br />Born in Japan in December 2017, Baby Chaco’s parents decided their precious tot’s fabulous hair was too good to keep to themselves, so they’ve been charting her hair journey on Instagram. <br /><br />In only a few months, six-month-old Baby Chaco’s hair has grown out to an incredible bouffant, which is often styled in different ways on Instagram. <br /><br />Her posts can get up to 10,000 likes, and she has fans from all over the world. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkYt78WgIO8/" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkYt78WgIO8/" target="_blank">A post shared by 髪記録 / hair diary (@babychanco)</a> on Jun 23, 2018 at 4:49pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Blb0ZCaH37r/" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Blb0ZCaH37r/" target="_blank">A post shared by 髪記録 / hair diary (@babychanco)</a> on Jul 19, 2018 at 6:15pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BlHYlEXnruQ/" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 58.79629629629629% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BlHYlEXnruQ/" target="_blank">A post shared by 髪記録 / hair diary (@babychanco)</a> on Jul 11, 2018 at 7:47pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkOih2XAqdj/" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkOih2XAqdj/" target="_blank">A post shared by 髪記録 / hair diary (@babychanco)</a> on Jun 19, 2018 at 5:57pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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This browser extension is secretly recording everything you do online

<p>Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox internet users may have had their entire online history recorded and stored by third-party developers.</p> <p>Security researcher Robert Theaton discovered a popular plugin for the Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox was recording everything users did online.</p> <p>The software add-on “Stylish” is designed to let users customise the appearance of webpages, but it has been hijacked by spyware.</p> <p>The extension, which has more than 1.8 million users worldwide, may have been recording the browsing history of everyone who uses it.</p> <p>Theaton, a software engineer from San Francisco, found the software had been recording browser history since January 2017, when it was bought by new owners SimilarWeb.</p> <p>Writing on his blog, Mr Theaton said: “It only takes one tracking request containing one session cookie to permanently associate a user account with a Stylish tracking identifier. </p> <p>“This means that Stylish and SimilarWeb still have all the data they need to connect a real-world identity to a browsing history, should they or a hacker choose to.'</p> <p>Stylish sends complete browsing activity back to its servers with a unique identifier, he claims.</p> <p>This includes your Google search history, which could allow SimilarWeb to connect an individual with all of their online activity.</p> <p>According to a statement from SimilarWeb back in 2017, when the company took over and updated its privacy policy, tracking was added to improve the browser extension, according to reports in <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.alphr.com/security/1009689/stylish-spyware-google-chrome-extension" target="_blank">Alphr</a>.</strong></span></p>

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New scam impersonating government service

<p>A warning has been issued about a new scam that seeks to lure Aussies into handing over their bank details by cloning the myGov website.</p> <p>The warning was issued yesterday by authorities on the <a href="https://www.staysmartonline.gov.au/alert-service/beware-fake-medicare-email" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stay Smart Online</span></strong></a> website.</p> <p>The scammers are issuing an email that is designed to look as if it’s been sent from Medicare, asking the recipient to “please kindly update your Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) payments”.</p> <p>If the link on the email is clicked, it takes the user to the clone site: mygovau.net.</p> <p>The real site is mygov.au.</p> <p>The government website links several services such as Medicare, Centrelink and the Australian Taxation Office.</p> <p>"If you input your login details you are directed to also enter your secret security question and answer, before you're taken to the fake Medicare website to input your bank account details," the Stay Safe Online warning states.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="500" height="334" src="/media/7819614/1_500x334.jpg" alt="1 (166)"/></p> <p>Dr Cassandra Cross, criminologist from the Queensland University of Technology, told the <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-07-05/mygov-scam-clones-government-website-medicare-phishing-email/9942908" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">ABC</span></strong></em></a> that online safety is more crucial as scams become more sophisticated.</p> <p>"They [cloned websites] look authentic, they look genuine. In this case the only difference is the URL," Dr Cross said.</p> <p>Dr Cross said this scam was like phishing emails claiming to be from banks that ask recipients to login to their account from a fake URL.</p> <p>"But they're using something a bit more timely and just a little bit different to catch people off guard and increase their chance that people will respond to it," she said.</p> <p>"We've done a lot of awareness around not putting information into banking websites that you'd click on from a link, but people wouldn't necessarily associate that same message with myGov.</p> <p>"This time of year we also see a lot around the Australian Tax Office, clinking on links to gain tax refunds."</p> <p>Previous scam indicators such as spelling mistakes and poor grammar can no longer be relied upon.</p> <p>"I don't think we can rely on those indicators as successfully now, because offenders have realised that people are looking for that and they've upped the ante, so to speak, so they've increased the level of sophistication that they put on these attacks."</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><strong>How to make sure you are not clicking on a scam email</strong></p> <p>* It is recommended that if you receive a message from an organisation, never click on the links in emails or text messages.</p> <p>* Login to your official myGov account by typing the correct URL into your browser, and then check your website inbox for any legitimate messages from Medicare.</p> <p>* Always be suspicious of messages that aren’t addressed to you directly and if you are still unsure, contact the organisation separately.</p> <p> Have you received this scam in your emails? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Is your Gmail account safe?

<p>Google has responded to a troubling investigation by the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/techs-dirty-secret-the-app-developers-sifting-through-your-gmail-1530544442" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wall Street Journal</span></strong></em></a>, which revealed people’s private emails could be read by third-party app developers.</p> <p>Google Cloud’s Director of Security, Trust and Privacy, Suzanne Frey, admitted that it was common for third-party developers to read the contents of users’ Gmail messages if they had been giving the permissions to do so.</p> <p>Frey has shared a blog post, explaining how users can make sure their accounts are secure.</p> <p>The three simple steps teach users how to restrict the access third-party developers had in their private inbox.</p> <p>Here is how you can control how much third-party developers can see.</p> <p><strong>1. Use the Security Checkup Tool</strong></p> <p>Sign into your Gmail account and then click on the squares in the top right-hand corner. Then click on ‘Account’ in the dropdown menu. Click on ‘Security Checkup’ – this will allow you to see how many devices are signed into the account and if there have been any security issues detected in the past 28 days.</p> <p>It also shows the sign-in and recovery method as well as how many third-party apps have access to data. If there are apps that are no longer being used, Google recommends for them to be removed to avoid privacy concerns.</p> <p><strong>2. Review permissions</strong></p> <p>Before granting access to non-Google applications, users are advised to review their permissions. If an app wants to access a user’s Google account, it will list what aspects it wants to access (E.g. read, send, delete and manage emails). Users then decide whether they want to allow the application to access their Gmail account.</p> <p><strong>3. View and control permissions</strong></p> <p>To access this option, sign into your Gmail account and click on the squares in the top right-hand corner. Click ‘Account’ in the dropdown menu, then ‘Apps with account access’. This allows users to see all the apps or services that are able to access their account. Users can remove the permissions for any they no longer trust.</p> <p>It also lets users look at saved passwords and which ones Google Smart Lock has permission to remember.</p> <p>You can also remove any passwords that are outdated. </p>

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Police warn of new Telstra scam targeting seniors

<p>Thousands of Aussies have been scammed out of millions of dollars after falling for hackers posing as Telstra employees over the phone.</p> <p>Police have issued a warning about the new phone scam, which particularly targets vulnerable elderly people.</p> <p>The scammers gain the trust of homeowners by asking whether they have been targeted by cold callers.</p> <p>They then offer a solution to stop the unwanted sales calls but ask for credit card details and passwords to “access personal computers” to guarantee the service.</p> <p>Leading Senior Constable Janine Walker told <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.thecourier.com.au/story/5494540/ballarat-this-is-a-scam-you-need-to-be-wary-of/?cs=62" target="_blank">The Courier</a></strong></em></span> that personal details should never be given over the phone.</p> <p>“Nobody is going to call you cold unless you’ve made an initial inquiry or complaint,” she said.</p> <p>“If somebody rings you out of the blue without any prior prompting or knowledge about an issue then it’s fairly safe to say that person is trying to scam you.”</p> <p>Constable Walker said the elderly and people living alone were most vulnerable to these scams.</p> <p>A victim, named Peter, said he spoke with a hacker from Telstra.</p> <p>"He had an Asian voice and said he was from Telstra," he said.</p> <p>"He asked if I get unwanted calls and he said ‘I can stop that tomorrow but I need some credit card details’.</p> <p>"I was thinking, this is bullshit, but I'll play along with you.</p> <p>"He started to get annoyed, but for someone older he could've sounded very plausible.”</p> <p>Last year the ACCC recorded that Australians lost a whopping $340 million – a $40 million increase from 2016.</p> <p>ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said scams were a national problem affecting millions of Australians.</p> <p>“It's very worrying that Australians are losing such extraordinary amounts to scammers,” she said earlier this year. “Based on just the reports provided to the ACCC, victims are losing an average of $6500.”</p> <p>“In some cases people have lost more than $1 million.</p> <p>“Some scams are becoming very sophisticated and hard to spot. </p> <p>“Scammers use modern technology like social media to contact and deceive their victims. </p> <p>“In the past few years, reports indicate scammers are using aggressive techniques both over the phone and online.”</p> <p>The ACCC encourages people to visit <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.scamwatch.gov.au">www.scamwatch.gov.au</a></strong></span> to report scams so it can warn others about them,</p> <p> </p>

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"Very sneaky" new scam hits Australia

<p>A new scam targeting taxi drivers has hit Australia, with a Melbourne cabbie revealing how he got scammed out $450 during a routine trip from Richmond to St Kilda.</p> <p>Srijan told Melbourne radio station 3AW a “charming” British man and his girlfriend got into his cab for the 16-minute drive that totalled around $35.</p> <p>As the end of the trip, both passengers were embarrassed they had neither cash or a credit card to pay for the trip. Instead, they told the driver he would transfer the money into his bank account using the ANZ app and he’d tip the driver an extra $15 as he had been so accommodating.</p> <p>“I gave him my BSB and account number and he told me he was going to transfer $50,” Srijan said.</p> <p>But the man returned saying he had accidentally put $500 in the account instead of $50.</p> <p>“He was sure. He told me to check my account … so I logged in to my account, I can see $500 deposited into my account and that money I could use right away. It was right,” Srijan said.</p> <p>He drove the man and his girlfriend to an ATM where he took $450 out and paid it back. But soon after, the original $500 deposit into Srijan’s account had vanished.</p> <p>Srijan has gone to the police, who are now investigating the incident.</p> <p>So how does the scam work? Experts say it is similar to a bounced cheque. The money is actually transferred but the person likely contacts their bank, claims the money was accidentally deposited and officially disputes the charges.</p> <p>Cyber security expert and Associate Dean at RMIT University Professor Asha Rao told news.com.au the scam has “many layers”.</p> <p>“I’m not sure if he used his own phone or the passenger’s phone, but if he didn’t use his own phone it’s very easy to fake,” Prof Rao said.</p> <p>Queensland University of Technology senior lecturer in criminology Cassandra Cross agrees.</p> <p>“(It’s) a new take on a classic fraud, the overpayment scam,” Dr Cross told news.com.au.</p> <p>“This is very common with payments of online goods. Your example takes that to a different target with the mobile pay. In other circumstances, the cheque will bounce or a credit card will be stolen so the funds aren’t actually there.”</p> <p>The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/types-of-scams/buying-or-selling/overpayment-scams">reports 176 “overpayment scams” were recorded</a></strong></span> in May this year alone, costing Australian victims $68,449.</p> <p>The website outlines how the scam works. “The scammer will contact you, make you an offer — often quite generous — them make payment through credit card or cheque. It will be for an amount greater than the agreed price.</p> <p>“The scammer will contact you with an apology for the overpayment, offering a fake excuse. The scammer might tell you that the extra money was included to cover agent’s fees or extra shipping costs. Or they may just say they simply made a mistake when writing the cheque.”</p>

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How to identify SMS scams

<p><em><strong>Lisa Du is director of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://readytechgo.com.au/" target="_blank">ReadyTechGo</a></span>, a service that helps people gain the confidence and skills to embrace modern technology. </strong></em></p> <p>For years, scammers have been calling landline phones in attempts to scam people, or via unsolicited emails. As more and more of us move from landline numbers to using mobile phones, and the ability for mobile phones now connected to the internet, scammers are now creating SMS competitions and message scams sent directly to your mobile phone.  <br /> <br /> I've received two text message scams in the last two weeks, and without thinking, one can quite easily follow their links, and be caught out.</p> <p><strong>Identify the scam</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="264" height="" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/ea47869b-5fdf-4147-bad2-1ead6e796e7a.png" class="mcnImage" style="max-width: 450px; line-height: 100%; outline: none; vertical-align: bottom; height: auto !important;"/></p> <p>This is a screenshot of the scam sent to my mobile:</p> <ul> <li>This "photo" message comes from a number that is not on my contact list -<em> Not sure why a stranger would send me a photo </em></li> </ul> <ul> <li>"Tap to Load Preview" – The scammer wants the recipient to tap on the "photo", which will most likely take the recipient to a website that will try to sign you up to dubious services they offer </li> </ul> <ul> <li>The link URL shows underneath the "Tap to Load Preview" area, and states yournewsms.xyz which looks dodgy to me! </li> </ul> <p>This is a common SMS scam which has been circulating:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="264" height="" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/1ee13ebe-24ce-42d1-9b6a-7ef77538c97d.jpg" class="mcnImage" style="max-width: 640px; line-height: 100%; outline: none; vertical-align: bottom; height: auto !important;"/></p> <ul> <li>A text message phishing scam which comes from what seems like a legitimate institution like a bank. These scammers hope you will follow their link and will try to gain your confidence by not asking for your personal information right away. Then the message will prompt you to input your bank login details, personal information or a PIN via the link they provide</li> </ul> <p>Don't be fooled! If you're ever in doubt about security linked to your online banking, please visit the website of your bank.</p> <p>Don't follow any links provided via text message or via email.</p> <p>Another scam:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="264" height="" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/94652982-0e7a-438d-b3ff-483be7642e0f.jpg" class="mcnImage" style="max-width: 590px; line-height: 100%; outline: none; vertical-align: bottom; height: auto !important;"/></p> <ul> <li>A text message warning the recipient that their iTunes account has been frozen.</li> </ul> <p>If you look at the link in the message "htto://ow.ly/XRbHA" is not a legitimate Apple website, so that is the first identifier of a scam.<br /> <br /> Again, when in doubt, visit the Apple website directly to log into your account.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="264" height="" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/504a18b7-845a-459b-a6dd-3530873784c9.jpg" class="mcnImage" style="max-width: 640px; line-height: 100%; outline: none; vertical-align: bottom; height: auto !important;"/></p> <ul> <li>There is also a spelling error in this message "Claim your accridited funds"</li> </ul> <ul> <li>The link provided is "urlz.fr"  </li> </ul> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Similar to email scams, always have a look at the "link" address, and it sounds like goobly gook – it’s a scam!!</p> <p>Please pass this information on to friends and family so they are aware of circulating scams, too.</p>

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Why you shouldn’t wish people “Happy Birthday” on Facebook

<p>Wishing a happy birthday on Facebook could get your account hacked and your private information stolen, a new survey has found.</p> <p>When combined with other information gleaned from Facebook posts, the annual birthday wishes could give scammers enough details to steal sensitive data.</p> <p>A survey by <a href="https://www.nationwide.co.uk/oversharing" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Nationwide</strong> </span></a>of people aged 16-25 found that 83 per cent said their friends “overshared” online, including information like their relationship status, health and political beliefs, and holiday updates. Up to 56 per cent of respondents said friends also share their current location on Facebook.</p> <p>These types of revealing posts are a goldmine for hackers and can even put homes at risk of burglary.</p> <p>“Social media is a great way for people to connect with friends or family, but it’s important to think about the information you are sharing with others, so it doesn’t fall into the wrong hands,” said Stuart Skinner, director of fraud at Nationwide.</p> <p>He continued: “Wishing someone a happy birthday or sharing your location may seem innocent enough, but fraudsters can piece together information from various places, collecting enough to defraud people.</p> <p>“To protect yourself, check privacy settings so only vetted friends can see updates, don’t give away too much information or anything you wouldn’t want a fraudster to see, have a strong password that doesn’t use any of your personal information and stop and think before sharing.”</p>

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Rules to follow to stay safe on public wifi

<p><em><strong>Lisa Du is director of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://readytechgo.com.au/" target="_blank">ReadyTechGo</a></span>, a service that helps people gain the confidence and skills to embrace modern technology.</strong></em> </p> <p>We live in a digitally-driven world, where access to services and essential information are all moving online. Being "connected" and having access to the internet is important.</p> <p>Many of us stay connected by connecting to public wifi available at libraries, cafes, hotels, airports and other public places.</p> <p>Is it safe?As scammers and hackers are on the rise, it's important to understand the risks of connecting to public wifi.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>The risks</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><strong>Hackers</strong></li> </ul> <p>The biggest threat to free wifi security is the ability for a hacker to position him or herself between you and the connection.</p> <p>What does this mean? Instead of information travelling between the hotspot and yourself, you're sending your information to the hacker. Through this setup, the hacker has access to every piece of information you are sending to the internet: credit card information, important emails and banking details.</p> <p>The more information a hacker has on you, the more chances he has on accessing systems portraying you.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Malware</strong></li> </ul> <p>Unsecured wifi connections are those connections which do not require a password. Hackers can use unsecure connections to distribute malware and can easily send your computer infected software.</p> <p>How do they do this? A pop up screen may appear on your computer offering a piece of popular software - If you click the window, malware will be installed.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>How to protect yourself</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><strong>Are you really connecting to a wi-fi network? Use the right one</strong></li> </ul> <p>Smartphones and tablets have the ability to "act as a modem", known as a "mobile or portable hotspot". This means a hacker may use their smartphone and turn it into a mobile hotspot.</p> <p>The hacker could call their mobile hotspot "Fed Square Free Wi-Fi". Those looking to connect to free wifi around Federation Square would see this hotspot on their available wifi list, and connect straight to a hackers device!</p> <p>Be mindful when connecting to free wifi and ask yourself, is it the wifi of a legitimate place?</p> <p>If you see wifi such as "Free Wi-Fi Here"... raise your eyebrows!</p> <p>If you're ever unsure, don't connect! Use your personal data connection where possible.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Use SSL connections</strong></li> </ul> <p>Enable the "Always use HTTPS" option on websites that you frequently visit. The extra "S" means it is "Secure", and all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted.</p> <p>If you do internet banking, you will notice that banking websites always have the https in front of the web address.</p> <p>When using free public wifi, don't log onto internet banking!</p> <ul> <li><strong>Turn off file sharing</strong></li> </ul> <p>Control your computer and devices by turning off file sharing options.</p> <p>On an Apple device, set AirDrop to "Contacts only".</p> <ul> <li><strong>Turn off wifi unless you need it</strong></li> </ul> <p>Not only will this conserve your battery, but will help you stay safe. If you don't need wifi, get into the habit of turning it off</p> <p>It's always safer to use your own internet connect or personal hotspot. We understand that this may not always be possible, so be mindful of which wifi you are connecting to and stay safe!</p>

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14 tips and tricks for using Spotify

<p>If you're one of the 50 million paid Spotify subscribers, you might think you know all there is to know about the popular music streaming service.</p> <p>You're likely aware there are more than 30 million songs to play, on-demand, across multiple devices. You know Premium subscribers can downloaded tracks to listen to offline. And you might've heard there are readymade playlists to match your mood, curated by experts and fans alike.</p> <p>So, what else is there to Spotify? We've compiled a list of some lesser-known features, tips and tricks, to help you get the most out of the service.</p> <p><strong>1. Play your own music</strong></p> <p>Many Spotify Premium users aren't aware you can weave in your own music, too.</p> <p>On your mobile device, tap on the Options tab in the upper left of the app and select "Your Library." On a computer, you'll see a "Local Files" tab listed on the left side of the main screen. By default, the desktop app looks for common directories like Music, Downloads or iTunes Media, but you can select specific folders in the Settings menu, too.</p> <p><strong>2. Spotify as a remote</strong></p> <p>Did you know you can use your mobile device as a remote to control your Spotify tunes on a nearby computer, music system, or Smart TV?</p> <p>Since Spotify allows you to quickly switch between devices you're logged into, you can use the Spotify app, on say, an iPhone or Android tablet, to start, stop and change tracks on your Windows PC, Mac, Sonos, and supported Smart TVs.</p> <p><strong>3. Keyboard shortcuts</strong></p> <p>Spotify desktop users can use keyboard shortcuts to quickly control music playback.</p> <p>On a Windows PC, skip forward and back between tracks using CTRL + Right Arrow and CTRL + Left Arrow, respectively. To adjust volume, it's CTRL + Shift + Up Arrow (for louder) or CTRL + Shift + Down Arrow (for quieter).</p> <p>For Mac OS X users, it's CTRL + CMD + Right Arrow and CTRL + CMD + Left Arrow to skip forward or back between tracks. For audio levels, it's CMD + Shift + Up Arrow (or Down Arrow) for higher or lower volume, respectively.</p> <p><strong>4. Preview a playlist</strong></p> <p>This is pretty cool. If you use Spotify on an iOS device -- namely, iPhone, iPad or iPod touch -- you don't need to open a playlist to see what songs are inside. Instead, tap and hold over the name of the playlist and you'll see album artwork for the first 12 songs. Now slide your finger over each album and you'll see the name, artist, and hear a sample of the track.</p> <p><strong>5. Spotify codes</strong></p> <p>Ever hear a great song streaming from a friend's Spotify account? Now you can use your smartphone's camera to quickly grab the track.</p> <p>Launched earlier in 2017, Spotify Codes lets you capture (or share) a song, artist, album, or playlist. Tap the ellipses ("...") next to a song and you will see a Spotify Code near the bottom of the artwork. You can also scan Spotify Codes printed on flyers, posters, and billboards.</p> <p><strong>6. Get lyrics</strong></p> <p>Want to learn the words to the latest songs? Feel like karaoke with friend? Spotify's desktop client has built-in lyrics support.</p> <p>Start playing a track and look for the "Lyrics" tab in the bottom right-hand corner of the window. Tap or click and it will scroll lyrics for most of Spotify's catalog. You can also tweak the size of the lyrics.</p> <p><strong>7. Go gapless</strong></p> <p>Don't want any silence between your songs? Keep the music going, without breaks, by enabling Spotify's "Gapless Playback" feature. To eliminate the gaps between tracks, visit the Settings tab and check off the "Gapless Playback" option, if the small box isn't already ticked. You can also crossfade tracks, if you prefer.</p> <p><strong>8. A is for Autoplay</strong></p> <p>On a related note, Spotify's Autoplay feature will automatically play similar songs once you've finished a playlist, album or selection of tracks. This can be found in the same Settings area. While you're here, make sure the "High quality streaming" tab is selected (Premium subscribers only).</p> <p><strong>9. Restore playlists</strong></p> <p>Spotify houses more than 2 billion playlists. The popular "Discover Weekly" tab, a highly personalized playlist, is based on your listening habits, automatically updated every Monday with new music.</p> <p>If you've accidentally deleted your favorite playlist, you're not out of luck. Log onto Spotify's website, and under Account Settings you can select Recover Playlists.</p> <p><strong>10. Playlist collaboration</strong></p> <p>If you're adding your own mega mix to Spotify -- perhaps for a summer house party or wedding reception -- you can now choose the option to make the playlist collaborative. You can grant friends access to it, and let the music sharing begin. Right click on the left-hand side of any playlist to get going.</p> <p><strong>11. Spotify running</strong></p> <p>If you exercise with your smartphone, as many people do, you might want to test-drive the Spotify Running feature, which lets you match songs to your listening habits with the pace of you run. On the smartphone app, tap the three horizontal lines in the top left corner and choose "Running." Spotify will detect your tempo as you start moving.</p> <p>Another way to find this feature is in the "Browse" section, under "Genres &amp; Moods."</p> <p><strong>12. Share (or don't)</strong></p> <p>Another way to share music with friends is through the Share button. Tap or click on the ellipses next to a song, album or playlist, and then select Share, to broadcast your playlist through social media, Spotify Messenger, or to copy a URL.</p> <p>For those "roll up the car window" songs you're embarrassed to admit you love, you can set your Spotify account to a "Private Session." Go to the Settings tab to make the change.</p> <p><strong>13. You don't need an app</strong></p> <p>While the website isn't as good as a dedicated app for the service, you can access your Spotify on a web browser. Perhaps you're on a shared PC in an airport lounge and you have some time to kill?</p> <p>At spotify.com, log in with your username and password, to begin streaming. If it's a public computer, be sure to log out before you leave.</p> <p><strong>14. Videos, comedy, concerts</strong></p> <p>Spotify isn't just a music streaming service. There are tens of thousands of videos (including video podcasts) you can stream, too, listed along the left side of the home screen. </p> <p>Feeling down? Under the "Genres &amp; Moods" tab, scroll down and select "Comedy."</p> <p>Spotify also lets you discover concerts in your area. Under the "Browse" tab, select "Concerts" on the right side of the screen. You can select music, artists and location preferences.</p> <p>Do you use Spotify?</p> <p><em>Written by Marc Saltzman. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span></strong></a>.</em></p>

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Priest shares hilarious reply to flirty text message

<p>Everyone is guilty of accidentally sending a text message to the wrong mobile number. But what if that wrong number actually belonged to a priest? </p> <p>That’s what happened to Father Simon Rundell, who received a flirty late-night text message which asked him, amongst other things, if he was working tomorrow.</p> <p>The priest from Devon in England received the random text late on Saturday night, and was asked, “U ok sexy? Are u in work tomorrow? X”</p> <p>The witty priest delayed his response, choosing to reply first thing the next morning, and hilariously writing: “Yes, I’m saying Mass at 9.30 &amp; 11.15, but I’m guessing you didn’t intend to text a priest on this one. Fr. Simon.” </p> <p>Father Simon shared the funny text message exchange on his Twitter account, saying, “I get the *best* wrong number texts…”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I get the *best* wrong number texts... <a href="https://t.co/Xs9tEVZYQB">pic.twitter.com/Xs9tEVZYQB</a></p> — Fr Simon Rundell (@frsimon) <a href="https://twitter.com/frsimon/status/1003163629846396928?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 3, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>His post has been liked almost 5,000 times and attracted a huge number of entertaining comments.</p> <p>One amused follower responded, “Maybe it was meant for you. No reason why someone can’t think you are sexy father.”</p> <p>While another fan of the priest shared, “Maybe you should have told her the time at which you were taking confessions.”</p> <p><img width="500" height="374" src="/media/7818988/screen-shot-2018-06-06-at-90829-pm_500x374.jpg" alt="Screen Shot 2018-06-06 At 9.08.29 Pm"/></p> <p>Have you ever accidentally sent a text message to the wrong mobile number or received a message that was not meant for you? Tell us in the comments below.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p>

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How to sign a document without printing it out

<p><em><strong>Lisa Du is director of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://readytechgo.com.au/" target="_blank">ReadyTechGo</a></span>, a service that helps people gain the confidence and skills to embrace modern technology. </strong></em></p> <p>There are often times when you need to sign or fill in a PDF form that has been sent to you. You could print out the document, fill it in, sign it, scan it and then email it back but that's all such a hassle for something that should be so simple.</p> <p>Thankfully with Microsoft Edge (previously known as Internet Explorer), you can do all that without having to print the document!</p> <p>Here’s how:</p> <p>Step 1: Right click on the PDF file.</p> <p>Step 2: Go to "Open with" and then click on "Microsoft Edge"</p> <p>Step 3: Click on the pencil icon located at the top right.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="600" height="NaN" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/04a179b2-1e01-4c08-a4e3-4cf46008b44d.png" style="width: 240px; height: 120px; margin: 0px; line-height: 100%; outline: none;"/></p> <p>Step 4: Click on the "pen" icon and choose the right colour and size for you signature.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="320" height="148" src="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e785dd9ba906ed79fad48bd7e/images/11f3ba9a-4647-40e1-bced-1a137714ef37.png" style="width: 320px; height: 148px; margin: 0px; line-height: 100%; outline: none;"/></p> <p>Step 5: Draw your signature by holding down left click and dragging your mouse. If you're unhappy with the signature (or you've made a mistake) click on the "eraser" icon in the top right and 'draw' over your signature to erase it.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Step 6: When you're satisfied with your signature, right click on the open PDF and click on "Save-As" to the document!</p> <p>Have fun signing documents in a jiffy!</p>

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